Film and Screen Media at University College Cork is a vibrant community of lecturers, researchers and graduate students; it publishes the highly successful peer-reviewed, open-access Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media and it hosts regular talks by filmmakers, professionals and scholars, as well as conferences, workshops and masterclasses. Doctoral students in Film and Screen Media may gain experience in teaching, journal editing and event organisation.

Two doctoral degrees are offered in the Discipline: the PhD in Film and Screen Media and the PhD in Film and Screen Media (Creative Practice). More information on these degrees may be found below. Before applying, interested students must first approach the relevant Lecturer to discuss their ideas for a dissertation. Candidates should contact the relevant staff member or email the Heads of Discipline at UCCFilmStudies@ucc.ie for further information and consultation. For information on staff and their research interests see our People section.

All incoming PhD/PhD track students will be registering for a Structured PhD. The UCC model of structured PhD education is comprised of a programme of supportive and developmental elements, with a stated minimum level of 15 credits of coursework and training. In addition, all students will be supervised by a supervisory team, or have a sole supervisor and a PhD advisor. More information about the Strucured PhD may be found HERE.

For further information on applying and on studying at UCC see:

UCC Graduate Office

International Office

Graduate School of the College of Arts, Celtic Studies & Social Sciences

CKH37 PhD (Arts) Film and Screen Media (Full-Time)
CKH38 PhD (Arts) Film and Screen Media (Part-Time)

To be eligible for consideration to enter on a programme of study and research for the Degree of PhD in Film and Screen Media, a candidate must normally have obtained a standard of at least Second Class Honours, Grade I, in a relevant Masters degree such as Film Studies, Communications/Media, Art History, Creative Writing, English Literature, Modern Languages/Cultures, or History.

The PhD in Film and Screen Media is based on a programme of study and research whose main focus is the writing of a major dissertation of no more than 80,000 words. Candidates will pursue a course of research, study and personal and professional development as prescribed by their Supervisor(s). PhD candidates undertake an equivalent student workload of 90 ECTS credits for each calendar year of full-time research, or proportional equivalent for part-time students. Students will complete a minimum of 270 credits (3 years, full-time) and a maximum of 360 credits, for consideration for the award of PhD.

CKH95    PhD (Arts) Film and Screen Media (Creative Practice) (Full-Time)
CKH96    PhD (Arts) Film and Screen Media (Creative Practice) (Part-Time)

To be eligible for consideration to enter on a programme of study and research for the Degree of PhD in Film and Screen Media (Creative Practice), a candidate must normally have obtained a standard of at least Second Class Honours, Grade I, in a relevant Masters degree such as Film Studies, Communications/Media, Art History, Creative Writing, English Literature, Modern Languages/Cultures, or History. Candidates with a Second Class Honours, Grade 1 in a relevant primary degree and evidence of advanced creative experience will also be considered. This should constitute a substantial portfolio of relevant creative film or video work, of at least five years duration.

The PhD in Film and Screen Media (Creative Practice) has two components: practical and critical. The relationship between these components will depend on individual research choices and should be addressed as part of the overall dissertation. The first and main focus of the PhD will be a body of practice-based work designed for exhibition. This may consist of a substantial, original, high quality film or of a coherent portfolio of practical film and screen media work. The second part of the PhD will consist of a critical discussion, based on a body of critical reading and reflection, exploring ideas, themes, and concepts that have a relationship with the creative work being undertaken. This should be written in tandem with the creative practice. The choice of form for this part of the thesis will be at the discretion of the candidate, in consultation with the supervisor. Possibilities include explicit reflection on the creative process or the academic thesis. Normally, this part of the PhD will account for 40,000 words.

Students will register through PAC.

Before applying, interested candidates must first approach the Graduate/PhD Studies co-ordinator Dr. Ciara Chambers ciara.chambers@ucc.ie to discuss their ideas for a dissertation.

Candidates will be asked by the potential supervisor to fill in a PhD Research Project Proposal Form, which can be donwloaded here: PhD Project Form.

Check the research profiles of Film and Screen Media Staff here.

MPhil

  • Maeveen Murray, ‘Conflict, Nostalgia and Disillusion: Images of the Sixties and Seventies in Italian Cinema of the Subsequent Decades’, Supervisor: Dr Laura Rascaroli (Completed 2001).
  • Ruairi O’Kelly, ‘Male spectatorship and the image woman: An approach to screening the woman from the point of view of masochism and voyeurism’. Supervisor: Dr Gwenda Young (Completed 2002).
  • Aoife Deasy, ‘Drawn Only On Herself: Joan Crawford as Melodramatic Star’. Supervisor: Dr Gwenda Young (Completed 2009).

PhD

  • Orla Borreye, ‘Invisible Prisons: Identity and Performance in Recent Mexican Cinema’. Arts Faculty PhD Scholarship, 2006-2007. Supervisor: Prof. Nuala Finnegan, Dept of Hispanic Studies (Completed 2008).
  • Nicole Sigl, ‘Identity in Recent Mexican and Quebecois Cinema’. Co-Supervisors: Dr. Maeve Conrick, Dept of French and Prof. Nuala Finnegan, Dept of Hispanic Studies (Completed 2008).
  • Deborah Mellamphy, ‘Gender, performance and transgression in the Depp/Burton films’. Supervisor: Dr Gwenda Young, Dept of English (Completed 2009).
  • Stefano Baschiera: ‘Pasolini, Bertolucci, Bellocchio: Reframing Space in Italian New Wave Cinema’, Arts Faculty PhD Special Award, 2004-2005; President’s PhD Scholarship, 2005-2006; Arts Faculty PhD Scholarship, 2005-2006. Supervisor: Laura Rascaroli (Completed 2009).
  • Marian Hurley, ‘Reworking the Neorealist Myths: Resistance Identities in Italian Cinema’. Supervisor: Dr Laura Rascaroli (Completed 2009).
  • Stefano Odorico, ‘Semiotics and (non)fiction. A semio-pragmatic analysis of documentary cinema’, President’s PhD Scholarship, 2006-2007; IRCHSS, 2008-2009. Supervisor: Dr Laura Rascaroli (Completed 2010).
  • Sarah May O’Sullivan, ‘‘Versions of the Masculine: A Comparative Analysis of Masculinity in Contemporary Canadian and Mexican Cinema’, Co-Supervisors: Dr Gwenda Young, Dept of English and Prof. Nuala Finnegan, Dept of Hispanic Studies (completed 2011, graduated 2012).
  • Aidan Power, ‘Continental Drifts: Travel and Transition in Post-National European Cinema’. Supervisor: Dr Laura Rascaroli (Completed 2011).
  • Jill Murphy, ‘ Hoc est enim corpus meum: Christian Art and Passion Iconography in the Work of Pier Paolo Pasolini and Jean-Luc Godard ’, Supervisor: Laura Rascaroli (Completed 2012).
  • Niall Heffernan, "Scientism and Instrumentalism after The Bomb : Dr StrangeloveEnd zone, and The Wire"
    Supervisors: Dr Alan Gibbs, Dr Gwenda Young (Completed 2014).
  • Abigail Keating, 'Locating the Transnational: Representations and Aesthetics of the City in Contemporary European Cinemas'. Supervisor: Dr Laura Rascaroli (Completed 2014).
  • Ian Murphy, “Corporeal Prisons: Dynamics of Body and Mise-en-scène in Three Films by Paul Schrader” 
    Supervisor: Dr. Gwenda Young, School of English (Completed Spring 2015).
  • Chen Yuanyuan, 'Rhythm in Experimental Chinese and European Animation: A Comparative Study' Supervisor: Prof. Laura Rascaroli; Funding: China-Ireland Scholarship (Completed 2015).
  • Nicholas O'Riordan, on the representation of Dublin in Irish cinema. Supervisor: Dr Barry Monahan.
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