Seminars 2020/2021

19th April 2021

Seminar Poster

Seminar
Speaker:

Professor Louise Bradley (School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin)

Venue:

Online via MS Teams
Link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_YzRhMTFiNjEtMWVlOC00Y2VlLWE0MDItNWUyMjI0NDM1YjFk%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2246fe5ca5-866f-4e42-92e9-ed8786245545%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22a1fc07ee-e1f8-4e7c-b82b-0e9f830a651d%22%7d

Date and Time:          

Monday, 19th April 2021, 4pm

Seminar Title:            Plasmon-coupled nano-emitters

Abstract: 
Nanophotonics has emerged in the 21st century enabled by parallel developments in material science and instrumentation. Light can now be detected, emitted and manipulated on the nanoscale, providing unprecedented control of emission and light propagation.  Nanophotonics uses a wide variety of nanoscale emitters and nanostructures with a view to applications across many fields including biosensing, imaging and optical communications. In this presentation I will explore the interaction of quantum emitters and zero dimensional nanostructures, including the phenomena strong light matter coupling. I will also consider the current challenge of tunable plasmonic systems. It will be shown how hybrid plasmonic-phase change material structures offer one route to tunable emission control.


29th March 2021

Seminar Poster

Seminar
Speaker:

Michael Johnson (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)

Venue:

Online via Zoom: (Meeting ID:885 4531 2932)
Link: https://astron.zoom.us/j/88545312932

The talk will also be streamed in real time via YouTube in the JIVE and EVN channel: https://youtu.be/YfPK1mHAdP0
(NOTE: Participants will be deferred to the YouTube channel after reaching the limit of 100 people on the Zoom session)

Date and Time:          

Monday, 29th March 2021, 3pm (Irish Time)

Seminar Title:            Shadows and Photon Rings: Imaging Supermassive Black Holes with the Event Horizon Telescope

Abstract:
The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) uses very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at 1.3-mm wavelength to produce images of supermassive black holes with horizon-scale resolution. I will discuss the breakthroughs that made these images possible and their implications for our understanding of supermassive black holes. I will also describe the emerging capabilities of the EHT to study relativistic dynamics of accretion flows and to elucidate the role of magnetic fields in jet launching. Finally, I will discuss the complex, fractal structure that is predicted to appear in higher resolution images of black holes, which enables a new type of radio interferometer capable of precision tests of General Relativity.

 

22nd March 2021

Seminar Poster

Seminar
Speaker:

Barry Walsh (MS&T Tech Transfer Lead/ Chief Scientific Officer, Alcon Ireland, Cork)

Venue:

Online via MS Teams
Link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_ZGFiZTg0NzQtYTEyNy00YzliLWI4OTMtM2NhYTQyZjZkNDQ5%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2246fe5ca5-866f-4e42-92e9-ed8786245545%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22a1fc07ee-e1f8-4e7c-b82b-0e9f830a651d%22%7d

Date and Time:          

Monday, 22nd March 2021, 4pm

Seminar Title:            Intraocular lens manufacturing – current process and future challenges

Abstract:
Intraocular lenses are implants which replace the natural lens of the eye when they become opaque through the onset of cataracts. Cataract surgery is one of the most frequent surgical procedures on the plant and the Alcon facility in Cork supplies approximately 15% of global demand. The presentation will give an overview of the manufacturing process and challenges it presents, and outline how a relatively simple product such as a polymer lens requires a variety of leading edge technologies and physical processing to come up with a product ready to restore sight.


1st March 2021

Seminar Poster

Seminar
Speaker:

Dr. Anthony Kiely (University College Dublin) 

Venue:

Online via MS Teams
Link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_NDllNWYzYzgtNmRiNi00MjhiLTllYzMtOWFlMTQzZTQ2MDg1%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2246fe5ca5-866f-4e42-92e9-ed8786245545%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22a1fc07ee-e1f8-4e7c-b82b-0e9f830a651d%22%7d

Date and Time:          

Monday, 1st March 2021, 4pm

Seminar Title:            Quantum Control of Complex Systems via Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

Abstract:
Adiabatic methods have been a cornerstone in quantum control to both prepare and manipulate states and are ubiquitous in atomic, molecular and optical physics. However, these methods have the drawback of requiring a long operation time. The term Shortcuts to Adiabaticity(STA) describes a variety of methods, typically analytical, which achieve the same outcome as quantum adiabatic processes in significantly shorter times [1].

Using Lewis–Riesenfeld invariants is one such method to derive alternative processes which work for much shorter times with perfect fidelity i.e. without final excitations. However, this approach has a limited range of applicability to small and simple systems. In this talk, I will address approaches to move beyond this and design control protocols for many-body systems. I will outline a new perturbative method termed enhanced Shortcuts to Adiabaticity (eSTA) designed to work for more complex systems [2]. I will also discuss recent work on devising a protocol for fast and robust magnon transport in a one-dimensional spin chain [3] and truncated counterdiabatic driving control based on the Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

[1] D. Guéry-Odelin, A. Ruschhaupt, E. Torrontegui, A. Kiely, S. Martínez-Garaot and J. G. Muga,
Rev. Mod. Phys. 91, 045001 (2019)
[2] C. Whitty, A. Kiely, A. Ruschhaupt Phys. Rev. Research 2, 023360 (2020)
[3] A. Kiely, S. Campbell arXiv preprint arXiv:2101.04995

22nd February 2021

Seminar Poster

Note: This seminar gives an idea of what PhD life is like, with the research as the secondary emphasis.

Seminar
Speaker:

Bruno Barton-Singer (PhD student, supervised by Bernd Schroers at Heriot-Watt University) 

Venue:

Online via MS Teams
Link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_NWZhMzRkNzctOTRlMi00ZTQ3LTg0NzctYTliYmJmNjVlNzg2%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2246fe5ca5-866f-4e42-92e9-ed8786245545%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22a1fc07ee-e1f8-4e7c-b82b-0e9f830a651d%22%7d

Date and Time:          

Monday, 22nd February 2021, 4pm

Seminar Title:            My Life in Solitons

Abstract:
The topological soliton is an intriguing feature of classical and quantum field theories that pops up across physics, from domain walls and vortices in condensed matter to objects in high energy physics that confound our understanding of what it means to be a fundamental particle, like magnetic monopoles. I'm a third-year PhD student, working under the supervision of Bernd Schroers at Heriot-Watt University, and my research has focused on magnetic skyrmions, a more recently studied soliton found in planar magnets. However, in this talk I'll focus on the first part of that sentence: what is it like to do a PhD? After introducing the basic concepts of my research topic, I'll talk through what I've worked on so far, trying to give a realistic impression of the ups and downs, and mention some things I learned about magnetic skyrmions along the way.

5th February 2021

 

Seminar Poster

Seminar
Speaker:

Dr. Sandra Etoka (Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics & University of Manchester)

Venue:

Online via Zoom: (Meeting ID: 885 4531 2932)
Link: https://astron.zoom.us/j/88545312932
The talk will also be streamed in real time via YouTube in the JIVE and EVN channel: https://youtu.be/KMZxi_qapOY 

Date and Time:          

Friday, 5th February 2021, 2pm (Irish Time)

Seminar Title:            Distance of optically-obscured evolved stars

Abstract:
As intermediate-mass stars head towards their final fate, they pass through the red-giant stage where they experience an increase of mass loss. This induces the creation of a circumstellar envelope of dust and gas. By the very end of this evolutionary stage, the amount of dust in the circumstellar envelope of a good fraction of these evolved stars is such that it blocks optical radiation, turning them into so-called OH/IR stars. These precursors of planetary nebulae are commonly observed throughout the Galaxy and are also observed in the Magellanic Clouds.

Since optically thick, measurements of their distances using optical parallaxes as e.g. delivered by GAIA, is not possible. This issue can be circumvented thanks to maser emission. As their name gives it away, the physical conditions turn out to be ideal for a strong (1612-MHz) OH maser emission to be produced in the outer layers of the radially-expanding spherical circumstellar envelope of OH/IR stars. I will present how, combining single-dish monitoring and interferometric mapping of this OH maser emission, the "phase-lag method" allows us to measure their distance.

1st February 2021

Seminar Poster

Seminar
Speaker:

Prof. J. Gonzalo Muga (University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain)

Venue:

Online via MS Teams: 
https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_NjI1ZmM1YjUtMWE2MC00NWY5LWFiMDgtY2UyYmMxOTg1OWVh%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2246fe5ca5-866f-4e42-92e9-ed8786245545%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22a1fc07ee-e1f8-4e7c-b82b-0e9f830a651d%22%7d

Date and Time:          

1st February 2021, 4pm (Irish Time)

Seminar Title:            Shortcuts to adiabaticity: An introduction and some recent developments

Abstract Pending...

9th December 2020

Seminar Poster

Seminar
Speaker:

Mareki Honma

Venue:

Online via Zoom https://astron.zoom.us/j/88545312932 (Meeting ID: 885 4531 2932)

Also streamed in real time via YouTube  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfTzWtxU8ZI&feature=youtu.be 

Date and Time:          

9th December 2020, 9am (Irish Time)

Seminar Title:             The sharpest view of the Radio Universe

Abstract:
In this talk, I will present the most recent results of high-resolution maser astrometry with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Maser astrometric surveys have been conducted with the Japanese VERA array and the Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy (BeSSeL) project, aimed at exploring the dynamic structure of the Milky Way.  I will present recent results from these surveys, mainly covering topics on the determination of fundamental parameters, rotation curve measurement, tracing spiral structures, comparisons/calibrations of GAIA astrometry, and so on. I will also cover some topics related to individual maser sources (star forming regions and AGB stars) revealed by VLBI astrometry in combination with other arrays such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). Finally, I will briefly discuss the future prospects of VLBI astrometry for forthcoming global VLBI in the SKA era. 

7th December 2020

Seminar  Speaker: Dr. Jukka Kiukas
Venue: Online via MS Teams
https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_MmY0M2ZjYWYtMzc2MS00YTYwLTkxMjUtMDY2OTAzMDk2NjU2%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2246fe5ca5-866f-4e42-92e9-ed8786245545%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22a1fc07ee-e1f8-4e7c-b82b-0e9f830a651d%22%7d
Date and Time:  7th December 2020, 4pm
Seminar Title: Joint measurements and quantum noise
Abstract:
In quantum theory, some physical quantities are incompatible, i.e. cannot be simultaneously (jointly) measured with arbitrary precision. While this is traditionally formalised using the well-known Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, a related approach focuses on how incompatible measurements turn into jointly measurable ones due to “imprecision” induced by random noise. This is motivated by current applications to e.g. quantum computing, where a “quantum processor” is typically subjected to noise from its surroundings. Incompatible measurements are crucial for various quantum information processing tasks, and consequently the study of their “robustness” against noise is an active field of research. In this talk I will first introduce the standard formulation of joint measurability in quantum information theory, and then demonstrate how incompatibility is affected by noise in simple models motivated by physics.

30th November 2020

Seminar Poster

 

Seminar Speaker: Dr. John Cuffe
Venue: Online via MS Teams
https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_ZjNmMTJlOWYtNDM5Mi00NmE4LWE5ZjAtNTU5YmQ3NTAyYmJh%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2246fe5ca5-866f-4e42-92e9-ed8786245545%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22a1fc07ee-e1f8-4e7c-b82b-0e9f830a651d%22%7d
Date and Time:  30th November 2020, 4pm
Seminar Title: Understanding Nanoscale Thermal Transport experimentally through Phonon-Photon Interactions
Abstract:
The understanding and manipulation of phonons in nanostructures is a topic of ever-increasing importance, as heat dissipation and thermal management are critical issues for nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. In particular, knowledge of the mean free path distribution of heat-carrying phonons is key to understanding phonon-mediated thermal transport. In this talk, I will review the recent advances in thermal characterization and phonon engineering that have drastically increased the understanding of heat transport and demonstrated efficient ways to control heat propagation in nanomaterials. I will summarize recent device-relevant methodologies of phonon engineering in semiconductor nanostructures and 2D materials. Finally, I will review recent advances in thermal characterization techniques, and discuss their main challenges and limitations. One of the primary uncertainties in the experimentally-challenging area of nanoscale thermal transport is accurately fitting your thermal model to experimental data. Can the powerful tool of Machine Learning overtake the ubiquitous ‘least square fitting’ to better predict real-world values for thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and above all, interface thermal conductance? 

9th November 2020

Seminar Poster 

 

Seminar Speaker:

Dr. Calum Ross

Venue:

Online via MS Teams:
https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_ZTZkMTlmOWItZTVmZi00YTMxLWE1OTEtZDA4MDRjZGYxM2Mw%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2246fe5ca5-866f-4e42-92e9-ed8786245545%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22a1fc07ee-e1f8-4e7c-b82b-0e9f830a651d%22%7d

Date and Time:          

9th November 2020, 4pm

Seminar Title:             Mathematical Models of Topological Solitons

Abstract:
Topological solitons are stable particle like objects which occur in some nonlinear classical field theories. They provide mathematical models for phenomena which occur in many physical systems. I have worked on several of these models, in particular Abelian-Higgs vortices and magnetic skyrmions. I will review some general details about solitons before introducing the models that I have worked on. The focus will be on a recent solvable model for magnetic skyrmions, non-trivial twists in the magnetisation field which occur in certain magnetic materials. This solvable model enables the construction of analytic skyrmion configurations. Many of these configurations showcase features that are observed in more general models, both numerically and experimentally.

 

19th October 2020

Seminar Poster  

 

Seminar Speaker:

Kenzie Nimmo

Venue:

Online via Zoom
https://astron.zoom.us/j/88545312932 (Meeting ID: 885 4531 2932)
Also streamed in real time via YouTube https://youtu.be/aHLBuDP43gc

Date and Time:          

19th October 2020, 3pm (Irish Time)

Seminar Title:             Pin-pointing the positions of repeating Fast Radio Bursts with the European VLBI Network 

Abstract:
Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are bright pulses of coherent radio emission with durations of only a few milliseconds, and unknown extragalactic origin. Some FRBs have been observed to repeat, whereas others appear as one-off events. Currently it still remains unclear whether all FRB sources have the ability to repeat, or if there are multiple populations with different physical mechanisms. Recently, the Galactic magnetar SGR 1935+2154 emitted a very bright radio burst (orders of magnitude brighter than typical Galactic radio bursts from pulsars/magnetars) unveiling a bridge between Galactic sources of radio bursts and FRBs. With the European VLBI Network (EVN) we can precisely localise FRBs to milli-arcsecond precision, identifying not only the host galaxy, but the region within the host that the bursts are originating from. This will help in understanding the FRB progenitor(s) and how FRBs link to Galactic sources. In addition to the real-time correlation observing mode (e-EVN), baseband data can be buffered to study fine time and frequency structures of the bursts, as well as their polarisation properties. In this talk I will discuss our approach to localising repeating FRBs using the EVN, present the localisation of a second repeater, FRB 180619.J0158+65, and present recent results on SGR 1935+2154.

 

 

Department of Physics

Roinn na Fisice

Room 213, 2nd floor, Dept. of Physics, University College Cork, Ireland,

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