Postgraduate Modules in Teaching and Learning

These modules focus on disciplinary stewardship (Golde, 2006). Central to these modules is disciplinary formation and identity as postgraduates hold dual roles of being apprentice scholars and teachers in their chosen discipline. As developing scholars, postgraduates are gaining the skills they need not only to create new research, but also to educate the next generation of researchers and teachers who will become disciplinary stewards themselves.  

Three postgraduate modules in Teaching and Learning are available to postgraduate students responsible for teaching:

Further details

Co-ordinator: James Cronin (email: j.cronin@ucc.ie)

Learning Design

The modules broadly use Problem-based learning (PBL) as a student-centered pedagogy in which students learn about a subject through the experience of solving an open-ended problem found in trigger material. This approach frames the assessments in each module. 

 

Testimonials

Where Finbarr taught, let Munster learn.”—The Teaching & Learning course is a great example of how University College Cork acknowledges its founding mission up until this day. In the hectic PhD life, this module gave me the rare opportunity to reflect on my teaching methods and study different academic approaches to education. It was a great way to connect with research students from other disciplines and learn from their experiences. I am looking forward to trying out these new strategies in my own tutorials!

Anne Mahler, PhD, School of English

"After successfully completing PG6003, I decided to continue my teaching and learning studies and enrolled in PG6012. PG6012 provides those enrolled with a lens through which to analyse their own teaching practice, engaging with the seminal academic context behind theories of teaching and learning. This reflective and exploratory approach has enriched my understanding of pedagogies within my own discipline and within the wider context which in turn has greatly assisted me in routing my approach in the lecture theatre within the academic context, a skill which will stand to me when applying for my first academic position." 

Samantha Williams, PhD, CCJHR, School of Law.

"Not only did PG6027 emphasise the relationship between teaching and learning, but it also concentrated on the significant link between research and education, and how this can augment academic practice. This module gave me the opportunity to further my teaching philosophy, link my teaching methods to the research literature, record evidence of learning moments, continually reflect upon both scholarship and practice, and ultimately embark upon a process of writing up this experience for an academic audience." 

Holly May Walker-Dunseith, PhD student, School of English, UCC.

Centre for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (CIRTL)

West Lodge, Main Campus,

Top