Course Modules

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FS6201 Milk Production and Quality

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (3-day block release at the Teagasc Animal and Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Lecturer(s): Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, and research staff from Teagasc Animal and Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Moorepark.
Module Objective: To review in detail the chemical and microbiological quality of raw milk and to explore the implications of these quality criteria for milk processing and finished product quality.
Module Content: Milk chemical composition: protein, fat, lactose, pH, NPN, fatty acid profile and impacts of seasonality thereon. Raw milk microbiology: pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. Raw milk collection, storage, handling and distribution. Raw milk contaminants, e.g., antibiotics, chlorates, nitrates/nitrites. Somatic cell count. Milk payment systems overview. Enzymology of raw milk – sources, activities, inactivation and implications for processing and product quality of the key enzymes in raw milk. Raw milk analysis and best practice in raw milk component analysis.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Explain the factors which influence the suitability of farm milk in Ireland for manufacture of dairy products
  • Link the quality of dairy products to the quality of raw milk used in their production
  • Relate breeding, feeding and seasonality induced changes in raw milk composition to differences in the processing properties, yield and functionality of dairy products made from a seasonal milk supply
  • Determine the influence of on-farm practices on the quality and suitability for processing of raw milk
  • Differentiate between microbiological and enzymatic pathways responsible for dairy product quality issues.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (written practical reports - 20 marks; on-line MCQ test - 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

CM6003 Teaching Organic Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Max 16.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 12 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (6 x 2 hrs tutorials, 6 x 2 hrs seminars); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of chemistry in the secondary school, associated reading assignments).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.
Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.
Module Objective: To develop new approaches to teaching Organic Chemistry. These new approaches will involve the use of computer-aided learning (computer datalogging, CD ROM technology, Internet resources etc.). In addition, use will be made of science, technology and society innovations in teaching this topic as well as the methodology of overcoming conceptual difficulties among students in certain areas of this topic.
Module Content: Fuels, oil refining and its products, chloroalkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, aromatic compounds, organic natural products, organic chemical reaction types - addition reactions, substitution reactions, reaction mechanisms, redox reactions, reactions as acids.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Discuss and evaluate the teaching approaches that may be used when teaching organic chemistry to second-level chemistry students;
  • Discuss the concepts of bonding, structural formula, isomerism, homologous series, chirality, optical acitivity, enantiomers and racemic mixtures in organic chemistry;
  • Interpret and discuss key structural features of the structural formulae of various organic compounds including aromatic substances;
  • Outline the principles of organic synthesis;
  • Apply a knowledge of organic synthesis to discuss and interpret a variety of given chemical reactions;
  • Discuss and interpret the mechanisms of selected organic reactions;
  • Interpret the infra-red and 1H nmr spectra of a wide variety of organic compounds;
  • Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of practical work 1 x 5,000 - 8,000).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit Portfolio, as prescribed by the Department).

EC6063 Applied Time Series Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: This module introduces time series methods in econometrics. It also deals with the application of these methods in economic research by providing experience of analysing data sets.
Module Content: Topics covered can include ARIMA models and Box-Jenkins methodology, Modelling the Variance: ARCH-GARCH models, Vector Autoregressive models (VAR), Non-stationarity and unit-root tests, Cointegration.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • derive various optimal estimators of time series models and describe any assumptions underlying their derivation
  • discuss consequences if assumptions don't hold and explain alternative estimation techniques
  • model relationships between time series variables in financial economics
  • estimate and interpret relevant parameters and tests statistics and carry out diagnostic tests.
  • use econometrics software to apply the above techniques to data sets in financial economics.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x assignment, max 3,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

LL6006 Dissertation in Languages and Cultures

Credit Weighting: 30
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.
Module Objective: To carry out a sustained research project on an original topic in the field; to develop research skills, critical thinking, and the identification of appropriate methodologies and presentation of findings in the form of a dissertation.
Module Content: Under the academic guidance of staff, students will independently explore a specialised area within the areas of applied linguistics, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese or Latin American studies, visual art, media, theatre, film, cultural history or pedagogies of language teaching, apply the appropriate research methodologies and present the results in a minor dissertation.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • demonstrate an ability to conduct guided individual research at an appropriate level;
  • Conceptualize and execute a sustained, specialized research project;
  • Develop individual research strategies and produce critical bibliographies;
  • Explain major interpretive strategies of the texts in question;
  • Display an independent approach to critical analysis and evaluation;
  • Write critically using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research;
  • Identify an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework consistent with their area of study;
  • Present their work in a minor dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words.
Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Research Dissertation 12,000 - 15,000 words).).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

HS3024 Galician Language II

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5.
Pre-requisite(s): HS2024
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (oral classes).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Martín Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Martín Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies; Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Module Objective: To achieve proficiency in spoken and written Galician.
Module Content: This module will build on the groundwork laid down in HS2024 and/or HS2025, using a mixture of grammar and translation classes, conversation with the native speaker as well as the video and audio resources of the Centre for Galician Studies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Interpret oral messages either addressed to them or to a general audience.
  • Read complex texts related to topics of interest to them and extract the relevant information.
  • Talk about their experiences, opinions, or topics familiar to them.
  • Write different types of texts, even in a formal register in varied fields: stories, social and political commentary, summaries of articles and lectures, etc.
  • Explain the most relevant aspects of Galician life and culture.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (exercises (10) and in-class test (10)); Oral Assessment 20 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((A pass Continuous Assessment and/or Oral mark is carried forward to the Autumn. Students failing Continuous Assessment must sit a 1.5 hr written test. The Oral Examination must also be re-taken, if failed).).

LT6003 Latin Texts

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 3. (Summer School).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Classics.
Module Objective: To teach basic grammar and translation skills in Latin.
Module Content: One Latin prose text or one poetic text.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Consolidate and expand their knowledge of Latin grammar, syntax and vocabulary.
  • Translate simple, unadapted Latin texts with the aid of a dictionary and commentary.
  • Show familiarity with the work of the authors read and their place in Latin literature.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2hr In-Class Test).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

SH7014 Stem Cells and Gene Therapy 1

Credit Weighting: 2.5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12hr(s) Lectures (with interactive discussion (8 hours optional lectures, 40 hours self directed learning.).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Helen Whelton, College of Medicine and Health.
Lecturer(s): Staff, National University of Ireland, Galway, (External delivery by Dr Linda Howard, Dr Thomas Ritter).
Module Objective: This module is designed to provide up to date information on stem cell biology and gene therapy with an emphasis on current and developing clinical strategies.
Module Content: Stem cell biology, gene therapy, current clinical stem cell and gene therapy strategies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the properties of different stem cell populations
  • Describe stem cell renewal and differentiation
  • Discuss the role of stem cells in degenerative disease and cancer
  • Describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of viral and non viral gene delivery strategies
  • Describe the principals underpinning stem cell and gene therapies with particular emphasis on current clinical strategies.
Assessment: 1.5-hour written examination on completion of module.
Compulsory Elements:
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail judgement.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5-hour written examination in Autumn.

AS6215 Translation in Contemporary Japanese Culture and Current Affairs

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): Students with a significant standard of Japanese Language (equivalent to Japanese Language Proficiency Test N2, assessed before entry); students from BA International after year abroad in Japan
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Translation Work-shops).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Till Weingartner, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Module Objective: This module will provide students with the necessary skills to translate texts from Japanese into English, while broadening their knowledge of Japanese culture and current affairs.
Module Content: Readings for the course will consist of a thematically focused set of textual materials taken from contemporary sources, particularly newspapers, but also including academic articles, reports, and magazines.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Translate authentic works in Japanese on Japanese culture, politics, and economics into English.
  • Understand key concepts in relation to translating Japanese texts into English.
  • Demonstrate an awareness and understanding of issues in contemporary Japanese culture, politics, and economics.
  • Demonstrate a strong Japanese vocabulary in several key areas.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 50 marks, annotated translations.).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

LW3407 Placement

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 0, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 3. (After Third University Examination, from June to August - for four weeks minimum. The Learning Journal is to be submitted before the end of September.).
Teaching Methods: 1 x 4weeks(s) Placements (Clinical placement with appropriate legal or business organisation. One mentoring visit per placement.).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.
Lecturer(s): Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law; Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law; Staff, Faculty of Law.
Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching and learning with exposure to institutional work process in legal or business organisations.
Module Content: 1 x 4 weeks minimum placement with an appropriate legal or business organisation. The work placement will be monitored by the Director of the BCL (Law and Business) and the Clinical Education Coordinator. Students will be expected to keep and submit a learning journal for examination by the Director of the BCL (Law and Business) and the Clinical Education Coordinator.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the organisation, its culture and purpose;
  • Apply legal and/or business knowledge to real-life situations in the workplace;
  • Apply research, writing and analytical skills in the workplace;
  • Demonstrate the acquiring of the attributes of professional responsibility, including the use of independent judgement, time and project management, communications and other enduring professional skills;
  • Demonstrate an ability to function independently and in a workplace team;
  • Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the workplace.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Learning Journal).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

HS1160 Intensive Language Training for the Global Marketplace (Spanish for Beginners)

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 192 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24hr(s) Other (on-line learning); 24hr(s) Other (language laboratory).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Siobhan Nally, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Module Objective: To introduce students to written and spoken Spanish with a special focus on language for use in the workplace.
Module Content: Intensive study of basic Spanish grammar, commonly used vocabulary and idiomatic language, with particular emphasis on language and vocabulary relevant to the workplace. The course will be delivered in small class groups and will integrate the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Show an understanding of phrases and frequently used vocabulary related to areas of most immediate relevance in everyday and work-related situations (e.g. basic personal information, shopping, local area, employment). Understand the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcements.
  • Read short, simple texts. Find specific, predictable information in simple everyday material such as advertisements, menus, timetables, and show an understanding of short simple personal and work-related e-mails and letters.
  • Communicate in routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information in formal/informal everyday and business-related scenarios.
  • Use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms family and other people, living conditions, educational background and present or most recent activities.
  • Write simple connected texts on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.
  • Write passages describing past experiences and impressions.
  • Write a curriculum vitae.
  • Recognise the appropriate context(s) when more formal modes of address should be used, both orally and in writing, for example with work colleagues.
  • Recognise standard opening and closing formulae and some common structures used in formal written business communication.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 240 marks (4 x in-class written tests); Oral Assessment 60 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students take a written test in lieu of failed Continuous Assessment. The Oral Examination must be retaken if failed).

CO6507 Adapative Leadership Workshop

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1. (Part 4, Year 2, MBA).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Other (Student Group Work and Contact Hours).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joan Buckley, Department of Management and Marketing.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Mba Course, Guest Lecturers.
Module Objective: This module builds on the students knowledge of the concepts underpinning and the realities imposing on personal career and change planning, as developed in the first Semester.
Module Content: The module further examines such topics as: current research in personal development and change; linking individual and organisational change; the learning leader; overcoming immunity to change and the development of personal growth/change in the context of professional career development.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Continue their identification of a number of significant personal change goals
  • Continue building and developing a personal change/career development plan
  • Present, defend and discuss this plan in documentary/essay form.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Students work individually to prepare a personal career and change plan of maximum 10,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

GL6006 Geotechnical Investigations of Soils and Rock

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 10 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 2 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr David (Ed) Jarvis, Department of Geology.
Lecturer(s): Dr David (Ed) Jarvis, Department of Geology.
Module Objective: To become familiar with the geotechnical properties of rocks and soils, principles of groundwater flow and controls on geotechnical behaviour.
Module Content: Properties and behaviour of geologic materials, rock mechanics; soil mechanics; geotechnical investigations, field and laboratory testing, principles of groundwater flow and controls on geotechnical behaviour, excavations and tunnelling, ground subsidence, slope stability, ground stabilisation, ground improvement, geotechnical risk assessment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Understand geotechnical terms and properties, methods of field and laboratory testing and the significance of geotechnical results.
  • Complete a desk study analysis of geotechnical data (from field and lab results).
  • Complete a field geotechnical assessment of slope stability risk.
  • Complete a field geotechnical assessment of subsidence risk.
  • Identify and design appropriate mitigation measures for slope stability and subsidence risk.
  • Identify and design appropriate ground stabilisation and ground improvement measures for destabilised ground.
  • Complete a desk study geotechnical assessment report for an underground mining project.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In class test 40 marks; Practical Reports 60 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of BEES).

AM2006 Mathematical Modelling for Biological and Environmental Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): MA1001, MA1002
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Henry, Department of Applied Mathematics.
Lecturer(s): Dr Stefan Schulz, Tyndall Institute.
Module Objective: To provide an introductory course to the construction and employment of mathematical models in the biological environmental sciences.
Module Content: Construction of mathematical models with first order and second order ordinary differential equations. Model accuracy and validation. Elementary partial differentiation and conservation principles. Models concerned with population dynamics, simple epidemiology and dispersive phenomena.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Recognise the main stages in the process of creation of simple mathematical models in some biological and in environmental areas;
  • Translate observational data into mathematical statements and apply generalised balance principles to construct evolution equations;
  • Carry out mathematical analysis of model equations, and identify important predictions of the model in the context of the application;
  • Solve some first order ordinary differential equations using a variety of technical skills;
  • Recognise that similar equations arise in very different contexts and make use of understanding gained in one context to gain insight into another.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (2 assignments of equal weight).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

ST2001 Introduction to Biostatistics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 350.
Pre-requisite(s): MA1001
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Wolsztynski, Department of Statistics (Department of Statistics).
Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Wolsztynski, Department of Statistics.
Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the applications of statistical methods in the Biological, Environmental, Health and Food Sciences.
Module Content: The application of Statistical Methods in the Biological, Environmental, Health and Food Sciences, with real examples; Descriptive Statistics, Statistical Graphics; Basic Probability concepts; Sampling and Sample Selection methods; Sampling Distributions; Estimation and Hypothesis Testing.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe and summarise quantitative data;
  • Compute marginal, joint and conditional probabilities;
  • Describe and apply discrete and continuous distributions;
  • Recognise and identify the key elements of estimation and hypothesis testing;
  • Compute and interpret confidence intervals for a single mean and for the differences between two means;
  • Formulate hypotheses, interpret and derive conclusions from SPSS output for comparing means;
  • Determine and model bivariate associations.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 MCQ of equal weight (20 marks), 10 in-tutorial tests of equal weight (10 marks), In-practical SPSS Project (10 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (in the case of students who have failed continuous assessment, the supplemental examination paper alone will provide a satisfactory assessment of the module learning outcomes worth 100 marks).

GG2025 Biogeography

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Rourke, Department of Geography.
Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Rourke, Department of Geography.
Module Objective: To study the distribution of biological material over the Earth's surface, and the factors responsible for the observed spatial variations.
Module Content: A grounding is provided in fundamental ecological relationships between organisms and their environment, within an ecosystems framework. A combined ecological, geographical and historical approach is taken to understand current biogeographical patterns of distribution. The reciprocal relationship between humans and the biosphere will be studied within such topics as evolution, biodiversity, nature conservation and island biogeography.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify global biogeographical patterns in the distribution of organisms.
  • Analyse the historical, geographical and ecological factors that shape global biogeographical distribution patterns.
  • Outline the centrality of the theory of evolutionary in biogeography.
  • Assess the Theory of Island Biogeography along with its application to the design of nature reserves and in conservation practices.
  • Outline the principle theories and practices in conservation biogeography.
  • Examine the key issues in the study and measurement of biodiversity.
  • Assess the reciprocal relationship between humans and the biosphere.
  • Outline the causes of species extinction.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

AU6026 Audiological Science and Rehabilitation IV (PBL based, mixed delivery curriculum)

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 16.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Tutorials (40 hrs of lectures, seminars and problem-based learning tutorials); Other (240 hrs of on-line activities and self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Amr El Refaie, School of Clinical Therapies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Medicine and Health.
Module Objective: To provide a detailed overview of audiological science and rehabilitation with particular reference to diagnosis and management of balance problems.
Module Content: Anatomy and physiology of equilibrium, pathology affecting balance organs, vestibular rehabilitation.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Relate princliples of clinical intervention in otology and neurotology to functional outcomes
  • Describe and analyse the theories of equilibrium, the anatomy and physiology of the peripheral and ventral systems involved in maintenance of balance, with special reference to the vestibular system
  • Relate and analyse various strategies involved in the diagnosis of balance dysfunction in different age groups
  • Differentiate the roles of various disciplines, governmental and voluntary organizations with regard to individualised management plans for balance disorders
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the problems affecting elderly population regarding maintenance of balance, and the role of the fall clinics
  • Plan and perform critical reviews of literature pertinent to the assessment and treatment of balance disorders in adult and paediatric populations.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (presentations, 50 marks; 1 x class test 50 marks; in class test 100 marks (end of semester)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% Students must pass each of the components independently to pass this module. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) (written) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by School).

NU7019 Advanced Research Qualitative Methods

Credit Weighting: 20
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3.
Teaching Methods: 40hr(s) Lectures; 360hr(s) Lectures (Tutorials and Seminars).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Eileen Savage, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: This module focuses on qualitative research methods.
Module Content: Historical and philosophical traditions, role and value of theory in qualitative research, research problems, design assumptions, sampling, debates on rigour, data collection strategies, analytical methods and reporting, software packages, criteria for assessing qualitative research, metasynthesis, usefulness of qualitative research to evidence based practice, dissemination strategies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Develop a high level of understanding of qualitative methodologies and associates debates
  • Compare various qualitative research approaches for their applicability in addressing research questions
  • Develop competency in critiquing qualitative research
  • Conduct field work in qualitative research collecting and analysing the data and synthesising the results
  • Evaluate ethical issues in relation to qualitative research methods
  • Evalute the usefulness of qualitative research to evidence based practice.
Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Written paper 400 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit written paper as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery).

FE1839 Communication and Presentation Skills for Food Organisations including Co-operatives

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Part 1: November - February).
Teaching Methods: 16hr(s) Lectures; 30hr(s) Directed Study (skills practice); 2hr(s) Workshops.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Enright, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development, and Industry Presenters.
Module Objective: This module will provide an understanding of the importance of individual and group communication skills in the contemporary food business environment.
Module Content: Importance of communication. Interpersonal communication. Group communication and Presentation skills. Processes that contribute to effective group functioning. Components of verbal and nonverbal communication. Understanding Personality types and different work styles. Group interaction and dynamism of groups.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Recognise the principles of effective presentations.
  • Be familiar and explain the effectiveness of different presentation media.
  • Prepare effective presentations.
  • Critically evaluate their own presentations.
  • Develop strategies to deal with fear before presentations.
  • Demonstrate strengthened knowledge, skills and confidence in presenting to groups.
  • Identify the importance of recognising different personality types and relevant approaches to dealing with them in group situations.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 Learning Log, 100 marks; 1 Project Presentation, 50 marks; 1 Presentation Skills, 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

LW3366 Advanced Legal Reasoning

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.
Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.
Module Objective: To provide students with a thorough and practical knowledge of the central themes, concepts and controversies that underpin legal reasoning and judicial decision-making.
Module Content: Approaches to and conceptions of practical reasoning; Judicial reasoning as a branch of practical reasoning; Judicial reasoning in the common law tradition of decision-making.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate critical awareness of various theoretical approaches to legal reasoning
  • Assess, with theoretical awareness, the value of the tools of legal reasoning in judicial decision-making
  • Assess the relationship between reasoning, interpretation and authority in law
  • Critically appraise the reasoning process that is utilised in specific judicial decisions
  • Based on awareness of theoretical approaches to practical reasoning, formulate a rigorous, critical response to the reasoning process in a particular legal decision.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay: 45 marks; In-Class Test: 45 marks; Participation: 10 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. (Written Assignment and In-Class Test).
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing an essay (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay ona topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, not later than the third Friday in August, as prescribed by the School of Law. Students who fail the module and have failed in-class test will be required to take a repeat test in Autumn.).

SS2825 Health and Wellbeing

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15, Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 70hr(s) Lectures; 30hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed study).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maire Leane, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Education, Sports Studies; Staff, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To enhance skills and knowledge for maintenance of physical, mental, emotional and sexual health and wellbeing.
Module Content: Diet and Nutrition
Exercise and Physical Activity
Emotions and Coping Skills
Positive Mental Health
Relationships & Responsibilities
Positive Sexual Health.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify the elements that make up positive physical, mental, emotional and sexual health
  • Be aware of their responsibilities in relation to their own physical, mental, emotional and sexual health
  • Have skills to advocate in relation to their own physical, mental, emotional and sexual health
  • Know where to access information and support services relating to physical, mental, emotional and sexual health
  • Be familiar with skills, programmes and behaviours which support positive physical, mental, emotional and sexual health.
Assessment: The module will be assessed completely by Continuous Assessment. Assessment will be formative as well as summative. The format of the assessment will reflect the learning style and specific needs of the student. Each student will undertake designated assessments to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes. Possible assessment tools may include · Presentations (oral visual, written) · Feedback sheets · Written work (worksheets, statements, descriptions) · Audio/visual formats (photos, power point etc).
Compulsory Elements: Attendance and assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: To pass the module each student must: (1) attend 50 of the 70 class hours associated with each module and (2) complete the designated assignments associated with the module. The student may achieve various levels of performance in their assignments. These will be determined against a 5 point scale: · Completes assessment task independently · Completes assessment task with verbal and/or gestural prompt · Completes assessment task with spoken/augmentative assistance · Completes assessment task with one to one assistance · Experiences the activity.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

EH6015 Occupational Health and Safety Management in the Workplace

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 15, Max 25 (-).
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1. (Year 1).
Teaching Methods: 16 x 3hr(s) Lectures (Including tutorials, problem based learning, workplace visits and self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Gallagher, Centre for Adult Continuing Education (Clinical Senior Lecturer, Dept Epidemiology and Public Health, Academic Director Centre for Adult Continuing Education (Consultant Health Services Executive Southern Area-Employment Health Advisiors.)).
Lecturer(s): Dr John Gallagher, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, Various lecturers from the HSA, HSE, EHA and industry.
Module Objective: Ensure understanding of core principles and practical implementation of modern occupational health and safety practice.
Module Content: Core knowledge base in principles and practice of modern occupational health and safety practice incorporating: Introduction and General Concepts, Occupational disease identification, prevention and surveillance, occupational health service delivery, disability and rehabilitation, occupational respiratory disease, occupational skin disease, occupational infections, noise, vibration, building related illness, shiftwork. Principles and practice of total worker health; mental health at work, musculoskeletal problems at work, principles of health promotion at work, creating supportive work environments, mental health promotion, health promotion planning and evaluation, ergonomics, occupational cancer, occupational reproductive issues, stress, violence, drugs and alcohol testing. Multidisciplinary team working; Principles of health hazard evaluation, monitoring and control: Relationship between occupational, environmental and public health.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the scope and relevance of the types of occupational ill health in the workplace and an understanding of the different types of occupational ill health.
  • Understand the mechanisms of prevention and management of Occupational Health and Safety issues in the workplace and relate these to the design of occupational health and safety programmes. Understand and be able to apply the principles of Total Worker Health to the modern workplace.
  • Distinguish the various disciplines and agencies providing occupational health care and show an understanding of occupational health issues in the modern work environment from a multidisciplinary perspective.
  • Describe the principles of ill health prevention, health promotion and rehabilitation in the workplace and explain how these interact.
  • Describe health surveillance in the workplace and explain when it is appropriate to implement health surveillance programs.
  • Perform a needs assessment relating to occupational health service provision.
  • Demonstrate critical appraisal skills including analysis of current literature and development of research based activities in Occupational Health and Safety.
  • Practice self directed learning, reflective practice and critical thinking about Occupational Health and Safety issues.
  • Critically contribute to group discussions on occupational health and safety issues of national, organisational or individual importance.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 1.5hr in-class test 100 marks; Case Study 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

CE4012 Traffic and Highways

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 1, Max 70.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 30 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Lecturer(s): Prof Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Module Objective: Introduction to Traffic Engineering and Highway Design. Traffic measurement, management and quantification. Design and evaluation of highways.
Module Content: Traffic Engineering. Traffic studies (Volume, speed, travel time, parking). Road safety engineering. Urban traffic managment including traffic signal systems. Geometric design of roads and intersections.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Generate the relationships between concentration, flow and speed on roads.
  • Assess the likely capacity of specific road types in terms of Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) and peak flow.
  • Quantify the traffic volumes and patterns on interurban road networks.
  • Quantify the current traffic and safety situation at a specific junction or road.
  • Design alternative traffic signal stagings and timings for simple urban junctions.
  • Describe the process involved in the design of roads.
  • Describe the functions of the different elements of geometric road design.
  • Conduct preliminary design of roads.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (20 marks: report on highway and traffic assessment; 10 marks: oral presentation).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

BM6002 Research Methods in Biomedical Sciences

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 36hr(s) Lectures; 14hr(s) Directed Study (Case studies, data analysis and relevant assignments).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Martina Scallan, School of Microbiology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Microbiology, and guest lecturers.
Module Objective: To provide a detailed appraisal of research methods in Biomedical Science.
Module Content: Research methodology; project and experimental design; statistical planning and analysis; evidence-based medicine; clinical audit; risk assessment; legal and ethical issues in biomedical research; scientific communication; scientific assessment and review.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Communicate legal and ethical issues in biomedical research.
  • Overview the stages of a research project from proposal through to publication, and processes used to evaluate the research.
  • Demonstrate written and oral scientific communication skills.
  • Perform appropriate statistical analyses on biomedical data.
  • Give an account of evidence-based medicine and clinical audit.
  • Describe key apects of risk assessment in hospital laboratories.
  • Develop and implement a research project.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x written report of 3,000 words (Oral, if required)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral if required.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by module coordinator. (Oral if required)).

CR6009 Terrorism and Political Violence

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Seminars).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Lynch, Department of Sociology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Lynch, Department of Sociology.
Module Objective: On completion of this module, students will:
Achieve an indepth and situated understanding of terrorism and political violence in both national and international contexts.
Module Content: 1. We know it when we see it! Definitions, history and the international system.
2. Theoretical perspectives on terrorism 1 (The individual)
3. Theoretical perspectives on terrorism 2 (The group)
4. Theroetical Perspectives on terrorism 3 (De-Radicalisation, desistance, disengagement)
5. Intergroup conflict
6. Post conflict and victims of TPV
7. Sub-state Terrorism
8. State Terrorism
9. Counter terrorism
10. Terrorism and Crime
11. Case Study - Al Qaeda, Isis and the Syrian War.
12. Case study – Northern Ireland.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Understand and critique the issues around defining terrorism (legal, psychological , social and political)
  • Critique social and psychological approaches to studying terrorism
  • Evaluate the historical development of the concept and its changing meanings over time
  • Understand and evaluate the political responses to terrorism
  • Situate our understanding of terrorism within the relvant academic disciplines and draw on existing theroetical frameworks in an effort to develop our understanding of terrorism as crime, terrorism as a social movement and terrorism as rational choice
  • Show familiarity with legal and extra-legal measures to suppress terrorism
  • Show familiarity with the nexus of terrorism in terms of its relationship with both crime and domestic and international conflict
  • Show familiarity with approaches to preventing terrorism
  • Apply existing psychologcal and sociological theories to understanding the internal dynamics of different types of terrorist movements and their links to the outside world.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (In Class presentatiion 80 marks; 3,500 word Essay 120 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

FE3010 Gender and Development

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 45.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Una Murray, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the ways in which gender inequalities are constructed and the impact of mainstream development on gender relations.
Module Content: Gender concepts (Women in Development, Gender and Development etc.); practical and strategic gender needs and their limitations; public and private theories and limitations regarding gender in practice; production and reproduction; gender policies at national and international levels; methods for gender analysis; gender in developing country contexts; conflict and gender in developing countries: masculinities; gender audits; mainstreaming gender issues in development institutions, in project/programme planning; monitoring and evaluation.An analysis of gender at local, national and international levels; ways of responding to gender needs; how discrimination operates within different societies; why development initiatives have so often failed to help women; the immediate and long-term needs for cultural and social change.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify and analyse practical and strategic gender needs.
  • Discuss the principal factors involved in gender mainstreaming.
  • Identify and discuss the ways that gender and discrimination operates at local, national an international levels.
  • Critique gender policies at national and international levels.
  • Identify ways to respond to gender imbalances.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x individual assignments 1,500 words each, 50 marks each).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at Lectures and Participation in Seminars.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

EC5209 Foundations for Business Practices 1

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (and Workshops); Seminars; Workshops; Practicals; Other (Blended on-line).
Module Co-ordinator: Mr David Butler, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: The economic foundations of the primary activities and functions of business and the role of business in the economy and society are considered to provide participants with a comprehensive perspective on the nature and operation of the business economy.
Module Content: This module focuses on economic frameworks and data analysis with business functions and practices in mind. The module aims to develop an understanding of a range of issues that relate to the practicalities of business that will allow students transform quantitative scientific methods to a business environment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Appreciate the functions of business practice and be able to identify the essential economic features that are central to a firms operations;
  • Develop frameworks in order to investigate a business research problem;
  • Describe and present economic data in various formats.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,500 word projects (50 marks each)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

AP1856 Young People's Challenging Behaviour

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 16, Max 22.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 6 x 4hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Grace Neville, Department of VP Teaching and Learning.
Lecturer(s): Dr Anthony Humphreys, Centre for Adult Continuing Education; Ms Margaret Creagh, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: To provide participants with the skills to understand, assess, intervene and evaluate interventions for children's challenging behaviours.
Module Content: The nature, origins, creative interventions of and maintenance factors of Children's Challenging Behaviours. Also the development of methods of assessment, intervention and evaluation of intervention strategies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the creative nature of children's challenging behaviours in terms of origin, intention and resolution of same.
  • Assess, evaluate and intervene in the social contexts in which children's challenging behaviours occur.
  • Competently outline challenging behaviours that are of an 'acting-out', 'acting-in' nature and the embodiments of children's inner turmoil.
  • Determine the effects that children's challenging behaviours have on the children's overall development and on the dynamics of family life.
  • Effectively mentor parents on how best to respond to their children's challenging responses and to present a course for parents on children's challenging behaviours.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; 80% attendance which is monitored by a class register.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator.).

LC0001 Medical English

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): -
Co-requisite(s): -
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (/Tutorials).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Elisabeth Okasha, Language Centre.
Lecturer(s): Ms Noreen O'Mahony, Language Centre.
Module Objective: To aid students in acquiring techniques to improve their capacity for academic study and to familiarise them with specialist English.
Module Content: The module familiarises students with specialist medical English and helps them to understand and to communicate with patients and medical professionals. The four skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking) are covered, using a generally communicative approach.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Communicate fluently with patients and medical professionals;
  • Read medical course text-books and other written material without trouble;
  • Produce written work of the standard required by the College of Medicine and Health.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Attendance and participation 20 marks; short tasks and assignments 80 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Minimum of 80% attendance which will be monitored by a class register.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

EE2017 Electrical Power Engineering II

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 80.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Lecturer(s): Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of the electrical power engineering.
Module Content: Single-phase and Three-Phase Power Circuits: AC Circuit Analysis, Real, Reactive and Complex Power, Power Factor Correction, Star, Delta Circuits; Electrical Safety and Wiring.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Apply the laws of electromagetism to power components;
  • Characterize these power components for their electrical properties;
  • Apply these power components in suitable circuits and applications;
  • Provide an overview of dc and ac power systems;
  • Test, characterize, experiment with and report on commonly used power machines.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 65 marks; Continuous Assessment 35 marks (Power laboratory sessions 15 marks; In-class written examination 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (15 minutes reading time) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (15 minutes reading time) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

EH7011 Interrogation, Interpreting and Reporting Scientific Data and Health Information (Integrated Epidemiology/Biostatistics)

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 12.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 3 x 7hr(s) Lectures (3 full days); 3 x 3.5hr(s) Lectures (3 x 1/2 days plus 200 hurs self-directed study.).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ivan Perry, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, module delivered by external collaborators (TCD and RCSI).
Module Objective: To interpret and report scientific data as applied to public health and health services research.
Module Content: Introduction to Stata (Data analysis and statistical software). Exploratory data analysis. Basic graphing and tabular functions. Using boxplots, normal quantile plots, kernel density plots. Graphing continuous x categorical and continuous x continuous variables. Confidence intervals. Analysing tabular data. Statas' epitab commands and applications. Recording and combining variables. Analysing survey data. Analysing a stratified, clustered dataset. Logic of hypothesis testing. Hypothesis tests for tablets and means. Running and interpreting simple univariate models. Graphing and analysing survival data. Logistic regression and simple survival analysis.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Use Stata.
  • Create an analysable dataset from raw data.
  • Document the contents of a dataset, and explore a dataset using numeric and graphical summaries.
  • Summarise data numerically and graphically.
  • Calculate measures of association.
  • Calculate and interpret confidence intervals for statistics.
  • Carry out simple hypothesis tests and interpret the results.
  • Compile a results section, tabulating and graphing results, together with descriptive text.
  • Save the commands necessary to replicate an analysis as a file.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x Data Reports and presentations worth 100 marks each.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% Students must pass each element of assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AP6154 Conflict and Co-operation

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 80 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.
Module Objective: To discuss the theory and practice of evolution and genetics as they pertain to human behavior.
Module Content: This module explores the application of biological theory to human behavior. This will involve knowledge of genetics, the various mechanisms of selection, various heritability issues, and the adaptationist programme. The focus will on particular psychological issues including sexual behaviour, life history theory, social behaviour, aggression, altruism and learning as a set of biological processes.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Appreciate the interface between the fields of biology and psychology and be able to justify the role of evolutionary theory as an over-arching explanatory paradigm unifying the field;
  • Examine how knowledge of genetics and selection can shed light on otherwise puzzling human behaviours, especially: Mate selection; Risk-taking; Social behaviours
  • Understand the nature of heritability: Including being able to perform some basic estimates of heritability, and discuss the importance of heritability in a broader context - e.g. gene-environment interactions.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 - 4,000 word essay (excluding references)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the co-ordinator).

NU6131 Clinical Practice in Specialist Nursing 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2 and 3.
Teaching Methods: 291hr(s) Placements (Practice based learning including reflective practice).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patricia Leahy-Warren, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To integrate theory with practice of specialist nursing to advance the student's knowledge and skills in their relevant clinical speciality, to facilitate the development of analytical and critical thinking skills and to encourage the students to continue their professional and academic development.
Module Content: Practice of specialist skills in nursing. Participation in the clinical environment with the supervision and guidance of the course co-ordinator/facilitator, preceptors and registered nurses in the specialist area. The development of critical reflective skills will be encouraged to evaluate current practice.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Integrate theory and practice of specialist nursing to improve standards of care
  • Develop and engage in critical thinking skills through the process of reflection in and on practice
  • Demonstrate advances in his/her practice within an evidence based nursing framework.
  • Enhance specialist nursing practice through the application of knowledge and clinical skills.
Assessment: Clinical Assessment of Competencies (Pass/Fail).
Compulsory Elements: Completion of 291 hours clinical placement, clinical competencies.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement for achievement of clinical competencies and completion of scheduled clinical hours.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

EN6056 Craft and Technique of Fiction (2): Reading the Novel

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 2 hours; Associated Reading, 2 hours; Research 4 hours; Consultation 1 hour.).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.
Module Objective: This module introduces the student to the novel form through a writerly analysis of a set text, identifying key literary techniques relating to narrative, dialogue, plot, character, point of view etc.
Module Content: The module will focus on developing students' understanding of the novel form by guided reading and formal analysis.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Read texts closely and identify key narrative strategies
  • Analyse a long fictional text with a view to its form and literary technique.
  • Apply analytic and craft-based skills to their own writing.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Critical essay, 80 marks; contribution and participation, 20 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

DR6024 Directed Study in Theatre and Performance

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 1, Max 18.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: Other (Two-hour Seminars, Field Trips, Directed Study, Practicals, Placements, supervision and Self-directed study).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bernadette Cronin, Drama and Theatre Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Drama and Theatre Studies.
Module Objective: To develop a students' independent research skills while also enhancing their critical awareness and analytical skills in relation to a focussed area of theatre theory or practice. The student will work with their supervisor to design and implement a project for research and study (including practice-as-research projects).
Module Content: Through a guided research process with their lecturer, students develop a project focussed on a specialized area of research.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • To design, plan and follow through on a small scale research project
  • Articulate in discussion and in practice some of the key features a focussed area of theatre research
  • Offer detailed analysis of the work of a number of key theorists and practitioners related to their chosen topic;
  • Articulate in discussion, writing and/or practice informed responses to the work studied;
  • Express in discussion, writing and/or practice an analysis of a number of major issues in their chosen area of study;
  • Complete a developed critical and/or creative project assignment based on their research.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Research and continuous assignments 50 marks; Final Project (approx 3000 words) 50 marks..).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

MB4011 Microbial Food Safety

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): MB2005 and MB2006 or equivalent
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Colin Hill, School of Microbiology.
Lecturer(s): Prof Colin Hill, School of Microbiology.
Module Objective: To provide comprehensive information on the prevalence and nature of organisms which cause foodborne diseases.
Module Content: Foodborne pathogenic micro-organisms; epidemiology. Costs and consequences of foodborne diseases; pertinent case studies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the nature of epidemiological investigations
  • Identify major food pathogens and high risk foods
  • Recognise major classes of viruses and parasites in food-borne disease.
  • Interpret molecular typing of pathogens.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

MX2006 Student Directed Special Study Module in Medicine

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 3hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study; Other (Self directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen Duggan, School of Medicine.
Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen Duggan, School of Medicine; Staff, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health.
Module Objective: To allow students to self organise a special study module in an area of special interest in Medicine.
Module Content: The student must contact a suitable tutor in the College of Medicine and Health, agree module objectives, content and learning outcomes and maintain a reflective portfolio of the design through to completion of this module. Suitable activities include, acquiring specific laboratory and/or other research skills, specialised clinical placement, inter-professional and interdisciplinary learning opportunities.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Conduct an independent appraisal of a topic of particular interest outside the core curriculum
  • Demonstrate proficiency in self directed learning
  • Demonstrate the ability to manage time effectively
  • Present the results of their work, verbally, visually and/or in writing.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Reflective Portfolio 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who fail continuous assessment will be required to submit further assignments as perscribed by the Module Coordinator), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Medicine).

IS6125 Database Analysis and Design

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): NONE
Co-requisite(s): NONE
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures; 24hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Dr Robert Gleasure, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To provide students with the concepts and skills required to analyze organizational activities, information flows and to subsequently create the data models required to support these activities.
Module Content: Topics covered include; requirements analysis, introduction to datafication and emerging data capabilities, and data modelling (ERDs and normalisation).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Analyse organisational activities to identify key data requirements
  • Generate ERD to identify data sources and their relationships
  • Employ normalisation processes to assist in meeting the data integrity requirements
  • Identify and strategize around semi-structured and unstructured data capabilities.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 Data Modelling Exam 20 marks, 1 Group Report 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

EH4007 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Directed Study (self-directed research project comprising a structured literature review, supervised by members(s) of staff in Dept of Epidemiology and Public Health and/or other Departments contributing to the BSc programme); 6hr(s) Lectures; 8hr(s) Other (group supervision).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona MacLeod, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona MacLeod, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health; Staff, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Module Objective: To provide students with practical experience in conducting a structured literature review and retrieving, summarising and interpreting a body of research literature on a topic of public health importance.
Module Content: Conducting a comprehensive literature review including: formulating a focused review question; developing inclusion criteria; searching for and retrieving studies from electronic databases; critically appraising relevant studies; extracting, analysing and summarising relevant data from studies; interpreting and discussing results; producing a structured report of a literature review.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Formulate a focused research question
  • Conduct a comprehensive search of the international literature to identify studies relevant to addressing a focused research question
  • Develop and apply selection criteria to determine what studies to include in a structured literature review
  • Critically appraise studies included in a structured literature review
  • Summarise the results of a critical appraisal
  • Interpret the results of a body of research literature and discuss their implications for public health
  • Make appropriate recommendations for future research and public health practice in the topic area reviewed
  • Communicate research findings in a structured, written report.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Research Project - 4,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Research Project report must be resubmitted, as prescribed by the Department.).

PF4004 Pharmacy Project

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 70.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 10 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; Other (Independent supervised research project, library research, report writing, project presentation, equivalent to approximately 180 hrs of directed study).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Stephen Byrne, School of Pharmacy.
Lecturer(s): Prof Stephen Byrne, School of Pharmacy.
Module Objective: To develop the students' research skills.
Module Content: Each final year student will be required to undertake a research project which will entail a literature survey, practical or fieldwork. The aims of the module are to teach the student how to: compile a relevant and up-to-date bibliography and review of the relevant literature; learn the appropriate experimental methods and techniques; collect and collate data; analyse the results including the use of statistical packages; logically interpret the data; discuss the findings in the context of the current state of the art; make justifiable conclusions. The students are required to present the project as an oral presentation and in written form.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate the capacity to think independently and develop a specialist knowledge in a particular area
  • Compile a relevant and up-to-date bibliography and literature review
  • Plan, develop and carry out a programme of work to meet the defined objectives
  • Learn and apply the appropriate experimental methods and techniques
  • Logically interpret the data, discuss the findings and make justifiable conclusions
  • Interact positively with their project supervisor by communicating knowledge, ideas and results in an effective manner
  • Present results effectively in a written format.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Literature Review ((50 marks) Research Performance (40 marks), Scientific Paper (80 marks) and Oral Presentation (30 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Literature Review, Scientific Paper, Project Presentation. Oral, if required.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

HS2019 Basque Language and Culture I

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 3hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Lecturer(s): Ms Leire Orduna Abadias, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Module Objective: To achieve an initial proficiency in both spoken and written Basque.
Module Content: Language classes and oral practice.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Introduce themselves
  • Interact in bars, restaurants and shops, either explaing their queries or interpreting the information received.
  • Maintain a basic conversation about daily activities and personal information.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 40 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Language exercises (15); class test (15)); Oral Assessment 30 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

MH6136 Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) models of Mental Health Problems I

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 16hr(s) Lectures (Group Discussion/Workshops/skills practice); 4hr(s) Other (On-line Learning); 80hr(s) Other (Self-directed Learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Moira O'Donovan, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: This module aims to give students an overview of the CBT models used when working with people experiencing depression and low self-esteem.
Module Content: Critique approaches to psychiatric diagnoses
CBT for Depression
Schema Therapy: An Overview
CBT for Low Self Esteem.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Critically analyse approaches to psychiatric diagnoses
  • Critically evaluate the treatment rationale for the various CBT models
  • Articulate the evidence base for utilising each CBT model for the specified problem
  • Critically appraise different CBT models as applied to depression and low self esteem
  • Outline and apply principles of each CBT model to the care of people experiencing depression and low self-esteem through the use of case studies and role play with other students.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written assignment/ Case study (100 marks) 1 X 1500 word assignment).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revise and resubmit 1,500 word written assignment as prescribed by the School of Nursing & Midwifery).

FS1824 Food Chemistry and Packaging

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 8hr(s) Lectures; 5hr(s) Fieldwork (Field trips); 4hr(s) Practicals; 3hr(s) Workshops.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Paul McSweeney, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Module Objective: To provide essential scientific background in the field of food chemistry, product evaluation and case studies of successful practitioners.
Module Content: Key characteristics of major food constitutents such as water, lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and vitamins and how some may be determined in the laboratory. Overview of the principal packaging systems used in foods.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Distinguish between proteins, carbohydrates and fats and to understand the basic chemical differences between these substances.
  • Describe the principal features of the protein, fat and carbohydrate systems in some common foods and to use this knowledge to explain the properties of the foods and major changes which may occur on processing.
  • Describe briefly the importance of enzymes to foods and the chemistry of food pigments, browning reactions and preservatives.
  • Describe the fundamentals of food packaging, types of packaging, basic legal requirements for food packaging, environmental issues pertaining to food packaging waste.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

MU3009 Finnish Folk Music from Ancient to Avant-Garde

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12 (-).
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Dr Juniper Lynn Hill, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To provide students with an awareness of issues and methodologies in the study of Finnish music.
Module Content: This course focuses on historical and contemporary folk music in Finland. Through extensive listening (and some singing and composing), students become familiar with traditional genres (such as kalevala epic songs and oral poetry, ancient string and wind instruments, and fiddle and accordion dance music) and the ideology and creative processes governing the re-creation of this music today. In our studies of contemporary folk music, we learn about the intersections of folk music and art music (especially avant-garde and experimental music), jazz (especially free jazz), popular music and world music. We will study cross-cultural musical collaborations, syncretisms and fusions and the relationships they reveal between Finnish musicians and Swedes/Scandinavians, Russians, Finno-Ugric peoples in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia, Finland's minorities and folk/traditional musicians from around the world. Students gain a deeper understanding of institutionalization, music education, professionalization, commercialization, revival, authenticity/legitimization, nationalism, transnationalism and globalization as we examine how these socio-musical processes have shaped Finnish folk music over the last two centuries.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of key trends in Finnish music.
  • Evaluate and critique a range of issues relevant to Finnish music in its cultural and social contexts.
  • Present ideas orally and engage actively in group discussion and debate.
  • Formulate original research questions within the defined area.
  • Exhibit an ability to prepare, plan and execute an independent project within the defined area.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Continuous Assessment 200 marks: Portfolio of work undertaken during the semester, 100 marks; Final project, 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

CR6012 Key Issues in Criminology

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Seminars).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Lynch, Department of Sociology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Lynch, Department of Sociology; Dr Katharina Swirak, Department of Sociology; Ms Catherine O Sullivan, School of Applied Social Studies; Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.
Module Objective: The purpose of this module is to have students engage with contemporary issues, debates and perspectives within contemporary criminology. Using a multidisciplinary approach students will explore sociological, legal and applied approaches to understanding crime and the discipline of criminology more generally.
Module Content: 1. Applying Psychology to the study of crime
2. Investigative Psychology
3. Contemporary Sociology Of Crime
4. Critical Criminology
5. The welfare state and crime control
6. Social policy and criminalisation
7. Social justice and criminal justice
8. Crime prevention- an overview
9. Introduction to Law
10. Critical Legal Studies
11. Socio-Legal Jurisprudence
12. Rights Theory.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Situate criminology as a field of studies within the its foundational disciplines.
  • Critically apply psychologcal concepts to the study of crime
  • Understand the social nature of crime
  • Appreciate the major debates within criminology.
  • Conceptualise the relationship of social policy and criminal justice policy
  • Locate applied crime prevention initiatives in relevant theoretical frameworks
  • Critically assess the neutrality of law
  • Identify the issues that shape criminal justice policy.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3 x 1500 word assignments (equal weighting)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

CS2513 Intermediate Programming

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 120.
Pre-requisite(s): CS1117
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marc Van Dongen, Department of Computer Science.
Lecturer(s): Dr Marc Van Dongen, Department of Computer Science.
Module Objective: To build on the foundation of CS1117, particularly in the areas of object-oriented concepts and library usage, in designing and implementing computer programs of increasing sophistication and complexity.
Module Content: · review of classes and objects;
· inheritance;
· polymorphism;
· object-oriented design;
· generators;
· special methods;
· the use of language libraries for tasks such as graphical user interfaces, event-driven programming, operating system interaction, regular expressions.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • express the principles of object-oriented design;
  • explain the use of some prominent language libraries;
  • show significant improvement in their overall programming skills.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (As prescribed by the Department: Tests and/or Laboratory Assignments).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

GG3037 Geography of Heritage

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Crowley, Department of Geography.
Lecturer(s): Dr John Crowley, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.
Module Objective: To understand the role of heritage in contemporary studies.
Module Content: This module examines the meaning of heritage in contemporary societies. It will specifically deal with issues of conservation and representation. Important heritage landscapes continue to be threatened by modern development. By focusing on specific case studies, it will examine the value placed on heritage in society. The politics of heritage will also be explored. Questions of identity, nationalism, and multiculturalism are central then to any discussion of the geography of heritage.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Critically analyse the role of heritage in contemporary society.
  • Assess the importance of conservation in an urban context .
  • Interpret and evaluate the significance of a series of heritage landscapes.
  • Apply the principles of good interpretation to museum exhibitions and galleries.
  • Discuss the role of heritage in a divided society.
  • Examine and question the extent to which specific aspects of Irish heritage have been 'commodified'.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

AR2045 Introduction to Archaeological Fieldwork

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): AR1001 or AR2200 or AR2111
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 35 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.
Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Mr Nick Hogan, Department of Archaeology; Ms Connie Kelleher, Department of Archaeology.
Module Objective: To provide students with the practical knowledge necessary to understand and apply the methods and principles of archaeological fieldwork, including field survey, excavation and underwater archaeology.
Module Content: This course aims to introduce students to the principles and methods of archaeological field survey. The student will be introduced to the different ways archaeologists collect survey information in the field. Topics covered include the organisation of archaeology in Ireland; the legal framework for Irish archaeology and heritage protection; documentary and map studies; and many different approaches to site investigation, from the use of aerial reconnaissance to geophysical survey. Students are required to carry out a field survey project. The course then moves on to examine excavation practice in modern archaeology, ending with an overview of underwater archaeology detailing its history and development. Fieldtrips are an integral part of the module.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify and review the sources used in archaeological field survey in Ireland.
  • Apply basic archaeological field survey and monument description techniques
  • Collate cartographic, documentary and field information with other sources, to produce reports on field monuments.
  • Assess the overall approach to archaeological excavation and the methodologies involved.
  • Trace the history and development of underwater archaeology in Ireland and abroad.
  • Examine current practice and legislation in respect to underwater archaeology in Ireland.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Field-Survey Project 120 marks; 1 x Class exam 60 marks; Fieldtrip participation 20 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Written submissions as prescribed by the Department).

ZY4020 Temperate Marine Biology

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 33.
Pre-requisite(s): BL3001, AE3016
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 6 x 1day(s) Fieldwork (Minimum 9 hours per day); 9 x 1hr(s) Lectures (during residential fieldcourse).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.
Lecturer(s): Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.
Module Objective: This module will be a week-long residential fieldcourse. This module will build on previous knowledge gained at 2nd and 3rd Year and provide students with the opportunity for in depth study of a range of marine habitats.
Module Content: The course will examine the fauna and flora of rocky shores, sandy shores and subtidal habitats. Students will gain an understanding of the key processes influencing life in these intertidal and subtidal habitats. In addition the students will gain experience of identifying larval stages, plankton and meiofauna. Furthermore, the students will design and undertake a short project at the end of the course utilising their experience in one of the habitats to gain experience of project design and analysis.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify key organisms from intertidal rocky and sandy shores as well as subtidal habitats.
  • Demonstrate the use of taxonomic keys to identify marine fauna and flora.
  • Outline a range of marine biological sampling techniques.
  • Recall key processes influencing marine life in these intertidal and subtidal habitats.
  • Design, conduct and analyse their own short research projects.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Two Practical Reports @ 50 marks each; Identification test 40 marks; Project write up 60 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

EC6106 Resourcing for Entrepreneurship and Innovation Part 1

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: Other (Lectures Presentations, Case Study Workshops and Practitioner).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Marie O'Connor, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Ms Marie O'Connor, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: To enable participants to identify the most effective and efficient modes of resourcing new, growing and established ventures for entrepreneurial and innovative processes.
Module Content: This module explores the resources necessary for entrepreneurship and innovation focusing specifically on the financial resource needs of entrepreneurs in evaluating a business opportunity. It explores the use of budgets and financial planning as a means of informing the decision making process of entrepreneurs at the earlier stages of the entrepreneurial process.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Understand the role of financial statements in a business.
  • Explore the role of budgeting in a business.
  • Evaluate the resource implications of a business opportunity.
  • Construct and interpret the various economic accounts used by organisations.
  • Construct and present the various economic accounts for a campus based business.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class exam).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

AD2862 Personal and Organisation Development

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 24.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (class based lectures and workshops); 2 x 1hr(s) Other (coaching sessions with internal organisation coach); 16hr(s) Practicals (practical assignments (via internal coach in organisation)); Directed Study (self-directed study, guided readings, case studies, work based project); Other (independent reflective learning through learning log).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Management and Marketing.
Module Objective: This module will enable participants to identify, specify and plan their own personal learning in line with their own objectives and specific career goals. It will also introduce students to the key concept of knowledge management and will enable them to conduct a work-based research project utilising concepts, skills and experiences derived from prior learning in the programme.
Module Content: Introduction to knowledge management
Optimising Personal Development Planning - PDP
Career Development.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Make effective plans and decisions in relation to formal personal development planning (PDP)
  • Define the basic concepts of knowledge management
  • Conduct small scale research and analyse the findings through extrapolating meaningful conclusions
  • Evaluate and recommend options for improvement or change based on outcome of research
  • Introduce the recommendations that have been made within the context of the organisation
  • Present data in a clear and logical manner using charts, diagrams etc. as appropriate.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Personal Development Plan, 20 marks; 1 x 4,000-5,000 word work based project, 160 marks; Oral Examination through Presentation, 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

PY4110 Stars and the Interstellar Medium

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): PY3109
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Frank Peters, Department of Physics.
Lecturer(s): Prof Paul Callanan, Department of Physics.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the physics of stars and other Galactic objects.
Module Content: Star formation, stellar atmospheres, radiative transfer, nebulae, dust,
supernova remnants, degenerate stars, stellar black holes, accretion physics.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Discuss in a quantitative way the major constituents of our Galaxy.
  • Explain the fundamental Physics of thermonuclear fusion in stars, sources of stellar opacity, the interstellar medium, radiatively excited nebulae, shockwaves.
  • Apply numerical and computational techniques in solving problems related to these topics.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (10 assignments, 2 marks each).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

NU6082 Principles and Practices of Recovery (Working in Partnership with Families)

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 25hr(s) Lectures (Workshops; Group Discussions; Tutorials); 75hr(s) Other (Course Work and Self directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Moira O'Donovan, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To expand students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and competence in the process of working in partnership with families of people experiencing mental health problems, using the principles and practices of the recovery approach.
Module Content: Partnership - a framework for working with families, families' experiences of caring; the principles and practices of engaging with families (collaborating, bridge building); family focused assessments, how families can help themselves in their own recovery, ways to work collaboratively with families.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Apply the principles and processes of recovery focused engagement and assessment with families when a member is experiencing mental health problems
  • Critically analyse research evidence that examines effective approaches for working with families
  • Discriminate and select assessment strategies which are appropriate and sensitive to families, their situation, setting, and context
  • Appraise and incorporate ways of working with families in their everyday practice that may assist families in their journey towards recovery
  • Integrate the principles and practices of partnership working into their current work with service users and their families/carers.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1,500 word assignment).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revise and resubmit 1,500 word assignment, as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.).

MU2063 Tin Whistle 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Year-long performance course to allow for growth of skills and adequate rehearsal time prior to the final assessed performance).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Workshops.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Mitchell Ingoldsby, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To develop performance skills on tin whistle.
Module Content: Group tuition in tin whistle performance.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Successfully execute a tin whistle performance at the relevant level of competence and in an appropriate style.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of tin whistle performance style.
  • Discuss the issues surrounding the performance practice of select genres.
  • Where appropriate, demonstrate an ability to perform sympathetically within the context of a group.
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the act of performance.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment (class participation), 40; Final Performance Examination, 60).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed performance examinations must be retaken as prescribed by the Department).

CS6312 Mobile Devices and Systems

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dan Emanoil Grigoras, Department of Computer Science.
Lecturer(s): Dr Dan Emanoil Grigoras, Department of Computer Science.
Module Objective: Give the students a thorough presentation of the mobile devices platforms: hardware including networking technologies, operating systems, programming.
Module Content: Understanding the features of mobile devices is a key aspect of their effective use. We will analyse hardware resource management, power saving strategies, then operating systems for sensors such as Tiny OS, Mantis, Windows Mobile, Symbian OS. Programming applications for mobile devices will be taught using Java ME, CLDC and MIDP. Bluetooth and IEEE 802.11 will be discussed as networking enabling technologies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Analyse and design mobile devices architecture and scarce resources management, especially battery power
  • Analyse mobile operating systems, the process/thread/active object models and management
  • Use MIDlet programming model and programme mobile applications
  • Use Bluetooth and IEEE 802.11 technologies for networking.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Mid-Term Examination 30 marks, I x End of Module Examination 30 marks; 10 x Lab Assignments, 3.5 marks each; 1 Paper Review, 5 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (corresponding to Mid-Term Examination and End of Module Examination) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by the Module Coordinator).

NU5007 Acute and Chronic Wound Care for Healthcare Professionals

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures (and will also include group discussion/work, video and practical workshops); 75 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Siobhan Murphy, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To critically assess, manage and evaluate acute and chronic wounds along a trajectory of wound healing in the current health care environment.
Module Content: Strategies for practicing effective wound management within a multidisciplinary healthcare environment. Programme participants will be required to reflect on practice to identify strengths and weaknesses in supporting the wound management role of the health professional.Indicative module content:
The knowledge skills and understanding required to assess, plan, implement and evaluate the care of patients with wounds is specialised and will be discussed/debated from an evidence based perspective in this module. Lectures will be presented by the multi disciplinary team and supported by interactive practical workshops. Students will also engage in developing an independent project and assignment preparation.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Perform a wound assessment and be able to identify tissue type(s) and phase(s) of wound healing.
  • Formulate a wound management plan from holistic assessment and re-assessment.
  • Select appropriate dressings and/or wound care technologies to be applied.
  • Identify and treat abnormalities in relation to woundcare.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( 1 x 1,000 word Treatment Plan - 60 marks; Computer-based Knowledge Assessment - 40 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery).

EH6044 Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): PG6009
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Tutorials, seminars, self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ali Khashan, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Lecturer(s): Dr Ali Khashan, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health; Dr Sinead O'Neill, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Staff, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Module Objective: This course is designed to provide students with quantitative and qualitative skills to conduct a meta-analysis.
Module Content: Formulation of study hypothesis, literature search, evaluation of study quality, statistical methods for meta-analysis.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Formulate a research question
  • Develop a study proposal
  • Assess quality of clinical trials and observational studies
  • Design a study form and collect data
  • Conduct data analysis using various statistical models
  • Demonstrate an understanding of potential bias and applications of meta-analysis
  • Prepare a structured report.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Meta-analysis - 80 marks, Presentation - 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for the Presentation is carried forward; students failing the Meta-Analysis must repeat, as prescribed by the Department.

ML2001 Introductory Molecular Biology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 250.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 2 x 4hr(s) Practicals; 1 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (laboratory-based).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Rosemary O'Connor, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Lecturer(s): Prof Rosemary O'Connor, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology; Prof Douwe Van Sinderen, School of Microbiology; Dr Sinead Kerins, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology; Ms Carmel Shortiss, School of Microbiology.
Module Objective: To provide an introduction to Molecular Biology.
Module Content: Genes and Genomes. DNA replication, DNA repair, RNA transcription and processing. Genetic code, and protein synthesis. Gene regulation, lac operon. Gene cloning, the tools and strategies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its applications.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Compare and contrast the structure of the nucleic acids, DNA and RNA and prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes.
  • Describe the molecular mechanisms of replication, transcription, translation.
  • Describe the different types of post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications.
  • Describe the causes and nature of DNA mutations, the pathways used to repair DNA damage, and the consequences of failing to repair DNA damage.
  • Describe the structure of an operon and how its expression can be regulated.
  • Identify gene regulation and understand a number of different mechanisms of regulation.
  • Identify and understand some Molecular Biological technologies, e.g. PCR, cloning, Southern blotting.
  • Demonstrate competence in performing basic Molecular Biology and Microbiology techniques and understanding their basis and application.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Laboratory Practical Work, 10 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Written and MCQ) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Written and MCQ) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (The laboratory practical mark is carried forward.).

ME6008 Robotics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Continuous Assessment - Project on Analysis of Kinematic Systems).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Lecturer(s): Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Module Objective: To provide an insight into robotic structures and their associated components and control.
Module Content: Perspective transformations; Palletizing and depalletizing; Basic configurations of serial robots; Spatial descriptions and transformations; Forward kinematics; Inverse kinematics; Continuous path control; Jacobians; Trajectory generation of robots and mechatronic systems.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Utilize homogenous transformations to solve engineering problems in applications such as palletizing and depalletizing.
  • Analyze a wide variety of previously unseen robotic structures including frame assignment and forward kinematic analysis, principally for the purpose of hand matrix derivation.
  • Develop inverse kinematic equations and perform numerical solutions of inverse kinematics problems for robotic structures.
  • Write a detailed engineering report based on a software-based project (utilizing Mathematica), in which the forward and inverse kinematics of prescribed robots are investigated in detail.
  • Formulate interpolation-based strategies for trajectory generation for robots and other automation and servo-based systems.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (Project Report on a Mathematica-based analysis of selected robotic structures 20 marks; In-class test(s) 5 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (15 minutes reading time) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (15 minutes reading time) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

AC4405 Derivatives Valuation

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Tutorials (Up to 10).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mark Mulcahy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Prof Mark Hutchinson, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: The objective of this module is to further examine derivatives encountered in practice and provide a theoretical framework for their pricing and implementation.
Module Content: Option Pricing, Volatility, Hedging and Trading, Interest Rate Derivative Pricing, Credit Derivatives, Weather Derivatives.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Derive and apply the binomial option pricing model to price derivatives.
  • Derive and use the Black Scholes option pricing model to price derivatives.
  • Demonstrate the importance of volatility term structure and smile when pricing derivatives.
  • Estimate the "Greeks" for derivatives.
  • Make informed hedging decisions.
  • Outline the usefulness of credit, weather and others in derivatives markets.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

LL6002 World Literature

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12hr(s) Workshops; 24hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.
Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German, plus staff from School of Languages.
Module Objective: To investigate and discuss recent and current developments including historical precursors of the theoretical discourse on literature, focussing on concepts such as authorship, the literary subject, transnational literature, world literature and literary neo-humanism.
Module Content: Paradigms, such as ideological criticism, psychoanalytical semiotism, poststructuralism, deconstructivism, feminism and postcolonialism have dominated the global discourse of literary criticism for half a century, they share one common fact, namely that they radically question, dispute and deconstruct cultural confinements of human identity, be they ideological, societal, national, philosophical or gender. In recent developments they have inspired new approaches to think and describe human subjectivity through literary and aesthetic means, unaffected by such confinements, confiding in their transgression, or advocating a sensitised awareness of the transcultural or subcultural, the corporeal and sensual of the human condition. The course concentrates on a selection of key texts in this context, both historical and current, by authors such as Nietzsche and Artaud, Sartre, Adorno, Heidegger, Bataille, Barthes, Blanchot, Levinas, Derrida, Agamben, Kafka, Coetzee and others. A comparative discussion of European and Asian approaches to art and aesthetics will also be included.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Reproduce core ideas of recent literary theories and concepts of world literature
  • Reflect critically on current developments of literary criticism
  • Discuss, analyse and interpret selected texts.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (One 5000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

IR6011 Identities and Representations: Medieval and Early Modern Ireland

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (specific reading assigned for each seminar).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kevin Murray, Department of Early and Medieval Irish.
Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.
Module Objective: This module comprises a focused analysis of the theme of 'identities and representations' as it relates to medieval and early modern Ireland.
Module Content: This is one of the core modules of the MA in Irish Studies: Identities and Representations. Seminar-based case studies look at how identities were negotiated during this formative period. We begin with St Patrick, the first writer to describe himself as Irish, and take in, for example, the beginnings of Irish literary culture, medieval art and archaeology, Viking and Anglo-Norman identities, and representations of the Irish by early modern writers such as Edmund Spenser.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • analyse the complex processes through which identities are formed and transformed with particular reference to medieval and early modern Ireland
  • investigate how people in medieval and early modern Ireland chose to represent themselves
  • investigate how people in medieval and early modern Ireland were represented by others
  • apply a range of methodologies required for undertaking research in medieval and early modern Irish Studies
  • present a research paper to an audience of peers.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay: 130 marks; Presentation: 70 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

EH6038 Applied Research for Gerontology and Rehabilitation

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 48hr(s) Lectures; Tutorials; Seminars; Other (directed learning); 180hr(s) Other (self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zubair Kabir, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Lecturer(s): Dr Zubair Kabir, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health; Dr Tony Fitzgerald, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health; Staff, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the epidemiological approach to studying the distribution and determinants of disease in older people. To provide an understanding of the applications of statistical methods in gerontology and rehabilitation research. That students gain the knowledge, skills and ethical appreciation appropriate to the design, undertaking and evaluation of research in diverse settings.
Module Content: Definition and uses of epidemiology. Measures of disease frequency (prevalence and incidence). Chance, confounding and bias in studies. Introduction to descriptive and analytical study designs (case studies, case series studies, cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies, randomised controlled trials). Measures of association used in research studies (including odds ratios and relative risks). Critical appraisal of rehabilitation studies. The relevance of statistical methods in research, with real examples. Descriptive statistics and graphical representations. Estimation and Hypothesis Testing. Qualitative research methodologies and study design. Qualitative data collection, analysis and reporting methods. Action research methodologies and health impact assessment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Define research and bio-statistical terms
  • Describe and summarise quantitative data using frequency tables, numerical measures, histograms and boxplots
  • Calculate and interpret measures of association from data collected during rehabilitation studies
  • Describe the basic design, strengths and limitations of descriptive and analytical studies
  • Compute and interpret confidence intervals for a single mean or proportion
  • Formulate hypotheses, interpret and derive conclusions from SPSS output for comparing means and proportions
  • List and discuss the strengths and limitations of a range of qualitative research methodologies and methods
  • Design, undertake and report on a basic qualitative study
  • Critically appraise reports of qualitative gerontological or rehabilitation research.research.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 1.5hr Epidemiology In-class Test - 70 marks; 1 x 1.5 hr statistics in class text - 70 marks, Research Project 60 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of failed In-class test(s)) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

PY3104 Statistical Thermodynamics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): PY2104
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Denise Gabuzda, Department of Physics.
Lecturer(s): Prof Albert Ruth, Department of Physics.
Module Objective: To further develop the students' knowledge in thermal physics.
Module Content: Phase transitions, non-ideal gases, chemical reactions, binary systems, low-temperature physics, semiconductor statistics, kinetic theory, heat conduction equation.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe and analyse the major topics of thermal physics.
  • Show a strong understanding of the terms, conventions, laws and units of measurement appropriate to thermal physics.
  • Derive and utilise the relationships associated with thermal physics.
  • Utilise the mathematical equations associated with thermal physics in solving both familiar and unfamiliar numerical problems associated with this field of physics.
  • Identify current research efforts in the field of thermal physics and appraise these experimental efforts in terms of the theory developed.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (10 assignments, 2 marks each).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

LW1153 Criminal Law

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.
Lecturer(s): Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law; Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law; Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.
Module Objective: To familiarise students with the general principles of criminal liability and the substantive provision of Statutory and Common Law offences.
Module Content: The module examines and analyses the general principles of criminal liability, mens rea and actus reus, general defences, and considers both the content and context of substantive criminal offences.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Classify elements of a crime as mens rea or actus reus
  • Interpret statutory provisions and related case law
  • Trace the development of criminal principles
  • Apply criminal principles to factual scenarios
  • Appraise the place of morality and policy in the criminal law
  • Recommend reform proposals for the areas of law covered.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

OG6005 Basic Gynaecology

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 18.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 14hr(s) Lectures; 12hr(s) Workshops (Includes Communication Statistics, PowerPoint presentation, Stress Management); 22hr(s) Directed Study (Includes preparation of paper critique & case study, practise & analysis of interview technique & presentation skills).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helen Doran, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Visiting Lecturers.
Module Objective: To enhance students communication and presentation skills
To teach high-quality gynaecological history taking and examination
To introduce students to basic statistics, audit and research methodology and strategies
To review pelvic embryology and anatomy with reference to obstetric and gynaecological practice
To introduce students to risk-management
To educate students on ethical principles and identify ethical issues commonly encountered in clinical
practice.
Module Content: Effective communication / What women want
Gynae history-taking and examination
Explaining medical conditions / breaking bad news
Clinical diagnosis based on history and examination
Powerpoint presentation
Essay writing
Normal sexual development
Adolescent gynaecology
Menstruation and the menopause - normal and abnormal
Pelvic anatomy
Embryology relating to pelvic structures
The audit cycle
Basic statistical concepts
Research methodology and strategies
Risk management in gynaecology
Litigation in gynaecology and medical negligence
The medical council
Ethical research
Confidentiality and consent.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate history taking and comprehensive gynaecological examination with the ability to describe expected findings in the presence of different gynaecological conditions
  • Demonstrate a patient-centred approach to explaining medical conditions and breaking bad news
  • Describe normal sexual development and the HPO axis
  • Describe the hormonal and physiological changes that occur during the menstrual cycle
  • Demonstrate an understanding of disorders of adolescent development
  • Display a detailed understanding of pelvic anatomy and embryological remnants
  • Describe the audit cycle and how it is of benefit in clinical practice
  • Describe the principles of consent and confidentiality in clinical practice
  • Review a research paper with regard to its ethical appropriateness and statistical methodology.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (OSCE - 140, Attendance - 10, presentation - 10, assessments - 2 x 20).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% OSCE & continuous assessment must be passed independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Failed OSCE of a module in the Summer can be repeated in the Autumn. There is no supplemental exam for students failing continuous assessment in the summer.).

FT1800 Food Technology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 8.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 20hr(s) Lectures (plus field-trip visit to a food manufacturing plant).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Lecturer(s): Mr David Waldron, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the basic principles of food processing technology.
Module Content: An introduction to food technology. Food ingredients. Food packaging. Food legislation. Unit operations in food processing, separation techniques, heat treatments, emulsion technology, chilling, freezing, evaporation, drying, fermentation, food ingredients and additives, cleaning in the food industry, introduction to food safety and quality control.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Outline the main unit operations used in the food industry.
  • Describe centrifugal and membrane separation techniques.
  • Discuss emulsion technology.
  • Discuss food preservation techniques including, heat treatments, evaporation, drying, chilling and freezing.
  • Explain the principles and application of food fermentations.
  • Describe cleaning and CIP in the food industry.
  • Discuss the basic principles of food safety and quality control and food safety legislation.
  • Describe Good Manufacturing Practices for food production.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (in-class test).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Supplemental test.

AC6120 Professional Examination Report

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 3.
Teaching Methods: Other (Under the guidance of academic supervisors, drawn from Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems staff, students will carry out work towards 300 hours self directed study towards Professional Examinations.).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Mark Hutchinson, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To facilitate professional development participants will undertake an independent course of study towards Professional Examinations.
Module Content: Student centred course of study towards Professional Examinations guided by professional syllabus, designated readings and individual reflection. The work programme will be monitored by a UCC academic mentor. Students will be required to keep and submit a learning journal/reflective log.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Develop professional qualifications so as to enhance future career prospects;
  • Practise the application of business skills;
  • Transfer learning skills from the academic to professional environment;
  • Develop ability to learn independently.
  • Demonstrate understanding of ethical issues in finance.
Assessment: Students Must Submit a Learning Journal/Reflective Log. (3,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: Students Must Submit a Learning Journal/Reflective Log.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

ED4105 Conceptual Foundations in the Psychology and Sociology of Education

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (associated reading and research).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Karl Kitching, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin Cahill, School of Education; Dr Karl Kitching, School of Education.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the study and application of core constructs from the Psychology and Sociology of Education.
Module Content: Changing Societal Contexts Constructing Adolescence/Young People.
Educability: Perspectives, Practices and Structures which 'Fix' and 'Change' Ability Well-being, Identity and Development: Contexts and Challenges.
Perspectives on Learning: Influences and Implications.
The 'Good' Teacher and Teaching? Intentions, Processes and Outcomes of Teaching, Learning and Assessment.
Schools as Agents of Social Stratification/Inequality Reproduction: Structures of Class, Race-Ethnicity and Gender-Sexuality.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate familiarity with key psychological and sociological constructs relating to student development and achievement.
  • Broadly evaluate critical debate around these constructs.
  • Apply this analysis and evaluation to inform and develop their school practice.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000-4000 word thematic research project).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Education).

EC3210 Principles of Insurance for Finance

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (Group One will take this module in Semester 2, Group Two will take this module in Semester 1).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: To introduce the fundamental concepts in risk, uncertainty and insurance with applications to financial markets.
Module Content: Risk and insurance. Role of information asymmetry. Adverse selection and moral hazard. Risk management in financial markets.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify risk faced by individuals and businesses and choose appropriate risk management techniques for these risks
  • Calculate risks given certain criteria and demonstrate how these risks can be reduced through diversification and/or risk pooling
  • Distinguish issues that reduce the insurability of risk and discuss how insurers can counteract these issues via contractual provisions
  • Apply risk management principles to financial markets.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Coursework Individual 1 x Essay 3000 words (20 marks), 1 x Inclass Test (80 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

AP3110 Psychological Therapies

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and group discussions); 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.
Module Objective: To develop a basic understanding of the main theories underlying a range of psychological therapies and consider the application of these theories in individual socail situations.
Module Content: This module will look at the origins of the therapeutic approach, an overview of the main
perspectives that informs practice and will consider a number of specific approaches to counselling psychology and psychotherapy including multi-cultural counselling.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe factors relevant to the emergence of the field of counselling and psychotherapy.
  • Recognise and discuss key factors and values pertinent to therapeutic work.
  • Reflect on the differences between the main approaches to counselling psychology and psychotherapy.
  • Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of at least one specific approach to counselling and psychotherapy.
  • Summarise the development of personal understanding of counselling and psychotherapy during the module.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

CS2502 Logic Design

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 120.
Pre-requisite(s): CS1101
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Frank Boehme, Department of Computer Science.
Lecturer(s): Dr Frank Boehme, Department of Computer Science.
Module Objective: Students should learn the ideas that underlie the design of digital circuits.
Module Content: Combination circuits: design and optimisation; Sequential circuits: design and optimisation; description languages; CAD.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Perform formula manipulations in Boolean Logic;
  • Design digital combinational circuits from a target specification down to gate level;
  • Design optimal combinational circuits (with minimum number of logic gates). If there is only one output line and not more than 4 input lines then this should be achieved without the help of software tools;
  • Design sequential circuits from a target specification down to state diagram level. Sub-optimal results might be achieved at gate level;
  • Reverse-engineer small logic circuits which are given on gate level.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (5 Laboratory Assignments, 4 marks each).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

MG6204 Capstone Module Seminars, Workshops and Lean Black Belt Project

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10.
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 Lectures (Seminars and Group Work); Other (Distance Learning (on-line materials and e-monitoring)); Directed Study (in-classroom assignment instructions and on-line assignment instructions and feedback).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joan Buckley, Department of Management and Marketing.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Management and Marketing.
Module Objective: The development and implementation of a Lean philosophy at supply chain level requires the ability to integrate strategic vision and operational capability. This module highlights the complexities involved in the development of supply chain strategies and the use of tools and techniques at organisation-wide and supply chain levels.
Module Content: Keynote speakers of international standing to address key strategic and operational supply chain issues.
Interactive workshops and seminars that address the linkages between the modules delivered.
Completion of a Lean project that delivers significant benefit to the student and their employer.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Apply tools and techniques to achieve optimal value improvements in supply chain processes
  • Resolve the complexities inherent in the use of Lean tools and techniques and supply chain management.
  • Develop and implement a Lean project that achieves significant sustainable operational and supply chain improvements.
  • Reflect on the learning experience in terms of personal professional development.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Compilation and submission of Black Belt Project, including executive summary (5,000 words)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmit written assignment.

CC1113 Celtic Literature

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 200.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kevin Murray, Department of Early and Medieval Irish.
Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin Murray, Department of Early and Medieval Irish.
Module Objective: The largest and most important component is Early and Medieval Irish literature. Its epic tales are studied in translation.
Module Content: The heroic literature of the Celtic countries with a particular emphasis on Ireland. The primary aim of this module is to investigate and assess the early heroic literature of the Celtic countries, with a focus on Irish texts from the Ulster Cycle and in particular on Táin Bó Cúailnge 'The Cattle-Raid of Cooley', the most important extant epic from medieval Ireland. On completion of this module, students should be able to outline the corpus of medieval Celtic literature, contextualise this literature within the societies that created it, and critically evaluate the extant material (which is studied in translation).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Examine and assess the early heroic literature of the Celtic countries;
  • Discuss the literature and the manuscript sources in detail;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the themes of early heroic literature, e.g. the warrior ethos, the role of women, kingship, etc.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1hr Class Assessment).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment(s) in lieu of any failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment).

FR1103 Foundation Course in Written and Oral French and Introduction to French for Business

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): Common European Framework level A2+ (recommended level: HC1 Leaving Certificate or equivalent)
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (72 Written and Oral classes).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Paul Hegarty, Department of French.
Lecturer(s): Ms Veronique Grabe, Department of French; Staff, Department of French.
Module Objective: To consolidate and to extend knowledge of French; to provide training in the use of French and in the main skills in communication (speaking, listening, reading and writing); to provide an introduction to French for business. By the end of this module, students should reach Common European Framework level B1.
Module Content: This module provides students with the opportunity to develop both their skills in communication and their understanding of the fundamental structures of French. It also provides an introduction to the use of French for business purposes. The module is taught in small groups with full scope for student participation. In each class, French is the medium of teaching. By the end of the year, students are expected to be able to express themselves simply and accurately in French and to sustain general conversation in French.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • comprehend an audio recording of clear standard French on familiar matters;
  • enter into a general conversation on topics of personal interest and aspects of contemporary French society;
  • describe and analyse a visual document;
  • write answers in French to questions to show their understanding of an extract of contemporary literature or journalism;
  • write a coherent, structured and grammatically accurate text of over 250 words, using a range of tenses and verb forms and a level of vocabulary reflecting their work during the year;
  • compose a variety of basic business letters in French.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class tests, 20 marks each); Oral Assessment 70 marks (30 marks of which for aural component).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. An overall pass mark in Continuous Assessment is carried forward to the Autumn examination. Continuous Assessment which received an overall fail mark must be repeated by means of a 1 hour departmental test which will take place near the time of the oral examination. An overall pass mark in the Oral examination (ie, oral and aural) is carried forward to the Autumn examination. Both elements of an overall failed Oral examination (ie, oral and aural) must be repeated in the Autumn examination. Students should consult departmental notice-board for lists of candidates and dates.

ED4106 Conceptual Foundations in Curriculum and Assessment

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen O'Brien, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen O'Brien, School of Education; Staff, School of Education.
Module Objective: To develop critical engagement with curriculum and assessment theories, concepts, policies and practice and plan for effective school/classroom responses.
Module Content: The Curriculum and Assessment module engages in the critical analysis of such areas as: Curriculum Theory and Policy Changes in Practice; Assessment Theory and Policy Changes in Practice; Ideology of the Curriculum; and Pedagogical Insights into the Curriculum.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Display knowledge and understanding of diverse curriculum and assessment constructs and explore their learning implications for school and classroom practices
  • Demonstrate a keen awareness of current problems and new insights informed by curriculum and assessment research studies and engage these in new cultural practices that promote pupil involvement and achievement
  • Critically explore the latest curriculum and assessment policy changes and investigate their impact on cultural practices in the school and classroom
  • Demonstrate a number of methodological protocols and practices, derived from curriculum and assessment areas of inquiry, in support of pupil development and achievement
  • Select from developed skills across curriculum and assessment areas of inquiry and nurture emerging skills to a satisfactory level
  • Act in diverse situated contexts in a manner that reflects an informed curriculum and assessment stance, particularly with respect to different and unpredictable contexts
  • Plan for and act upon some change practice to their teaching, in the interest of good learning processes
  • Demonstrate awareness and a more informed personal/professional stance vis-à-vis politico-ideological constructions of curriculum and assessment
  • Scrutinise normalised relations in society and school with respect to curriculum and assessment assumptions and values and, consequently, develop some personal/professional critique with a view to communicating effectively to specialised and non-specialised audiences alike.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000-4000 word action project).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Education).

AP1149 Introduction to Developmental and Social Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 392.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.
Lecturer(s): Ms Anna O'Reilly-Trace, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.
Module Objective: In this module you will learn about the findings and theories of developmental sciences and social psychology.
Module Content: An introduction to theories and research in social psychology focusing on the areas of social influence (e.g. inter-group behaviour and conformity), social relations (e.g. group identity and prosocial behaviour) and social thinking (e.g. attitudes and attribution). An introduction to theories and research in developmental psychology, covering selected aspects of perceptual, motor, cognitive, social and emotional development in childhood, adolescence and adulthood.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the key stages of human development across the lifespan: when they occur and what their characteristics are.
  • Identify the main forces (biological and social) that shape the course of human development. Demonstrate some understanding of how those forces interact with each other.
  • Describe controversies regarding the relative importance of different forces shaping the course of development (e.g. How important is parental upbringing, compared to genes, compared to peer influence)
  • Describe key theories that try to explain developmental changes
  • Evaluate those theories in the light of available evidence
  • Describe some key features of human social cognition (especially the fundamental attribution error and cognitive dissonance)
  • Describe Fiske's four social modes of cognition.
  • Critically evaluate explanations of human aggression and altruism that are commonly offered.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

SS2827 Gender, Sexuality, Development and Human Rights

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 6 x 3hr(s) Lectures (including discussion groups); 1 x 6hr(s) Lectures; 76hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rola Abu Zeid-O'Neill, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development, Staff, other related departments; Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: This module is an interdisciplinary course that explores gender issues within the context of development. It aims to emphasise: a) the ways in which gender and social relations influence differential access to, and control over, development resources and processes; b) the benefits and costs of development and global change for men and women of different nations, classes, races and ethnicities; c) the work of governments and development organisations, and their attempts to implement gender-sensitive interventions.
Module Content: This module presents insights into the diversity of ways in which sexuality and gender are understood, experienced, practiced, talked about and regulated in different social, (sub)cultural, political and historical contexts. Studying gender and sexuality as social constructions provides us with the opportunity to study the ways in which personal experience is connected to society at large and in which both gender and sexuality structure and are structured by broader socio-economic political and historical processes, in the context of globalisation and human rights.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Define the key concepts relating to gender, sexuality and ownership of development resources.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of evolution of approaches to gender and development.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with feminist perspectives on development and human rights intervention policies.
  • Gain a greater insight into and understanding of the relevance of gender and sexuality in development and human rights.
  • Have a basic understanding of gender analysis and some skills in use of gender analysis in project planning.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay, 80 marks; Class and group participation, 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Centre for Adult Continuing Educaion).

AN1006 Topographical Anatomy

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 45.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 16 x 2hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr André Toulouse, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience.
Lecturer(s): Dr André Toulouse, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience.
Module Objective: To achieve an understanding of the structure and function of those parts of the living human body relevant to dental practice.
Module Content: Structure and function of the head, neck and thorax. Overview of abdomen and pelvis. Structure-function relationships. Living anatomy.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify the anatomical structures on cadavers and in patients.
  • Relate anatomical structures to their function.
  • Differentiate anatomical variations and compare them with pathological changes in anatomical structures.
  • Apply knowledge to understand disorders and damage to anatomical structures.
  • Work in groups in Dissecting Room to develop communication skills.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 120 marks (MCQ, Shoart answer questions & essay questions); Continuous Assessment 80 marks (Topographical anatomy CA (Short answer questions 40 Marks), Topographical anatomy (spot examination 40 Marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral if required.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and In-class Examinations) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

EH6093 Introduction to Research Methods and Epidemiology (Online)

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 8.
Pre-requisite(s): MPH students to complete core module: EH6092 Introduction to Public Health (Online) Occupational Health Students to complete core module: EH6107 Principles and Practices of Occupational Health (Online)
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.
Teaching Methods: 72hr(s) Directed Study (Online self-directed learning); 48hr(s) Other (Online moderated activities); 40hr(s) Other (Written assignment reflection and development); 40hr(s) Directed Study (Reading).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zubair Kabir, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Lecturer(s): Dr Zubair Kabir, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health; Dr Tony Fitzgerald, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the epidemiological approach to studying the distribution and determinants of disease in populations so that students gain the knowledge, skills and ethical appreciation to the study design and to the evaluation of public health research in diverse settings. To provide an understanding of the theory and application of statistical methods in public health, with examples from recent research.
Module Content: The modules has two broad strands: Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Strand 1:
Basic concepts of epidemiology, measuring of disease frequency and disease association; causal inference - confounding, bias and effect modification; epidemiological study designs and critical appraisal of published epidemiological papers.
Strand 2:
The application of statisical methods in health sciences, statistical analysis using Stata.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Define epidemiology, its uses, and to critically assess basic epidemiological terms and concepts;
  • Calculate and interpret measures of disease frequency and measures of association from data collected during epidemiological studies;
  • Describe the basic design, strengths and limitations of observational and experimental epidemiological studies;
  • Critically appraise, interpret various epidemiological studies in order to design basic epidemiological studies from a research protocol perspective;
  • Describe and summarise quantitative data using frequency tables, numerical measures and graphs;
  • Apply inferential methods, including formulating hypotheses, constructing and interpreting confidence intervals;
  • Apply and interpret methods for correlation and linear regression analyses;
  • Interpret the results of statistical analyses and critically evaluate the use of statistics in the medical literature; and
  • Perform fundamental statistical analysis using statistical software.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (MCQs 50 marks; Online Activities 50 marks; Written Assessment(s) 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

LW1104 Foundations of the Legal System

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.
Lecturer(s): Ms Colette O'Donovan, Department of Law.
Module Objective: To provide students with a foundation for further legal studies and to analyse the legal system from functional and critical perspectives.
Module Content: Sources of Irish Law; Precedent and the Development of Case Law; The Legislative Process and Statutory Interpretation; The Courts; Law Reform.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify the sources of law and their relative positions of authority within the Irish Legal System;
  • Criticise judicial decisions in light of the doctrine of precedent;
  • Assess the importance of judicial independence;
  • Describe techniques of statutory interpretation;
  • Differentiate between the first instance and appellate functions of the courts;
  • Evaluate the legislative process in Ireland;
  • Engage with current political debates as they pertain to the above matters.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

MU6043 History and Theory of Ethnomusicology

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 8 x 3hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Juniper Lynn Hill, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Dr Juniper Lynn Hill, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To deal with the intellectual history and the theory of scholarship in ethnomusicology.
Module Content: A comprehensive exploration of the intellectual history and theory of the discipline through an examination of its roots in comparative musicology and the anthropology of music, and the development of the interdisciplinary scope of the subject in more recent times.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the intellectual history of the discipline of Ethnomusicology.
  • Apply theoretical models from ethnomusicology and related disciplines to new data.
  • Display critical research, writing and presentation skills.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (short writing assignments, 120; 2 minor projects, 40 each).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

DH1001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities I

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.
Module Objective: Introduce basic core concepts in Digital Humanities and lay foundations for collaboration in DH work and further digital scholarship.
Module Content: This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital humanities history and theory. It will lay the foundations for subsequent modules by introducing students to a variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital humanities practice. Students will explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the changing nature of scholarship, on communities of practice, peer review, collaboration and "critical friends". The changing nature of academic debate and the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work and topics such as digital rights management, licensing and copyright will be introduced. Students will engage with local, national and international networks, and begin to explore the creation of a digital "presence".
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Create a personal portfolio of critical digital writing comprising a range of media, including text, video and mixed media
  • Collaborate to create a team web artifact (website, journal, video, map, or other tool as agreed with teaching team)
  • Recognise the broad extent of conceptual issues in the field
  • Explain the rationale behind practices like blogging, open access publishing, distant reading and visualization
  • Explore issues in knowledge representation
  • Focus on the creation of new knowledge environments
  • Demonstrate knowledge of some of the major debates in digital humanities
  • Participate in the collaborative nature of digital humanities
  • Participate in active discussion on issues in DH within the class and in the broader DH community.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individual portfolio of reflective digital critical writing (30 marks); team digital artifact creation (30 marks); Presentation on new knowledge environments (15 marks); Active creation and participation in virtual and social networks (15 marks); participation, engagement and contribution in all media, and face to face (10 marks). Equivalent to about 4,000 words in total).).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Continuous Assessment.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

MH6102 The Ethics of Cure and Care

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 48hr(s) Lectures (Group Discussion/Field Trips/Workshops/Tutorials); 152hr(s) Other (Coursework and Self Directed Learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joan McCarthy, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: Development of skills in ethical reasoning and decision-making and the application of these skills to the analysis of case studies that arise in end-of-life care.
Module Content: Issues addressed from an ethical, professional and legal perspective include: patient autonomy and its limits; pain management; withholding and withdrawing treatment (e.g. artificial nutrition and hydration, resuscitation, ventilation); patient advocacy and professional integrity; moral distress and moral climate; selected case scenarios; relevant empirical research in end-of-life care.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Critically discuss key ethical issues as they arise in position papers and selected case studies in end-of-life care.
  • Distinguish between challenges that arise among different patient populations (e.g. competent adults, older people, patients with disabilities) and in different healthcare settings (e.g. acute care hospitals, nursing homes, neonatal units).
  • Delineate key ethical concepts, positions and arguments that arise in relation to death and dying.
  • Critically evaluate current ethical approaches to: respect for patient autonomy and its limits; the management of pain in end-of-life settings; withholding and withdrawing treatment.
  • Summarise relevant empirical ethics research in relation to health professionals¿ involvement in end-of-life decision-making.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word written assignment).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit essay, as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery).

EC6601 Econometrics: Theory and Applications 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Eakins, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Dr John Eakins, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: To further participants' knowledge of econometric theory and facilitate the preparation for economic research by examining a number of extensions to the classical linear regression model.
Module Content: Techniques covered include Qualitative choice modelling, Panel Data Analysis, Seemingly Unrelated Regressions, Macroeconomics Time Series Analysis, Financial Time Series Analysis, Instrumental Variables.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the theoretical background to a range of different econometric models.
  • Estimate cross sectional, panel and time series econometric models using relevant software.
  • Carry out an applied econometric research project which would include the interpretation and evaluation of econometric results and hypothesis tests.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word project 40 marks;).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

SS2008 Social Work 1

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rosemary R. Meade, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Hurley, School of Applied Social Studies; Ms Mairie Cregan, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To provide a critical understanding of the development and provision of care in the community and the ensuing implications for social work practice.
Module Content: The ideological bases of caring will be discussed and the principles, policy and practice of community care will be explored with reference to Irish and European social work practice.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Trace the history of family welfare, from its ideological origins to tis place in contemporary Irish society.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the principles, policy and practice of community care in the State.
  • Explore the role of social work services, both statutory and voluntary in meeting the needs of individual and groups with society.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the demographic changes in Irish society over recent years and the challenges these changes generate for social work service delivery.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word portfolio).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board.

NU5093 Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Neonate 1

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 32.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2 and 3.
Teaching Methods: 70hr(s) Lectures; 130hr(s) Other (Group work: preparation for presentations; Self-Directed Learning; Recommended reading).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Geraldine McLoughlin, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To explore normal midwifery practice in pregnancy, labour and the postnatal period.
Module Content: Childbirth, normal life event, reproductive anatomy and physiology, pregnancy and antenatal care, transition to parenthood, labour and birth, care in normal labour, care of mother following birth, initial care and assessment of the newborn, postnatal care of mother and baby, infant feeding. Midwifery skills, health and safety.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the physiological and psychological processes of pregnancy, labour and the puerperium.
  • Analyse the role and responsibilities of the midwife in the provision of maternity care for women and their babies.
  • Critically explore the midwife's role in supporting women in normal childbirth and the factors which affect the mother's choices in infant care.
  • Discuss the relevance and appropriateness of evidence based literature and its application to midwifery care.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3 hour In-class Test: 200 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance and participation at all timetabled teaching activities, submission of written work.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resit 1 x 3 hour In-class Test.

CT6008 Dysphagia, Eating, Drinking and Swallowing

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (5 x 6hrs Problem-based tutorials; 180 hrs self directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helen Kelly, School of Clinical Therapies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Helen Kelly, School of Clinical Therapies; Staff, School of Clinical Therapies.
Module Objective: To enable students to evaluate recent research developments in the areas of dysphagia, eating, drinking and swallowing disorders in a variety of populations with dysphagia.
Module Content: Instrumental evaluation of swallowing; evidence based intervention techniques for children and adults; interdisciplinary practices in dysphagia management.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Critique assessment procedures in dysphagia, eating, drinking and swallowing.
  • Discuss the significance of recent progress in evidence-based interventions.
  • Compare and contrast the literature evidence on recent developments in assessment and intervention for dysphagia.
  • Explain the importance of interdisciplinary practices in the management of dysphagia.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (3000 word essay on a topic agreed with the module coordinator).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School), Marks in passed elements of Continuous Assessment are carried forward.

BD2001 Léann an Bhéaloidis

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Iosmheid 6, Uasmheid 50.
Pre-requisite(s): Ní hann dó.
Co-requisite(s): Ní hann dó.
Teaching Period(s): Seimeastar 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1 (h)uair(e) an chloig Léachtaí.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ciarán Ó Gealbháin, Roinn An Bhéaloidis.
Lecturer(s): Dr Ciarán Ó Gealbháin, Roinn An Bhéaloidis; Dr Stiofán Ó Cadhla, Roinn An Bhéaloidis.
Module Objective: Dul amach ar chúlra agus ar stair an bhéaloidis. Léann an tseanchais agus an bhéaloidis a rianú siar go dtí na préamhacha intleachtúla in Éirinn i léann na Gaeilge agus san Eoraip tré chéile. Comhthéacs agus bunús an léinn a phlé.
Module Content: Chonacthas an focal 'béaloideas' sa Ghaeilge chomh fada siar leis an seachtó céad déag ach níor ceapadh an focal Béarla 'folk-lore' go dtí 1846. Féachtar ar bhunús agus ar theacht chun cinn léann an bhéaloidis mar fhastaím, mar ábhar suime agus mar ábhar léinn in Éirinn agus san Eoraip. Cad iad na smaointí a threisigh le teacht chun cinn an léinn seo agus conas a samhlaíodh i réanna éagsúla é.
Learning Outcomes: Nuair a bheidh an modúl seo déanta ag na mic léinn beidh:
  • Scrúdú déanta ar bhunús léann an bhéaloideas.
  • Comhthéacsaí intleachtúla an bhéaloidis pléite.
  • Léamh déanta ar fhás tuiscintí móra an bhéaloidis.
  • Béaloideas na hÉireann agus na hEorpa pléite.
  • Curtha le cumas an mhic léinn anailís a dhéanamh ar chultúr.
Assessment: Marc ar fad 100: An obair a dheanfai i gcaitheamh na bliana 100 marc (1 x Aiste 2,500 focal).
Compulsory Elements: An obair a dhéanfaí i gcaitheamh na bliana.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Má bhíonn an ceacht / aiste / tionscnamh 7 lá déanach, nó féna bhun san, bainfear 5% den marc iomlán den marc atá ag dul don mac / iníon léinn. Má bhíonn an ceacht / aiste / tionscnamh 14 lá déanach, nó féna bhun san, bainfear 10% den marc iomlán den marc atá ag dul don mac / iníon léinn. Náid (0) an marc a bhronnfar ar aon cheacht / aiste / tionscnamh a bheidh 15 lá déanach, nó os a chionn san.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: Gan Scrúdú Scríofa Foirmiúil.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Ní thugtar ar aghaidh ach na marcanna sin a théann ar aon chuid den mheasúnú leanúnach ar éirigh leis an mac / iníon léinn ann. Má theipeann ar an mac / iníon léinn in aon chuid eile, ní foláir an chuid / na coda sin a dhéanamh in athuair (Aiste breise (1 x 2,500 focal) a sholáthar, de réir mar a theastaíonn ón Roinn).

CS1070 Introductory Python Programming for Digital Humanities

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Barry O'Sullivan, Department of Computer Science.
Lecturer(s): Prof Barry O'Sullivan, Department of Computer Science.
Module Objective: Introduce the basics of Python programming for Digital Humanities.
Module Content: Running Python scripts; Using a programming editor; Basic Python programming for processing strings and text files: variables, expressions, strings and lists, repetition and conditional statements; Numeric data; Functions; Introduction to processing text markup including XML in Python.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of computer programming;
  • Write and debug simple programs to search, alter and format strings and text documents;
  • Have an appreciation for the tasks involved in handling text that has been marked-up in XML.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (5 assignments worth 5 marks each; 1 Departmental Test worth 15 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

EN6047 Irish Culture: Colonial, Postcolonial Transnational

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Heather Laird, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Dr Heather Laird, School of English.
Module Objective: This module introduces students to the "colonial" as a critical category for reading the interaction of cultural politics and literary production in Ireland.
Module Content: Edward Said has argued that "one of the main strengths of postcolonial analysis is that it widens, instead of narrows, the interpretive perspective". This module introduces students to the "colonial" as a critical category for reading the interaction of cultural politics and literary production in Ireland. Students will study the work of such seminal anti-colonial scholars and activists as Frantz Fanon, in particular writings that explore the relationship between culture and colonialism, as well as examples of Irish postcolonial criticism. With regard to primary texts, students will consider work written from a number of imperial/colonial positions, beginning with early texts by the colonial administrators, Edmund Spenser and Sir John Davies, through nineteenth- and twentieth-century essays, poems, drama, and novels, written from both sides of the colonial and sectarian divide, up to contemporary Northern Irish 'Troubles' fiction.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Critically read and analyse a selection of writings/films written/directed from a number of imperial/colonial positions
  • Relate the set texts to one another and to other examples of Irish writing and film
  • Discuss the cultural and historical background which framed the emergence of these set texts
  • Engage critically and constructively with the views of a selection of anti-colonial/postcolonial critics
  • Define terms and concepts central to anti-colonial/postcolonial criticism
  • Participate in class and group discussions
  • Deliver effective presentations
  • Formulate an independent argument about the relationship between culture and colonialism in Ireland, drawing on and contributing to existing scholarship
  • Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

HI6018 Digital History

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 24.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Critical reading and study and reflective, collaborative online discussion of key texts and artefacts.).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.
Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.
Module Objective: To provide students with skills to make appropriate use of digital tools in their research and writing.
Module Content: Digital history and humanities, aims, objectives, philosophies, approaches; debates and controversies. Capturing and analysing textual and quantitative sources using text scanning, markup, spreadsheet and database tools as appropriate.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Know about the range of digital technologies available for analysis and writing in history.
  • Know about the development of digital techniques in historical scholarship, and the debates about the appropriate use of computing in historical research.
  • Know how to accurately create a digital version of a primary historical source using appropriate methods.
  • Demonstrate an ability to use digital tools for scholarly analysis.
  • Demonstrate the ability to present primary sources and research outcomes using digital technologies.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the community of practice in digital history, and an ability to participate in the community.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assessments based on a portfolio of work including digital versions of primary sources: 200 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

ED6315 The Teaching of Geography

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): Normally students must have pursued the study of Geography in their final degree or have some recognised academic attainment in the subject.
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Murphy, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Mr John Mulcahy, School of Education; Staff, School of Education.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the syllabi and programmes of Geography operating in post-primary schools and to the pedagogies and assessment procedures appropriate to the subject.
Module Content: This module examines the nature of Geography as a school subject and its place in the curriculum against the background of the new Junior Cycle Framework document and the Leaving Certificate programme. It examines the present syllabi, emphasising the autonomy given to the teacher in planning, choice of settings and selection of pedagogies. Attention is given to the construction of lessons, innovative pedagogies, selection of resources and formative assessment. The final element is preparation for being part of a departmental team responsible for the planning and development of the subject.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Synthesise the key principles and concepts underlying the subject, Geography, as it relates to secondary education in Ireland
  • Demonstrate a critical awareness of current issues raised in the Junior and Senior Cycle Geography syllabi and new research-informed insights informed by development in the areas of Geography
  • Critically appraise the Junior and Senior Cycle Geography syllabi and corresponding assessment guidelines
  • Develop and implement lessons and a course of study incorporating appropriate pedagogic strategies for the promotion of learning in Geography
  • Design and apply appropriate resources in the teaching of Geography including ICT
  • Act in a wide variety of ways appropriate to the teaching of Geography including engaging in collaborative subject planning and promoting Geography at school level
  • Assume responsibility for the development of classes and individual students as Geographical learners including developing appropriate assessment modes and providing feedback to students
  • Self-evaluate, reflect and take responsibility for their continuing academic and professional development as Geography teachers
  • Analyse the ethical impact on themselves of teaching Geography and communicate conclusions and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these clearly and unambiguously through discussion, reflection, and module assignments.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,000 word reflective projects (50 marks each); one to be submitted at the end of each Semester 1 & 2).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Education).

MG6813 Current Issues in Project Management

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): N/A
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: Other (distance learning (on-line materials and e-mentoring)); Directed Study (in-classroom assignment instructions and on-line assignment instructions and feedback; guided readings and online materials; e-mentoring).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr David McKevitt, Department of Management and Marketing.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Management and Marketing.
Module Objective: To engage and critically discuss current issues in project management theory and practice.
Module Content: To distinguish between properly managed projects and successful projects; the merits of technological support for project management; project management extrapolated to the organisational context; cultural diversity in virtual teams; the recovery of trouble projects.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Evaluate the relationship between project structures and organisational context
  • Appraise the benefits of information systems to project management practice
  • Apply and contextualise current debates to the organisation context
  • Critically assess troubled projects.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3000 word group literature review, 140 marks; 1 x 2000 word individual report, 60 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

GV3208 Elections and Voting

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.
Lecturer(s): Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.
Module Objective: On completion of this module, students should have an appreciation and understanding of contemporary political behaviour.
Module Content: Theoretical and comparative approaches to key topics including electoral and party systems, voter choice and turnout, models of voting behaviour, public opinion and the mass media. Country case studies will be used in the course of this module.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify and describe various types of electoral and party systems
  • Distinguish between the different theoretical models of voting behaviour
  • Relate those models of voting behaviour to country case studies
  • Assess the impact of economic voting on elections
  • Evaluate the role of political parties and leaders in election campaigning
  • Examine the influence of public opinion and mass media on voting behaviour and election outcomes
  • Analyse electoral turnout
  • Research and present information effectively and comprehensively.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1,500 word essay (30 marks); class debate (20 marks) and in-class test (50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

IS6200 Introduction to Business Programming

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures; 24hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fergal Carton, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of the basic tenets of structured programming techniques.
Module Content: Topics covered include: Introduction to computer programming, algorithms, programming paradigms, good programming practice, principles of object-oriented programming.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Employ fundamental programming techniques including data storage, looping, decision making and flow control
  • Utilise programming frameworks and integrated development environments for Windows and web applications
  • Be proficient with visual and code-based data connectivity and database management
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the principles of object-oriented programming.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks ( In-class MCQ - 25 marks and lab exam - 25 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

FS2802 Food Business

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 20hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the food business sector in Ireland, an awareness of the principles of marketing and distribution and the managerial process.
Module Content: Introduction to food marketing and distribution with particular reference to consumer behaviour and marketing strategy. Specific marketing issues considered include: market segmentation, consumer choice, pricing, promotion, distribution in food markets. An introduction to new food product development and relevant analytical techniques.

Overview of the Irish Food sector including size, structure, employment profile, industry capability and future strategies. Competitive advantage - matching resources to marketing opportunities, innovation and product development. Specific issues considered include consumer trends and new food product introductions, introduction to food marketing channels, the managerial process and the role of information in business development.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify and consider the implications of key trends on consumer food demands.
  • Explain and illustrate how consumer markets can be broken down into smaller more manageable groups.
  • List and describe the components of the marketing mix. Illustrate their relevance in the food products category.
  • Illustrate the application of food marketing through developing a simple marketing strategy for a food product based on secondary and primary information.
  • Outline market trends and NPD knowledge management.
  • Describe innovation management.
  • Outline the managerial process as it relates to the food industry.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class test, 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1.5 hr paper to be taken in Autumn).

AS1004 An Introduction to the Development of East Asia

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 2 x 8hr(s) Workshops; 8hr(s) Directed Study (Mentored Group Project preparation).
Module Co-ordinator:
Lecturer(s): Staff, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the development of the modern economies and business cultures of Korea, China, and Japan.
Module Content: This module will introduce students to the different modes of development and business cultures that exist in Korea, China, and Japan.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the modern development of the economies of Korea, China, and Japan.
  • Analyse and explain the differences in the economies and business cultures of Korea, China, and Japan.
  • Critically discuss the developmental histories and objectives of Korea, China, and Japan.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay (65 marks), 1 x group project (35 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department and submitted by the end of the third week of August.).

IS4441 Advanced Tools and Methods for IS Development

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): IS4442
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Dr Tom O'Kane, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To provide students with the knowledge and skills to specify, develop, manage and support large scale business applications.
Module Content: Development lifecycles; Advanced development methodologies; Software verification and validation; Project planning; Project Scheduling methods.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Differentiate between dependency-driven versus agile software development methodologies
  • Demonstrate an understanding of software verification and validation techniques
  • Identify the key components associated with software project planning.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

HI6036 Contexts for Medieval History

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.
Module Objective: To introduce students to key research contexts for themes and topics in medieval history.
Module Content: Identification of fundamental turning points and transformations in the history and culture of medieval Europe with specific reference to the research interests of staff in the School of History.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Be familiar with the turning points in medieval European history and culture.
  • Identify and address existing debates and scholarship concerning the cultural milieu and historical understanding of the period.
  • Gain knowledge of key historical sources and their interpretation in modern scholarship.
  • Learn the skills necessary to produce advanced critical essays and a dissertation in their chosen topic.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,000 word essay: 50 marks; 20-minute oral presentation: 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

FL1010 Introduction to Folklore and Ethnology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 18hr(s) Lectures (18hrs lectures over 6 nights).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stiofán Ó Cadhla, Roinn An Bhéaloidis.
Lecturer(s): Dr Marie-Annick Desplanques, Roinn An Bhéaloidis; Dr Clíona O'Carroll, Roinn An Bhéaloidis; Dr Ciarán Ó Gealbháin, Roinn An Bhéaloidis; Mr Shane Lehane, Roinn An Bhéaloidis; Dr Stiofán Ó Cadhla, Roinn An Bhéaloidis; Staff, Roinn An Bhéaloidis, and PhD researchers.
Module Objective: To provide a broad introduction to the discipline of Folklore, including its historical development, aims and methodologies.
Module Content: This module will introduce students in a general way to the subject of folklore and ethnology. The lectures will examine the rise of folklore and tradition as ideas from the great romantic and national movements since the Enlightenment. This will lead on to discussion of the current concerns of the discipline. Where does it come from? What is it? What has it been interested in and why? Students will be introduced to the main ideas of folkloristics as they have been classified and identified across time.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Trace the development of Folklore as an academic discipline.
  • Identify the key areas where Folklore can enrich our understanding of modern society, in respect of cultural expression, community identity and creativity.
  • Assess customs and traditions in a structured way that encourages interpretation.
  • Evaluate the value of Folklore to society.
  • Assess the skills and potential of Folklore as a professional discipline.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay (100 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

SS4209 Placement Portfolio

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary Wilson, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Mary Wilson, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To link professional practice (placement two) and university based modules.
Module Content: This module prepares students for placement two and provides a series of seminars and tutorials before, during and after the placement. These seminars and tutorials will focus on both professional and theoretical issues.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Appraise their professional development while on placement and identify their future learning needs.
  • Critically evaluate social work and the social worker's role in various practice contexts.
  • Examine and evaluate the influence of students' own values on their practice.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and application of at least one theoretical approach to social work.
  • Recognise the impact of social policy and legal frameworks on social work practice.
  • Critically analyse how social justice is promoted or discouraged in a professional setting.
Assessment: Professional portfolio.
Compulsory Elements: To meet professional requirements, attendance at lectures and tutorials will be monitored by a class register.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

GN4001 Developmental Genetics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 70.
Pre-requisite(s): GN3003 and/or BC3006 ; BC3007
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas F Moore, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas F Moore, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Module Objective: To provide detailed information on mammalian and plant developmental genetics.
Module Content: Introduction to developmental events and concepts, Techniques and concepts in classical embryology, Genetic tools for analysis of development, Pattern formation in Drosophila & vertebrates, Genetic factors in cellular differentiation, Genetics of gamete formation, Sex determination and dosage compensation, Overview of plant developmental genetics, Genetic factors in aging and senescence, Overview of population genetics, sexual selection, Inclusive fitness, kin selection and imprinting, Pleiotropy and epistasis, Selected primary research literature.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Outline key concepts and controversies in the history of developmental biology.
  • Discuss how spontaneous and induced mutations provide essential resources for the study of developmental biology.
  • Outline key molecular and cellular milestones in the pre- and post-implantation development of fruitfly and mammalian embryo.
  • Outline the evolution and mechanisms of sex determination and dosage compensation in the roundworm, fruitfly and human.
  • Discuss the different genetic and cellular maternal and paternal contributions to mammalian development, including genomic imprinting.
  • Discuss theories of evolution of lifespan and senescence and the mechanisms of cellular and organismal senescence.
  • Describe molecular and cellular mechanisms of stem cell pluripotency and the induction and differentiation of muscle and blood cells.
  • Define epistasis and describe how genetic techniques can be used to analyse epistatic interactions in a variety of organisms.
  • Using the primary literature, provide a detailed description of a gene targeting strategy in mouse embryonic stem cells.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Oral if required).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

GA3012 Tréimhse Taithí Oibre II

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): Ní hann dó
Co-requisite(s): Ní hann dó
Teaching Period(s): Seimeastar 3.
Teaching Methods: Tréimhsí Taithí Oibre (trí mhí).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Pádraig Ó Macháin, Roinn Na Nua-Ghaeilge.
Lecturer(s): Dr Sean Ua Suilleabhain, Roinn Na Nua-Ghaeilge; An Fhoireann, Roinn Na Nua-Ghaeilge; An Fhoireann, Roinn Na Dlí, móide ionadaí ón Ionad Oibre.
Module Objective: Taithí a fháil ar an Ionad agus ar a chuid oibre.
Module Content: Beidh na mic léinn bainteach le hIonad Oibre (arna fhaomhadh ag an bhfoireann) i rith na tréimhse teagaisc. Beifear ag súil leis go nglacfaidh siad páirt ghníomhach i saothar an Ionaid Oibre le linn an ama sin. Mic léinn go dteipfidh orthu sa mhodúl so i scrúdú an tSamhraidh agus go mbeidh an modúl á dhéanamh arís acu an bhliain dár gcionn, beidh sé de dhualgas orthu tréimhse taithí oibre trí mhí a shocrú dóibh féin in Ionad Oibre go mbeidh glacadh ag an Roinn leis.
Learning Outcomes: Nuair a bheidh an modúl seo déanta ag na mic léinn beidh:
  • tuiscint mhaith acu ar shaothar an Ionaid Oibre;
  • páirt ghníomhach glactha acu i saothar an Ionaid Oibre;
  • a dtinreamh san Ionad Oibre sasúil;
  • dialann oibre an Ionaid Oibre coimeádta acu go sásúil.
Assessment: Tréimhse taithí oibre trí mhí.
Compulsory Elements: Tinreamh sásúil le linn na Tréimhse Oibre agus an dialann oibre a bheith coimeádta go sásúil.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Náid (0) an marc a bhronnfar ar aon cheacht / aiste / tionscnamh a bheidh déanach (nó neachtar acu tabharfar teip don mac / iníon léinn sa mhodúl más modúl 'Pas/Teipe' atá i gceist).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pas a bhaint amach. Teip i gcás Tréimhse Oibre nach gcomhlíontar go sásúil.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: Gan Scrúdú Scríofa Foirmiúil.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Ní bheidh aon scrúdú sa bhFómhar ann.

IT3310 Futurism: Word and Image

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 Lectures (Other: Independent reading of designated texts).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.
Lecturer(s): Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.
Module Objective: To study and gain an understanding of one of Italy's major avant garde movements, futurismo, through texts and images.
Module Content: This module will examine the art, photography, architecture, poetry, prose and manifestos produced by those involved in the twentieth-century avant garde movement known as futurismo. Figures studied may include Marinetti, Govoni, Palazzeschi, Carrà, Bragaglia, Boccioni, Severini, Sant' Elia etc.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify prescribed texts and images, and their cultural and historical context;
  • Discuss key ideas of prescribed texts and images;
  • Analyse stylistic features of prescribed texts and images;
  • Analyse the relationship of prescribed texts and images to each other and to their cultural and historical context;
  • Evaluate prescribed texts and images.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,750-2,000 word essays (45 marks each) or 1 x 3,500-4,000 word essay (90 marks); class participation 10 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment by 2nd Fri. in August, as prescribed by the Department).

IS2203 Systems Analysis and Systems Change

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Up to 11hrs Practicals/Laboratory Sessions, as specified by the Department).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Mr Cathal Doyle, Department of International Education office; Mr Frederick Creedon, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To provide students with an advanced understanding of business systems analysis methods in the context of managing organisational and technological change.
Module Content: The module covers the fundamental concepts of change resulting from the implementation of Information Systems, and the role of systems analysis in managing change. Topics include technical, organisational and social changes resulting from Information Systems implementation initiatives, planning methods, and approaches to managing change.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Discuss the various issues associated with change resulting from the implementation of Information Sytems.
  • Apply systems analysis methods to plan for change resulting from the implementation of Information Systems.
  • Apply systems analysis and other methods to manage change resulting from the implementation of Information Systems.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 40 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (Course/Project Work).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AP1504 Research Methods in Education and Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.
Module Objective: The module is an introduction to the research methodology of the social sciences. It should teach you how social scientists (especially those working in the field education and psychology) go about studying human behaviour and human mind. It should also teach you about the value, indeed, indispensability of scientific research as a tool for solving practical problems concerning childcare, teaching, healthcare, and other aspects of human wellbeing.

We hope that this module will help you develop into savvy consumers of research: people who appreciate the value of research evidence, know where to find that evidence, can understand it, are able to appraise it critically, and can use it to improve their own professional practice (e.g. in teaching or childcare).
Module Content: The scientific method. Psychological and educational measurement. Basic principles and skills of data analysis (quantitative and qualitative). Evidence-based practice. Ethical principles of human research. Academic writing and publishing.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Understand key terms used to describe the process of scientific research;
  • Know the key elements of scientific research and use this knowledge to distinguish between good and poor science, as well as between science and pseudoscience;
  • Begin to develop the skills of critical evaluation of scientific news presented in the media;
  • Understand ethical issues in researching people;
  • Use the tools and concepts of descriptive statistics to interpret numerical data;
  • Know about the basics of academic publishing: the types of scholarly publication, the peer-review process, and the structure of a typical peer-reviewed research paper;
  • Develop academic writing skills, especially the skills of presenting scientific evidence in a format and style accessible to a layperson;
  • Know why scientific research is indispensable in finding answers to theoretical and practical problems of human development, including childcare and education;
  • Understand the concept and the process of evidence-based practice.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x very brief reports).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

SS6803 The Reflective Practice Teacher

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 8, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 12hr(s) Lectures; 12hr(s) Other (Class presentations); Directed Study (and Library).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carmel Halton, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Carmel Halton, School of Applied Social Studies; Ms Nona Lyons, School of Applied Social Studies; Ms Caroline May Shore, School of Applied Social Studies; Ms Ruth Murray, School of Applied Social Studies; Mr Philip A. Mortell, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To enable candidates to critically reflect on their own practice teaching and consider research, policies and developments with respect to practice teaching. To encourage candidates to reflect on their experience of practice teaching and its links with personal and career development. To enable candidates to identify and trace research developments and policies affecting practice teaching both locally and nationally. To encourage candidates to evaluate their performances as a practice teacher using a specific placement example.
Module Content: Candidates make a group presentation reflecting on their practice within an anti-oppressive, anti-racist framework, exploring their personal and professional development.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Critically reflect on their practice teaching.
  • Critically appraise research, policies and developments with respect to practice teaching.
  • Critically reflect on their experience of practice teaching.
  • Critically appriase and evaluate their performances as practice teachers.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word assignment).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

ST6010 Current Topics in Statistical Applications to Actuarial Science

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 1, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Directed Study (Directed Reading; Individual Research; Computer Analysis.).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Linda Daly, Department of Statistics.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Statistics.
Module Objective: To develop independent research, presentation and communication skills in advanced statistical applications to Actuarial Science.
Module Content: Current Statistical methodologies of use in Actuarial Science.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe a statistical methodology of topical interest in actuarial science;
  • Present key theoretical results that underpin the use of the statistical methodology;
  • Apply the methodology in a practical actuarial setting;
  • Evaluate and interpret results and outputs generated;
  • Critically evaluate arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts and data so as to make judgements, and to frame appropriate questions to achieve a solution to a problem of an actuarial nature;
  • Have an ability to reflect and an understanding of actions required for career development in the Actuarial Science area;
  • Demonstrate the ability to undertake online and independent research and communicate such in written and oral report form;
  • Demonstrate a statistical and professional proficiency suitable for entry to the actuarial and financial services jobs markets;
  • Demonstrate a broad understanding of the range of application of statistics to actuarial and financial processes.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Report 200 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

PH6012 Human Rights 1

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Vittorio Bufacchi, Department of Philosophy.
Lecturer(s): Dr Vittorio Bufacchi, Department of Philosophy.
Module Objective: To investigate the politics and philosophy of Human Rights.
Module Content: The idea of human rights is one of the most pervasive features of our political reality, and yet the concept of 'human rights' remains vague and contested. The aim of this course is to explore the nature and political significance of human rights. We will try to find an answer to some of the following key questions: What are human rights? Are human rights universal? Which rights are human rights? How do we resolve a conflict of human rights? Can human rights be justified?.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate the acquisition of a basic body of knowledge directly related to the concept of human rights;
  • Evaluate the relationship between politics and philosophy;
  • Explore the possible linkages between key concepts in political philosophy, including rights, duties, liberty and equality;
  • Locate the various ideologies promoting disparate theories of human rights;
  • Outline a possible model of human rights.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 5,000 word essay to be submitted in August).

BM6013 Advanced Immunology

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 36hr(s) Lectures; 14hr(s) Directed Study (Case studies, data analysis and relevant assignments).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Tommie McCarthy, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, and guest lecturers.
Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive understanding of Immunology.
Module Content: Immunoglobulins and T-cells, MHC and Antigen presentation, Lymphocyte repertoires and T- and B-cell signalling, viral and bacterial immunity, tolerance and autoimmunity.
Cells and organs of the immune system.
Antigen specificity, clonal selection and immunological memory in adaptive immunity.
Antimicrobial peptides in innate immunity.
Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathways in pathogen recognition.
Antibody structure and classification of immunoglobulins.
Rolls of the MHC complexes in antigen presentation and histocompatibility.
Organization and rearrangements of T-cell receptor genes.
Role of regulatory T-cell in tolerance and the suppression of immune responses.
Molecular mimicry and the breakdown of tolerance in autoimmunity.
Characteristics of immunodeficiency in HIV patients.
Applications of antibodies in the clinical laboratory.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Review the humoral and cell-mediated divisions of the immune system.
  • Describe origins, differentiation and maturation of immune cells.
  • Distinguish between adaptive and innate immunity and discuss the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in adaptive immunity.
  • Compare immune responses mechanisms in viral and bacterial infections.
  • Delineate the mechanisms underlying detrimental immune responses in asthma, allergic reactions and autoimmunity.
  • Outline the abnormalities of the immune system that cause immunodeficiency.
  • Integrate the principles of immunology with the application of antibodies in clinical diagnostic tests.
  • Analyze relevant primary literature and summarize material for presentation to peers.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (2 x In Class Tests 30 marks each (Oral, if required).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral, if required.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (Except when continuous assessment was failed overall. In this case the Supplemental Exam will incorporate assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment. (Oral, if required)).

DN1009 Oral Surgery for Dental Nurses

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 70 (20 In Hospital Clinical Training and 50 Outreach Clinical Training).
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2 and 3.
Teaching Methods: 15hr(s) Other (Lectures and Tutorials); 15hr(s) Directed Study; 70hr(s) Placements (Clinical Practice).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Harrington, University Dental School & Hospital.
Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Harrington, University Dental School & Hospital; Staff, University Dental School & Hospital, and staff, Dublin Dental School and Hospital.
Module Objective: The principle aim of this module is to provide the students with a foundation in the principles and clinical practice of oral surgery and oral medicine.
Module Content: Principles and practice of extraction of deciduous and permanent teeth.
Local anaesthesia, relative analgesia, conscious sedation, and general anaesthesia and the regulations associated with each.
Minor oral surgical procedures.
Pre and post operative care of patients in relation to minor oral surgical procedures.
Oral medicine relevant to dental nursing.
Dental radiography- use, hazards, precautions, techniques; Processing, recording and maintenance of dental radiographs; Storage of radiographic films and chemicals; Care of dental radiographic equipment; Regulations governing the taking of dental radiographs.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Discuss the different types of anaesthesia and the regulations that govern their use in dentistry.
  • Discuss the principles of tooth extraction.
  • Provide close support/chair side assistance to the dental surgeon during minor oral surgery procedures.
  • Identify all oral surgery instruments and materials.
  • Discuss oral medicine relevant to dental nursing.
  • Describe the indications, contra indications, techniques and regulations governing the taking of dental radiographs.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (In Class Test x 1 100 marks and OSCE 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at and participation at all timetabled teaching activities is compulsory. Each element of continuous assessment must be attempted.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% Students are required to achieve 50% in each component of continuous assessment.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: All failed elements of continuous assessments must be repeated in the Autumn.

EC6044 Quantitative Techniques and Analysis Part 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (including computer laboratory sessions).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ann Kirby, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: This module aims to develop and apply the participants quantitative and analytical skills. Methods for data analysis including bivariate analysis, multivariate analysis and factor analysis will be studied, and applied using SPSS for Windows.
Module Content: 1. Non-Parametric Statistics
2. Statistical techniques to explore relationships among variables
3. Correlation
4. Partial Correlation
5.Multiple Regression
6.Factor analysis.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Interpret and employ different quantitative techniques: in terms of problem definition as a means of solving existing relationships; and use as an exploratory tool.
  • Identify the relationship between problem definition and the modelling process.
  • Apply the statistical tools of analysis using SPSS.
  • Report and analyse the results generated from the data.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x project worth 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

CH6102 Modern Chinese Administrative and Business Language (Mandarin) II

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Other (language classes( a mix of classes, lab and tutorials)).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jacqueline Sheehan, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Module Objective: To enhance the advanced level of Chinese language in administrative and business environment.
Module Content: This course intends to further develop students language capabilities to enhance their work in Chinese business and administration. By the end of the course students should have developed capability to give presentation and write letters and reports in a Chinese context. They will also learn to use of Chinese internet.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Express oneself clearly and coherently with appropriate details when giving a description or argument;
  • Negotiate with Chinese business partners in formal or informal occasions;
  • Read a business text;
  • Give formal presentation in Chinese on a variety of business or administrative occasions;
  • Apply high technology (internet) into the communication with Chinese companies or organisations such as emails or visual meetings;
  • Make appropriate use, orally and in writing, of a wide range of vocabulary in a variety of social and professional contexts at a level ranging from HSK 4 to HSK 5( Chinese Language Proficiency Test).
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 150 marks ( 2x in-class tests( 50 marks each ) coursework( 50 marks)); Oral Assessment 50 marks (1 oral test).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (including the oral assessment which must be repeated if failed).

BM1004 Creativity, Innovation and Teamwork

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s):
Teaching Methods:
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sinead Kerins, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Cork Institute of Technology.
Module Objective:
Module Content:
Learning Outcomes:
Assessment:
Compulsory Elements:
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module:
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

NU6149 Clinical Practice in Specialist Mental Health Nursing II

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 291hr(s) Placements (Practice based learning including reflective practice).).
Module Co-ordinator:
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To integrate theory with practice of specialist mental health nursing, in which students can advance knowledge and skills, demonstrate the ability to analyse complex situations, implement appropriate interventions, and continue their professional and academic development.
Module Content: Practice of advanced skills in mental health nursing, participation in the clinical environment with the supervision and guidance of the course co-ordinator/facilitator, practice facilitator and registered nurses in the mental health setting; the development of critical reflective skills will be encouraged to evaluate current practice.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Develop and engage in critical thinking skills through the process of reflection in and on practice
  • Integrate the theory and practice of mental health nursing to improve standards of care
  • Demonstrate advances in his/her practice by completing four of the five core competencies of a clinical nurse specialist as outlined by the National Council for the Professional Development of Nursing and Midwifery
  • Complete a minimum of 291 Practice based learning hours.
Assessment: Clinical Assessment of Competencies (Pass/Fail).
Compulsory Elements: Completion of a minimum of 291 hours clinical placement.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement for achievement of the clinical competency and completion of scheduled practice based learning hours.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students failing to achieve a pass judgement (i.e. where a fail, absent or incomplete judgement is recorded) at the Winter Examination Board will be required to repeat the clinical placements in a repeat year, as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

AD1845 Project Management under the guidelines of the Construction Regulations

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: 16 x 3hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: This module is based on the current Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (Construction) Regulations 2013. It will enable the student to familiarise themselves with the requirements of the various bodies invovled in a project from start to finish.
Module Content: Students will learn about cost and risk control as well as developing and applying policies and procedures. Other topics will include subcontractor management, purchasing and project financing. Project start up and close out techniques will be covered.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the function and operation of the Construction Safety Partnership.
  • Advise on project management structures used in construction in Ireland.
  • List the obligations of a client in managing health and safety in construction projects.
  • Advise on the role and functions of the Project Supervisor Design Process and Project Supervisor Construction Stage as outlined in the SHWW (Construction) Regulations.
  • Prepare a preliminary and construction stage safety and health plan for a non-complex construction project.
  • Outline the role and functions of designers and contractors as outlined in the SHWW (Construction) Regulations.
  • Prepare a design risk assessment for a non-complex construction design issue.
  • Prepare a safe system of work (method statement and risk assessment) for a non-complex construction task and outline the content of a safety file for a non-complex construction project.
  • Describe the differences between the roles of health and safety coordinator, safety advisor, safety officer and safety representative as outlined in the SHWW (Construction) Regulations.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1,500 word assignment).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

AD1886 Personal Effectiveness

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 24.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of this programme).
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (class based lectures, workshops, case studies and presentations); 24hr(s) Other (practical assignments via internal coach in organisation); Directed Study (self-directed study using guided readings. Additional independent research for assignments.); Directed Study (self-directed study (guided readings, case studies, work-based projects).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Angela O'Donovan, Department of Human Resources.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: This module aims to offer the student an opportunity to explore and develop their strengths and areas in need of improvement across a range of key generic personal and interpersonal skills which are essential to the effective engagement of work related activities.
Module Content: Understanding ones values and approach via personality assessment tools Myers Briggs, 16PF, etc.
Motivation.
Individual difference in organisation behaviour.
Time Management.
Communciations and Presentation Skills.
Giving and receiving feedback.
Optimising Personal Development Planning - PDP.
Career Development.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Increase their effectiveness in work related actions.
  • Recognise specific areas of personal strength and areas which require improvement.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of individual motivation theory and recognise resulting behaviour.
  • Organise and plan time more effectively.
  • Deliver constructive feedback.
  • Make effective plans and decisions in relation to formal personal development planning (PDP).
  • Demonstrate career mapping and directive action.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000-4,000 word work based project, 120 marks; Oral Examination through Presentation, 80 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

GA6013 The Transmission and Interpretation of Gaelic Literature

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (online).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Pádraig Ó Macháin, Department of Modern Irish.
Lecturer(s): Dr Sean Ua Suilleabhain, Department of Modern Irish; Prof Pádraig Ó Macháin, Department of Modern Irish.
Module Objective: To explore Gaelic literature as transmitted and interpreted in the written medium.
Module Content: For much of Gaelic literary tradition, the manuscript - vellum and paper - constituted the staple accessory of the man of letters, and this module will address Irish manuscript tradition in the context of literary production. The print medium will also be treated of, particularly with regard to the literature of Reformation and Counter-Reformation, and to the re-discovery and re-interpretation of Gaelic literature at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. Texts such as Eleanor Hull, The Cuchulain saga in Irish literature will be referenced.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • demonstrate the continuity of theme and form in Gaelic literature from early to modern times
  • show an in-depth familiarity with the location and distribution of source material for Gaelic literature
  • recognise the type of source from which any given piece of literature is likely to have emanated
  • explain the historical factors which governed the emergence of a parallel print culture at the end of the sixteenth century and the beginning of the seventeenth
  • understand the complex interaction between script and print in Irish tradition
  • demonstrate a knowledge of the factors that fed into the renaissance and reacquisition of Irish learning and literature at the end of the 19th century.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Online moderated activities 50 marks, Essay (2,500 words) 150 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmission of assignments.

MU2046 American Shape-Note Ensemble 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Year-long performance course to allow for growth of skills and adequate rehearsal time prior to final assessed performance).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Ms Sinead Hanrahan, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To develop performance and leadership skills in American Shape-Note Singing.
Module Content: Workshops in American Shape-Note performance. In this mixed-voice, a cappella ensemble, we sing the three- and four-part shape-note music as performed in the participatory, democratic and ardent singing tradition of the US South. The repertoire comes from books such as "The Sacred Harp", comprising hymns, odes, and anthems written between the 16th and 20th centuries, as well as other sources containing religious and secular folk songs and hymns. This ensemble is open to all students with and without previous singing experience. It will involve loud enthusiastic singing, and will be excellent for acquiring or improving skills in conducting and sight-singing.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Successfully execute a Shape-Note performance both as singer and as conductor at the relevant level of competence and in an appropriate style.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Shape-Note performance style, leading style and notation.
  • Demonstrate an ability to perform sympathetically within the context of a group and to lead a group.
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the act of performance.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous assessment (class participation), 40; Final Performance Examination, 60).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed performance examinations must be retaken as prescribed by the Department).

IS1107 Information Systems for the Networked Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Practicals (Up to).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To illustrate how Information Systems may be utilised to: (i) support the disparate information needs of multiple users within an organisation; and (ii) enhance interactions with customers, suppliers and business partners.
Module Content: The module considers the need for integrated systems within organisations; databases and and managing the information resource; modern data architectures; leveraging e-Commerce and the internet; securing IS.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe how the database management approach can be utilised to organise, access and manage the data resources of an organisation
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how IS (particularly internet- based IS) can be used to streamline internal business processes and to enhance interactions with all external stakeholders
  • Discuss the key issues regarding securing IS and how these issues may be addressed
  • Demonstrate an ability to employ a number of IS tools commonly used in organisations.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Multiple Choice Questionnaire 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

GG6504 Digital Image Processing

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 7.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.
Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.
Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the principles underlying the acquisition and nature of Earth Observation data and advanced practical techniques for image processing.
Module Content: This module will cover aspects of image processing, including enhancement, algebra, fusion, classification, manipulation of data from different passive and active sensors including optical, thermal, hyperspectral, radar and lidar imagery, and ground truthing of imagery through field techniques.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Manipulate imagery from different sensors to derive higher order information.
  • Evaluate the different data products that can be produced from raw imagery.
  • Combine data from multiple sources for retrieval of more advanced surface characteristics.
  • Demonstrate competency in using a common image processing software package.
  • Collect and analyse field reflectance data.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x practical projects; 25 marks each).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed-in-class praticals and assignments, as prescribed by the Department).

EC6038 Health Care Economic Evaluation 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): EC6037
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jane Bourke, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: This module provides an understanding of theoretical techniques and methodological issues encountered by health businesses in measuring and valuing health outcomes and decision analytical modelling for use in health care economic evaluations. Economic evaluations are essential for health businesses as they are a requirement for product/service reimbursement by state agencies.
Module Content: This module focuses on measuring and valuing health outcomes and employing decision analytical modelling in economic evaluations of health care technologies by health businesses. These techniques will be applied to health technologies, such as pharmaceuticals, diagnostic and surgical procedures in various types of economic evaluations: Cost-Utility Analysis, Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Cost-Benefit Analysis. Natural health units and Health-related quality of life will be measured and valued. Decision Analytical Models such as decision trees and Markov models will be studied.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe approaches to measuring and valuing health outcomes for different types of economic evaluations;
  • Construct appropriate decision analytical models for empirical examples of health care technologies;
  • Apply decision analytical models in empirical examples of economic evaluations of health care technologies using appropriate software.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2000 word assignments (40 marks each), 1 x presentation (20 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Lecturer(s)).

PF6601 GXP - The Fundamentals for working in a regulatory environment

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 30hr(s) Lectures (workshops, case studies and presentations); 10hr(s) Practicals; 10hr(s) Directed Study (guided readings).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brendan Griffin, School of Pharmacy.
Lecturer(s): Dr Brendan Griffin, School of Pharmacy, guest lecturers Mr Stan O'Neill and Dr Dairine Dempsey, Staff School of Pharmacy.
Module Objective: To provide an overview of the regulations governing the pharmaceutical industry. To create awareness of the importance of GMP, GDP and GCP standards in the development, manufacture and supply of medicines. In addition this module provides technical training on GMP, GDP and Pharmacovigilance and incorporates the skills needed for evaluating best practice in the pharmaceutical industry.
Module Content: Introduction to Pharmaceutical Regulatory affairs. Licencing requirements for new medicines and facilities. Principles of GMP and GDP. Basis of Pharmacovigilance. Special topics on GMP e.g. regulatory inspections.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Explain the role of regulatory bodies in licencing medicines and manufacturers.
  • Develop personal insights into the importance of Quality, Safety and Efficacy standards of medicines for human use.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of GMP, GDP and Pharmacovigilance.
  • Make appropriate recommendations on the standards that should apply in manufacture and supply of medicines.
  • Distinguish between acceptable versus unacceptable GMP practices.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay 50 marks; 1 x on-line MCQ 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

GL2001 Introductory Sedimentology for non-Geologists

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Andrew Wheeler, Department of Geology.
Lecturer(s): Prof Andrew Wheeler, Department of Geology.
Module Objective: To provide instruction to sediments, sedimentary processes, sedimentary environments.
Module Content: Systematic study of the composition and textures of siliciclastic and carbonate sediments. Subaqueous traction processes and structures. Flow regime. Mass transport processes and deposits. Subaerial processes and deposits. Erosional processes and structures. Superficial surface processes. Post depositional processes and structures. Sedimentary environments.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Summarise the composition and properties of sedimentary rocks and justify the classification schemes used for these sediments.
  • Discuss the relationship between the external morphology of sediment bedforms and their internal structure.
  • Describe the various types of mass transport processes and their resulting deposits.
  • Summarise the types of subaerial transport processes and the internal and external structure of their resulting deposits.
  • Describe and discuss the genesis of the various types of superficial and internal post-depositional sedimentary structures.
  • Evaluate sedimentary environments in terms of processes and products.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Project paper 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

AP6156 Psychology and Intellectual Disabilities

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Lectures, workshops & guest speakers); 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology, and invited speakers.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding, appreciation and critical awareness of the nature of intellectual disabilities and their implications for individuals and families.
Module Content: The module will consider the presentation, aetiology, assessment, treatment and prognosis of common intellectual disabilities presented to psychology services for child and adult populations. Models and theories of intellectual disability will be considered, particularly in regard to the assessment of functional adaptive behaviour, together with the ethics, values and impact of intellectual disability. The module will present the historical development of services for people with an intellectual disability and consider models of disability and the philosophy of service provision.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe the most commonly presented intellectual disabilities (IDs) in child, adolescent and adult populations;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of psychology in the assessment of intellectual disability;
  • Explain the contribution of empirical research to understanding intellectual disability;
  • Evaluate the models and theories of Intellectual disabilities;
  • Evaluate appropriate psychological interventions and models of practice for various IDs;
  • Critically reflect on the ethics and values surrounding intellectual disability.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay (excluding references)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the co-ordinator).

GG3042 Climatic Variability and Change

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): GG2016 or equivalent
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography.
Lecturer(s): Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography.
Module Objective: To study variability and change in contemporary climates and the methods used to investigate climate change and variability.
Module Content: Processes leading to climate change and climate variability; climate data analysis; use of climate models to assess causes of climate change and project future change. Impacts of climate change.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Appreciate the key atmospheric processes related to climate change and variability.
  • Analyse observed or modelled climate data to identify key processes involved in climatic variability and change.
  • Assess the role of human activity in climatic variability and change.
  • Recognise the limitations of meteorological and climate data and challenges involved in attribution of climate change and variability.
  • Design and carry out an original research project.
  • Use published literature in the field of climatology to inform your research.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Research project 50 marks; Climate analysis assignments 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

LW6585 Migration Law and Human Rights

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.
Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.
Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of key concepts of international, European and domestic immigration law from a human rights perspective.
Module Content: This course examines current issues in immigration law with a particular focus on EU law developments. The course combines an analysis of International, European and domestic law. It also builds on existing links between the Faculty of Law and immigration law agencies in Ireland. Topics to be covered include:

- The EU and Immigration Law / Freedom of Movement and evolving concepts
- Migration and Family Life - Rights to Family Reunification
- Migrant Workers and Human Rights
- Irregular Migration: Human Trafficking and Smuggling
- Citizenship and Nationality: International, European and domestic
- Enforcement: Detention: Deportation, Immigration offences / Returns.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in EU immigration law;
  • Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in EU Freedom of Movement law;
  • Apply key concepts of European human rights law to immigration problem scenarios;
  • Critically evaluate and discuss immigration and citizenship laws and processes;
  • Describe and analyse key debates on immigration, including on human trafficking, irregular migration and the rights of migrant workers.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 90 marks; Class participation 10 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the Department. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the Department).

FE4008 Food Security and the Developing World

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To explore the impact of changing patterns of world food trade, structural adjustment and other intervention programmes on rural livelihoods and survival strategies in the developing world.
Module Content: The economic and environmental sustainability of livelihood portfolios and the impact on food security of structural adjustment programmes, trade liberalisation, bilateral and multilateral donors and changing governmental policies and roles.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Assess the impact of institutional policy on developing countries e.g. SAP, PRSP etc;
  • Summarise the contributions of financial institutions to food security;
  • Measure various changes in governmental policies in trade liberalisation, privatisation and donor agencies;
  • Evaluate the sustainable livelihood framework using livelihood portfolios;
  • Debate the roles of bilateral and multi-lateral agencies in developing countries;
  • Predict the forces and nature of sustainable livelihoods in a complex world;
  • Describe the differences between the North and South on issues of sustainable development.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (30 marks In-class Group presentation; 70 marks essay 2,500 word group essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

ED6349 The Teaching of Geography 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): ED6360 with school teaching placement hours in Geography
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Murphy, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Education.
Module Objective: To enable student teachers to use more creative and progressive pedagogies in the teaching of Geography at all levels in the post-primary school.
Module Content: This module builds on and develops key concepts of Geography pedagogy covered in Year 1, inclusive of the social and political changes at national and international level, and advances in the technology of geographical investigation and interpretation. Some emphasis is placed on the teaching of Geography at senior cycle examining the core, elective and option structure of the programme with particular focus on how the core skills of geography can be developed at more advanced levels in all post-primary classrooms. The advanced teaching for understanding and active learning pedagogical approaches envisaged in the curricula are examined in greater detail including a more critical and deeper consideration of the range of available resources to support geographical fieldwork and the development of advanced geographical literacy, numeracy and assessment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Synthesise the key principles and concepts underlying the subject, Geography, as it relates to secondary education in Ireland
  • Demonstrate a critical awareness of current issues and research in the teaching of Geography and new insights informed by development in the areas of Geography
  • Critically analyse and implement the Geography syllabi at all post-primary levels including all assessment guidelines
  • Develop and teach lessons and a course of study incorporating appropriate research informed creative and active pedagogies for the promotion of learning in Geography at all levels
  • Develop and flexibly apply appropriate resources and ICT in the teaching of Geography
  • Engage in collaborative subject planning and lead and promote Geography at school level
  • Demonstrate the ability to self-evaluate, reflect and take responsibility for and action on their continuing academic and professional development as Geography teachers.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,000 word action research projects (50 marks each); one to be submitted at the end of each Semester 1 and 2).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

MG1601 Marketing Fundamentals

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Mr James Fairhead, Department of Management and Marketing.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Management and Marketing.
Module Objective: To familiarise students with the fundamentals of marketing practice.
Module Content: Topics will include
· the marketing concept
· how to segment markets, select target-markets and position brands
· managing the marketing mix
· the ethics of marketing, and the marketing of ethics
· the evolving role of the marketing manager
· the customer and consumer as marketer.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Exercise appropriate judgment in the application of marketing concepts, strategies, tools and techniques so as to deliver customer-value and achieve strategic competitive advantage.
  • Develop and implement marketing strategies and plans.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Individual assignment 2,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s).
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As directed by the Department.).

FE4417 Contemporary Issues in Development

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding of key contemporary issues in development studies.
Module Content: The module analyses key contemporary development issues and debates. It provides an indepth survey of contemporary theoretical issues and developments and analysis of policy prescriptions. Issues such as GMO's, debt, impact of HIV/AIDS, role of civil society, impacts of globalisation, sustainable development could be addressed.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Explain the basic concepts of development in contemporary world of today
  • Criticise issues such as GMO's, debt, and impact of HIV/AIDS development strategies.
  • Assess the relevance of key strategies in efficient resource utilisation.
  • Evaluate the key contributions of policy prescription in development.
  • Summarise the mainstream issues that contributes to globalisation.
  • Justify the impact of civil societies on participation, democracy and sustainable development.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Written paper (2,500 words)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

FE1820 Credit Union Ethos, Structure and Core Activities

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 150, Max 500.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: 1 x 7.5hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (distance education module); Other (on-line directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive understanding of the background to credit unions as well as the structure of their organisations, their core activities and the sector in which they operate.
Module Content: Topics include: the historical origins and development of the credit union movement, principles of co-operative organisations, credit union operating principles, the credit union ethos, ethical considerations for credit union officers, structure of the credit union movement, key stakeholders in the movement, structure of the credit union, the central role of members, the role of the board of directors, the role of credit union committees and other key positions in the credit union, the reporting structure, credit union core services.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Explain the historical development of the credit union movement in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland;
  • Differentiate between co-operative organisations and other organisational types;
  • Explain the Operating Principles of credit unions and discuss the role they play in the credit union movement today;
  • Explain the organisational structure of the credit union including the roles of key officers, members and committees;
  • Evaluate the ethical considerations for a credit union officer in carrying out their role;
  • Evaluate the nature of membership in a credit union and the importance of a member-centred approach in meeting member needs;
  • Explain the core services provided by the credit union to members and explore the potential for broadening the range of services in the future.
  • Apply their learning within a credit union context for the purposes of improving individual and group performance.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 1,500 word knowledge-based assignment, 100 marks; 1 x 1,500 word practical case-study, 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. All Continuous Assessment elements are compulsory.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit coursework, as prescribed by the Department).

NU3092 Health, Ageing and the Lifecycle - Perspectives on General Nursing with Older People

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 40hr(s) Other (Lectures, tutorials and directed learning); 60hr(s) Other (Self directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Patricia Fehin, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: to develop an awareness of healthcare interventions which promote healthy ageing.
Module Content: Ageing in an inclusive society. The challenges and opportunities of changing demographics. Healthy active ageing, consideration of evidence based practice in the care of the older adult. Assessment and the presentation of illness in older people. Overview of chronic disease management with a particular focus on conditions associated with dementia. Co morbidities in the older person. Mental health issues and the older person. Transitions in care. Protection of older people including elder abuse and self-neglect. The arts as therapeutic modalities. Loss and end of life issues. Legal issues and legislation pertaining to the older adult. Safe medication management for the older adult. Communication and meaningful engagement with older people and their families.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Differentiate between the challenges and opportunities related to an ageing society and the influence of changing demographics on health and social policy.
  • Discuss the effects of the process of ageing on individuals and their families (from physical, psychosocial, sexual and cultural perspectives).
  • Undertake an holistic and person centred assessment of older people's health care needs.
  • Define what behaviours constitute meaningful engagement with older people.
  • Discuss how nurses can collaborate with and advocate for older people to promote their health and wellbeing.
  • Examine end of life issues, legal and ethical issues that impact on older people and the protection of vulnerable older people.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of pharmacological issues and safe medication management associated with older people.
  • Observe and describe the manifestations of health and disease as depicted through the medium of visual arts.
  • Draw on insights gained through the experience of arts appreciation, to enhance their own clinical practice.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Part 1: Essay; Part 2: Reflection on visit to art gallery).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance and Participation at all timetabled teaching activities.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery).

NU6070 Practice Enhancement for Nursing and Midwifery

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Blended Learning: 16hrs Lectures/Workshop (face to face); 184hrs Online Learning; Discussion Board Preparation and Participation, Required Reading, Assignment Preparation and Submission, Self-Directed Learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Landers, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To enable the nurse and midwife to apply critical theoretical insights to the enhancement of Nursing and Midwifery practice.
Module Content: Quality enhancement in nursing and midwifery, continuous quality improvement, stakeholder perspectives on quality health care, standard setting, performance monitoring, patient/client satisfaction with health services, quality and equity of provision, clinical quality, nursing audit.
Linking theory and practice. Learning experiences planned on individual interests, with emphases on gaining in-depth skills and knowledge of the clinical role in nursing or midwifery, the process of developing excellence and scholarship in nursing and midwifery practice, description, analysis and synthesis of the practice domain of nursing or midwifery, the process of enhancing the contribution of nursing to the delivery of care, action, strategies to improve nursing or midwifery practice, practice innovation.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Critically review the process of quality improvement and its application to clinical practice
  • Conduct an audit on an aspect relevant to clinical practice
  • Disseminate results to clinical teams in conjunction with Quality Office, Director of Nursing, Midwifery or Quality and clinical Team
  • Identify actions required to close the quality loop.
  • Critically reflect on the process of enhancing the contribution of nursing to the delivery of patient care.
  • Develop and demonstrate critical faculties through advanced reflection skills
  • Critically reflect on the process of introducing and evaluating nursing/ midwifery care initiatives at ward, unit or inter-departmental level
  • Evaluate and reflect on the effectiveness of various nursing strategies which can be used to advance practice
  • Demonstrate vision of professional practice that can be developed beyond scope of practice.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Poster Presentation: 180 marks; E activities: 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Completion of E activities.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revise and resubmit Poster Presentation, as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery. The mark for E Activities will be carried forward.).

HA1801 Renaissance Studies

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: 18hr(s) Lectures; 3hr(s) Tutorials; 8hr(s) Other (gallery field trip and 1hr resources workshop); 170hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, Staff, History of Art and guest lecturers, where appropriate.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the art and culture of the Italian Renaissance.
Module Content: This module will explore Italian Renaissance painting, sculpture and architecture. The Renaissance heritage of Rome, Florence and Venice will be explored through case studies. Artists studies will include Giotto di Bondone; Duccio di Buoninsegna; Leonardo Da Vinci; Michelangelo Buonarroti and Raphael Sanzio.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify the characteristics of Renaissance aesthetics with reference to a rediscovery of Classical Antiquity.
  • Distinguish different artistic techniques such as fresco and tempra painting.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the theory and practice of scientific perspective in Renaissance painting, sculpture and architecture.
  • Discern different types of patronage during the Renaissance period: the courts, Papacy and republics.
  • Examine art writings of the period, principally, Vasari's Lives of the Artists (1550s), and critically evaluate the ways they establish and validate canonical interpretations of the discipline of art history.
  • Develop critical analysis of the Renaissance period through written critical reflection and gallery visits (Hunt Museum Limerick & National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin).
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,500 word written portfolio of work, 100 marks; 1 x 2,000 word field trip written project, 90 marks; 500 word contribution to a discussion forum (either in-class or online) visual analysis forum assessed through written online posting, 10 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Director, Centre for Adult Continuing Education).

ER4001 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.
Pre-requisite(s): GG3052
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Summer after Third University Examination, and Periods 1 and 2 of Fourth Year).
Teaching Methods: Other (6-8 weeks Field and/or Laboratory-based Research Project).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Andrew Wheeler, Department of Geology.
Lecturer(s): Prof Andrew Wheeler, Department of Geology; Staff, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geology.
Module Objective: To undertake an independent research project.
Module Content: An independent research project involving fieldwork and/or laboratory work on an applied topic in Ireland or abroad. The fieldwork is carried out during the summer of Third Year together with some of the laboratory research work, when applicable. A 10,000 word, typed and hard cover bound report is written during the Fourth Year and is submitted prior to the last day of Semester 2.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Plan and design a research project under supervision.
  • Formulate a research question
  • Use available databases
  • Record appropriate field data
  • Analyse data collected in order to establish relationship and patterns
  • Write a report of the research project, including the conclusions drawn from the data.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Project Aims and Procedures Document 15 marks; Project Interim Presentation 15 marks; Supervisors Report 15 marks; in class test 45 marks;1 x 10,000 word Research Project to be submitted during Semester 2, 210 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition students must achieve a Pass judgement in their Continuous Assessment (Project Aims and Procedures Document; Project Interim Presentation; Supervisors Report; in class test;1 x 10,000 word Research Project) independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and re-submit research project for evaluation by mid-August as prescribed by both Departments.).

PF4015 Novel Drug Delivery

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 70.
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 25hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 3 x 3hr(s) Workshops (and tutorials); 110hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Katie Ryan, School of Pharmacy.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Pharmacy, guest lecturers.
Module Objective: To study and evaluate the design and formulation of targeted and other novel drug delivery systems and technologies.
Module Content: This module builds on the skills and competencies achieved in the earlier Pharmacy modules. It will cover content related to:
Veterinary dosage forms. Advanced materials employed for drug delivery.
Novel formulation design and drug delivery. Targeted drug delivery approaches and applications. Medical devices. Advanced therapeutic approaches. Cell therapeutics and delivery. Radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear pharmacy operations.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Discuss the challenges associated with formulation and drug delivery.
  • Describe and critically assess formulations and devices employed for drug delivery in humans and animals.
  • Assess specific strategies, formulations and technologies that have been employed to achieve modified and targeted drug delivery.
  • Justify the development of novel drug delivery systems based on relevant factors including drug properties, clinical considerations, route of delivery, vehicle characteristics and release profile etc.
  • Design appropriate novel formulations in a practical setting in response to defined criteria.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (mid term examination 10 marks; laboratory class assignment 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral if required.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% In addition, students must obtain at least 50% in each of the End of Year Examinations and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Pharmacy).

EN6002 Dissertation in Comparative Aesthetics and the Arts

Credit Weighting: 30
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 3.
Teaching Methods: Other (Individual Supervision).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of English.
Module Objective: To analyse and critically discuss an approved topic in detail.
Module Content: A dissertation written under the supervision of a staff member on an approved topic.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Engage in original research;
  • Develop individual research strategies and produce critical bibliographies;
  • Identify and utilise major interpretive and argumentative strategies;
  • Analyse and criticise relevant positions and approaches on an academic level appropriate to postgraduate research;
  • Demonstrate ability to write critically, logically and systematically, using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research;
  • Argue for an original position on an advanced level of critical reflection.
Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (max 15,000 words) to be submitted by the first Friday in October).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

GV3219 International Relations of Asia

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.
Lecturer(s): Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the political, security and economic interests of Asia's major powers.
Module Content: The aim of this module is to provide a critical analysis of Asia's major powers as well as its international linkages and dynamics.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe Asia's complex history, its geographical reach, bilateral relations and emerging multilateral institutions
  • Differentiate between the main theoretical perspectives on the international relations of Asia
  • Analyse the political, security and economic interests of the region's major powers
  • Identify and assess the role played by external actors
  • Evaluate the merits of bilateral and multilateral cooperation
  • Evaluate the role of non-state actors for the regional economic and political development.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

FE6009 Food Marketing Channel Analysis Part 2

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 40hr(s) Lectures; 4hr(s) Other (computer sessions); 8hr(s) Other (site visits).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: This module aims to develop the participant's ability to critique and evaluate marketing strategies developed and implemented at the retail and brand management stages of national and international food channels.
Module Content: Trends in national and international food retailing; Shopper Behaviour; Category Management, Brand Equity; Brand Management in the food sector; Customer and brand portfolio decision-making.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Define categories from a consumer's and shopper's perspective
  • Develop category management plans
  • Present category management proposals
  • Evaluate negotiation positions between retailers and suppliers
  • Critically evaluate a product's brand equity and brand identity system
  • Evaluate brand management strategies throughout the food marketing channel.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Category Management Plan - 40 marks, Brand Report - 30 marks, In-class test - 30 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

SC4001 Sociology of Health: Contemporary Debates and Holistic Healthcare for the 21st Century

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 200.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: Other (24hrs Lectures/Group Work/Tutorials/Seminars).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.
Module Objective: Module Objective: This course is designed as a discursive and interactive forum to provide a wide variety of learning opportunities and to facilitate the acquisition of a range of competencies and flexible disciplinary skills.
Module Content: Current debates: Sociology in Healthcare / Sociology of Healthcare.
Sociological Theory and Nursing practice: Issues of power, knowledge and discourse, the social process of knowledge production, communication and the media. Biomedical, Complementary and Alternative Models of Healthcare. Nursing professionalisation and the production of new nursing knowledge. Iatrogenic illness: the case of 'Medicines out of Control. Bureaucracy in healthcare, a barrier to organisational change. Lay-professional and Inter-Professional interaction in Healthcare. Changing models of healthcare, co-cultural and multicultural approaches. Understanding the process of transformation and change in healthcare. A case study approach will be used throughout in an analysis of Current Debates / biomedical solutions and alternatives.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Outline and summarise the concepts of thinking sociologically and engaging the sociological imagination
  • Outline the main ideas and arguments of each of the theorists presented in the course
  • Compare and contrast theoretical perspectives presented
  • Critique and evaluate the relevance of sociological concepts, theoretical insights and research data for analysis of contemporary healthcare issues.
  • .
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay, 80 marks; Attendance 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. To meet professional requirements attendance at lectures, tutorials, seminars etc. will be monitored.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department. The mark for attendance is carried forward).

IS4414 Information Systems Management

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Up to 22hrs Practicals/Laboratory Sessions, as specified by the Department).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Mr Gerard Daniel O'Riordan, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To provide students with a thorough understanding of the fundamental issues in managing the Information Systems function of an organisation.
Module Content: IS Management: Managing the IS department; Sourcing and retaining skills; Managing IS teams; The economics of information; Managing IS and electronic business investments; Administering the cost of IS - charge out strategies; The outsourcing alternative.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Employ different approaches to the actual management of change especially in relation to change enabled through ICT
  • Identify the main ethical issues which arise from the use of ICT and develop an approach to manage these
  • Outline the main technical components to Service Orientation Architecture and System Integration and to assess the business benefits which might arise from their employment
  • Identify the main issues arising from business/ICT alignment and to employ a portfolio approach to integrating ICT and business strategies.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Course/Project Work - 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

FE6121 Food Business Project

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Independent Research with Supervision).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To provide students with the necessary research skills and the latest research methodologies to facilitate the analysis of key issues in the evolving food supply chain.
Module Content: Detailed investigation of selected food marketing or food economics issues associated with a particular food product, process, firm or marketing channel as approved by the Programme Director.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Analyse the research process and its key components
  • Design a research process and identify a suitable research question
  • Complete a literature review on a selected topic.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Literature Review - 10,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

HA2003 Modernism in Europe

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sabine Tania Kriebel, Discipline of Art History.
Lecturer(s): Dr Sabine Tania Kriebel, Discipline of Art History.
Module Objective: To study themes and issues in modern art from 1839 to 1945.
Module Content: This module will examine concepts of modernity and modernism in the visual arts. The course is chronological, moving through various moments in modern art from the invention of photography to the advent of totalitarianism in Europe. The module examines this wide-ranging visual history in context, considering discourses of medium-specificity, technological innovations, art and politics, and aesthetic debates.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify the defining features of modern art 1839-1945;
  • Relate artistic practice to the social, political, and economic context of the period:
  • Relate artistic practice to relevant critical and theoretical texts;
  • Identify a representative selection of the major works from 1839-1945;
  • Analyse works in visual terms and discuss their significance in both artistic contexts and within the wider context of their production;
  • Write analytically about a specific work or body of works, incorporating factual information, scholarly research and critical interpretation in a clear and coherent argument for which the artwork provides visual evidence.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Visual Test: 40 marks and Critical Essay: 60 marks (2,500 words).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing Continuous Assessment must submit a piece/pieces of assessed coursework, as prescribed by the Department, by third Friday in August).

HS2024 Galician Language and Culture I

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (/language classes); 12 x 1hr(s) Other (online/ conversation/ directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Martín Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Martín Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Module Objective: To achieve an initial proficiency in both spoken and written Galician. To provide an introduction to Galician cultural and political history.
Module Content: Language classes and oral practice. Introduction to topics related to Galician cultural traditions and their contribution to the formation of national identity.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Maintain a basic conversation about daily activities and personal information.
  • Interact in hotels, shops, tourist and post offices, hospitals, banks, etc., either explaining their queries or interpreting the information received.
  • Interpret information and follow instructions about basic needs like addresses, shopping, eating, health, etc.
  • Find relevant information in catalogues, menus, articles, letters, timetables, etc.
  • Write short messages about daily activities, letters about their immediate experience, fill in forms with personal information.
  • Describe and outline the physical and human geography of Galicia.
  • Identify the major landmarks in Galician political and cultural history.
  • Outline the history of the Galician language.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 1500 word essay (20); language exercises (20)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((A pass Continuous Assessment and/or Oral mark is carried forward to the Autumn. Students failing Continuous Assessment must sit a 1.5 hr written test. The Oral Examination must also be re-taken, if failed).).

HA2017 Legible/Visible: Art and Interpretation

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Knowles, Discipline of Art History.
Lecturer(s): Dr Flavio Boggi, Discipline of Art History.
Module Objective: To critically examine different modes of writing about artworks: description, analysis, interpretation, explanation and judgement.
Module Content: This module explores a fundamental question: what are we doing when we write about art? What is the relationship between our visual experience of artworks and the language that we use to describe, analyse, interpret, explain and judge them? And what is the difference between these different modes of art writing: what is the purpose of each, what different skills do they require, and how are they related? This module explores these questions by focusing upon specific artworks and texts from a variety of historical moments, in order to encourage a sharper awareness of what we are doing when we write about art, and how different modes of art writing yield different results.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Use a variety of conceptual tools to more precisely describe, analyse, interpret, explain and judge different kinds of artworks;
  • Understand key methodological concepts derived from art history, cultural theory and philosophy;
  • Combine the close analysis of specific objects and texts with broader modes of methodological inquiry;
  • Produce robust independent research replete with full systems of referencing appropriate to academic standards.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay - 85 marks; attendance and class participation - 15 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Any failed or non-submitted essays must be submitted by the third Friday in August prior to the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the Department).

EN6057 Writing for the Media

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 8 x 1.5hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 2 hours; Associated Reading, 2 hours; Research 4 hours; Consultation 1 hour).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.
Module Objective: This module introduces the student to various forms of journalistic writing that bear a close relationship to fiction practice - feature writing, reviewing, blog-posting and essay-writing - through reading and craft-based practice.
Module Content: The module will use the work of leading journalists and essayists to familiarise students with various strands of journalistic writing and will involve a series of practice-based writing assignments, which will include learning to pitch for prospective publications, either print or on-line.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Be familiar with a number of journalistic forms of writing
  • Be able to produce sustained writing in one or more of the forms studied.
  • Know how to pitch and tailor writing to a target market.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio with agreement of programme co-ordinator, 80 marks; pitch and placement, 10 marks; participation and contribution, 10 marks).).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

GG3048 Environmental Economic Geography

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.
Lecturer(s): Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.
Module Objective: Environmental economic geography takes a geographical approach to the interface between production, consumption and environmental impact. In particular, to critically evaluate strategies for dealing with municipal and industrial wastes, scrap and by-products that reduce the environmental impact of production and consumption.
Module Content: The module examines the relationship between production, consumption and the environment via an examination of the evolving economic geography of wastes (particularly scrap materials, industrial wastes and by-products). Particular emphasis will be placed on ecological modernisation, industrial ecology, industrial symbiosis, eco-industrial parks, material cycling, life cycle analysis, material flow analysis, and other novel strategies to redirect wastes back into production and consumption processes.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate a sound understanding of the evolving role of waste in contemporary societies.
  • Appreciate that industrial wastes, scrap and by-products are often internally heterogeneous resulting in widely differing geographies/strategies for reuse from local scale eco-industrial parks to global commodity markets.
  • Become familiar with the policies and instruments designed to enhance the environmental performance of industry and learn how to evaluate their effectiveness.
  • Understand differences in supply and demand for recyclables and by-products are driven by current potential stocks of recyclables which result from the broader development trajectories of various regions of the world.
  • Appreciate the societal notions of waste and the policies that governments adopt to deal with such wastes are culturally specific and related to wider ideas about the nature of capitalism and the role of the state in regulating business and environmental protection.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

ED6202 Assessment for and of Individual Pupil Learning and Attainment

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 20 x 1.5hr(s) Lectures (In addition, students will undertake school/classroom tasks and undertake considerable independent learning time.); 4 x 1.5hr(s) Workshops.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dan O'Sullivan, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Education.
Module Objective: Students will evaluate and use appropriate tests in pupil diagnosis and attainment. Students will interpret, apply and review tests results in appropriate teaching methodologies.
Teachers will collaborate with other professionals, school colleagues and home support in assessing, planning, implementing and reviewing educational plans.
Module Content: Key concepts in psychological and sociocultural learning theories, curriculum development, assessment and test administration and interpretation with particular emphasis on differentiation in the planning, implementation and review of appropriate curriculum for pupils with SEN.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Evaluate appropriate assessment materials for pupil diagnosis and attainment
  • Apply and administer such test and assessment materials in classroom practice
  • Interpret such test and assessment results
  • Implement and review appropriate intervention and support, particularly in respect of literacy and numeracy needs
  • Collaborate effectively with other professionals, school colleagues and parents/carers.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3000-5000 words assignment [Two Individual Education Plans]).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (within two years of first registering on the course).

AS3020 Issues in Contemporary Korea and Japan

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kevin Cawley, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Module Objective: This module introduces the student to many aspects of contemporary Korean and Japanese society, including modernisation and democratisation, the changing family, gender issues, religion, the political system and popular culture.
Module Content: This module focuses on the experiences of the two countries during the age of colonialism leading to their often problematic relationship, the Second World War followed by the Korean War, the national division of Korea and the recovery of both Japan and Korea to two of the most advanced nations in the world. It will compare major social and political issues in the two countries, as well as some of the social challenges arising from their modern transitions. It will also deal with the conflicting cultural identities of Japan, North and South Korea.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of major events in twentieth- century Korean and Japanese history.
  • Critically assess the growth and development of democracy in modern Korean and Japanese societies
  • Explain the impact of the Korean Wave (Hallyu) and Cool Japan in the field of popular culture.
  • Identify issues arising from the national division, multiculturalism and conflicting cultural identities.
  • Understand the changes in the family in Japan and Korea due to modernisation and changing gender roles and perceptions.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word (max) essay - 100 marks;1 x 1,500 word (max) essay - 60 marks;1 x Class Presentation - 40 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AC6118 Aircraft Leasing

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mark Mulcahy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Prof Mark Hutchinson, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: The focus of this module is to allow participants to understand the profile of the international aviation finance industry.
Module Content: Legal, tax, financial reporting and risk issues of purchasing aircraft; how to finance an aircraft purchase; the key issues faced when leasing an aircraft; and, specific Regulatory issues (e.g. EU regulation, Cape Town Convention).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Understand the legal, tax, financial reporting and risk issues of purchasing aircraft;
  • Compute, understand and compare the different methods of financing an aircraft purchase;
  • Interpret the key issues faced when leasing an aircraft;
  • Develop key analysis tools to understand the effect of specific Regulatory issues (e.g. EU regulation, Cape Town Convention) on the sector.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Contribution/Participation - 10 marks; Continuous assessment 1 x 2,000 word case study - 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

EN6031 Poetry 1

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 4 hours; Associated Reading, 4 hours; Research 8 hours; Consultation 2 hours.).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jools Gilson, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Prof Jools Gilson, Department of Music, Writer-in-Residence; Visiting Writers; Staff, School of English.
Module Objective: The module introduces students to advanced methods in the writing of poetry across a range of forms. The workshop examines connections between aesthetic techniques and practice and provides an intensive examination of the processes by which poetry is created.
Module Content: Students of the module will be exposed to historically-informed and theoretically-rigorous approaches to the area of poetry, and will be introduced to some of the most influential contemporary critical and practical models currently being applied to the writing of poetry. Texts studied will include work from major poets. Current creative theory and practice will also figure significantly in the module content. The module will focus on developing the student's own creative practice in the field of poetry and will include self-reflective essays on the developing process of their own writing and an awareness of the structural challenges and the requirements of particular forms. Research methods appropriate to the forms of writing taught are addressed as part of the module.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Discuss key aspects of the theories of poetry
  • Analyse some aspects of the relations between their own writing practice and these theories
  • Write critically and analytically on subjects within the field of poetry
  • Produce a portfolio of poetry, developed through clear and recordable processes of enquiry and selection.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (portfolio with agreement with programme co-ordinator, 160 marks; preparation, 10 marks; contribution 10 marks; and prepared presentation 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

GV4000 The Politics of Public Health Management

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator:
Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.
Module Objective: To Examine the impact of Public Management on public health services.
Module Content: Theories and practice of Public Management in the context of public health.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Differentiate between the traditional model of public administration and new public management.
  • Assess the significance of the politics/administration dichotomy and bureaucracy in shaping public administration.
  • Evaluate the roles played by politicians and administrators in the public service modernisation agenda
  • Identify weaknesses in the concept of new public management.
  • Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses.
  • Propose potential solutions to the problems raised.
  • Analyse the tools introduced by new public management, e.g. benchmarking, service indicators.
  • Apply new public management to the Irish public service, e.g. civil service, local government, HSE.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Article Review 30 marks, 2,500 word case study assignment (70 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of cou