Research Publications

Computational Commensality: from theories to computational models for social food preparation and consumption in HCI

Computational Commensality: from theories to computational models for social food preparation and consumption in HCI Niewiadomski, Radoslaw; Ceccaldi, Eleonora; Huisman, Gijs; Volpe, Gualtiero; Mancini, Maurizio Food and eating are inherently social activities taking place, for example, around the dining table at home, in restaurants, or in public spaces. Enjoying eating with others, often referred to as “commensality,” positively affects mealtime in terms of, among other factors, food intake, food choice, and food satisfaction. In this paper we discuss the concept of “Computational Commensality,” that is, technology which computationally addresses various social aspects of food and eating. In the past few years, Human-Computer Interaction started to address how interactive technologies can improve mealtimes. However, the main focus has been made so far on improving the individual's experience, rather than considering the inherently social nature of food consumption. In this survey, we first present research from the field of social psychology on the social relevance of Food- and Eating-related Activities (F&EA). Then, we review existing computational models and technologies that can contribute, in the near future, to achieving Computational Commensality. We also discuss the related research challenges and indicate future applications of such new technology that can potentially improve F&EA from the commensality perspective.
http://hdl.handle.net/10468/9382

Lead users' innovative work behavior in digital platform ecosystems: a large scale study of app developers

Lead users' innovative work behavior in digital platform ecosystems: a large scale study of app developers Schaarschmidt, Mario; Stol, Klaas-Jan; Walsh, Gianfranco; Bertram, Matthias Application developers constitute an important part of a digital platform’s ecosystem. Knowledge about psychological processes that drive developer behavior in platform ecosystems is scarce. We build on the lead userness construct which comprises two dimensions, trend leadership and high expected benefits from a solution, to explain how developers’ innovative work behavior (IWB) is stimulated. We employ an efficiency-oriented and a social-political perspective to investigate the relationship between lead userness and IWB. The efficiency-oriented view resonates well with the expected benefit dimension of lead userness, while the social-political view might be interpreted as a reflection of trend leadership. Using structural equation modeling, we test our model with a sample of over 400 developers from three platform ecosystems. We find that lead userness is indirectly associated with IWB and the performance-enhancing view to be the stronger predictor of IWB. Finally, we unravel differences between paid and unpaid app developers in platform ecosystems.
http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8625

Exploring onboarding success, organizational fit, and turnover intention of software professionals

Exploring onboarding success, organizational fit, and turnover intention of software professionals Sharma, Gaurav G.; Stol, Klaas-Jan The IT sector struggles with talent acquisition and low retention rates. While several field studies have explored onboarding of software developers, the software engineering literature lacks studies that develop and evaluate theoretical models. This study seeks to explore the link between onboarding of new hires and turnover intention of these professionals. In particular, we develop a theoretical model that identifies a number of onboarding activities, and link these to onboarding success. We then look at what we have termed “organizational fit,” which we define as two aspects of software professionals, namely job satisfaction and the quality of their relationships on the workfloor, and investigate how these mediate the relation between short-term onboarding success and a longer-term intention to leave (or stay with) an organization. We test our model with a sample of 102 software professionals using PLS-SEM. The findings suggest that providing support to new hires plays a major role in onboarding success, but that training is less important. Further, we found that job satisfaction mediates the relationship between onboarding success and turnover intention, but workplace relationship quality does not. Based on the findings, we discuss a number of implications for practice and suggestions for future research.
http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8743

Digital commensality: Eating and drinking in the company of technology

Digital commensality: Eating and drinking in the company of technology Spence, Charles; Mancini, Maurizio; Huisman, Gijs Commensality is a key aspect of social dining. However, previous research has identified a number of pros and cons associated with the incorporation of digital technology into eating and drinking episodes. For instance, those who are distracted by digital technology may eat/drink more (that is, they may overconsume) as a result of their failure to attend to the food-related sensations that are thought to cue the termination of eating. Similarly, it has often been suggested that the use of mobile devices at mealtimes can disrupt the more commensal aspects of dining/drinking (at least among those who are physically present together). At the same time, however, looking to the future, it seems clear that digital technologies also hold the promise of delivering opportunities for enhanced multisensory experiential dining. For instance, they might be used to match the auditory, visual, or audiovisual entertainment to the eating/drinking episode (e.g., think only about watching a Bollywood movie while eating a home-delivery Indian meal, say). Indeed, given the growing societal problems associated with people dining by themselves, there are a number of routes by which digital technologies may increasingly help to connect the solo diner with physically co-located, remote, or even virtual dining partners. In this review of the literature, our focus is specifically on the role of technology in inhibiting/facilitating the more pleasurable social aspects of dining, what one might call “digital commensality.” The focus is primarily on Westernized adults with reasonable access to, and familiarity with, digital technologies.
http://hdl.handle.net/10468/8811

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