Course Modules

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AM6006 Mathematical Modelling of Biological Systems with Differential Equations

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): AM6002, AM6003
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Video Lectures Online); 36 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Online Self-Directed Learning); 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Webinars).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Mulchrone, Department of Applied Mathematics.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Mathematics.
Module Objective: From a mathematical perspective this course provides an introduction to the solution of ordinary differential equations including phase plane analysis, equilibria and stability. Modeling skills are developed by studying detailed examples of model development and interpretation taken from the biological research literature including: population models, fish stocks, speciation, predator-prey interactions, epidemics and ecology.
Module Content: First order ordinary differential equations, population models, exponential growth, the logistic equation, fish stocks, stability, speciation, systems of first order ordinary differential equations, predator prey interactions, phase plane analysis, tree ecology, vectors, epidemics, equilibrium, the ozone layer, stability in non-linear systems, restoration ecology, matrices, Australian predators, advection, diffusion, pattern formation.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Solve first order linear ordinary differential equations. Formulate, solve and interpret simple mathematical models in biology. Construct and interpret phase diagrams for non-linear differential equations. Identify points of equilibria and determine their stability. Critically assess mathematical models presented in the biological research literature.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Homework Assignments by 4 [10 marks each], Project report [40 marks]: Project Presentation [20 marks]).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by Module Coordinator.).

SC3055 Research Project 2

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): SC2002
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Third year Research Project which must be taught in Semester 1 and Semester 2).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 48hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.
Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology; Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology; Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology; Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology; Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.
Module Objective: To provide a discursive environment enabling students carry out an extensive research project.
Module Content: Taking the form of seminars, this module focuses on a substantive research topic (e.g. the symbolic order of waste, blood and society, Northern Ireland, risk and responsibility, the media, gender and development, feminism, globalisation and the economy, subcultures, etc.). Through the discussion of theory, methodology and research, the participants are initially prepared for individual research on selected aspects of the topic. Subsequently, the emphasis shifts to the discussion of the research in progress and the presentation of research projects and research essays to the group.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Students who liaise with their supervisor and complete their Sociology Research Project are offered a wide range of opportunities to develop new competencies and transferable disciplinary skills. On completion of the project students should be able to: Describe both the subject matter and aim of the research Summarize and discuss the theoretical literature relevant to the substantive subject matter of the project Critically evaluate the methodological literature relevant to the project and clearly describe the methods utilized during the course of empirical research Synthesize their empirical research and theoretical knowledge in order to develop new understandings of their selected topic.
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Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 10,000 word Research Project 255 marks - submission of a literature review 30 marks- Attendance 15 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmission of revised Project, as prescribed by the Department.

NU4069 Intellectual Disability Nursing Practice

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2 and 3.
Teaching Methods: 37weeks(s) Placements (1 week supernumerary Placement and 36 weeks of Internship Practice Placements (supervision, role modelling, and reflection); 10hr(s) Lectures (Directed Learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lynne Marsh, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To facilitate students' continuing practice with particular emphasis on achieving all competencies at Identification and Internalisation levels in nursing care activities within the five domains of Nursing practice, as specified by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland (NMBI) and Clinical skills as specified by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.
Module Content: Clinical practice in intellectual disability nursing units/contexts with an emphasis on five domains of clinical practice (1. professional/ethical practice 2. holistic approaches to care and the integration of knowledge 3. interpersonal relationships 4. organisational and management of care and 5. personal and professional) and promoting health and well being of clients and their families. Protected Reflective Education In Practice (PREP) to incorporate sessions relating to five domains of clinical practice, key nursing practice and management roles (including medication management) and client safety.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Engage in organisation and management of nursing care showing increasing independence since year 3. Discuss the concept of person-centred care, representative of clients preferences, values and needs within the context of their families, communities and the health care delivery systems. Discuss competencies and clinical skills achieved at Identification and Internalisation levels with registered nurses using examples from clinical practice. Analyse own professional development by way of self-reflection and enquiry. Demonstrate self-direction in prioritising and delivering nursing care. Provide evidence based care in all nursing care activities. Evaluate clinical situations utilising critical analysis and problem solving skills. Discuss and manage allocated case load of patients/clients (with minimal supervision). Discuss national (e.g. NMBI) and local (Health service provider and School of Nursing and Midwifery) policies and guidelines.
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Assessment: Completion of required Competencies and Clinical skills at Identification and Internalisation levels (Competency Booklet) (Pass/Fail). Attendance in Clinical Practice over 37 weeks as scheduled in the programme (Pass/Fail). Competencies and TS&I at Identification and Internalisation level. Completion of the relevant sections of the Assessment of Competence Booklet (i.e. relevant reflective notes, interviews etc.) must be achieved by the end of the final placement in Year 4. Completion of Clinical hours as recorded by the ALO in COPE and verified by the AO, SoNM, UCC (Yes/No). Clinical Hours record time sheet of any 'repeat time' and/or 'time owing' ((if relevant) (Yes/No).
Compulsory Elements: Students must complete all Preparatory Practice Requirements prior to commencing clinical practice placements as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement for achievement of clinical competencies and mandatory therapeutic supports and interventions (i.e. reflective notes, interviews, placement details, declaration etc). Students must have achieved ALL competencies and mandatory therapeutic supports and interventions at Identification and Internalisation level by the end of the final placement in Year 4. Completion of the required reflective notes, interviews and clinical placement details, signed and dated by both student and registered nurse. Completion of scheduled clinical time (37 weeks) Completion of student 'End of Year Declaration' and 'Student self-assessment' pages in Assessment of Competence Booklet.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Passed elements of continuous assessment are carried forward. Failed elements must be repeated as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery. Students must keep a Record of Clinical Hours of any 'repeat time' and/or 'time owing' and submit to the Allocations Office, School of Nursing & Midwifery, UCC. Students failing to achieve a pass judgement at the Winter Examination Board will be required to repeat the module in a repeat year. In addition, failure to attend 'repeat time' and/or 'time owing' as prescribed/scheduled by the School of Nursing and Midwifery will result in a fail judgement and students will be required to repeat the module in a repeat year.

GG6502 Introduction to Remote Sensing

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.
Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.
Module Objective: To provide a foundation course in Remote Sensing and image processing as applied to environmental data in geography and the earth sciences.
Module Content: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic concepts and principles in Remote Sensing and to explore the application of the technology. Hands-on training in image processing and interpretation will be provided in the laboratory sessions. The module focuses on the treatment of digital data as acquired through a variety of orbiting and airborne platforms.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain how digital images are acquired by satellite sensors. Differentiate between a range of different satellite platforms and the data they collect. Demonstrate knowledge of the electromagnetic spectrum and the interaction of radiation of different wavelengths with the Earth's surface. Describe some of the applications of digital images. Use a standard image processing software package. Interpret digital images acquired by different sensors. Correctly apply basic image processing techniques in order to enhance the quality of information derived from images.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 1,500 word reports (20 marks each); 3 x computer based practicals (10 marks each)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. .
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed in-class practicals and assignments as prescribed by the Department).

HI2003 Culture and Power: Renaissance Intellectual History, 1450-1650

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Hiram Morgan, School of History.
Lecturer(s): Dr Hiram Morgan, School of History.
Module Objective: To examine culture as political, religious and social propaganda.
Module Content: This module seeks a deeper insight into the Renaissance and Reformation period by looking at examples of art, literature, architecture, music and science. Topics include: the iconography of piety; the new information technology of printing (which facilitated not only diffusion of knowledge but also questioning of received knowledge); new learning and new theologies; the similarities in the Protestant and Catholic Reformations (attacking popular culture, enforcing social control, domesticating women); the consolidation of anciens regimes.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify the major intellectual and cultural developments of Renaissance and Reformation period. Relate the evidence presented in the Culture and Power course to the relevant chronology and historiographical debates. Communicate in writing effectively and to present work about the Culture and Power course in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions. Construct a relevant argument about the Culture and Power course that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations. Locate, gather, sift and synthesise source material presented during the Culture and Power. Work independently on the Culture and Power course under the constraints imposed by the component of assessment, for example: word limit, time limit and deadlines. Think critically and creatively about the Culture and Power course so as to bring the necessary skills to their assessed work in this module.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (A failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

MB4110 Food Fermentation and Mycology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Gerald F. Fitzgerald, School of Microbiology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Niall O'Leary, School of Microbiology; Prof Gerald F. Fitzgerald, School of Microbiology.
Module Objective: To provide comprehensive information on the use of micro-organisms in food fermentation. Information on spoilage of foods and animal feeds by fungi and yeasts. Information on the main mycotoxin producing fungi.
Module Content: Application of bacteria, yeasts and moulds in the production of fermented dairy, vegetable and meat products. The development of starter cultures used in food fermentation. The metabolic activities of lactic acid bacteria. Optimisation of starter culture performance. Food Spoilage yeasts, including preservative resistance and resistance to low water activity environments. Mycotoxin production by Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium species.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the nature, significance and application of starter cultures of lactic acid bacteria used in food fermentations; Discuss the challenges of using starter cultures in large, modern industrial scale fermentation processes; Outline the microbiological processes involved in the production of a range of fermented dairy, meat, soy, and vegetable products; Explain the role of yeasts and moulds in spoilage of foods; Discuss issues surrounding mycotoxin production in foods.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Assignment 1 x 1,000 word Report 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AC3008 Auditing

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire O'Sullivan Rochford, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Mr Sean Power, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the core principles of Auditing.
Module Content: Theory and practice of internal and stockholder auditing.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Outline the purpose and role of Auditing. Describe the various stages of the Audit Process Model. Assess the importance of risk for an auditor. Discuss the importance of internal controls to the auditor. Identify behaviours which constitute unprofessional practice in the auditor - client relationship. Conduct and document audit work for a number of key business cycles.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1.5 hr(s) Interim examination 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

CS2513 Intermediate Programming

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 120.
Pre-requisite(s): CS1117
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marc Van Dongen, Department of Computer Science.
Lecturer(s): Dr Marc Van Dongen, Department of Computer Science.
Module Objective: To build on the foundation of CS1117, particularly in the areas of object-oriented concepts and library usage, in designing and implementing computer programs of increasing sophistication and complexity.
Module Content: · review of classes and objects;
· inheritance;
· polymorphism;
· object-oriented design;
· generators;
· special methods;
· the use of language libraries for tasks such as graphical user interfaces, event-driven programming, operating system interaction, regular expressions.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    express the principles of object-oriented design; explain the use of some prominent language libraries; show significant improvement in their overall programming skills.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (As prescribed by the Department: Tests and/or Laboratory Assignments).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

IT5001 Translation Project

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): LL6018 or equivalent
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Daragh O'Connell, Department of Italian.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Italian.
Module Objective: To develop advanced translation skills between Italian and English, focusing on translation into the L1.
Module Content: The module will prepare students to translate a 1,500-word text of their choice from Italian to English or English to Italian, drawing on appropriate theories, methodologies and approaches to the translation of different text-type and genres, encouraging them to reflect on issues such as target audience and function and to use a range of translation resources. Students will be expected to agree a project with their tutor, for which they will translate a text from Italian to English or English to Italian and provide commentary on the text, in the form of annotations, where appropriate, and in a separate analytical essay in English.* Periodical tutorial and/or seminar support will be provided.
*Students will normally be expected to translate into their first language.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    demonstrate knowledge of the main areas of debate in the analysis and practice of translation understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to the analysis and practice of translation analyse and describe the different parameters which constitute a text's translatability show competence in the use of a variety of translation resources show awareness of key differences between the two linguistic systems produce a critical translation from Italian into English or English to Italian (see above) present written translations in a professional manner
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Translation Project (1,500 words translation + 1,500 words commentary)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

CM6020 Research Project and Dissertation in Analytical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 30
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2 and 3.
Teaching Methods: 20 x 1weeks(s) Other (Independent Supervised Research Project).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.
Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.
Module Objective: Training through research in Analytical Chemistry/Science research and problem-solving skills, litearature searching and presentation skills.
Module Content: The project requires students to carry out innovative research into new methods/applications in Analytical Chemistry/Science, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, work in a team, write and submit a bound research dissertation. The project work should specifically explore new analytical developments, such as new mechanisms, devices, materials or measurements. Candidates carry out their research in the laboratories of the University or an approved academic or industrial partner.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Co-ordinate and execute a programme of research. Survey the peer-reviewed research literature. Present the findings of research in a written, bound dissertation. Document experimental procedures and outcomes in appropriate formats. Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on experimental findings.
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Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Written Presentation of Research in a Dissertation).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Written Dissertation.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

GA3008 An tÚrscéal sa Ghaeilge

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Iosmheid 6.
Pre-requisite(s): Ní hann dó
Co-requisite(s): Ní hann dó
Teaching Period(s): Seimeastar 1 agus 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1 (h)uair(e) an chloig Léachtaí.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Pádraig Ó Macháin, Roinn Na Nua-Ghaeilge.
Lecturer(s): Dr Sorcha Mairead Nic Lochlainn, Roinn Na Nua-Ghaeilge.
Module Objective: Scileanna léirmheastóireachta agus scríbhneoireachta a mhúineadh tré shaothair phróis a léamh agus a phlé ag seimineáir agus aistí liteartha a scríobh.
Module Content: An t-úrscéal mar fhoirm liteartha; an t-úrscéal sa Nua-Ghaeilge - a chineál; pléifear ceisteanna a bhaineann leis an réadachas, an scigaithris, metaficsean.
Learning Outcomes: Nuair a bheidh an modúl seo déanta ag na mic léinn beidh:
    taithí acu ar shaothair fhada próis a léamh go criticiúil; léargas acu ar an úrscéal mar fhoirm liteartha; taithí acu ar scileanna mionanailíseacha liteartha; taithí acu ar abhar liteartha a phlé i bhfoirm aistí.
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Assessment: Marc ar fad 100: An obair a dheanfai i gcaitheamh na bliana 100 marc (3 x Aistí spriocanna le socrú leis an léachtóir).
Compulsory Elements: An obair a dhéanfaí i gcaitheamh na bliana.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Náid (0) an marc a bhronnfar ar aon cheacht / aiste / tionscnamh a bheidh déanach (nó neachtar acu tabharfar teip don mac / iníon léinn sa mhodúl más modúl 'Pas/Teipe' atá i gceist).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: Gan Scrúdú Scríofa Foirmiúil.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Na haistí a dhéanamh arís agus iad a chur isteach roimh scrúdaithe an Fhómhair.

HI2043 Digital History

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); Directed Study (online collaboration and discussion, group work and self-directed learning to fulfil the assessment component).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.
Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.
Module Objective: To introduce basic core concepts in digital history, lay foundations for collaboration in digital history work.
Module Content: This module will introduce students to the practice of 'Digital History' - history using contemporary digital tools. It will survey the development of digital history, introduce students to the capture of historical data in digital forms, and apply some basic digital methods to conduct simple analyses of digital sources. The course will look at current international approaches and projects, and explore how they might be applied to local primary data. In the course students will begin to develop skills in online and collaborative work which are an important part of the contemporary practice of digital history, and build the foundations for their own digital personal learning environments.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate knowledge of the main developments in the use of digital tools for historical research; Demonstrate awareness of a range of contemporary research in digital history; Locate and evaluate sources in the online environment; Create a digital version of a text based source; Create a digital version of a non-text source; Conduct basic qualitative and quantitative exploration of both text ad non-text sources in History using digital tools; Begin to develop a personal learning environment using digital tools; Collaborate on research based learning using digitised primary sources in history; Explore tools and methods to create their own personal learning environment to locate and mange knowledge digitally.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (portfolio of individual and group creation of digital historical archives, analysis of digital sources, presentation of results of analysis of digital sources, use of digital tools to locate, evaluate and manage research, active participation in online networks and class discussion forums, documented in reflective writing by blogging. Equivalent to about 5,000 words in total).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks in passed elements of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

MA4062 Topics in Modern Algebra

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 75.
Pre-requisite(s): MA1057 and MA1058, or MA1055; MA2055
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Bernard Hanzon, School of Mathematical Sciences.
Lecturer(s): Dr Andrei Mustata, Department of Mathematics.
Module Objective: To further develop major concepts in Modern Algebra with applications.
Module Content: A range of algebraic concepts and techniques chosen from rings and modules, computational algebra techniques and optimization, group representations, fields and field extensions, Galois theory, Lie groups and algebra, homology, algebraic varieties.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Compute Groebner bases and apply elimination theory techniques; Calculate homology groups of complexes; Perform irreducible decompositions for given representations by finite groups and some classical groups; Compute the Galois group of given field extensions; Explain the connection between an affine algebraic variety and its ring/field of functions and use these to understand basic properties of given varieties. Apply homology techniques to calculate simple invariants of algebraic varieties.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (2 in-class tests of equal weight).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

LW6101 Introduction to Planning Law

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Tutorials; 75 x 1hr(s) Other (Self directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.
Lecturer(s): Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding of principal elements of the planning acts and regulations.
Module Content: Introducion to key legal principles and concepts; The control of development; The Development Plan; Environmental protection; Compensation; Planning Appeals and Judicial Reviews; Planning procedures; Building and other relevant legal codes.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Outline the sources of planning law Identify the policy factors shaping the development of planning law Extract the basic principles of planning law from relevant legislation and case law Explore the interaction between EC environmental law and national planning law Apply the basic pronciples of planning law to given factual scenarios
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 67 marks; Continuous Assessment 33 marks (1 x 3,000 to 4,000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. All elements are compulsory. In addition, participants are required to sign an attendance register at each class of the module. If a participant's attendance falls below 80% he / she will be debarred from entering the examination for the module and will be required to repeat the module in accordance with the repeat year requirements.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

EN6053 Old English Literature to c. 1200

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 1, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus directed study (associated reading and consultation hours)).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English; Staff, School of English.
Module Objective: This module examines Old English poetry and prose in its literary, material and cultural context, placing canonical texts such as Beowulf and The Wanderer in dialogue with less-studied works.
Module Content: The course will consider issues in Old English writing such as authorship and authority, manuscript compilation and genre, and the political and gendered inflection of heroic culture in Anglo-Saxon England. It will explore the contexts of literary production in insular and continental environments in this period, and the legacy and influence of Anglo-Saxon literature in later traditions.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Critically read and analyse a range of primary texts in Old English, experiencing both 'canonical' and marginal works as well as both traditionally literary and non-literary writings. Relate primary texts to existing debates and scholarship concerning these texts, their cultural milieu, and the historical understanding of the period Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in the defined subject area of the course.
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Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000- word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and participation 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

RD1007 Theoretical Dental Hygiene 2

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 14.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 60hr(s) Lectures; 50hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Martina Collins, University Dental School & Hospital.
Lecturer(s): Ms Martina Collins, University Dental School & Hospital; Staff, University Dental School & Hospital.
Module Objective: The principle aim of this module is to provide theoretical knowledge relevant to dental hygiene.
Module Content: Dental plaque biofilm. Introduction to periodontal disease.
Periodontal assessment and treatment.Periodontal indices.Brushing techniques/ Oral hygiene measures/Oral Hygiene interdental aids.Dentifrices/Types and Ingredients.Chemical agents in dental care.Outline to risk factors in periodontal disease-local/systemic. Effects of smoking /smoking cessation. Factors relating to dental care for patients with significant medical conditions. Basic introduction to radiographic analysis. Record keeping. Scope of practice. Law and ethics. Behavioural science.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Recognize the significance of plaque biofilm. Discuss dentifrices and chemical plaque control. Describe available oral hygiene aids and demonstrate an understanding of their role. Enhance and build on knowledge relating to medical conditions. Discuss the effects of smoking and the benefits of smoking cessation. Develop a fundamental knowledge of periodontal disease, assessment and treatment; understand the benefits of modifying risk factors in periodontal disease. Demonstrate a basic understanding of radiographic analysis. Develop knowledge and skills in communication. Be familiar with scope of practice, accurate record keeping and ethical/ legal issues in relation to dental hygiene.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (in class tests 200 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students will be required to repeat failed elements of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed).

AP5816 The Flow of Coaching

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15, Max 24.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (/Demonstrations/Role Play).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof John A Groeger, School of Applied Psychology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.
Module Objective: The effective management of the Coaching Session.
Module Content: Self Motivation / The Psychological Contract / Structure, preparation and delivery.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Effectively manage the coaching session. Create a safe space for coaching. Assess the importance of the psychological contract. Set SMART goals for coachees. Use powerful questioning to move the conversation forward. Identify the nature of self motivation and creativity in the coaching conversation. Deal with uncertainty.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3 x 600 word reflective logs, 60 marks; 1 x 1,000 word assignment, 40 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment, attendance at lectures.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

AP7008 Clinical Research Methods and Data Analysis 1

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 30hr(s) Lectures (/Seminars/Workshops (This module will be offered as a blended learning module. Some lectures will be available as integrated and interactive online lectures and other lectures will be delivered face-to-face in class)).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean Hammond, School of Applied Psychology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.
Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of methodological strategies in clinical research and impart the skills required to plan an effective and ethical research project in a variety of clinical contexts.
Module Content: Posing research questions and identifying appropriate methodological approaches to take.
- Practical, methodological and ethical issues in planning research
- Introduction to a variety of strategies for research.
- Relating data analysis strategies to the research question and the data collected.
- Disseminating research.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Formulate and appropriately conceptualise original research questions; Plan and design a research project taking account of ethics, methodology, feasibility, likelihood of answering the research question, and analysis; Evaluate research designs theoretically, methodologically, ethically and practically; Select and use appropriate data collection methods; Select and use appropriate methods for analysing data; Write a viable research proposal.
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Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word research proposal containing a critical review of the chosen topic, a fully justified research question, detailed justification of methodology to be used and the data analytic strategy proposed.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

MH6101 Ethical Governance

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (Seminar, Discussion, Group Work, Presentation); 76hr(s) Other (Course work and Self-directed learning.).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joan McCarthy, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To develop skills in evaluating ethical governance in clinical practice and research in human health and illness.
Module Content: This module: describes the history and organisational structures of Clinical Ethics Committees (CECs) and Research Ethics Committees (RECs) in Ireland and elsewhere; delineates and analyses principles, guidelines and decision-making frameworks applicable to ethical structures in clinical practice and health research; reviews lessons from history in relation to unethical governance and unethical research; critically discusses selected case scenarios; identifies models of good ethical governance; identifies key requirements of Research Ethics Committees (RECs) for ethical approval of research studies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the origins, formation, constitution and role of CECs and RECs. Explain key principles, guidelines and decision-making frameworks applicable to ethical structures in clinical practice and health research. Discuss notable ethical controversies that arise in relation to clinical practice and research with human subjects. Delineate key ethical concerns underpinning the application process of RECs for approval of research studies. Critically discuss selected clinical scenarios that prompt the involvement of CECs and/or RECs. Evaluate best practice in relation to ethical governance in healthcare and health research.
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Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word written assignment).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit written assignment, as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery).

SC6627 Social Pathology and Civic Health

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Other.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.
Module Objective: To develop a sociological understanding and critical interpretation of social pathology and civic health in contemporary society.
Module Content: The module will outline, analyse and critically interpret the pattern of contemporary illnesses, ( e.g. suicide and deliberate self-harm; depression, anxiety and affective disorders; eating disorders, substance abuse; chronic fatigue syndrome, etc) that have a sociological profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These diseases are symptoms of social and cultural pathologies, and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society manifest in crime, deviance, and social disorder, and at the level of individual patients' bodies. These social pathologies arise from individual and collective experiences of social changes and cultural shifts.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    demonstrate the following cognitive competencies with respect to the materials covered: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation. Specifically, students should be able to: Describe the field of inquiry outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies. Identify major sociological theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas. Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the seminar. Analyze aspects of the seminar's field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts. Explain phenomena and formulate particular problems covered by the seminar in terms of general sociological theories. Criticize topics and issues covered in the seminar and evaluate issues and debates.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x seminar paper (3,500 - 4,000 words) due in mid-January).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

EC1214 Macroeconomic Tools of Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Prof Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the methods of economic reasoning in the business context.
Module Content: Theory and applied theory of production, employment and income in the monetary economy, including money, the interest rate, the exchange rate, balance of payments, inflation and unemployment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe and distinguish between the main economic indicators of activity, Produce and interpret economic tools of analysis, such as graphs, Perform economic calculations, which enable the learner to appreciate economic concepts with greater clarity, Critically evaluate economics related scenarios reported in the media and assess the impact such scenarios can have on everyday life, Describe and examine key economic indicators and assess the impact of changes in such indicators on everyday life.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class Tests).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

SS7006 State and Society

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: Other (1 week residential and 3 months online).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To critically examine relationships between state and society.
Module Content: Relationships between the state and society are never static. This relationship is undergoing particular change at present and this module seeks to focus on the changes by addressing: globalisation and the state; social movements; social policy and social control; and management of risk.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify the complex linkages between organisation and research. Critically analyse research on organisations and organisations' use of research. Explore different approaches to organisational analysis/evaluation. Apply debates on research and organisation to their own organisational contexts and practice.
.
Assessment: Continuous Assessment (1 x 5000 word assignment: participation in online discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Winter exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negotiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as a fail.

SS6314 Social research: methodology and ethics

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 14 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (online guided seminars); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eluska Fernández, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Caitriona Ni Laoire, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To introduce basic principles and methods of social research.
Module Content: The module will explore key epistemologies and methodologies in social research, including an examination of principles of research design, qualitative and quantitative research methods and research ethics.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify the theoretical, methodological and policy contexts informing the choices open to researchers in undertaking a research project for a taught Masters degree. Identify the key components of the social research process. Differentiate between different research methods (both qualitative and quantitative) and the purposes for which they can be used. Demonstrate a capacity to anaylse both quantitative and qualitative data. Identify potential ethical issues involved in undertaking social research, and be able to suggest ways in which these might be addressed. Exhibit the skills required in writing a research proposal.
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Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (4,500 word research proposal (170 marks); online seminar contribution (30 marks).).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

ED3306 Coaching Science 1

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): ED3307 Coaching Science 2
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (including Tutorials and Practicals).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Wesley O'Brien, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Dr Wesley O'Brien, School of Education.
Module Objective: To enable students to further advance their theoretical knowledge, competencies and skills that are required for consistent success at the advanced scientific coaching level.
Module Content: This module focuses on strategies to prepare coaches and athletes for training and competition. It will concentrate on the principles of health related fitness, specifically strength and conditioning strategies to create well prepared, injury resistant athletes, and performance monitoring to further enhance on-field performance.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Develop knowledge and coaching strategies for fundamental movements skills assessments. Develop coaching skills for functional movement screening, analysis and intervention. Address long and short term training programmes relating to the principles of health-related fitness. Students will apply numeracy and literacy skills to in-class activities and assignments.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word class assessment 70 marks; in-class assessment 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

SS3019 Science, Technology and Public Controversy

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Classes will be of 2 hours duration).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Orla O'Donovan, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: : Through an introduction to literature from the multidisciplinary field of social studies known as Science and Technology Studies (STS) this module invites you to reflect on some of the basic categories, distinctions and dualisms commonly used to understand science and technology, and the public controversies that sometimes surround them. Included in these categories are the lay person and the expert, opinion and science, biomedical and subjective knowledge, fact and anecdote, the mind and body, human and animal, human and nonhuman, culture and nature, objective and subjective, and the natural and social sciences. Because so many technoscientific controversies are conflicts about knowledge, debates about what can count as knowledge and as science is a key focus of our discussions.
Module Content: In the first part of the module the focus is on becoming familiar with key concepts and ideas in Science and Technology Studies. This is done by discussing what have become classic writings in the field by authors such as Donna Haraway, Michel Callon and Bruno Latour that address issues such as the split between nature and culture, the boundaries between experts and lay people, and how commonplace technologies shape human behaviour and how we move through the world. In the second part of the module these concepts and ideas are used to explore a number of specific science and technology controversies, such as those surrounding GMO foods, vaccinations, enhancement medicine, reproductive technologies and genetic screening. Following Donna Haraway's (2006) advice, we will explore these controversies in a way that tries to avoid either "blissed-out technobunny joy" or Promethean "nightmares of apocalypse". Drawing on the concepts of scientific and technological citizenship, debates about how these controversies might be resolved democratically are also considered.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Discuss some of the key concepts, themes and debates in the multidisciplinary field of social studies, Science and Technology Studies (STS). Demonstrate a familiarity the goals of STS, particularly in regard to democratising and opening up the 'black box' of science and promoting 'scientific citizenship'. Explain how STS can be a resource in helping us to understand the public controversies surrounding many scientific and technological 'advances'. Critically comment on science and technology controversies as struggles over meaning, morality and the distribution of resources. Demonstrate a familiarity with debates about if and how science and technology controversies can be resolved using democratic processes.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay and student presentation).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by School.

MU2052 Renaissance Vocal Ensemble 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Year-long performance course to allow for growth of skills and adequate rehearsal time prior to final assessed performance).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Workshops.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Mr Ian Sexton, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To develop skills in the performance of Renaissance vocal music.
Module Content: Coaching in the performance of the rich tradition of Renaissance music, drawing on both sacred repertories (e.g., Latin motets) and secular repertories (e.g., partsongs in English, French or other languages). Small ensembles consisting of very few singers per part will be formed, involving both male and female voices.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Successfully execute a performance at the relevant level of competence and in an appropriate style. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of specific Renaissance performance styles. Demonstrate an ability to perform sympathetically within the context of a group. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the act of performance.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment (class participation), 40; Final Performance Examination, 60).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed performance examinations must be retaken as prescribed by the Department).

FX3003 Special Studies in Filmmaking/New Media

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 37.
Pre-requisite(s): FX2003
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gwenda Young, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Mr Dan O'Connell, School of English, Film and Screen Media.
Module Objective: To develop students' understanding and practical knowledge of developing a project in film or new media.
Module Content: This module will develop students' knowledge of specific aspects of practical filmmaking and new media, and consist of the planning and development of a film or internet-based project.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate ability to conceptualise and develop a creative project. Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamentals of video-making and/or digital media production. Demonstrate knowledge of marketing and promotion of films and new media.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Practical Project [120 marks]; Showreel/Portfolio [60 marks] Marketing & Promotion of an end of year showcase of films. [20 marks]).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the programme).

AC3304 Introduction to Pricing Assets and Valuation

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 3hrs Tutorials/Practicals).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Maeve McCutcheon, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Mr David Humphreys, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To give an overview of the principles of Corporate Finance.
Module Content: Portfolio theory: asset pricing; equity valuation; derivatives, option pricing.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Use portfolio theory to explain the risk return trade-off in investment. Use the Capital Asset Pricing Model for investment decisions. Review the use of options contracts for hedging and speculation. Apply and critique models used in the equity valuation process.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

BC4002 Protein Science

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): BC3001
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Computer Tutorial); 3 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Sheehan, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Lecturer(s): Prof David Sheehan, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Module Objective: To describe advanced aspects of protein (especially enzyme) structure and function relevant to modern Biochemistry.
Module Content: The protein structural hierarchy. Protein crystallography. Solving structures by X-ray diffraction. Multi-dimensional NMR for protein structure determination and its comparison with crystallography. The protein structural database. A tutorial on structural databases and their uses followed by a computer based assignment. The protein folding problem In vitro and In vivo. Meaning and determination of kinetic parameters of enzymes. Some methods for probing kinetic mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis and protein engineering. In vivo and In vitro environment of enzymes. Proteomics.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Outline the protein structural hierarchy and its origins in covalent and non-covalent bonds. Discuss the principal methods for determination of three dimensional structures of biomacromolecules. Access and navigate the protein databank. Download PDB files and view them with protein graphics programs. Determine and understand the meaning of the kinetic parameters of enzymes. Appreciate the limitations and advantages of particular methods to elucidate enzyme function. Discuss current methods for expression and purification of recombinant proteins. Critically compare the context of enzymes within the cell with the in vitro circumstances in which enzymes are usually studied. Appreciate the importance of substrate chanelling in metabolic control
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (30 Marks Computer based assignment). (Oral if required).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral, if required.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

CE4002 Dissertation in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 1, Max 70.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Meetings with Supervisor re: Project Work).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis Kelliher, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Lecturer(s): Dr Denis Kelliher, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Module Objective: To complete a report and seminar on a given project topic.
Module Content: Each student is assigned a project, and meets with the supervisor once a week.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Set-up and manage effectively a team structure to carry out a group project; Set up and manage a weekly reporting structure to a project supervisor; Carry out a critical literature review to contextualise the project using the library, the World Wide Web and other relevant sources of information; Design and execute particular experiments or tests to achieve a project goal and interpret the results, when relevant to the project; Design and write a computer programme to achieve a project goal and interpret the results, when relevant to the project; Apply a piece of software to achieve a project goal and interpret the results, when relevant to the project; Demonstrate high ethical standards by acknowledging the intellectual property of others (no plagiarism!) and in honestly reporting experimental and computational results (no fraud!); Write and submit a well-structured technical report in standard correct English; Prepare and present a 10 minute (per student) presentation of the project and its conclusions to a non-technical audience.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Report to be presented at the end of the second semester, 170 marks; Seminar to be presented during the second semester, 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Meetings with Supervisor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

FE3016 Micro-Finance and Development

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To review and evaluate innovative approaches for increasing the supply and range of financial services to the poor and their contribution to economic and social development.
Module Content: The theoretical foundations of microfinance and its role in development. This will include: (i) defining microfinance and distinguishing it from traditional financial services; (ii) understanding the different paradigms associated with microfinance and development; (iii) distinguishing between different approaches to measuring impact of microfinance programmes; and (iv) evaluating the contribution of microfinance to poverty reduction, gender empowerment, social and economic development. The different factors, at a micro level, that influence the design and operation of microfinance programmes will be examined. These will include: (i) the influence of the national and sectoral context; (ii) identifying market, clients and services; and (iii) designing microfinance products. Specific case studies of microfinance will be reviewed and evaluated against the macro and micro theoretical foundations influencing microfinance design eg Credit Unions, Grameen Bank, Islamic Approaches to Microfinance, and LETS schemes.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain the principles, scale and impact of micro-finance in a developing and developed world context. Evaluate the link between micro-finance and poverty reduction. Distinguish between the poverty lending and financial systems approaches to micro-finance. Discuss and analyse the characteristics and application of a wide range of micro-finance initiatives, including Grameen Banking, Islamic finance, credit unions, and local economic trading systems (LETS). Describe and assess the link between gender issues and micro-finance. Categorise the main factors that influence the design of micro-finance services. Provide examples of how different factors influence the design of micro-finance services. Evaluate the main features of well-designed micro-finance programmes. Conduct research on micro-finance initiatives.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x Discussion Board Postings 10 Marks and Individual Essay 20 Marks (1 x 1,500 words)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance and participation at lectures.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

NU1064 Midwifery Theory and Practice for Various Clinical Settings I

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (Practical's); 26hr(s) Other (Directed Learning); 110hr(s) Other (Self -Directed Learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Agnes Phelan, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Ms Agnes Phelan, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Department of Microbiology, Department of Physiology.
Module Objective: To develop midwifery knowledge and skills in relation to pregnancy, childbirth, the postnatal period and care of the newborn and the role of the midwife in the prevention and control of infection in the maternity services.
Module Content: Introduction to care of women for pregnancy childbirth, the postnatal period and care of the new-born. Introduction to cardiovascular and respiratory systems, vital signs and early warning scores for maternity, health and safety, standard precauction for midwifery practice. Child protection and safety for the maternity services. Introduction to knowledge and skills in relation to the care of pregnant women with medical, surgical and mental health, gynaecological conditions. Introduction to the care of the sick neonate and women in the community. Aseptic technique. Introduction to administration of medication and WHO Patient Safety programme.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Assess the woman in pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal period for deviations from normal health and provide advice for normal pregnancy. Assess the vital signs of a mother and baby. Discuss the provision care in the antenatal, birthing suite and in the postnatal period. Discuss the clinical care of a pregnant woman requiring surgical interventions. Outline the provision of care in the community in relation to pregnant women, mothers, babies and their families in the community Discuss the screening tests for antenatal and fetal wellbeing and for mothers and babies in the postnatal period. Identify the principles of infection prevention and control in the maternity services.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3000 assignment).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance and participation at all timetabled teaching activities.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

AH7006 Criticial Thinking 1500 - 1800 (Texts, Contexts and Cultures)

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12 (Maximum total for UCC, NUIG and TCD = 50).
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (per week in Semester 2 in situ); 3 x 1day(s) Workshops (and directed research).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS (Prof. of Renaissance Studies, CACSSS Graduate School).
Lecturer(s): Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS, and Dr. Crawford Gribben (TCD).
Module Objective: To examine current approaches to culture in a given period as background to postgraduate research in the humanities.
Module Content: The module studies current scholarship in regard to Renaissance and Early Modern culture and society, as well as new transdisciplinary methodologies in humanities research. Topics include: the religious imagination, the apocalyptical imagination, the psychology of emotions, spatial consciousness, historical consciousness, the symbolics of power, the aesthetic. Readings include but are not limited to original texts by: F. Redi, J. Calvin, B. Cellini, G. Medici, and scholarship by B. Shapiro, P. Findlen, J. B. Harley. The module substitutes a current module entitled "Renaissance History", AH7001.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Read critically and thoroughly a variety of documents from the Renaissance and Early Modern period, ranging across several disciplines, modes of expression and cultures Understand cultural change, 1500-1800 Read critically in the current scholarship (including texts written by their peers) Understand major approaches in current research on Renaissance and Early Modern history and culture. See how current theories and methods are used to gain a better understanding of specific problems. Apply particular theories and methods in creative ways to formulate questions and hypotheses on specific topics of their own devising. Utilize IT resources applied to their disciplines, for the issues analyzed in the course. Formulate analytical arguments and present them in a group, deploying resources from modern scholarship and historical documents Write up research results correctly and convincingly
.
Assessment: 1 x 5000 word project.
Compulsory Elements:
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: In the event of a student failing a module or not being able to complete it before the summer TCC board, the module co-ordinator with the approval of the TCC board may prescribe supplementary work in lieu.

GL4011 Economic Geology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): GL2010, GL3003 or GL3004 and GL3027
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Giulio Solferino, Department of Geology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Giulio Solferino, Department of Geology; Staff, School of BEES.
Module Objective: To teach advanced aspects of economic geology and genesis of ore deposits.
Module Content: The following topics will be covered at an advanced level: Magmatogenic deposits, hydrothermal ores, supergene deposits, sedimentary rocks-hosted ores, Irish-type deposits, principles of reflected light microscopy, paragenetic sequencing, GIS data handling.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Critically analyse current models for 'Irish type' base metal deposits using appropriate examples Outline the principal types of ore deposits and describe their formation Identify common ore minerals Employ reflected light microscopy as a means to understand ore mineralisations Recognise the use of GIS datasets in mineral exploration Produce a paragenetic sequence description
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Assignment 1 (10 marks); Assignment 2 (20 marks); Presentation (20 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Presentation marks carried forward).

IS4443 Principles of Web Design for Business

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Up to 22hrs Practicals/Laboratory Sessions, as specified by the Department).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of how to design, develop and evaluate web sites for different business environments.
Module Content: The topics covered include e-business models, the web development lifecycle, website usability and performance, client-side web programming languages (e.g. HTML, CSS).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Discuss eBusiness models Critically evaluate website design, usability and navigation issues Evaluate the value of social media and other web 2.0 technologies in website design Write well-formed HTML pages implementing Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 40 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (Course/Project Work).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AU6019 Human Development, Cognition and Communication Through the Lifespan

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 16.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (20 hours x lectures/seminars/workshops); Other (50 hours x on-line activities and self-directed fieldwork and learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Amr El Refaie, School of Clinical Therapies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Medicine and Health.
Module Objective: To provide a detailed introduction to medical sciences pertinent to audiology.
Module Content: Cognitive, emotional and social development through the lifespan; Human embryology and genetics; Typical and atypical speech and language development; Theories of learning; Gerontology and the impact of ageing on communication and counselling.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the principles of human embryology and genetics, with an emphasis on the auditory system Relate learning and conditioning processes to lifespan development; the process of aging of the auditory system and presbyacusis Describe the main components involved in memory; Differentiate various theories of learning; Explain the relationship between thought and language; Describe a number of different concepts related to parental/carer's coping strategies in response to the diagnosis of hearing loss; Practice active listening and empathic skills in relation to counselling in Audiological practice;
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% Students must pass each of the components independently to pass this module. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by School).

EC6626 Corporate Treasury Management

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Prof Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: The aim of this module is to develop participants' skills and knowledge of the principal financial instruments and strategized used by corporate treasury managers within businesses.
Module Content: The focus of this module is on understanding how companies can best manage the enterprise's holdings, with the aim of maximising the firm's liquidity, and mitigating its operational, financial and reputational risk, while enhancing shareholder value. Specific topics will include: the strategic objectives of corporate treasury, evaluating interest rate and foreign exchange rate risk.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    differentiate between the strategic objectives of corporate treasury evaluate arguments for and against hedging foreign exchange rate risk and interest rate risk evaluate the management of liquidity in a multinational corporation through cash and working capital management, financing foreign trade and corporate risk management employ techniques to efficiently manage a business's cash flows employ techniques to efficiently manage a business's cash flows identify and quantify interest and exchange rate risk explain the workings of risk management derivatives
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 inclass exam, 50 marks: 1 Group Project, 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

DH6106 Teaching and Learning in Digital Humanities

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and discussion, face-to-face and online).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.
Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.
Module Objective: Introduce students to the tools, pedagogies and debates relating to teaching in
the humanities in the digital era.
Module Content: Module will look at the main developments and debates in teaching and learning
in higher education, and look at how digital tools affect, modify and develop those debates; and at
pedagogical uses of digital tools.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Read some of the debates on the scholarship of teaching and learning in the humanities. disciplines Demonstrate an ability to apply those debates to the digital humanities. Demonstrate an ability to use appropriate strategies and pedagogies to design effective teaching in their humanities area. Demonstrate an ability to use a variety digital and blended learning tools to create, deliver and evaluate teaching & learning in their humanities area. Demonstrate an ability to collaborate on and share research on teaching and learning
.
Assessment: Assessment is based on a portfolio which will include literature reviews, papers, presentations, examples of data applications in the humanities and digital artefacts, to the equivalent of 5000 words.
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at Seminars.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

FE6501 Business Processes Across the Supply Chain

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 5 x 4hr(s) Other (Block Release).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To familiarise the student with key business processes across the dairy supply chain.
Module Content: Supply chain processes in the dairy chain; Innovation and NPD in dairy; Category Management; and Team Building.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify the key NPD success factors across the dairy sector; Critically analyse the different commercialisation strategies that food firms utilise in competitive markets; Identify key supply chain business processes and assess how these may be employed to reduce costs and/or add value in dairy supply chains; Evaluate product merchandising and assortment using category management principles; Describe and explain the key components of the category management process; Display a knowledge of how to construct effective teams.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks (Open Book); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Category Management Project Report).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Open Book) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Open Book) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head of Department).

CO1004 Peer Assisted Learning (for Audit)

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (22 x 1 hr Group Mentoring up to 10 students per group sessions.).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Dr Noel Woods, Centre for Policy Studies.
Module Objective: To promote improved learning and further develop knowledge and understanding of business modules through a participative learning environment and to increase end of year academic performance. Specifically target support at any difficult components of the modules.
Module Content: Weekly sessions through directed activities supported by module notes, on confidence boosting techniques, effective presentation techniques, examination preparation, how to work effectively in groups, guidelines for writing essays, and the social experience of life in university. Each student is given the opportunity and encouraged to ask questions in an informal environment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate effective planning and project management skills Participate in large group activities Structure clear and concise business assignments Deliver clear and effective presentations
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100:.
Compulsory Elements: Attendance at, at least 12 sessions and completion of one assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

EC6625 Financial Economics and Business Strategy

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stefanos Ioannou, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Dr Stefanos Ioannou, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: This module examines the links between financial markets and business strategy where the former is an important consideration in the latter. The objective is to introduce techniques relevant for analysing business performance and formulating business strategies. Tax and cost of capital and its relationship to the capital structure of the firm are also examined.
Module Content: Techniques are employed which enable firms to choose efficiently between alternative investment opportunities and to properly evaluate investment risk.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    apply techniques of investment appraisal critically discuss key issues around business investment strategy including tax and the cost of capital for a multinational corporation, its relationship with global capital markets and the capital structure of the firm evaluate the risks in investment analysis and explain the workings of risk managment derivatives
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 Individual Assignment, 40 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

SS3032 Politics and Social Policy III

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Cathal O'Connell, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Prof Cathal O'Connell, School of Applied Social Studies; Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, School of Applied Social Studies; Dr Elizabeth Kiely, School of Applied Social Studies; Dr Fiona Dukelow, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To explore the changing contexts of welfare from the perspectives of political economy, feminism, civil society, identify and cultural politics.
Module Content: Elements of the post WW2 Welfare Consensus; The Crisis of the Welfare State; New Right critique; feminist critique; civil society, citizenship and social welfare; political ecology; the Third Way. Human rights and social welfare.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Have advanced insights into a range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives on welfare. Be in a position to interpret and analyse the factors which influence the formation, implementation, and efficacy of social policies in contemporary societies. In a position to apply a range of welfare paradigms to particular social policy initiatives. Demonstrate a capability to critically appraise social policies using insights drawn from theories of citizenship, political economy, feminist perspectives, critical theory, and social movements theory. Be able to critically analyse different concepts about the links between rights and the provision of welfare internationally.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to complete all elements, i.e. to submit Continuous Assessment and sit the End-of-Year Written Examination.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who fail or do not submit Continuous Assessment must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the School.).

ST6007 Advanced Biostatistics (Online)

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 36hr(s) Directed Study (online self-directed learning); 24hr(s) Other (online moderated activities); 20hr(s) Other (written assignment reflection and development (submitted online)); 20hr(s) Directed Study (reading).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tony Fitzgerald, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Lecturer(s): Dr Tony Fitzgerald, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, /Department of Epidemiology and Public Health; Staff, Department of Statistics.
Module Objective: Provide an understanding of the theory and application of linear and logistic regression in public health with examples from recent research.
Module Content: Application of biostatistics in public health theory and practice; simple and multiple linear regression; simple and multiple logistic regression; presentation of statistical analysis; Model Building; Use of Stata statistical software.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the role of biostatistics in the discipline of public health and describe basic statistical methods routinely employed in health research Demonstrate an understanding of simple and multiple linear and logistic regression models Apply linear and logistic regression models and communicate the results to non-statistical experts Apply statistical techniques to identify confounding and effect modification in epidemiological studies Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies Develop written and oral presentations based on a detailed statistical analysis for both public health professionals and educated lay audiences.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (MCQs 30 marks; Project Report: 30 marks; Graded Discussion Board 20 Marks; Online 'live' Presentation: 20 marks. Students may be asked to present their assignment via online seminar/presentation and to respond to questions posed by lecturers and peers.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. All elements of assessment are mandatory and must be attempted. Compensation between elements is permitted.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% All three components of continuous assessment to be passed independently.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

SS3024 Social Movements and Health

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Orla O'Donovan, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: The objective of the module is to introduce students to the social science literature on social movements that strive to subvert dominant understandings of health and illness, and to the diverse theories and methodologies used to research and better understand them. It also aims to foster students' curiosity and capacity to think critically about these social movements, and about how common sense thinking about health and illness can be changed. The movements discussed in the module include the mental health, disability, breast cancer and transsexual movements.
Module Content: Key ideas and concepts in theories of social movements are reviewed, including those that emphasise how movements can subvert common sense ideas, cultural codes and expert systems of knowledge, and create spaces where new identities can emerge. But most of our discussions will focus on specific movements' contributions to reshaping discourses of health and illness. Movements that will be discussed include disability and mental health movements, and those mobilised around breast cancer and transsexuality. The actions of individuals such as Irish author Christopher Nolan whose writings challenged "ableist language" and British punk artist Ian Dury whose music confronted discomfort and disgust at the disabled body are also considered. The politics of self-naming whereby individuals and groups identify themselves using labels such as mad, queer, crippled, survivor, user, expert by experience and, in the case of Ian Dury, Spasticus Autisticus, is a central theme.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate understanding of the key themes and concepts in the social science literature on health movements Discuss the diverse methodologies used to research health movements Illustrate how Pierre Bourdieu¿s theory of symbolic power has been used to understand health movements Appraise the contributions of specific health movements to changing common sense understandings of health and illness Evaluate the contributions of various health movements to changing health policy
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay - Assignment 3000 words and student presentation).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination:

PD6116 Urban and Metropolitan Spatial Planning

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 25 x 1hr(s) Other (tutorials/workshops/studio/field work); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (Up to 50 hours self directed study).
Module Co-ordinator: Mr Brendan O'Sullivan, Department of Geography (Planning and Sustainable Development).
Lecturer(s): Mr William Brady, Department of Sociology, Planning and Sustainable Development.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the contemporary dialogues in urban development and the spatial planning challenges facing neighbourhoods, towns, cities and city-regions.
Module Content: Contemporary dialogues in urban development throughout the world, Regeneration and Development of cities; Land use challenges facing the city, urban quarters, urban form, waterfronts streets and open spaces; Changing urban perspectives on work, living, recreation, business and civic life; culture, arts and diversity in the city, formal and informal urban networks and economies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Evaluate the nature of the urban environment, its value to society and its economic role Analyse the sustainability issues, theories and models associated with urbanisation and the effectiveness of planning responses and challenges Evaluate critically the effectiveness of interventions such as, urban management, development, regeneration and renewal; Demonstrate an ability to formulate sustainable urban plans, strategies and policies. Assess the role and scope of statutory and non-statutory planning instruments to address critical sustainability issues facing contemporary cities
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x study visit report (40), 1 x group assignment (40), 1 x short practical assignment (20).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. All elements of continuous assessment (20 marks or higher) shall be passed independently.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of continuous assessment (20 marks or higher) shall be carried forward. Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated as prescribed by the Course Director.

PT6401 Pharmacology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (run on a biennial basis).
Teaching Methods: 35hr(s) Directed Study (Distance learning); 1 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 1 x 2hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anne Moore, School of Pharmacy.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
Module Objective: To teach the basic principles of pharmacology.
Module Content: Pharmacodynamics (drug action, agonism and antagonism, specificity and dose effects); dose response. Receptor pharmacology and cell signaling. Neurotransmission and general autonomic nervous system pharmacology. Application of basic principles in selected examples of drug use including drug effects on major body systems. Drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. Introduction to Pharmacokinetics. Drug interaction, side-effects and adverse drug reaction. Drug discovery, development and testing. Clinical trials.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Define how drugs and other exogenous chemicals produce effects in living systems. Identify the molecular mechanisms of action of various drug classes. Relate mechanisms of drug action to management of specific diseases. Interpret and design pharmacological experiments to quantitatively assess drug action. Appraise current drug interventions from a pharmacological perspective. Assess novel approaches to drug design and development.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Written Assignments and Practicals).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% Students must obtain at least 40% in the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (There will be a special Supplemental Examination for students failing Continuous Assessment).

LW2001 Clinical Legal Skills

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seán Ó Conaill, Department of Law.
Lecturer(s): Dr Seán Ó Conaill, Department of Law.
Module Objective: To develop in students the skills necessary to work effectively in a group; to enhance communication and presentation skills; to encourage students to take ownership of their learning.
Module Content: Researching legal materials; compiling a legal presentation; presentation skills; group work; reflective learning.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Conduct legal research using the various databases and research tools available; Contribute to the compilation and delivery of a legal presentation using resources such as powerpoint, handouts, prezi etc.; Work effectively in a group; Engage in reflective practice and experiential learning.
.
Assessment: Continuous assessments consisting of group work and presentation.
Compulsory Elements: Continuous assessments consisting of group work and presentationGroup work and presentation.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement must be achieved in both assessments. For students not satisfying this requirement a Fail judgement overall will be returned for the module.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail one of the elements of the continuous assessment will be required to submit an alternative assessment/make a presentation as specified by the School of Law.

FR6701 French for Reading Purposes : Proficiency Level

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): Common European Framework level B2 in reading skills (recommended level: HC1 Leaving Certificate or equivalent)
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Milouda Louh, Department of French.
Lecturer(s): Ms Milouda Louh, Department of French.
Module Objective: To develop competence in the reading of a range of authentic French texts of advanced level. By the end of this module, students should have moved towards reaching the Common European Framework level C2 in reading skills.
Module Content: This module provides training in reading comprehension skills. The course will examine variations in French language through the study of a range of contemporary texts in French (fiction, non-fiction, newspaper articles). Students will be trained in a variety of reading skills including general and detailed reading, how to follow an argument, coherence and linking, seeking out specific information and implicit meaning. The texts may be complemented with visual aids (film adaptations of novels, interviews).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    use reading strategies developed during the course. understand the main ideas contained in complex texts on both concrete and abstract topics. understand detail, tone, purpose, structure, implications in a written text.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class tests 2 x 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

IS2818 Administration and Support of IT Architectures

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 3hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr John McAvoy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems, and FAS.
Module Objective: This module will cover practical issues in adminstering and supporting hardware and software components of business IT infrastructures.
Module Content: Support fundamentals for the Windows 2000 Professional and Windows 2000. Enterprise Server Operating systems: Installing Windows 2000 Professional and Advanced Server; Managing Accounts, Policies and user rights using Active Directory; Configuring the Windows environment; File systems; Securing IT systems; Managing resources; Connectivity issues - Internetworking services (IIS, internet services), RAS; monitoring and optimisation and troubleshooting.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Install Windows 2000 professional. Install Windows 2000 Advanced Server. Use Active Directory to manage accounts, policies and user rights. Understand the tupes and benefits of the various filesystem types. Configure the Windows environment. Monitor the windows environment for performance and troubleshooting purposes.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Group work/project/in-class exams).
Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both the end of year written examination and continuous assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

FE6706 Community Co-operatives and Social Enterprises

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (The module may be offered in either Semester 1 or Semester 2, depending on timetabling).
Teaching Methods: Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To explore co-operative approaches to meeting needs not addressed adequately by conventional businesses or by governments, (including the provision of public services which are being phased out or down-graded by governments) in both urban and rural communities.
Module Content: Co-operative strategies for meeting neglected needs such as different ways of organising child-care, services for people with disabilities, and rural transport systems, and different ways of addressing community and environmental concerns, such as housing, tourism, and leisure activities.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Appraise critically the effectiveness of responses by the State, private and community/voluntary sectors to human needs. Describe and assess critically the co-operative approach to meeting human needs. Define social enterprises and the factors that account for their emergence. Appraise the community development role of social enterprises. Define community co-ops and explain the factors that account for their emergence. Assess critically the role of community co-operatives and explain the factors that account for their success. Research and report on aspects of a community co-operative or other social enterprise. Discuss and debate the concepts of community co-operatives and social enterprises with their colleagues.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (On-line discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

IT6105 Teaching of Italian as a second language 2

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): Italian Language Competence [Level C1-C1 (CEFR ¿ Common European Framework of Reference)]
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (This module runs over one semester, but will be offered twice during the academic year [subject to demand]).
Teaching Methods: 90hr(s) Other (30 observation hours; 60 teaching hours); 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (mock exam practice).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr M Gabriella Caponi, Department of Italian.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Italian.
Module Objective: To study and implement techniques and practice for the teaching of Italian as a second language to a range of learners.
Module Content: This is a team-taught course which covers theories as well as techniques and practice for the teaching of Italian as a second language to a range of learners, with the aim of achieving student understanding of the target language. This course will consider current Italian pedagogical approaches to the teaching of Italian as a second language.
The simulation of an exam for the certification of DITALS 2.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Make appropriate use, orally and in writing, of a wide range of vocabulary relating to the theory and practice of teaching Italian as a foreign language. Identify and define aims and objectives for a range of Italian language courses. Devise and execute sample lesson plans in a real classroom situation. Use a range of classroom management skills and techniques in a language lesson. Create and implement a curriculum, syllabus and outline assessment strategies for a range of Italian language courses. Use the latest technological tools in a language class Integrate Web 2.0 tools, such as educational blogs, wikis and podcasts in the teaching environment
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Project [2,500 - 3,000 words] 75 marks; 3 Written Assignments [1,000 words each] 25 marks each; Oral Assessment 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

IS4414 Information Systems Management

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Up to 22hrs Practicals/Laboratory Sessions, as specified by the Department).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Mr Gerard Daniel O'Riordan, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To provide students with a thorough understanding of the fundamental issues in managing the Information Systems function of an organisation.
Module Content: IS Management: Managing the IS department; Sourcing and retaining skills; Managing IS teams; The economics of information; Managing IS and electronic business investments; Administering the cost of IS - charge out strategies; The outsourcing alternative.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Employ different approaches to the actual management of change especially in relation to change enabled through ICT Identify the main ethical issues which arise from the use of ICT and develop an approach to manage these Outline the main technical components to Service Orientation Architecture and System Integration and to assess the business benefits which might arise from their employment Identify the main issues arising from business/ICT alignment and to employ a portfolio approach to integrating ICT and business strategies
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Course/Project Work - 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

SE6003 Polymer Materials (PLAS H5001 - Athlone Institute of Technology)

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12hr(s) Lectures; 30hr(s) Directed Study (assignments); 6hr(s) Practicals (laboratory practical (on-line lectures and on-site laboratory workshop in AIT)).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Clement Higginbotham, Athlone Institute of Technology.
Module Objective: "Polymer materials" is a core subject area for a PhD student researching any aspect of polymer science and technology, including at the micro- and nano- scale. This assignment-based module introduces students to polymer materials and focuses on structure/property relationships. It also deals with more specialized advanced polymer systems. The practical element will teach the students to synthesize and characterize a range of polymers using various analytical tools.
Module Content: · Introduction to polymer materials,
· Review of polymerisation methods,
· Molecular weight determination,
· Property modification and the use of additives,
· Developments in commodity polymers,
· Composites,
· Speciality polymers,
· Specialised applications,
· Diffusion control, Environmental aspects of polymers,
· New trends and developments in speciality polymers,
· Nanomaterials.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Have an enhanced knowledge and understanding of polymeric materials. Know general relationships between structure, properties and applications. Interpret and evaluate the underlying concepts and principles of material selection for advanced polymer applications. Use acquired analytical and characterisation skills at an advanced level to undertake research activities on speciality polymers. Solve technically complex problems relevant to the evaluation of material properties. Communicate information and observations using appropriate terminology through the preparation of written scientific reports. Demonstrate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of new materials and their applications.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (based on assignment submissions).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on the module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

PF6200 Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Run on a biennial basis).
Teaching Methods: 70hr(s) Directed Study (Distance learning); 2 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stuart Collins, Department of Chemistry.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Pharmacy; Staff, Department of Chemistry.
Module Objective: To introduce chemistry principles underpinning the design, development, manufacture, analysis and control of pharmaceutical compounds.
Module Content: Development of pharmaceutical chemistry; basic drug design and development; basic structure-activity relationships. Introduction to the structural chemistry of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Introductory Medicinal Chemistry; Acidity and basicity of pharmaceutical compounds; pKa. Pharmaceutical stereochemistry. Introductory Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Pharmaceutical analysis; Drug stability and accelerated stability testing. Principles of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry. Introduction to the chemistry of natural compounds; Chemical synthesis of naturally derived pharmaceutically active compounds.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Understand structure, stereochemistry and reactivity of organic compounds especially in relation to pharmaceuticals Comprehend the factors which affect acidity and basicity of pharmaceutical compounds Appreciate the information provided by a range of analytical techniques and their limitations Analyse pharmaceutical processes Understand and develop a systematic method for the analysis of drug compounds using a wide range of techniques Understand the role of analytical chemistry support to various pharmaceutical processes including the study of drug degradation, by-products and unknown impurities Demonstrate and apply the skills learned at the teleconference, workshop and other tutorial sessions
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written assignments and in term tests).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% Students must obtain at least 40% in the End of Year Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (There will be a special Supplemental Examination for students failing Continuous Assessment).

SS6206 Dissertation in Social Work

Credit Weighting: 20
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Supervision).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Bantry White, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Social Studies; Dr Kenneth Burns, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To enable students to apply research skills to investigate an aspect of practice in depth.
Module Content: The module requires each student to complete a 10,000 word dissertation and to participate in a research conference, whereby s/he makes a public presentation of the research process and findings. In this way, students are encouraged to dissemination of research and to become research-minded practitioners.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Examine and respond to research questions relevant to social work through completion of a 10,000 word dissertation Employ the skills of literature searching and critical appraisal through completion of a literature review Make considered methodological choices and justify these choices in the context of social work research Demonstrate knowledge and skills of data collection, analysis and representation through implementation of a chosen research method(s) Demonstrate an awareness of research ethics and integrity Reflect upon and articulate in written form their own learning arising from the process of engaging in research Deliver a professional presentation at the student research conference demonstrating clarity, accountability and integrity
.
Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Dissertation, 10,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit revised dissertation, as prescribed by the Department).

GA2032 Litríocht na Sean-Ghaeilge

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Iosmheid 6.
Pre-requisite(s): Ní hann dó
Co-requisite(s): Ní hann dó
Teaching Period(s): Seimeastar 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1 (h)uair(e) an chloig Léachtaí.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh, Roinn Na Sean Agus Na Meán Ghaeilge.
Lecturer(s): Dr Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh, Roinn Na Sean Agus Na Meán Ghaeilge.
Module Objective: Suirbhé ar scéalaíocht na Sean-Ghaeilge.
Module Content: Pléifear ábhar, comhthéacs agus fiúntas na scéalaíochta.
Learning Outcomes: Nuair a bheidh an modúl seo déanta ag na mic léinn beidh:
    tuiscint leathan acu ar chorpas litríochta na Sean-Ghaeilge; mioneolas acu ar phríomhscéalta na Rúraíochta, Táin Bó Cuailnge ina measc; anailís déanta acu ar litríocht an laochais i gcomhthéacs domhanda; tuiscint dhoimhin acu ar mhórthéamaí litríocht Ghaeilge na Meánaoise.
.
Assessment: Marc ar fad 100: Scrúdú Scríofa Foirmiúil 70 marc; An obair a dheanfai i gcaitheamh na bliana 30 marc (Scrúdú scríofa ranga).
Compulsory Elements: An obair a dhéanfaí i gcaitheamh na bliana. Scrúdú Scríofa Foirmiúil na bliana.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Ní thagann i gceist.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x páipéar 1.5 (h)uair(e) an chloig le déanamh sa Gheimhreadh 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x páipéar 1.5 (h)uair(e) an chloig (scrúdú scríofa foirmiúil agus an obair a dhéanfaí i gcaitheamh na bliana san áireamh le chéile) le déanamh san Fómhar 2017.

ED6055 Children's Literature and Pedagogy

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alicia Curtin, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Dr Alicia Curtin, School of Education.
Module Objective: To develop student understanding of the value and power of incorporating children's literature into classroom pedagogies.
Module Content: This module asks students to explore the role of children's literature in teaching and learning. We begin with an analysis of the representation of childhood in a selection of key texts (iconic and modern) chosen from different genres of children's literature. Students will then consider and engage in an active and research-based way with a central theme of the module - writing for children.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Recognise key themes related to the representation of childhood in a variety of genres of children's literature Differentiate between competing ideologies and figured worlds present in children's literature texts and consider their possible effects Discuss key concepts such as identity, agency, cultural bridging and empowerment in relation to the reading and writing of children's literature Share research and experience undertaken in this module with their own pupils in ways that will foster in them an appreciation and enjoyment of reading and writing children's literature Critically interpret messages, value systems and ways of being encoded in children's literature for its readers Evaluate children's literature across a variety of key themes and concerns central to the module which encourage a meaningful engagement between pupil and text
.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (In-course assignment 1500 words (100 marks); End of module assignment 3500 words (200 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the School of Education).

ST4491 Introduction To Operations Research

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): Introductory course in Probability and Statistics, such as ST1023 or ST2036
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Finbarr O'Sullivan, School of Mathematical Sciences.
Lecturer(s): Dr Supratik Roy, School of Mathematical Sciences.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the application of quantitative and computing methods to decision-making problems in management.
Module Content: Linear programming models for resource allocation; sensitivity analysis and duality; multiple management objectives using goal programming; network flow models for transportation, job-scheduling and inventory management; Integer linear programming; network-representations; resource-levelling and time-cost tradeoffs, stochastic optimization.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    describe the form of a linear programming model for a management decision problem; develop linear programming formulations of such problems, and apply the Simplex method for solving linear programming problems, together with associated sensitivity analysis; describe the dual of a linear programming problem, and interpret the dual problem in economic terms; carry out the Branch and Bound method of solving integer linear programming problems; describe the linear programming formulation of the transportation problem, and carry out the solution of such problems, together with associated sensitivity analysis; formulate and analyse management optimization problems with multiple objectives as Goal programming problems; formulate and solve linear programming problems in a statistical software package; apply principles of stochastic optimization to real-life problems.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 In-class Test (15 marks), 1 Assignment (15 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

MG3013 Marketing Communications

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen O'Sullivan, Department of Management and Marketing.
Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen O'Sullivan, Department of Management and Marketing.
Module Objective: To consider the theoretical frameworks, uses and applications of marketing communications and social media marketing strategies in contemporary marketing practice. To appraise and develop contemporary integrated marketing communication and social media marketing strategies in a constantly evolving market place.
Module Content: Students will be introduced to the theories, challenges and processes involved in developing, managing and implementing integrated marketing communication and social media functions in contemporary organisations.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain, critique and apply the evolving role of marketing communications and social media marketing within the firm Discuss the important theories, concepts and processes involved in developing, managing and implementing integrated marketing communications and social media marketing strategies Evaluate and critique diverse integrated marketing communication and social media marketing strategies across a wide range of business sectors
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

PT3446 Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 0, Max 70.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 40 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 7 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Christian Waeber, School of Pharmacy (and Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics).
Lecturer(s): Dr Christian Waeber, School of Pharmacy; Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
Module Objective: To deepen the understanding of the effects of drugs on the major systems of the body, of their metabolism and toxicity, and how these factors influence therapeutic choices.
Module Content: Systematic pharmacology: autonomic, CNS, cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, GI tract and renal. Drugs in inflammation, oncology and haematology; antimicrobials. Basic pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, toxicology.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain pharmacological approaches to management of disorders of the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, haematological, endocrine and renal systems. Describe pharmacological approaches to management of psychiatric disorders. Explain pharmacological approaches used in chemotherapy of cancer and infectious disease. Describe the major classes of drugs that are used in treatment of pain, inflammatory and rheumatological conditions. Discuss anaesthetic drugs and the pharmacology of pain. Discuss drug metabolism and mechanisms of drug toxicity in various organ systems.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (2 x MCQ's 30 marks each) ; Oral examination if required).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Students who fail Continuous Assessment in the Winter must submit assignment(s)/undertake MCQ Examination as prescribed by the Department, and Oral Examination if required.

MD3012 Principles of Human Structure for Practitioner Paramedics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 100hr(s) Other (Online self-directed learning and e-tutorials).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olivia O'Leary, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience.
Lecturer(s): Dr Andreea Factor, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience; Dr Olivia O'Leary, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience.
Module Objective: To enable the student to base their professional paramedical practice on a solid knowledge base of basic and clinical human anatomy.
Module Content: Anatomical terminology; structural biology of the major body systems and how this relates to illness.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Use appropriate anatomical terminology. Describe in detail the following major body systems: Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous, Digestive, Lymphatic and Immune, Urinary and Integumentary. Identify important anatomical features of the body. Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the anatomical basis of illness and traumatic injuries throughout the human lifespan.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Participation in online discussions 20 marks; e-tivities 80 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Completion of e-tivities and online MCQs.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience).

PF6411 Immunization Policy and Practices for Pharmacists

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 7, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 10 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 3hr(s) Workshops (case studies); 62hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anne Moore, School of Pharmacy.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Pharmacy; Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
Module Objective: To advance the students understanding and in-depth training of the development and use of vaccines, injection practices and current methods used in the development and evaluation of vaccine efficiency, safety and policy and an awareness of immunisation issues in high, medium and low income countries.
Module Content: Advanced theoretical aspects of vaccinology, public health and epidemiological research, development, policy and implementation that defines the need, development and testing of new human and veterinary vaccines in high, middle and low income countries. The role of infectious disease surveillance, epidemiology, economy and public perceptions in shaping vaccine policy and implementation by global and national organisations; historical, current and future perspectives. Introduction of new vaccines in the expanded programme of immunization, in adults and in the elderly patient. Strategies to improve vaccine efficacy. Vaccines as a public health measure to counter new and emerging infectious diseases. Synergies of scientific, manufacturing and regulatory factors.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Critically evaluate immunization practices and vaccine programmes with respect to disease burden and their impact on specific populations. Describe the scientific and clinical factors which contribute to vaccine use and immunization practices. Discuss the role of governments in vaccination programmes and other disease prevention activities. Evaluate own contribution to a group activity
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral if required.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Pharmacy).

SS3016 Social Perspectives in Mental Health

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Cathal O'Connell, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Ms Lydia Sapouna, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To present a critical overview of mental health from its evolution in institutional care forms to present day community care strategies.
Module Content: Institutional care; community care initiatives; social and economic integration; normalisation and human rights.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Examine the history of mental health care and the shift from institutional to community based care. Describe and review the key conceptual and policy developments shaping current mental health care. Consider the impact of service provision on users and carers and critically evaluate the implementation of mental health policy. Recognise and analyse the impact of social and environmental factors on the experience of mental distress. Examine the role of legislation in promoting a rights- based approach to mental health care. Appreciate the role of advocacy and service user involvement in mental health.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to pass the Formal Written Examination.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

HS2007 Dissertation (Business, Culture & Society in the Spanish-speaking world)

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): HS2101 or HS2102 and HS2008
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Self-Directed Study).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Lecturer(s): Ms Seana Ryan, Department of Hispanic Studies.
Module Objective: To train students in focused writing in an area relating to Hispanic business.
Module Content: Students are required to submit a dissertation on a business or related topic (on either Spain or Mexico) approved by the Module co-ordinators in the Department of Hispanic Studies and the Faculty of Commerce. The subject of the dissertation will be decided by individual consultations with students.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Design and complete a selected research project. Identify and apply a suitable research methodology linked to a specific research question. Present research findings using appropriate conventions
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 5,000 word dissertation).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Re-submission of revised dissertation, as prescribed by the Department).).

IS6125 Database Analysis and Design

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): NONE
Co-requisite(s): NONE
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures; 24hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Dr Robert Gleasure, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To provide students with the concepts and skills required to analyze organizational activities, information flows and to subsequently create the data models required to support these activities.
Module Content: Topics covered include; requirements analysis, introduction to datafication and emerging data capabilities, and data modelling (ERDs and normalisation).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Analyse organisational activities to identify key data requirements Generate ERD to identify data sources and their relationships Employ normalisation processes to assist in meeting the data integrity requirements Identify and strategize around semi-structured and unstructured data capabilities
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 Data Modelling Exam 20 marks, 1 Group Report 30 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

MF2052 Introduction to Financial Mathematics

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): ST1051, MA1059 or equivalent
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (20 x 1hr Tutorials/Practicals).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Linda Daly, Department of Statistics.
Lecturer(s): Ms Linda Daly, Department of Statistics.
Module Objective: To provide an introduction to financial and actuarial mathematics.
Module Content: Theory of interest rates; Annuities; Discounted cash flows; Equations of value; Analysis of loan schedules; Valuation of fixed interest securities and investment performance; Arbitrage and forward contracts; Term structure of interest rates; Stochastic interest rate models; Project appraisal.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Apply a generalised cashflow model to analyse financial transactions. Describe how to take into account the time value of money using the concepts of compound interest and discounting. Carry out calculations involving the present value and the accumulated value of a stream of payments using specified rates of interest. Define an equation of value and apply this to calculate loan repayments under a Repayment Mortgage contract. Analyse and compare investment projects in terms of their Net Present Value and Discounted Payback Period. Describe the investment and risk characteristics of the following types of assets: fixed interest government borrowings, fixed interest borrowing by other bodies, shares and other equity-type finance and derivatives. Analyse elementary compound interest problems allowing for both income / capital gains tax-liabilities and calculate the real yield obtained by an investor on a number of bond-type transactions. Define the concept of arbitrage, explain the significance of the No Arbitrage assumption and use this assumption to calculate the forward price of a number of derivative-type contracts. Evaluate the duration and convexity of a cashflow sequence and explain how such concepts are used in the (Redington) immunisation of a portfolio of liabilities.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 in-class tests of equal weight (30 marks), 1 assignment (10 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

EC3153 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): EC3152
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 5 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Frank Crowley, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Dr Frank Crowley, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: To understand and apply the theory of econometrics in both the business and public policy environment.
Module Content: Cross section and time series techniques are used to examine the effectiveness of government policy and business decisions.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    List the steps in applied regression analysis for conducting economic research. Explain the properties of Ordinary Least Square estimators. Select and employ techniques for analysis economic theory. Identify and solve for problems in regression analysis. Build a model that can be used for econometric research. Choose an econometric model by applying certain specification criteria.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x project 10 marks; 1 x In-class Test 10 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

IT2306 Italo Calvino and the Interpretation of Reality

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Independent reading of designated texts).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.
Lecturer(s): Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the works of one of the most important writers of the post-war period.
Module Content: A detailed study of selected short works by Italy's best-known twentieth-century writer, Italo Calvino.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify prescribed texts, and their cultural and historical context; Discuss key ideas of prescribed texts; Analyse stylistic features of prescribed texts; Analyse the relationship of prescribed texts to each other and to their cultural and historical context; Evaluate prescribed texts; Communicate the above in written and oral presentations at a level appropriate to undergraduate second year.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,750-2,000 word essay [70 marks]; class participation, including in-class presentation [30 marks]).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessments, by the second Friday in August, as prescribed by the Department).

AC6407 Business Leader Series

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (guest speaker series; workshops).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Margaret Healy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: This module consists of a series of interactive case study and guest lecture sessions, focused on topical issues in Management Acounting and business generally. The objective is to enhance the commercial skills and business awareness of the student.
Module Content: Interpersonal skills; Communication skills; Business analysis skills.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Analyse real-life business cases. Communicate in a professional manner with business people. Present in a professional manner to business people. Develop skills in research and report writing. Demonstrate understanding of ethical issues in Managment Accounting practice.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (class contribution: 20 marks; Report (2,000 words) 80 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

SL2007 Language Sciences II

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (18 hrs x Lecture/Workshop/Practical); Other (120 hrs x Coursework and Self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator:
Lecturer(s): Dr Nicola Bessell, School of Clinical Therapies.
Module Objective: Competence in analysis and test procedures for children's language.
Module Content: Phonological development and impairment; language development and impairment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Outline the stages of phonological development in typically-developing children. Analyse the salient phonetic and phonological characteristics of speech samples from children with impairment. Explain the Stackhouse/Wells model and the assessment procedures relevant to it. Evaluate distinct theoretical approaches to language development. Characterise the main features of grammatical development in English from two to five years. Define specific language impairment (SLI) and distinguish it from other developmental disabilities involving language deficits. Describe the grammatical deficits found in SLI and other developmental disabilities. Enumerate the validity and reliability issues involved in collecting and transcribing language samples.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x assignment (100 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

GV1400 Local Development and Public Health

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To introduce the key concepts of local development, and health protection and promotion in relation to public policy and to analyse public health issues in a local development framework.
Module Content: Definitions and scope of local development and public health; local development organisations, structures and processes; links between local development and public policy particularly in relation to public health; policy and other influences on the health of the population in developed and developing countries.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the major factors that determine the health of populations at a local, national and global level Explain what is meant by "Public Health" Identify major public health issues at a local, national and global level Recognise interventions employed to research and address public health problems
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1500 word Essay).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

MX1006 Student Directed Special Study Module in Medicine

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 3hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study; Other (Self directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen Duggan, School of Medicine.
Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen Duggan, School of Medicine; Staff, School of Medicine.
Module Objective: To allow students to self organise a special study module in an area of special interest in Medicine.
Module Content: The student must contact a suitable tutor in the College of Medicine and Health, agree module objectives, content and learning outcomes and maintain a reflective portfolio of the design through to completion of this module. Suitable activities include, acquiring specific laboratory and/or other research skills, specialised clinical placement, inter-professional and interdisciplinary learning opportunities.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Conduct an independent appraisal of a topic of particular interest outside the core curriculum. Demonstrate proficiency in self directed learning. Demonstrate the ability to manage time effectively. Present the results of their work, verbally, visually and/or in writing.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Reflective Portfolio 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

SS3049 Politics and Social Policy IV

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Cathal O'Connell, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To explore the changing contexts of welfare from the Keynes/Beveridge Model to new formations in post-industrial society.
Module Content: Welfare Consensus; Welfare Crisis; the New Right Critique and Policy measures; Political Ecology; Critique of the 'Third Way'.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Have advanced insights into a range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives on welfare. Be in a position to interpret and analyse the factors which influence the formation, implementation, and efficacy of social policies in contemporary societies. In a position to apply a range of welfare paradigms to particular social policy initiatives. Demonstrate a capability to critically appraise social policies using insights drawn from theories of citizenship, political economy, feminist perspectives, critical theory, and social movements theory. Be able to critically analyse different concepts about the links between rights and the provision of welfare internationally.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination. Attendance at lectures.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 min(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

MU3041 Gamelan 3

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): MU2041 or MU2D10
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Music performance course: year-long to allow time for musical development and rehearsal prior to final examination).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Ms Kelly Boyle, Department of Music; Prof Mel Mercier, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To develop and expand gamelan performance ability and experience.
Module Content: Students learn to play traditional music (Karawitan) from Central Java, Indonesia, on the Department's Javanese gamelan. This gamelan, which was made for UCC in Java in 1994, consists of various tuned, bronze-keyed, xylophone-type instruments, gongs and drums, and is named Nyai Sekar Madu Sari ("Venerable Flower of Honey Essence"). At this level of study, students will be expected to exhibit more advanced musical skills than those required for Gamelan 2 and they should expect to show elements of innovation and leadership (for instance, mastering more than one instrument, acquiring advanced improvisatory skills, contributing to the making of arrangements for the ensemble and supporting less experienced musicians).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Successfully execute a gamelan performance at the relevant level of competence and in an appropriate style. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of multiple specific performance styles and genres. Reflect critically on the characteristic components of differing types of gamelan composition and performance. Demonstrate an ability to perform sympathetically within the context of a group, taking a leading role where appropriate.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Weekly Contribution to Classes (participation, support, leadership), 40 marks; Final Practical Examination 60 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed performance examinations must be retaken as prescribed by the Department).

EN3109 Creative Writing 2

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15 (This module is only available to students taking BA English (CK109).).
Pre-requisite(s): EN2101
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (with associated independent writing and research.).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English; Staff, School of English.
Module Objective: This module focuses on developing competence in fiction and poetry.
Module Content: Students will produce sustained pieces of work in a workshop setting where their work will be reviewed by their peers. They will also keep a writing journal charting their writing process and literary development.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Write and develop work in fiction and poetry Make informed choices about genre, style and forms of self-expression Engage in advanced discussion of issues relating to writers and writing Demonstrate, in critical prose, an awareness of their own writing processes, addressing issues of style, craft, and personal literary development.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio of creative work equivalent of c. 3000 words, 100 marks; writing journal, 40 marks; contribution and participation, 60 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AS2010 History of Japanese Culture

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Till Weingartner, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Module Objective: To provide students with a detailed overview of the symbiotic relationship between history and culture in Japan with the intention of facilitating their understanding of the direct impact that historical events have had on cultural and social developments. A key focus will be placed on how Japan's classical culture has influenced modern and contemporary society.
Module Content: This module examines how the culture of Japan evolved from early civilization through to the 20th century. A number of prominent cultural texts from a range of genres, including poetry, mythology, theatre and prose, are examined from a historical perspective to identify the key issues they raise and gain insights into how culture in Japan can be viewed as a historically changing construct. In addition to translated primary sources, secondary literature will be employed that provides students with an overview of the process by which they can contextualize the available sources and develop insights into Japanese culture from an academic perspective.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate an understanding of how Japan’s culture has evolved from the early stages through to the 20th century; Recognize notable literary and cultural works within the context of Japan’s cultural and historical development; Critically reflect on stereotypical notions of Japanese culture as unique and isolated, and examine how such perceptions have been influenced and employed historically; Consider pre- and early-modern Japanese historical events and philosophies in a global context; Identify and assess the application of classical Japanese cultural themes and motives in contemporary society in Japan; Critically examine the common contemporary debates surrounding Japanese culture.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1x 3,000 word (max) essay 100 marks;1 x 1,500 word essay, 60 marks; 1x in-class presentation, 40 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

EN6048 Gender and Sexuality

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.
Lecturer(s): Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.
Module Objective: This module examines the relationship between gender, sexuality, culture, and nation and the queering of those categories into the twenty-first century.
Module Content: 'All nationalities are gendered; all are invented; and all are dangerous', Anne McClintock argues, 'dangerous ...in the sense that they represent relations to political power and to the technologies of violence'. Gender and sexuality mark a critical juncture of history, politics, the body, the individual, and the state in Irish culture, a nexus of anxiety and interest in the ongoing project of defining 'Irishness'. Historically Ireland has been figured as female, both in colonial discourse and nationalist iconography, while in the twentieth century, on both sides of the border after partition, strict sexual norms based on religious values came to be associated with national character. The chosen texts will be analysed in the context of questions drawn from a number of theoretical approaches, including feminist theory, gender theory, and queer theory.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate an in-depth critical awareness of the relationship between Irish artistic production, including writing and film, and the history of gendered and sexed readings of Irish identity Analyse and critically discuss selected Irish texts in different genres (fiction, drama and poetry) in the context of theories of gender and sexuality Advance complex and developed readings of course readings, based on detailed reading of the texts and a sound understanding of their historical and cultural contexts Engage critically and constructively with the views of other scholars and students, and with various modes of scholarship Deliver effective presentations Formulate an independent argument about gender and sexuality in Irish writing and film, drawing on and contributing to existing criticism and interpretation in the field of study Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English, within the fields of Irish writing and film
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

SS1885 Human Diversity

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.
Teaching Methods: 4 x 3hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 7hr(s) Other (day session); 2 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 80hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alastair Christie, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: Students will have knowledge of the extent of the diversity of human cultural expression and recognise the cultural specificity of the cultural systems within which they themselves are located.
Module Content: Social anthropology; the meaning of 'culture'; family/kinship, economic and political systems; traditional and modern Irish culture; the cultures of the Traveller community and of new communities in Ireland; sociological understandings of 'structure' and 'agency'.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Provide a defintion of the discipline of social anthropology. Discuss the meaning and significance of 'culture'. Distinguish alternative patterns of family and kinship relations. Distinguish alternative patterns of economic relations. Distinguish alternative patterns of political relations. Compare and contrast cultural patterns evident at different points in Irish history. Appreciate the contextual nature of modern Irish culture. Discuss alternative conceptions of the priority of 'structure' vs. 'agency' as means of understanding the relationship between human beings and society.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must attend a minimum of 75% of lectures and tutorials, which will be monitored by class register, unless absence is certified. Students who do not meet the minimum attendance requirement may be disallowed from undertaking the module assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Director, Centre for Adult Continuing Education).

SH7019 Case Studies in Research Ethics

Credit Weighting: 2.5
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: Other (The module employs a combination of e-learning using materials delivered via Blackboard and a face-to-face workshop with discussion of specific case studies.).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Fanning, Department of Medicine.
Lecturer(s): Staff, University College Dublin, Professor Alan Baird, UCD.
Module Objective: Develop an understanding of the influence of ethics on clinical research.
Module Content: This module is designed for research students and examines ethical issues that arise during the conduct of research. Delivery is blended with access to online materials followed by an interactive workshop that uses case histories to illustrate relevant issues.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Understand and use ethical frameworks and basic tools in research ethics debates. Explain and justify your decisions about research ethics. Know about resources for extending and updating knowledge of ethics.
.
Assessment: Completed portfolio must be submitted. Full attendance required.
Compulsory Elements: Attendance at workshop, completion of online activities.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgement.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and re-submit written assignment, as prescribed by the Graduate School in consultation with the module coordinator).

AC3007 Intermediate Management Accounting

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): AC1109 and AC1115 or equivalent
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Practicals (Up to 10 hrs).
Module Co-ordinator:
Lecturer(s): Dr Margaret Healy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems; Dr Peter Cleary, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To develop participants' understanding of the theory and practice of Management Accounting.
Module Content: Theory and practice of Management Accounting.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Apply a range of management accounting decision making techniques. Identify alternative strategies for resolving problems. Communicate and defend chosen strategies in an effective manner. Use strategic decision making models to reduce uncertainty. Discuss the characteristics of traditional and newer approaches to costing. Demonstrate the relevance of management accounting techniques to business decisions.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Interim exam 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AS3020 Issues in Contemporary Korea and Japan

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kevin Cawley, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Module Objective: This module introduces the student to many aspects of contemporary Korean and Japanese society, including modernisation and democratisation, the changing family, gender issues, religion, the political system and popular culture.
Module Content: This module focuses on the experiences of the two countries during the age of colonialism leading to their often problematic relationship, the Second World War followed by the Korean War, the national division of Korea and the recovery of both Japan and Korea to two of the most advanced nations in the world. It will compare major social and political issues in the two countries, as well as some of the social challenges arising from their modern transitions. It will also deal with the conflicting cultural identities of Japan, North and South Korea.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate an understanding of major events in twentieth- century Korean and Japanese history. Critically assess the growth and development of democracy in modern Korean and Japanese societies Explain the impact of the Korean Wave (Hallyu) and Cool Japan in the field of popular culture. Identify issues arising from the national division, multiculturalism and conflicting cultural identities. Understand the changes in the family in Japan and Korea due to modernisation and changing gender roles and perceptions.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word (max) essay - 100 marks;1 x 1,500 word (max) essay - 60 marks;1 x Class Presentation - 40 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

MG4040 Relationship Marketing

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen O'Sullivan, Department of Management and Marketing.
Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen O'Sullivan, Department of Management and Marketing.
Module Objective: To not only introduce the fundamental concepts and theories of relationship marketing (RM) but also provide an insight into the industry and marketplace application of relationship marketing technqiues and strategies. This module encourages a holistic understanding of relationship marketing by detailing three distinct categories of marketplace relational dynamics; busines-to-consumer relationships (B2C), consumer-business-consumer relationships (CBC) and business-to-business (B2B) relationships.
Module Content: Introduction to strategic market relationships; understanding relationship theories; relationship planning and development; people and relationships; core business relationships including customer partnerships, internal partnerships, supplier partnerships and external partnerships.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Outline the main concepts and theoretical ideas in B2C, CBC and B2B relationship marketing Critically evaluate the relationship metaphor (and other marketing metaphors) Discuss why consumers develop relationships with brands Explain the role of CRM and loyalty programmes in consumers' everyday lives and the potential value to marketers Assess critically the dynamic nature of CBC relationships and their benefits/disadvantages to marketers Describe the market conditions/barriers driving B2B RM Adopt a creative and original approach to representing RM Implement a RM strategy in each of the marketplace categories
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Group representation and report, 1,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

FR6702 Advanced French Intercultural Communications

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Margot Spencer, Department of French.
Lecturer(s): Ms Margot Spencer, Department of French.
Module Objective: To develop digital text analysis and processing skill-sets in French.
Module Content: This module will provide interactive training in advanced digital/ICT text analysis and processing skill-sets. Students will train in meta-cognitive, cognitive, socio-communicative and interpreting strategies. Students will develop workplace-related project management skills working on a set of professional digital intercommunications simulations.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    apply strategies in which they have trained during the course. process and analyse a wide range of digital/ICT material on specialised topics. operate professionally in complex human intercultural situations. demonstrate project management skills.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x projects x 50 marks each).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

EE4015 Robotics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Project on analysis of forward and inverse kinematics of some typical robotic structures).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Lecturer(s): Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Module Objective: To provide an insight into various robotic structures and their associated components and control.
Module Content: Perspective transformations; Palletizing and depalletizing; Basic configurations of serial robots; Spatial descriptions and transformations; Forward kinematics; Inverse kinematics; Continuous path control; Jacobians; Trajectory generation of robots and mechatronic systems.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Utilize homogeneous transformations to solve engineering problems in applications such as palletizing and depalletizing. Analyze a wide variety of previously unseen robotic structures including frame assignment and forward kinematic analysis, principally for the purpose of hand matrix derivation. Develop inverse kinematic equations and perform numerical solutions of inverse kinematics problems for robotic structures. Write a detailed engineering report based on a software-based project (utilizing Mathematica), in which the forward and inverse kinematics of prescribed robots are investigated in detail. Formulate interpolation-based strategies for trajectory generation for robots and other automation and servo-based systems.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (Project Report on a Mathematica-based analysis of selected robotic structures (20 marks); In class test(s) (5 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

ED6604 Outdoor Education and Sport Development

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Susan Crawford, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Dr Susan Crawford, School of Education.
Module Objective: To introduce basic principles and practice of Outdoor Education and Sport Development.
Module Content: Introduction to basic principles and practice of Outdoor Education and Sport Development from both theoretical and practical perspectives. The module will explore in detail concepts of outdoor education and sports development from both national and international perspectives.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the key components of outdoor education programmes and their application to sport development Compare and contrast existing examples of outdoor education programmes Plan and design an outdoor education programme for an Irish setting Evaluate the newly designed programme in the light of national and international standards
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x In Class Assignments 50 marks each).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

PH6047 Philosophy and Health

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 8.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Vittorio Bufacchi, Department of Philosophy.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Philosophy.
Module Objective: To critically examine the concepts and processes that define health and disease.
Module Content: This module will introduce students to concepts of health and disease as well as the processes used to evaluate health and disease. Some of the topics to be discussed include the medical and ethical accounts of health and disease, questions about what constitutes health and related notions about quality of life, and the social, political and cultural dimensions of health and health care.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Critically evaluate the concepts of health and disease; Describe and critically evaluate the major determinants of health and disease; Describe and assess what constitutes health and quality of life; Describe and critically evaluate the methodologies used in evidence-based medicine; Describe and critically appraise methods for the evaluation of public health; Synthesise in general terms the ethical basis of health.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 5,000 word essay to be submitted).

BL6020 Genetics and the Marine Environment

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the application of genetics to the understanding and sustainable use of the marine environment.
Module Content: Students will be provided with an introduction to the methods of collection and analysis of genetic information on marine organisms, including the latest genomic techniques. The biological diversity revealed by these techniques, and technological interventions they enable, will be surveyed. Work will focus on the application of this information to understanding fundamental aspects of the marine environment and its sustainable use with examples from oceanography, fisheries, aquaculture, biotechnology and conservation.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate knowledge of the basic methods of analysis of genetic data. Describe key aspects of genetic diversity of the marine environment and the major processes influencing it. Demonstrate an understanding of genetic technologies and their application. Critically evaluate genetic information and its relevance to issues concerning the marine environment
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Essay (20 marks); Practical report (10 Marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

GA1062 Feidhm na Gaeilge sa Stair

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Iosmheid 10, Uasmheid 25.
Pre-requisite(s): Ní hann dó
Co-requisite(s): Ní hann dó
Teaching Period(s): Seimeastar 1 agus 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 4 (h)uair(e) an chloig Eile (de Chianfhoghlaim trí áiseanna TFC (ITC)); 24 x 1 (h)uair(e) an chloig Eile (staidéir phríobháidigh); 30 x 1 (h)uair(e) an chloig Eile (ar dhá mhór-aiste); Eile (úsáid na punainne athmhachnaimh foghlama).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ciaran Dawson, Ionad Na Gaeilge Labhartha.
Lecturer(s): Dr Ciaran Dawson, Ionad Na Gaeilge Labhartha.
Module Objective: Eolas a thabhairt do na mic léinn ar ról feidhmeach stairiúil na Gaeilge i bhforbairt na sochaí in Éirinn agus i gCéin.
Module Content: Pléifidh an modúl seo le feidhm na Gaeilge sa tsochaí ó ré na Sean-Ghaeilge anuas go dtí an lá inniu. Déanfaidh sé é seo faoi na ceannteidil seo leanas :
· Forbairt na teanga ón bProto-Cheiltis anuas go dtí an Nua-Ghaeilge.
· Forbairt an Leabhair Ghaeilge.
· An Ghaeilge agus na Gairmeacha tríd na hAoiseanna.
· Ról an Scríobhaí agus na Lámhscríbhneoireachta.
· Úsáid Stairiúil na Gaeilge i gCéin.
· Úsáid na Teicneolaíochta.
Modúl ar líne ar fad a bheidh anseo agus mairfidh sé ar feadh na bliana acadúla. Cuirfear ábhar seachtainiúil i láthair na mac léinn sna meáin éagsúla leictreonacha (téacsanna, suíomhanna gréasáin, podchraoladh srl) agus iarrfar orthu freagairt dó trí mheáin éagsúla Ghréasáin 2.0 (Plé ar-líne, Vicithe, Blaganna, Podchraoladh). Táthar ag súil le go gcaithfidh gach mac léinn 4 uair an chloig in aghaidh na seachtaine ar a laghad leis an obair seo.
Learning Outcomes: Nuair a bheidh an modúl seo déanta ag na mic léinn beidh:
    siad ábalta plé go húdarásach le forbairt na Gaeilge mar theanga fheidhmeach siad ábalta stair na Gaeilge mar theanga fheidhmeach a phlé i gcomhthéacs a forbartha sa lá atá inniu ann siad ábalta forbairt na Gaeilge Feidhmí sa 21ú hAois a scrúdú i gcomhthéacs a staire mar theanga fheidhmeach siad ábalta comparáid a dhéanamh idir forbairt na Gaeilge Feidhmí agus forbairt theangacha eile na hEorpa
.
Assessment: Marc ar fad 200: An obair a dheanfai i gcaitheamh na bliana 200 marc (An obair i gcaitheamh na bliana 80 marc (40 marc ar chaighdeán na teanga, 40 marc ar thathag na hoibre); dhá mhór-aiste 2,500 focal an ceann, 120 marc (60 marc agus 60 marc)).
Compulsory Elements: Obair i gcaitheamh na bliana; teagmháil leictreonach leanúnach; freastal ar chruinnithe eagraithe; an dá mhór-aiste taighde.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Náid (0) an marc a bhronnfar ar aon cheacht / aiste / tionscnamh a bheidh déanach (nó neachtar acu tabharfar teip don mac / iníon léinn sa mhodúl más modúl 'Pas/Teipe' atá i gceist).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: Gan Scrúdú Scríofa Foirmiúil.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Ní thugtar ar aghaidh ach na marcanna sin a théann ar aon chuid den mheasúnú leanúnach ar éirigh leis an mac / iníon léinn ann. Má theipeann ar an mac / iníon léinn in aon chuid eile, ní foláir an chuid / na coda sin a dhéanamh in athuair (Beidh caoi chun obair na bliana agus chun an dá mhór-aiste athchóirithe a chur isteach arís sa chás nach bhfuil pas faighte.).

MB4011 Microbial Food Safety

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): MB2005 and MB2006 or equivalent
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Colin Hill, School of Microbiology.
Lecturer(s): Prof Colin Hill, School of Microbiology.
Module Objective: To provide comprehensive information on the prevalence and nature of organisms which cause foodborne diseases.
Module Content: Foodborne pathogenic micro-organisms; epidemiology. Costs and consequences of foodborne diseases; pertinent case studies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the nature of epidemiological investigations Identify major food pathogens and high risk foods Recognise major classes of viruses and parasites in food-borne disease. Interpret molecular typing of pathogens
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

ED4317 Historical and Philosophical Aspects of Physical Education, Sport and Physical Activity

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Blended learning [6 x 2hr on-line and 6 x 2hr face to face]); Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Catherine Chambers, School of Education.
Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Catherine Chambers, School of Education.
Module Objective: To introduce students to theories of philosophy and their application to the historical context of physical education sport and physical activity.
Module Content: The module adopts a multidisciplinary approach to the study of historical sport and the various philosophies that informed and contributed to these histories. The study of sport history in this course will employ both descriptive and interpretive approaches that offer the student a genealogy of pre-modern and modern sports with a focus on 19th and 20th century

We begin with sport in pre-modern civilizations (early Greece and the Roman Republic/Empire), move through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Enlightenment periods and into 19th century Europe and worldwide. We then explore the 20th century, late colonization, the Industrial Revolution, and high modernism sport before reaching recent (1950s-present) late capitalism/postmodern and current approaches to sport. Each phase will be associated with various philosophical positions not only on the body and the myriad notions of physical education and culture but on the place of sport as a mediated, constructed, and informing social institution.

Our consideration of philosophies, social practices, and influences will include moral and ethical issues in sport situations and an analysis of the actions and decisions as they relate to moral and aesthetic values. We will be acquainting ourselves with various philosophical schools and ethical theories and then using these as basis to formulate an informing philosophical and ethical orientation for one's own functioning as a sport participant, administrator, teacher/coach, advisor/practitioner or researcher.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Critically analyse key historical movements, periods and places in physical education, sport and physical activity Apply philosophical theories to current sociocultural issues in physical education, sport and physical activity contexts. Critically evaluate curricular and pedagogical approaches to physical education, sport and physical activity through the lenses of equity and inclusion and access. apply numeracy and literacy skills to in class activities and assignments.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (4000 word e-portfolio).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

CH3105 Current Issues in Business Management in China

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): NONE
Co-requisite(s): NONE
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jacqueline Sheehan, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Lecturer(s): Prof Jacqueline Sheehan, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the theory and practice of Chinese management and the challenges facing organisations and their leaders in today's competitive Chinese business environment.
Module Content: A systematic approach to the examination of the theory and practice of Chinese management and leadership studies, as well as an examination of Chinese management in an international context.
Introduction to the wider cultural and historical backgrounds informing the large-scale reforms which have occurred in the Chinese economy in the recent past.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Understand the specific cultural and organisational aspects of Chinese business. Critically discuss various approaches to the study of business management. Develop, present and discuss case studies of business management in China. Analyze the various systems of governance for different sectors within the Chinese economy.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 50 marks (1.5 hours); Continuous Assessment 150 marks (continuous assessment 60 marks; 1x3000 word essay, 70 marks; attendance and participation 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Chinese Studies).

IS2215 Visual Programming

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Up to 22hrs Practicals/Laboratory Sessions, as specified by the Department).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ciaran Murphy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew Pope, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To give students an understanding of visual programming and user interface design.
Module Content: Principles of user interface design, introduction to recursive programming, file processing, database programming (ADO), introduction to objects, classes and class libraries, package and deployment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Utilise the .NET Framework for application development Identify the syntax and language enhancements introduced in .NET Utilise the methods and properties of the .NET fundamental classes Be proficient with visual and code-based database connectivity and database management through ADO.NET Undertake Object Oriented programming in .NET using polymorphism, encapsulation and inheritance
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (MCQ - 20 Marks; Programming Project - 20 Marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Attendance at lectures and practicals (if applicable).
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AT6011 Design Research: Cultures and Context

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 3hr(s) Lectures ( + 9 hrs of seminars + 12 hours tutorial group + independent study).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Kevin McCartney, Cork Centre for Architectural Education (Mr. Jason O'Shaughnessy, Cork Centre for Architectural Education).
Lecturer(s): Staff, Cork Centre for Architectural Education.
Module Objective: a) To analyse the physical characteristics of a specified site or terrain
b) To develop a critical perspective on the prevailing socio- economic-cultural, planning and historical issues raised by the study and recording of a particular site context.
c) To identify and develop a critique of relevant architectural approaches to contexts comparable with those studied.
Module Content: Examples of site analysis and critiques of contextual issues, case study methodology.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Develop critical and intellectual skills which relates to a design investigation project. Analyse, interpret and synthesise key research themes. Undertake independent research using accessible textual and primary sources. Develop key thematic and research ideas within a Group. Produce a critical research framework.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 coursework submissions. [1]Contextual Study using architectural representations @ 75 marks [2] Recording, documentation and critical reflection through visual media @ 25 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

NU6028 Emergency Nursing II

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (50hrs Modified Lectures/Case Studies/Self-directed Learning; 160hrs Coursework and Self-directed Learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mark Tyrrell, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To facilitate the expansion of the student's knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to emergency nursing practice.
Module Content: Contemporary emergency nursing practice: Nursing care of patients with medical and surgical emergencies, Paediatric emergencies, obstetric emergencies, those who have experienced sexual violence or abuse; Mental health emergencies; Environmental emergencies; Considerations in the care of the older adult in the emergency department.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Analyse complex situations and initiate appropriate nursing interventions in the care of critically ill patients Critically examine Emergency Nursing as it applies to diverse medical, surgical, obstetric and paediatric and other emergencies. Apply the principles of Emergency Nursing to clinical practice in diverse emergency situations as they relate to specific client groups (such as the mentally ill, the elderly, the child, and the victim of violence and abuse). Critically evaluate the role of the emergency nurse in Health Promotion
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word Academic paper 200 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Revise and resubmit 1 x 3,000 word Academic paper as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

EE6103 Advanced VLSI Architectures

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 24.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Project).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emanuel Popovici, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Lecturer(s): Dr Emanuel Popovici, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Prof William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
Module Objective: To teach the principles of Advanced Digital VLSI Design through applications in VLSI Digital Signal Processing.
Module Content: Algorithms: filtering (including FIR and IIR) and Spectral Analysis. Architectures: Pipelining, Parallel Processing, retiming, Systolic Architectures (Synchronous), Asynchronous. Arithmetic Functions: Adders and Multipliers, number representation and redundant arithmetic. Advanced Digital Signal Processing, System Level Design Flow, Hardware-software co-design, Power optimization for hardware-software systems, Systems on a Chip(SoC), Networks on a Chip(NoC), 3D-IC and Field Programmable systems(FPSoC), VHDL for Synthesis and Verification.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Design a Digital Filter; Estimate the Spectrum of a signal; Design a VLSI Architecture to implement a Digital Filer and a spectral estimator; Explain the importance and challenges of designing digital systems; Describe an embedded(hardware-software) system design flow from specification to physical realization; Estimate the cost and the performance of a hardware-software system(timing, power consumption); Define a SoC, NoC, FPSoC;
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Report 1 50 marks, Report 2 100 Marks, Performance 50 Marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

DR1005 Texts and Contexts I (Part 1) Greek to Modern

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 36.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): DR1006
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Practical classes, and associated seminars/tutorials/theatre visits).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marie Kelly, Drama and Theatre Studies.
Lecturer(s): Dr Marie Kelly, Drama and Theatre Studies; Staff, Drama and Theatre Studies.
Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of theatre texts of different periods, forms and styles from Greek to Modern Theatre.
Module Content: This module will proceed through the twin study of texts and theatre history. Through the study of a wide variety of play - texts of different periods, forms and styles, students will be introduced to modes of formalist analysis. Through the study of the societal and theatrical contexts within which these plays were written, students will be introduced to considerations of the specific performance implications of the texts and the nature of the theatre events of which they were a crucial part.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate an understanding of a historical range of theatre forms; Analyse a range of dramatic texts of different periods and styles; Articulate the theatrical and stylistic features of key texts; Read the performance possibilities implied by a script, score and other textual or documentary sources; Develop production proposals for the theatrical realisation of dramatic texts.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written Essays and in-class assignments totalling approx. 3,000 words).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Class participation.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

GK2003 Reading Greek

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): GK1001 or equivalent
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Vicky Janssens, Department of Classics.
Lecturer(s): Ms Vicky Janssens, Department of Classics.
Module Objective: To complete the study of Greek morphology and syntax.
Module Content: Reading Greek JACT (Cambridge 2007), sections 12-19.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Classify and identify the principal elements of the morphology of Attic Greek. Identify and describe the main constructions in the syntax of Attic Greek. Combine the above elements in order to translate sentences from English into Greek. Analyse the structure of and translate sentences and continuous passages from Greek into English with the aid of a dictionary.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks (1 x 1.5 hour examination); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x In Class tests).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

AD5832 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Inclusion (Disability Studies)

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: 48hr(s) Lectures; 150hr(s) Other (self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Social Studies, and guest lecturers; Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: To provide an interdisciplinary perspective on the human experience of disability with an emphasis on facilitating inclusion.
Module Content: An interdisciplinary module informed by the arts, humanities and social sciences that investigates society's understanding of disability from a historical, social, cultural, political, legal, global and educational perspective.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Reflect from an historical perspective how disabled people have been and continue to be excluded in society. Discuss how the question of inclusivity needs to be understood as a political issue. Evaluate the relationship between creativity and inclusion. Debate the importance of cross-cultural approaches to disability, human rights and education. Discuss the role of legislation in facilitating inclusion. Highlight the links between advocacy and inclusion. Theorise on forms of educational policy and practice that engage with the requirements of diverse learners.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (5 x 600 word reflective logs (for inclusion in course portfolio), 100 marks; 1 x 1,500 word assignment, 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

AD6805 Managing Collective Employment Relations

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): MG6805
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Other (comprising 15 hrs of lectures; 6 hrs skill development session and 3 hrs guest lecture on module relevant topic); Directed Study (self-study using dedicated learning materials); Other (CPD planning (CPD) via a meeting with career mentor nominated at start of programme (mentor to be a senior HR professional in industry or public sector).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: The purpose of this module is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of employment relations perspectives and debates. Having Irish and global coverage this module equips the student with an ability to analyse and evaluate competing academic theory and employee relations practice in the management of employment relations. The influence of employment management approaches on organisational climate and behaviour is explored with reference to both unionised and non-unionised organisations as well as organisations of varying size, sector and origin. As part of this module students will critically explore the structures and processes required to effectively manage the employment relationship.
Module Content: · practices in union and non-union, small and large, private, public and indigenous and multinational organisations stakeholders in employment relations
· employment relations theory and practice
· relationships between organisation climate & behaviour and employment management approaches
· influence of change on employment relations activity
· developing policy and procedure for the organisational management of employment relations.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Different theories and perspectives on employment relations. The impact of local, national and global contexts shaping employment relations climates. The roles and functions of the different parties to control and manage the employment relationship. The importance of organisational-level employment relations processes that support organisational performance, including the design and implementation of policies and practices. The importance of employment relations procedures that help mitigate organisational risk, including the design and implementation of policies and practices in the areas of discipline, grievance, dismissal and redundancy. The integration of employment relations processes and how they impact on policy, practice and organisational outcomes such as performance and employee engagement.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3,000 word assignment, 80 marks and an individual presentation linked to theassignment, 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (in the Autumn).

AD1002 Introduction to Social Enterprises and People Centred Business

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: 8 x 3hr(s) Lectures (interactive group work and class discussion); 76hr(s) Other (self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: To integrate and apply a range of business skills in a social enterprise and a people centred business.
Module Content: Organising and running a people-centred business and social enterprises; decision making practices; governance.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain the rationale informing the governance of a social enterprise and a people centred business Demonstrate an understanding of what is meant by the term, people centred business Define and locate the economic sector/context in which social enterprises and people centred businesses exist Assess the role of the social enterprise and people centred business in the economy and society Describe the legal frameworks available for a social enterprise and a people centred business
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Profile of a Social Enterprise, 1,500 words).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

MA2061 Game Theory and Linear Algebra

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 10.
Pre-requisite(s): MA1055
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ben McKay, Department of Mathematics.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Mathematics.
Module Objective: To provide an introduction to business-related applications of linear algebra.
Module Content: Applications of linear analysis to game theory, Markov chains, linear programming.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Solve linear optimization problems subject to linear inequalities; Use the simplex method; Find optimal strategies and calculate expected values of games; Employ Markov matrices in business models;
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 class test).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

ES2033 Model European Union

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 32.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 14 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Lecturer Meetings with individual country groups); 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals (1 x 2 day Model EU).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.
Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.
Module Objective: To give students an opportunity to develop communication and negotiating skills by participating in simulated Summit Meetings, over two days, of the European Council and the Council of the EU.
Module Content: Students will be divided into country groups representing members of the European Union, and each will take responsibility for a ministerial portfolio. The Model EU / Simulation itself will take place over 2 days. A press communiqué will be prepared by press teams each day. On the final day of the exercise, there will be a press conference. A written report of 1,500 words must also be submitted.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Organise and participate in simulated two-day Summit Meetings of the European Council and the Council of the EU. Articulate their country's policies in a coherent manner on current European Union affairs and effectively negotiate their positions in both small groups and in plenary sessions. Chair a meeting. Write a clear and succinct press communique. Prepare a well-structured, coherent written report on their participation in the Exercise.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word report regarding the Model EU Exercise 30 marks; Participation in the Model EU Exercise 70 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 1,500 word report 30 marks; and 3,500 word essay in lieu of participation in the Model EU Exercise 70 marks, to be submitted in Autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

FE2203 Food Economics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 3 x 1 hr(s) tutorials).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Mr Stephen Thornhill, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To develop appropriate methods and constructs to enable students to examine issues dealing with the agri-food sector.
Module Content: Economic theory of household food consumption, profit-maximising food producers, commodity and food markets and agricultural policy impacts.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain household food production and consumption decisions Explain the economic theory behind profit maximising investment and production decisions among food firms Explain the theory behind commodity and food price formation Explain how agricultural and food policies influence food prices and social welfare Explain the weaknesses of the economic supply and demand model from a food sector perspective
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1,500 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

MU2023 Sounds Like Listening

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music (Lecturer: Danny McCarthy).
Lecturer(s): Mr Danny McCarthy, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To develop skills in the creation of music including original composition and improvisation.
Module Content: This is a course based on the concept of 'sound art'. The popularity of this art-form has grown enormously in recent years, and sound art works now regularly appear in all major art exhibitions. Sound art is a unique and exciting creative tradition, linked to the ideas of John Cage and other experimental artists working in many different disciplines, and encompasses both sound and vision.

The course takes the form of weekly workshops designed to develop a deeper awareness of 'listening' as a practice. They include work on improvisation techniques with a strong emphasis on sound installations and performance; visual and audio examples of current and historical sound-art practice; 'sound walks'; and the concept of 'acoustic ecology'.

This course is taught by Danny McCarthy, one of Ireland's leading sound artists. Assessment is by the creation of an installation (fixed or mobile); a sound-art-based presentation; an acoustic-visual work; a work presented as a score or a recording; or a seminar-style presentation on an aspect of sound art.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Discuss the issues surrounding the creation of sound art. Engage with and assess the creative work of others. Create sound art in various styles and for various media.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Practical sound art project (installation, acoustic-visual work, score or recording, or a seminar-style presentation),100).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

GE0104 German Language (Intermediate Level B1), Pt 1

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): GE0105
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: Other (3 contact hours per week).
Module Co-ordinator: Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German.
Lecturer(s): Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.
Module Objective: To improve a student's skill in German by one level on the language ability scale.
Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered accurately reproduce grammatical forms dealt with identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at the lower end of level B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages participate successfully in class discussions with fellow students by expressing and defending their own views and demonstrating an understanding of their fellow students' views produce grammatically correct written texts by applying German language at the lower end of level B1 examine aspects of German culture and society and reflect on them
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 in-class test 50 marks; project with presentation 30 marks; vocab tests, attendance and participation 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students failing Continuous Assessment must undertake a 1 x 1.5 hr test as prescribed by the Department.

AC2101 Consolidated Financial Statements and Reporting

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s): AC1103 and AC1104 or equivalent
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Up to 10hrs Tutorials).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire O'Sullivan Rochford, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Ms Claire O'Sullivan Rochford, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To develop an understanding of contemporary corporate financial reporting.
Module Content: Development of issues of income measurement, asset valuation, recognition of liabilities and the presentation of financial information. Consideration of the regulatory framework of corporate financial reporting. The theory, nature and effects of accounting regulations on the published financial reports of corporations and other entities.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify and interpret various complex business combinations; Explain and apply various International Financial Accounting Standards to business transactions pertaining to consolidated accounts Compare and contrast the requirements of International Financial Reporting Standards with the Irish/UK equivalent; Prepare a set of group financial statements for consolidation purposes. Discuss and review various contemporary accounting issues.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

BM1010 Biological Chemistry 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s):
Teaching Methods:
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sinead Kerins, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Module Objective:
Module Content:
Learning Outcomes: .
Assessment:
Compulsory Elements:
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

SS5400 Research Project (H Dip Social Policy)

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To identify appropriate research topics and to produce a research report under staff supervision.
Module Content: Elements of research; research strategies; data selection; data collection; collation and analysis; application of statistical packages; final report writing.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Be familiar with the theoretical, methodological and policy contexts informing the choices open to researchers in undertaking a small-scale postgraduate research project. Be familiar with the choices involved at the data selection stage and their implications. Display familiarity with the many aspects of data collection, via either the primary or secondary data collection process. Have developed a capacity to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data. Demonstrate a good grasp of the ethics and politics of social research. Exhibit the skills required in writing a graduate research project.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 10,000 word Research Report.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA must be resubmitted to the Autumn Exam Board.

MH6118 Recovery Principles, Values and Practices in Mental Health

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (Group Work/Tutorials/Reflective Sessions/Seminars/Blended Learning); 76hr(s) Other (Self-directed Learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Harry Gijbels, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Dr Harry Gijbels, School of Nursing & Midwifery, and invited guest lecturers.
Module Objective: Offer students the opportunity to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and attitudes to work in a recovery oriented way, both at an individual and practice development level, which will enable individuals to access opportunities, facilities, roles and activities and which facilitate and develop community integration of people with mental health problems.
Module Content: The module focuses on the values, principles, approaches, strategies and interventions to promote and evaluate the implementation of recovery oriented approaches in mental health care, from both an individual and organizational perspective, but with a particular focus on the role of practitioners in health, social care, and educational settings and the uniqueness of the recovery journey for each service user or person 'in recovery'. Historical perspective of recovery movement; values, belief and principles of recovery; key elements of recovery oriented approaches; recovery focused strategies, methods and tools; implementing recovery oriented services and practices; exploring key elements such as hope, meaning and purpose, control and choice, self-help and self-management strategies, risk taking, challenging service-defined notions of risk, relationships in supporting people in recovery; social inclusion; recovery frameworks for care planning; recovery focused strategies, methods and tools; implementing recovery oriented services and practices; personal stories of recovery, evaluation strategies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate a critical understanding of the background and context to the development of recovery in mental health practice. Critically review the principles, values and beliefs which underpin and guide recovery focused and oriented approaches. Evaluate the key elements, and demonstrate a working knowledge, of recovery focused practice. Discriminate and select recovery oriented strategies, methods and tools which are appropriate and sensitive to service users, their situation, setting, and context. Demonstrate the ability to work with individuals, groups and communities in a recovery focused way. Evaluate the factors that may help or hinder recovery and critically reflect on your own practice in relation to these. Examine the evidence base of recovery focused interventions. Critically reflect on their own current practice as to how these help or hinder recovery.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (One x 1,500 word essay (100 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revise and resubmit 1 x 1,500 word essay as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.).

EC2018 Economics Journey Through Life's Decisions [Microeconomics]: Behavioural Economics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars ( Workshops); 100hr(s) Directed Study (Directed Reading, Project work).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Frank Crowley, Department of Economics.
Lecturer(s): Dr Frank Crowley, Department of Economics.
Module Objective: To introduce the strengths and weaknesses of the neoclassical models of decision making and understand how they depart from empirical evidence. To examine how the discipline of psychology when combined with economics may help our understanding of how individuals make decisions.
Module Content: Participants will learn to use the Economic Way of Thinking through an examination of the following type of questions: How has behavioural economics fundamentally changed the way Economists conceptualise the world? Why is it dangerous to see patterns in data? How do experts make split-second decisions? Why are we prone to reckless behaviour? When do we need a nudge to make a 'good' decision? Why are large groups of people often smarter than experts? How can we avoid groupthink? How do we use 'rule of thumb' when making decisions? What affect has choice architecture on our decisions? Can choice architecture help individuals make better decisions?.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Introduce students to the principles of behavioural economics Understand the strengths and weaknesses of neoclassical models of decision making Critically evaluate how individuals depart from the assumption of homo-economicus Examine the how choice architecture influences individual decisions Identify areas that behavioural economics can help policy making
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x project work, 2000 words, 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

MB4019 Computational Biology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): MB3016
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcus Claesson, School of Microbiology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Marcus Claesson, School of Microbiology.
Module Objective: Introduction to the application of computer based applications in biology and with specific reference to microbial systems.
Module Content: Introduction to computers applications for microbiologists. Sequencing and associated problems e.g. quality control, microbial genome sequencing strategies and coverage issues. Sequence alignment; profile alignment, multiple alignment, Molecular biology databases; including nucleotide and amino acid derived databases, protein structure databases. Database similarity searches using BLAST. Phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution, protein structure prediction. Gene finding and functional annotation of microbial genomes, motif searches; e.g. in secreted proteins. Methods for microbial comparative genomics such as whole-genome alignment, gene order comparisons, identifying inversions and transpositions. Methods for analysing microbial variation data (eg. SNPs).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain the importance of computers and bioinformatic software as tools for the microbiologist. Describe the strategies and work-flows employed to sequence and annotate genome sequences, and explain the limitations and caveats that apply. Retrieve DNA/amino acid sequences from the main public sequence repositories, and identify putative functions and origins for the sequences and evolutionary relationships (if any) between the sequences. Describe and apply the basic principles of common bioinformatic techniques used for sequence alignment, phylogenetic analysis, and analysis of variation data such as SNPs. Describe the basic principles of protein structure and structure prediction methods, and use a desktop programme to display and analyze the three-dimensional structure of a protein.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (15% Practical assessment + 15% Written reports).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by Module Coordinator).

MU2058 Irish Harp 2

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 2, Max 4.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Year-long performance course to allow for growth of skills and adequate rehearsal time prior to final assessed performance).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Workshops.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Ms Lisa Canny, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To develop performance skills on the Irish harp.
Module Content: Small group tuition on the Irish harp.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Successfully execute a performance at the relevant level of competence and in an appropriate style. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of specific performance styles. Analyse and interpret the characteristic components of relevant performance styles. Where appropriate, demonstrate an ability to perform sympathetically within the context of a group. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the act of performance. Discuss the issues surrounding the performance practice of select genres.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment (class participation), 40; Final Performance Examination, 60).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed performance examinations must be retaken as prescribed by the Department).

AC6007 Cost Management Practices

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12.
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Tutorials (Up to 5 hr(s)).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Peter Cleary, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Dr Margaret Healy, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: The objective of this module is to provide students with a through understanding of management accounting concepts and techniques for cost management, together with key interpretive, critical and communication skills.
Module Content: Topics covered include: customer and market profitability analyses, product costing and cost driver analyses, cost management for products, processes and services and current issues in cost management.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate the relevance of the distinction between differenent types of costs. Prepare and present management accounting information for a number of decision-making contexts. Discuss the characteristics of traditional and newer approaches to costing. Apply and interpret calculative routines for process and job costing; transfer pricing; customer profitability analyses; marginal and absorption costing. Describe forces of change in Management Accounting practice. Demonstrate the relevance of management accounting techniques to business decisions.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (in-class examination 25 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

CS3605 E-Enterprise Team Project

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 120.
Pre-requisite(s): CS2500
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 16 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 16 x 1hr(s) Practicals; 16 x 1hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr James G. Doherty, Department of Computer Science.
Lecturer(s): Dr James G. Doherty, Department of Computer Science.
Module Objective: Students should learn the value of, and the problems associated with, working in teams, especially in the case of the development of large software systems for e-enterprises; They should appreciate the problems associated with developing large software systems for e-enterprises, and techniques that can overcome some of these problems.
Module Content: Students work together in formal groups to build software systems for e-enterprises. Lectures, seminars and workshops will provide specific project support covering such topics as: working in groups, project management and planning, analysis and design, configuration management, version control, verification and validation, project documentation.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Work effectively with others in a software development team; Plan and apply project management techniques to scheduling and controlling the software development process; Identify the difficulties and risks inherent in developing large pieces of software; Document the software design and development process; Apply software skills to the implementation of a web software system; Design and apply a software testing plan; Deliver technical presentations during the software development cycle; Apply learned skills and experience more effectively in future project work; Contribute positively to projects during their Work Placement internship.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Breakdown as given out by Department: Project Related Presentations, Progress Documentation Submission, Presentation of Completed Task, Submission of Project Reports).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by the Module Coordinator).

MU2006 Musical Cultures of East Asia

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 15min(s) Tutorials (one on each assessed component).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To provide students with an awareness of musical thought, behaviour and practice in East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Taiwan), seen in historical and cultural context.
Module Content: Lectures survey and discuss significant readings and recordings. Sample weekly topics include: regional overview (geography, culture and language); regional overview (instruments); shakuhachi music of Japan; Japanese folksong; sanjo music of Korea; p'ansori music of Korea; Korean samul nori; Beijing opera; qin music of China; rock music in China; music and gender in East Asia. Tutorial support is offered for essay writing and other assessments. A Blackboard site is available with support materials.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Evaluate critically approaches to studying the music of East Asia. Effectively explain selected key issues in the study of East Asian music. Choose and apply methodologies appropriate for the music under consideration. Communicate their results appropriately in two genres of research writing.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Musicological Essay of c.2,500 words, or Music Transcription Project of equivalent size (c. 2 mins of music transcribed plus accompanying commentary), 100 marks; Anthropological Essay of c.3,000 words or analytical study (with sample transcriptions as appropriate), 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

PD6111 Contemporary Concepts in Planning Theory

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 25 x 1hr(s) Other (tutorials/workshops); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (Up to 50 hours self directed study).
Module Co-ordinator: Mr Brendan O'Sullivan, Department of Geography (Planning and Sustainable Development).
Lecturer(s): Mr Brendan O'Sullivan, Department of Geography, Planning and Sustainablel Development.
Module Objective: To develop a solid intellectual engagement with the theory, provenance, ethics and rationale of and for planning and sustainable development.
Module Content: Theory and Intellectual foundations of Planning and Sustainable Development. The moral and ethical questions surrounding planning and development and the role of the reflective planning practitioner.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Critique the case for and against spatial planning and the various forms and theories of spatial planning Analyse the diversity of cultures, views and ideologies that may have a bearing on planning Critique the nature of values, ethics and the meaning of professionalism within contemporary planning contexts
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x essay up to 4000 wrds (60), 1 x essay up to 2000 wrds (20), 1 x marked tutorial (20).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. All elements of continuous assessment (20 marks or higher) shall be passed independently.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of continuous assessment (20 marks or higher) shall be carried forward. Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated as prescribed by the Course Director.

DR6038 Contemporary Performance Theory & Practice 2

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): none
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Other (Practical classes, workshops).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bernadette Cronin, Drama and Theatre Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Drama and Theatre Studies.
Module Objective: To provide students with an intensive course covering core aspects of theory, criticism and practice; ensuring students have a thorough and in depth grounding of areas within the field while also have a clear sense of the scope and parameters of how the current field is constituted.
Module Content: This module will be led by Drama & Theatre Studies staff or Visiting Specialist staff and will involve exploration of and training in physical, vocal and other performance skills. This is a core course taught by teaching team across terms 1 & 2 in co-requisite with Contemporary Performance Theory and Practice I. It is taken by all students allowing an ongoing space for the cohort to work together and share their learning experiences. It will also assist them to develop strategies for a critically reflexive approach to the material. Module content and emphases will vary depending on the nature of the project in the co-requisite module but will involve relevant contemporary theory and practical research in directors theatre, applied theatre, physical performance, multimedia and digital performance, and playwriting.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify major performance theories employed and define key concepts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the module. Apply theories and practices addressed in the module and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own performance project. Demonstrate competency in the appropriate practical performance skills at MA level. Articulate in discussion, in writing and/or in practice a critically reflexive approach to both the process and the outcomes of the creation of performance project.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Course Participation & Performance Projects 150 marks; Written Assignment, approx 5000 words, 150 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AU6025 Audiology Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 16.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2 and 3.
Teaching Methods: Other (6 x 1 hr individual or group supervision/discussion; 180 hrs self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Siobhán Laoide-Kemp, School of Clinical Therapies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Medicine and Health.
Module Objective: The completion and write-up of an independent research project.
Module Content: An approved topic of research in the broad field of Audiology. The research project can be a systematic review of the literature or a pilot clinical experiment.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify and present a viable research question Describe a rationale of the project, clear aims and relevant clinical population, using the PICO method Organise timely and efficient data collection Manage and co-ordinate relevant external factors for the purposes of completing a research project Apply the principles of systematic reviews to the research question and demonstrate effectiveness in search methodologies and estimation of bias in relevant data Interpret the results of the analysis in the light of the aims of the research. Prepare a detailed report of the research project in the form of a journal article Present a summary of the research to an audience of peers and scholars
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Write-up of research project, 150 marks; seminar presentation 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% Students must pass each of the components independently to pass this module. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded. The Audiology Research Project will be submitted at the end Semester three. Students who fail to achieve the required standard (50%) will resubmit at the end of Semester three in the following academic year.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Clinical Therapies).

BT4004 Microbial Biotechnology

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-directed learning assignments).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Morrissey, School of Microbiology.
Lecturer(s): Dr John Morrissey, School of Microbiology, Staff School of Microbioogy, External Experts.
Module Objective: To provide students with knowledge on the application of molecular methodologies for engineering microbes for use in modern biotechnology industries.
Module Content: Application of microbes (in the biotechnology industry); Molecular technologies to manipulate microbes and to express heterologous proteins. Comparison of different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial expression systems. Applications of genetically engineered microbes in the food, beverage, industrial, environmental and pharmaceutical industries. Regulatory and safety issues associated with the use of recombinant microbes in industry.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain the molecular methods used to generate recombinant microbes for application in the biotechnology industry, Evaluate the merits of different microbes for specific industrial applications, Discuss specific examples of microbial application in different biotechnology industries, Discuss how new molecular approaches are being developed for biotechnology applications, Explain the regulatory and safety issues regarding application of recombinant microbes in industry.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

FS1812 Introduction to Fish Processing Technologies

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.
Teaching Methods: 20hr(s) Lectures (plus factory visit (min. 4 hrs)).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Lecturer(s): Prof Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Module Objective: To become familiar with the main fish processing technologies used in Ireland.
Module Content: Ingredients and technologies involved in the manufacture, packaging and preservation of consumer fish products (surimi, fermented, smoked and salted fish products) from a global perspective.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the main processing operations used in the further processing of fish to give a range of fish based consumer products. Describe the principal methods of packaging used with fish based products.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class test).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s). Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1.5 hour paper to be taken in Autumn).

AC6207 Accounting Research, Analysis and Communication

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (project work to be completed by the end of July).
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (including student presentations. Students will carry out their project work for submission by the middle of July).
Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Doran, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: This module provides the opportunity to acquire the necessary knowledge and analytical skills to enable students to design, conduct and present research in areas of interest to accountants in practice and in industry, and also to clients of the profession.
Module Content: Financial statement analysis. Training in research methods. Report writing and presentation of research results. Occasional seminars with accounting professionals and executives in industry.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Carry out business research to provide a solution to a client issue Locate and discuss recent literature in the research area and choose and utilise appropriate research methods Identify relevant databases and sources of research data and extract appropriate information Calculate financial ratios and explain how financial ratios are used to assess valuation, performance and solvency Analyse company and third party information including financial statements and critique the insights gained Write an effective business report Review and assess the clarity of working papers Formally present the findings of a business report or assignment engagement proposal to a client or professional peers.
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Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Two Individual projects (80 marks each); One group financial statement research and analysis report 5,000 - 8,000 words (80 marks). Up to 60 marks will be allocated for student participation in classes, site visits and other events included as part of this module.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

FS4002 Team Product Development Project

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Research Project (typically product or process development) carried out by teams comprising 2-4 students, under the supervision of staff; seminars and practicals in communications skills).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Paul McSweeney, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Daniel Mulvihill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.
Module Objective: To provide students with scientific project experience applicable to all aspects of development of a food product or process; to enhance communication skills.
Module Content: Laboratory and processing hall-based research project on a relevant area of food science and technology under the supervision of an appropriate staff member. Students will prepare a detailed report on their experimental work and findings. Students will also attend a series of seminars and workshops designed to enhance communications skills.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Apply principles of new product development to the practical development of an innovative food product Undertake a scientific research project in a systematic way in a small team Produce an innovative food product at laboratory and pilot scale Apply techniques such as chemical, physical, microbiological and sensory analysis, including shelf-life determination to a new food product, and develop a HACCP plan for this Produce a comprehensive project report including a review of relevant literature Understand how the fundamental rules of food packaging are applied in the development of new food products
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (preparation of report, based on review of literature and details of process or product development and experimental work).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Participation in project and submission of required reports.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

NU3096 Health Needs of People with an Intellectual Disability across the Lifespan III

Credit Weighting: 15
No. of Students: Max 25.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 100hr(s) Other (lectures, tutorials and directed learning); 200hr(s) Other (self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Maria Caples, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Ms Maria Caples, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Dr Therese Ruane-O'Hora, Department of Physiology, Department of Physiology; Dr Kathleen Quane, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience, Department of Anatomy; Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: This module aims to develop students' knowledge, understanding and application of the general health needs of people with intellectual disabilities presenting with common acute and chronic healthcare conditions within a multi-disciplinary context.
Module Content: Anatomy & Physiology (20hrs): Scientific principles to include: applied anatomy and physiology.
Nursing and applicable principles of science for people with intellectual disabilities with varying acute and chronic conditions of the central nervous system; renal system and urological system, reproductive system and sensory system. A brief over-view of wound healing (physiological process of wound healing and factors impacting upon it and associated nursing actions). Nursing and applicable approaches to health promotion, nutrition and medication management. Acute and chronic conditions in this module relate to the musculoskeletal, central nervous system, renal, urological, reproductive and sensory systems.

Scientific principles to include:
- relevant pharmacology, anatomy, physiology and nutrition
- anatomy of the brain and genitourinary system
- physiology of the nervous system and renal system.
- medication management to include the principles of safe medication management and nursing considerations concering drug therapy for people with an intellectual disability with acute and chronic conditions relating to the central nervous system, renal, urological, reproductive and sensory systems.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the anatomy of the brain and genito-urinary system. Describe the physiology of the brain as it relates to control of movement and sensation and describe the physiology of the renal system. Construct nursing care plans to meet the needs of people with an intellectual disability in relation to acute and chronic conditions of the central nervous system; musculoskeletal system, central nervous system,renal system, reproductive system,sensory system, and associated diseases and disorders. Discuss the holistic role of the intellectual disability nurse (incorporating medication management and nutritional principles). Relate the investigation of specific skin disorders as they relate to people with an intellectual disability. Discuss the principles of wound injury and healing. Discuss the factors (physical, psychological, social, spiritual and cultural) and lifestyle choices that can be affected when diagnosed with various acute or chronic conditions.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks (Physiology (35 marks), Anatomy (30 marks) and Nursing (135 marks)); Continuous Assessment 100 marks (MCQ tests, Nursing 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance and participation at all timetable teaching activities.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% overall. In addition students must obtain a minimum of 45% in each of the individual assessments independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (only if students fail the module overall, in which case students must sit a 1 x 1.5hr paper (where a module has both a continuous assessment and a formal written examination, students will be required to repeat and resubmit at the autumn supplemental examinations both the examination and the continuous assessment elements if failing the continuous assessment at the first attempt)).

LW6584 International Refugee Law

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.
Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.
Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of key concepts of international, European and domestic refugee law from a human rights perspective.
Module Content: This course examines current issues in refugee law in an international and comparative perspective. The course combines an analysis of International, European and domestic law. It also builds on existing links between the Faculty of Law and refugee law agencies in Ireland. Topics to be covered include:
- The historical evolution of international refugee law
- The EU asylum Acquis
- Problems of Definition and Qualification: Emerging case law
- The asylum process and determination procedures
- The role of judicial review in asylum adjudication
- Gender and Sexual Orientation asylum law
- Climate justice, forced migration and international protection
- Separated Children in the asylum process
- Non-refoulement: risk, securitization and criminalisation
- Exclusion clauses / terrorism and political offences.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in asylum law in Ireland and the EU; Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in international refugee law; Apply key concepts of refugee law to problem scenarios; Critically evaluate and discuss asylum adjudication processes; Describe and analyse key human rights debates in European asylum law.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 90 marks; Class participation 10 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

GR3026 Extended Essay

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 8, Max 60.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Directed Study (Guided research and preparation of essay).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Classics.
Module Objective: To allow students to explore in depth a topic of Roman History or Culture as agreed with the relevant Lecturer at the beginning of the academic year.
Module Content: Guided research and preparation of supervised extended essay.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    demonstrate an ability to conduct guided individual research at an appropriate level; discuss key ideas relating to chosen topics; demonstrate a knowledge of relevant secondary literature at appropriate level; communicate the above appropriately in written presentations.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessments, by the second Friday in August, as prescribed by the Department).

GV1215 Local Government and Politics of Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.
Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.
Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive introduction to local government and sub-national politics in Ireland.
Module Content: On successful completion of this module, students will have an understanding of how local government operates in Ireland and of the political structures and institutions of the State at sub-national level.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Differentiate between local and central government; Construct a timeline for important events in the local political history of Ireland; Understand and analyse sub-national structures in Ireland. Describe the significant period from 1898-1940 in terms of the foundation of Ireland's local government system; Assess the significance of Irish local political institutions in shaping Irish society; Evaluate the roles played by central and local government; Identify weaknesses in local public institutions; Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses; Propose potential solutions to the problems raised.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1,500 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

FE3820 Credit Union Placement

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 1, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 3.
Teaching Methods: Fieldwork.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.
Module Objective: To enable students to diversify their practical experience in credit union operations.
Module Content: The credit union placement will be undertaken in an approved credit union, other than one the student is normally involved with, or with an approved credit union representative body, either in Ireland or abroad. Students will be placed for a minimum of 120 hours in a relevant work environment and will be expected to make a significant contribution to their area of work. Students are required to prepare a learning log of their placement.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Work in credit union or credit union representative body as a volunteer or staff member; Report in writing on their credit union placement work; Reflect analytically on aspects of their credit union placement work; Devise a plan to transfer the knowledge gained on placement to their usual credit union working environment
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x participating group project (max. 1,500 words), 60 marks; 1 x 1,000 word reflective log, 60 marks; 1 x 1,500 word essay, 80 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students failing this module must repeat it in a subsequent cycle and must pass it in order to graduate. Students who are unable to fulfil the requirements of the placement due to good cause, such as illness, will be facilitated to change electives to FE3821 Summer School, with agreement from the Registrar.

DR3011 Theatre and Performance Practice III

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 24.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Practicals (+ associated rehearsals).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bernadette Cronin, Drama and Theatre Studies (Drama and Theatre Studies).
Lecturer(s): Dr Bernadette Cronin, Drama and Theatre Studies; Staff, Drama and Theatre Studies.
Module Objective: To develop students' creative, technical and/or critical skills in developing, producing, presenting and analysing a public theatre performance.
Module Content: Through intensive practical sessions this module will combine the analytical, creative and expressive skills already acquired in Years 1 and 2. The module will explore means and ends of making theatre performance and develop team performance projects in response to a specific remit. Each team will be mentored by a member of the teaching team from the Department of Drama & Theatre Studies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Work effectively as a member of a self-managing creative team; Devise an effective public performance; Perform competently as part of an ensemble; Produce a written critical reflection on, and documentation of, the creative process.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Participation and Completion of Project 120 marks; Written assignments - approx 2,500 words - 80 marks.).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

CR2004 Official Criminal Statistics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 6, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology, Blazej Kaucz.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the key concepts, substantive themes, acclaimed studies and debated issues associated with the official criminal statistics.
Module Content: The module discusses and assesses the nature of the official criminal statistics and criminal data; the history of the official criminal statistics; the organizational factors and methodologies used in constructing the official criminal statistics; and media coverage of the official criminal statistics.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe correctly, for Ireland and in comparison with other countries, how the official statistics are produced; Identify and define key sociological traditions in relation to data gathering and analyzing; Analyze aspects of and issues associated with the social usage and media coverage of the official criminal statistics; Discuss and evaluate the reasons why citizens do not report crime; Read the patterns within the official statistics; Understand the importance and usage of the official criminal statistics within criminology; Assess the critiques of the official criminal statistics.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class test mid semester (50 marks); 1 x 1,500 word essay at end (50 marks).).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

PY4115 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Directed Study (Independent supervised research - 12 weeks).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Frank Peters, Department of Physics.
Lecturer(s): Prof Frank Peters, Department of Physics.
Module Objective: To develop skills in independent research and presentation.
Module Content: Independent study of a topic in Physics.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Conduct a project, demonstrating that they have acquired the skills required to manage the project and the ability to take initiatives and think independently. Make a mature assessment of the value and significance of the project work. Produce a project report. Give an oral presentation of the results of the project.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Research project, participation: 80 marks, oral presentation: 40 marks, written report: 80 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

AP6016 Research Methods and Data Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures (This module will be offered as a blended learning module. Some lectures will be available as integrated and interactive online lectures and other lectures will be delivered face-to-face in class.).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.
Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of qualitative and quantitative methodological strategies; consider ethical issues in research design and procedures for data collection and analysis; work with students on the skills required to carry out an effective research project and practice data analysis.
Module Content: - Theory, method, and research design in psychology
- Practical, methodological and ethical issues in planning research
- Reflexivity in research
- Issues in qualitative date collection and analysis (eg ethnography, thematic analysis, grounded theory, case study method, discourse analysis)
-Issues in quantitative date collection and anslsis (eg univariate, non-parametric and parametric frequentist approaches, multivariate statistical analysis and model testing).
- Using SPSS applications for data analysis
- Disseminating research.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Formulate and appropriately conceptualise original research questions; Plan and design a research project taking account of ethics, methodology, feasibility, likelihood of answering the research question, and analysis; Evaluate research designs theoretically, methodologically, ethically and practically; Select and use appropriate data collection methods; Select and use appropriate methods for analysing data; Evaluate methods of analysis including univariate and multivariate statistical analysis, as well as qualitative analysis Write research reports
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 - 5,000 word statistical analysis 100 marks; prepare an online resource (to be specified by the lecturers) as part of an online pack to be developed by the class for teaching qualitative research 3,000 - 5,000 words 100 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

MF4051 Continuous Time Financial Models

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): MF3052, ST3053, MA3051, MF2050
Co-requisite(s): MF4054
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Bernard Hanzon, School of Mathematical Sciences (Head of Department of Mathematics).
Lecturer(s): Prof Bernard Hanzon, School of Mathematical Sciences.
Module Objective: To introduce continuous-time financial models.
Module Content: Application of stochastic calculus to continuous time asset pricing models. Relation with discrete time models. The no-arbitrage principle. Derviation of Black-Scholes equations. Construction of replicating portfolios. Models for interest rates. Heath-Jarrow-Morton modifications. Credit risk modelling.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Define and apply various concepts related to continuous time dynamic portfolio strategies and to define, to apply the concept of an arbitrage free market and a complete market, and to derive the Black-Scholes partial differential equation using the construction of a replicating portfolio; Give and perform calculations with the representation of the price of a European option as an expectation under the pricing measure; Define and perform calculations with various representations of interest rates; Analyze and perform calculations with the term structure equation for short rate models and with the bond options formula under various model assumptions; Describe the HJM drift condition for forward rate models and to perform calculations; Derive specific results for options that are not model dependant; Show how to use binominal trees for option pricing; Describe the different approaches to credit risk modelling; structural models, reduced from models, intensity based models.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 in-class test (10 marks); 3 Assignments of equal weight (10 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

HA1801 Renaissance Studies

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: 18hr(s) Lectures; 3hr(s) Tutorials; 8hr(s) Other (gallery field trip and 1hr resources workshop); 170hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, Staff, History of Art and guest lecturers, where appropriate.
Module Objective: To introduce students to the art and culture of the Italian Renaissance.
Module Content: This module will explore Italian Renaissance painting, sculpture and architecture. The Renaissance heritage of Rome, Florence and Venice will be explored through case studies. Artists studies will include Giotto di Bondone; Duccio di Buoninsegna; Leonardo Da Vinci; Michelangelo Buonarroti and Raphael Sanzio.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify the characteristics of Renaissance aesthetics with reference to a rediscovery of Classical Antiquity. Distinguish different artistic techniques such as fresco and tempra painting. Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the theory and practice of scientific perspective in Renaissance painting, sculpture and architecture. Discern different types of patronage during the Renaissance period: the courts, Papacy and republics. Examine art writings of the period, principally, Vasari's Lives of the Artists (1550s), and critically evaluate the ways they establish and validate canonical interpretations of the discipline of art history. Develop critical analysis of the Renaissance period through written critical reflection and gallery visits (Hunt Museum Limerick & National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin)
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,500 word written portfolio of work, 100 marks; 1 x 2,000 word field trip written project, 90 marks; 500 word contribution to a discussion forum (either in-class or online) visual analysis forum assessed through written online posting, 10 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Director, Centre for Adult Continuing Education).

MA1058 Introduction to Linear Algebra

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 200.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ben McKay, Department of Mathematics.
Lecturer(s): Dr Andrei Mustata, Department of Mathematics.
Module Objective: To provide an introduction to Linear Algebra.
Module Content: Linear Algebra: vectors, dot products, conics & quadrics, matrices, determinants, linear equations.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Solve systems of linear equations. Prove theorems and identities using induction. Explain the meanings of the words determinant, eigenvalue, eigenvector, invertibility, kernel, image, and spectrum. Find the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a square matrix. Find the determinant and inverse of a 3 x 3 matrix, and solve associated linear equations. Deduce the solvability of a system of linear equations, without finding the solutions, via Gaussian elimination. Deduce whether one vector is a linear combination of others, and by the same method deduce the dimension of the kernel and image of any matrix, using Gaussian elimination and examining pivots. Prove the equivalence of the dozen invertibility criteria of Strang's nutshell using the main theorems of linear algebra.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 in-class test).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): None.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

MU3043 String Chamber Music Ensemble 3

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): MU3043 or MU2D10
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Music performance course: year-long to allow time for musical development and rehearsal prior to final examination).
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jonathan Stock, Department of Music.
Lecturer(s): Ms Sharon Nye, Department of Music.
Module Objective: To develop and expand performance ability and experience as a chamber musician.
Module Content: Tuition in the rehearsal and performance of chamber music largely from the Classical and Romantic repertoires. At this level of study, students will be expected to exhibit more advanced musical skills than those required for String Chamber Music Ensemble 2 and they should expect to show elements of innovation and leadership (for instance, breadth of repertoire covered, acquisition of advanced stylistic and technical skills, research of editions, contribution to the organising of rehearsals and external performances, and supporting less experienced musicians).
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Successfully execute a chamber music performance at the relevant level of competence and in an appropriate style. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a wide range of repertoire and matching performance styles. Reflect critically on the characteristic components of chamber music rehearsal and performance. Demonstrate an ability to perform sympathetically within the context of a group, taking a leading role where appropriate.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Weekly Contribution to Classes (participation, support, leadership), 40; Final Practical Examination, 60).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance is monitored by a class register taken by the tutor.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed performance examinations must be retaken as prescribed by the Department).

NU6146 Cancer Management and Supportive Cancer Care 1

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 15.
Pre-requisite(s): NU6145
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (16 hrs Lectures/Workshop; 184 hrs Distance Learning; Discussion Board Preparation and Participation, Required Reading, Assignment Preparation and Submission, Self-Directed Learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patricia O'Regan, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.
Module Objective: To develop an in-depth understanding of the treatment modalities available to patients with cancer, the psychosocial issues they may encounter, and to explore cancer in specific population groups in the context of professional nursing practice.
Module Content: Cancer treatments including radiotherapy, chemotherapy, role of surgery, gene therapy, immunotherapy, bone marrow / stem cell transplantation, treatment toxicities.
Psychosocial issues including - emotional impact of a cancer diagnosis, cancer related distress, sexual and reproductive dysfunction, sexuality, body image, cancer survivorship, spirituality, transition from active treatment to other settings, palliative and end of life care, family and care giver issues, social and economic issues quality of life as an outcome of cancer.

Cancer in specific context including needs of older people, ethnic minority groups, people with an Intellectual Disability.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Critically discuss the key principles of current cancer treatment modalities Critically evaluate the empirical research on the new developments in cancer treatment management and their impact on the patient with cancer Critically examine the psychological, psychosocial and emotional needs of those with a diagnosis of cancer and their loved ones and consider the care of those with complex needs. Identify and critically review issues facing patients with cancer may experience, including social, economic, spiritual, survivorship.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3,000 word case study, 180 marks; E activities: 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery).

EH6053 Public Health Informatics

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 18hr(s) Lectures; 6hr(s) Other (directed learning).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Conlon, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.
Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the use of public health informatics to protect and promote the health of populations.
Module Content: Public Health information infrastructure, influence of such communications; legal and ethical principles of communication; application of methods of communication.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe how public health literature is used to collect, collate, analyse and disseminate data Develop a toolkit to critically evaluate public health datasets Demonstrate use of information technology to access, evaluate and interpret public health data Demonstrate an ability to use health informatics to advocate for public health policies and programmes Apply legal and ethical principles to the use of information technology and resources in public health settings Apply theory and strategy - based communication principles across different settings and audiences
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2500 word essay).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students must revise and re-submit 2,500 word essay, as prescribed by the Department.

NE6009 Dissertation in Sustainable Energy

Credit Weighting: 30
No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): NE6008
Teaching Period(s): Semester 3. (Summer Months after Period 2).
Teaching Methods: Other (Project Work).
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge to a substantial sustainable energy research project requiring analytical and/or design and/or experimental effort.
Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with supervisor.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Carry out a sustainable energy research project Acquire and analyze relevant energy data for research topic Demonstrate investigative research skills Undertake a detailed research project in sustainable energy Prepare and deliver a dissertation in sustainable energy Prepare and deliver a research seminar presentation Discuss and defend research approach, results and limitations.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation Report 525 marks; Seminar Assessment 75 marks .).
Compulsory Elements: Oral presentation to defend the thesis.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

OH2001 Preventive Dentistry and Dental Public Health

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 14.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: 43 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 9 x 1hr(s) Practicals.
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mairead Harding, University Dental School & Hospital.
Lecturer(s): Staff, University Dental School & Hospital.
Module Objective: To teach the theory and basic preventive measures for the individual patient and the Community.
Module Content: Oral Biology. Dental Caries/Fluorides. Oral Health Promotion and Dental Health Education. Dental Public Health. Fissure Sealants.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Describe the determinants of disease and the principles of Oral Health Promotion and disease prevention Measure salivary flow rates and explain the role of saliva, oral microbiology and diet in the maintenance of oral health and prevention of oral disease Issue and interpret a diet diary and communicate appropriate dietary advice to their patients Assist their patients in developing favorable oral health habits applying contemporary behaviour modification theory Design, implement and evaluate appropriate preventive programmes for individuals or communities, including effective application of preventive techniques Describe and discuss the mode of action, benefits and risks associated with the use of different modalities of fluoride and describe their rational use to patients Describe and discuss the measurement, level and recent changes in oral health in Ireland and the system for delivery of oral health services, their advantages and disadvantages
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Progressive Assessment 50 In Class test 150).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AP6800 Organisational Learning and Consultancy

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 48hr(s) Other (lectures, case studies, simulation, literature review, presentation.).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Ms Angela O'Donovan, Department of Human Resources; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.
Module Objective: To understand the nature and principles of strategic organisational consulting and the difference between internal and external consultancy.
Module Content: a. Understanding Learning and Development
b. Consultancy cycle (Entry, contracting, investigation, feedback, action, review)
c. Consultancy roles (internal/ external/ change and project managers/leaders)
d. Consultancy perspectives theory
e. Organisational Learning Environment - Business Aspects
f. Impact assessment
g. Learning and development strategy
h. Ethical Issues.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Build new capabilities in strategic level learning development. Interpret knowledge of fundamental and current theory and practices in learning and consultancy inquiry. Identify environmental characteristics. Develop expertise and ability in identifying ethical issues inherent in learning, development and consultancy activities.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3000 - 4000 words written project).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% students are required to achieve the pass standard in both examination and continuous assessment elements.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

SS6036 Youth Work: Working with Individuals and Groups

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Hilary Jenkinson, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Ms Cindy O'Shea, School of Applied Social Studies; Ms Hilary Jenkinson, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To equip students with the skills required to respond effectively to the needs of young people in individual (one to one) and group situations.
Module Content: This module builds on the theoretical and practical foundations of reflective youth work practice methodologies in developing student skills for working with individuals and groups.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Recognise and apply appropriate theories of counselling Practice appropriate engagement and communication skills Recognise professional limits and boundaries in youth work Respond effectively to individuals in crisis Facilitate youth groups Design and implement developmental group work programmes using appropriate resources Record and evaluate group work processes and outcomes Record and evaluate work and outcomes with individual young people
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Case Study 1 (Individuals), 1 x 3,000 words. Case Study 1 (Individuals), 1 x 3,000 words. Case).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (50% is the maximum mark awarded in repeat examinations.).

WL2101 Intercultural Communication

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 50.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mark Chu, Department of Italian.
Lecturer(s): Dr Mark Chu, Department of Italian; Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.
Module Objective: To give students a comprehensive overview of selected concepts and theories of intercultural communication and intercultural competence from an interdisciplinary perspective.
Module Content: Examination and analysis of interdisciplinary perspectives in intercultural communication, various research approaches, relevance for further learning endeavours and implications for foreign language learning. The module concentrates both on theoretical constructs and applied learning.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    describe key components of intercultural communication from a range of disciplinary perspectives analyse the contribution of various scholars in the field of intercultural communication internationally demonstrate critical reflection on the relevance of non-linguistic factors in effective communication communicate appropriately and effectively in written and oral presentations
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Presentation).
Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment by the first Friday in August, as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

SS6026 Dissertation in Youth Work with Community Arts and Sports Studies

Credit Weighting: 20
No. of Students: Max 20.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Supervision).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen Hogan, School of Applied Social Studies.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Social Studies.
Module Objective: To enable students to apply research skills to investigate an aspect of policy and/or practice in depth.
Module Content: This module requires each student to complete a 15,000-word dissertation in an area of policy and/or practice related to youth work, community arts and sports studies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Identify the key components of the research process. Identify potential ethical issues in undertaking social research, and be able to suggest ways in which these might be addressed. Differentiate between different research methods (both qualitative and quantitative) and the purposes for which they can be used. Have developed a capacity to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data. Exhibit the skills required in writing a research proposal. Conduct a piece of social research in an area of youth work, community arts and/or sports, using a range of different research methods. Undertake a literature review, methodology, analysis of data and presentation of findings. Connect primary research data with theoretical debates and concepts. Identify the original contribution which their research makes to the production of social scientific knowledge.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (1 x 2,000 word research proposal, 1 x 15,000 word dissertation).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit revised thesis, as prescribed by the School).

ST4001 Biostatistics II

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15, Max 150.
Pre-requisite(s): ST3001
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cronin, Department of Statistics.
Lecturer(s): Mr Cathal Doherty, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: To provide an understanding of biostatistical methods applicable to the design of experiments and the reporting and presentation of data analyses.
Module Content: Analysis of Variance (and Covariance); Non-Parametric Techniques; Experimental Design; Presentation of Data Analyses. The approach taken will be to explain and demonstrate principles in statistics using real-life examples.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Test for differences between means of three or more groups using analysis of variance and apply post hoc tests where appropriate; Use suitable non-parametric techniques to test for differences between groups which do not meet the criteria for parametric testing; Validate the assumptions underlying major statistical techniques; Use the principles of experimental design to plan experiments; Describe how to present data analyses (analysis of variance and non-parametric techniques).
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 Assignments of equal weight).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (in the case of students who have failed continuous assessment, the supplemental examination paper alone will provide a satisfactory assessment of the module learning outcomes worth 100 marks).

BM4017 Bioinformatics for Biomedical Science

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students:
Pre-requisite(s):
Co-requisite(s):
Teaching Period(s):
Teaching Methods:
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sinead Kerins, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.
Module Objective:
Module Content:
Learning Outcomes: .
Assessment:
Compulsory Elements:
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

GV6112 The Third Sector and the State

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.
Lecturer(s): Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.
Module Objective: To examine the political context in which the voluntary and community sector operates.
Module Content: This module examines the political context in which the voluntary and community sector operates, referring to theories and narratives of governance. Civil society's relationship with and involvement in governance networks and policy networks is discussed with particular focus on local and national partnership processes. Finally, the changing dynamics of Irish governance and its impact on the voluntary and community sector in the post partnership era is assessed.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Discuss the political context in which the voluntary and community sector operates Critically examine competing theories of governance Outline and critically assess the changing dynamics of Irish governance with particular reference to the Irish social partnership model Identify and analyse the political challenges faced by the voluntary and community sector; in the post partnership era
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word report).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

AR6009 Mortuary Theory

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 4, Max 7.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Lectures/Seminars); Fieldwork.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.
Lecturer(s): Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.
Module Objective: To examine the life cycle and its material culture correlates.
Module Content: Modern archaeology is multi-disciplinary, drawing on information and resources from both the natural and social sciences. This course concentrates on the latter of these two and explores the history of ideas about which aspects of life in the past archaeologists feel they can uncover. Particular attention is paid to the role of ethnography in archaeological explanation. The course is structured around an examination of the human life cycle and proceeds through the examination of mortuary and other behaviours using archaeological and anthropological case studies.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate an understanding of the history of archaeological thought; critically evaluate differing archaeological approaches to death and disposal; understand the development of ideas concerning Rites of Passage; critically evaluate differing approaches to childhood in archaeological writing; critically evaluate differing approaches to gender in the archaeological literature; critically evaluate approaches to Otherness and difference in archaeological research.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (5 x Seminar presentations 50 marks; 1 x Project (2,000 words) 50 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department.).

OT3008 Independent Project in Occupational Studies

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 5.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 and 2.
Teaching Methods: Other (Self-directed study in relation to health or social care setting).
Module Co-ordinator: Ms Helena O'Sullivan Dempsey, School of Clinical Therapies.
Lecturer(s): Ms Clare O'Sullivan, School of Clinical Therapies; Ms Helena O'Sullivan Dempsey, School of Clinical Therapies; Staff, School of Clinical Therapies.
Module Objective: To allow students to further their professional competencies via an independent study project in relation to a health or social care setting.
Module Content: To be determined via a learning contract.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Demonstrate evidence based knowledge and skills in the application of relevant theory Develop professionally through self-directed learning, integrating theory and practice Recognise and apply the basic principles of relevant theory to chosen area of study Develop a comprehensive end of project report
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Independent Written Study Report 200 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

MG6021 Operations Management

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 15.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr David McKevitt, Department of Management and Marketing.
Lecturer(s): Dr David McKevitt, Department of Management and Marketing.
Module Objective: To examine, apply and critique and apply the main elements of Operations and Supply Management.
Module Content: Design of product and service operations; supply chain management, ICT and reverse auctions; strategic procurement; process design; capacity planning; forecasting; quality.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Examine contemporary thinking in Operations Management Explain how operations and supply chain management affects organisations and industries Analyse and discuss the operations management function and associated activities within the organisation Demonstrate an ability to critically analyse operations problems using quantitative and qualitative tools Apply and critique a range of operations tools and frameworks relative to the challenges of the business environment
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Group Project with presentation, 30 marks; Individual Learning Journal 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as directed by the department).

PH2006 Philosophy of Mind and Consciousness

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: -.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lilian O'Brien, Department of Philosophy.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Philosophy.
Module Objective: To provide a review of contemporary accounts of our mental life.
Module Content: Our minds seem to be at once both the thing that we know best and the thing that eludes our best efforts at theory-building. This module introduces students to current philosophical debates about the nature of mind and its place in the natural world. Prominent theories of mind will be considered with particular attention paid to their capacity to capture the first-personal, the apparently private, and experientially rich nature of mental life.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Recognise the problem of consciousness as it appears in a number of different philosophical traditions; Identify the different viewpoints on consciousness taken by major philosophers; Assess the relative merits of the different theories of consciousness; Connect the problem of consciousness with other topics in philosophy of mind, such as subjectivity, privacy, embodiment and self-awareness; Construct arguments and examples to defend or critique theories of consciousness.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 40 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay 40 marks; attendance and participation 20 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 2,500 word essay and, in lieu of failed attendance and participation, an additional 2,500 word essay, as prescribed by the Department).

GV6115 European Security

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 12 hours seminars, guest speakers, conferences).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.
Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.
Module Objective: To enable students to understand the dynamics shaping the contemporary European security environment and Europe's role in global security, the main security challenges facing European governments and the nature and role of European security institutions.
Module Content: This module will examine: debates on the nature of the European security order of the early twenty-first century; key policy challenges facing European governments; the main European security institutions (the EU, NATO, and the OSCE); relations between the West and Russia; and Europe's role in addressing global security issues.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Critically analyse debates on the nature of the contemporary European security order. Describe the main European security institutions and evaluate their on-going development. Analyse the main security policy challenges facing European governments and critically assess alternative policy responses to these challenges. Identify and make use of relevant academic and policy-oriented literature.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word policy report (80 marks); 1 x 3,000 word essay (80 marks) and in-class presentation (40 marks)).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

FE2808 Case Study Analysis in Development Studies

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): None.
Co-requisite(s): None.
Teaching Period(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. (semester details for this module will be confirmed at the start of the programme).
Teaching Methods: 10 x 3hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials; 167hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning. Lectures, interactive group/class discussions, recommended readings).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O Tuama, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Lecturer(s): Staff, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.
Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity of understanding the work of three development activists who will introduce case studies of their work.
Module Content: Session 1: Participatory Community-Based Natural Resource Management
This case study will examine the participatory development approach of the Traditional Irrigation Improvement Programme to community-based management of natural resources, including soil, water and forests, in Tanzania.

Session 2: Food Security and Famine
This case study looks at the causes of and responses to food insecurity and famine, in both historical and current contexts, through examination of the current global food situation and the millennium development goals, the Irish Famine of the mid-nineteenth century, and recent famines such as those in Sudan, Ethiopia and Malawi.

Session 3: HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa
This case study will look at HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Having outlined the current situation, it will examine the implications, the response, the dilemmas and the challenges posed by the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Criticise development narratives concerning the environment and natural resources. Apply basic Participatory Rural Appraisal methods and tools. Evaluate the quality of participation in the approaches utilised by development projects. Discuss theoretical perspectives on food security. Critically analyse the actions of key players such as governments, the international NGO community, the World Food Programme, and the media in their responses to emergencies. Discuss and analyse impacting factors in food security such as access, affordability, availability, and food safety. Discuss the implications of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Criticise some of the popular approaches to HIV/AIDS prevention in sub-Saharan Africa. Examine some of the dilemmas confronting women in sub-Saharan Africa in trying to protect themselves against HIV infection. Identify some of the challenges that lie ahead in meaningfully engaging with the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa.
.
Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,500 word journal of learning).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Director, Centre for Adult Continuing Education).

IS6036 Design and Innovation

Credit Weighting: 5
No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.
Pre-requisite(s): none
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 2.
Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.
Module Co-ordinator: Prof Frederic Adam, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems (and programme coordinator, Institut Superieur du Commerce de Paris, France).
Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.
Module Objective: To provide students with a detailed understanding of the stages of the product development life cycle, from the generation of ideas to the design stages to the commericialisation and launch and to the ulitmate retirement.
Module Content: This module contains a theoretical presentation of the product life cycle illustrated by real life examples and focusing on innovative products or products that are radically transformed by embedded technologies and innovations. Each phase is presented in turn and activities that run for the whole life cycle are outlined. The roles of the different stakeholders in the process are described and their contributions are also outlined.
Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
    Explain in detail the different stages in the new product development life cycle Provide clear examples of activities which might be performed at the different stages of the life cycle Propose coherent strategies for the management of the NPD cycle in an organisation
.
Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class exam 20 marks; in-class presentation 40 marks; essay 40 marks).
Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at lectures and any other prescribed activities.
Penalties (for late submission of course/project work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.
Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.
End of Year Written Examination Profile: No Formal Written Examination.
Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

FM2101 Foundations of Medicine, Neuroscience

Credit Weighting: 10
No. of Students: Max 200.
Pre-requisite(s): None
Co-requisite(s): None
Teaching Period(s): Semester 1.
Teaching Methods: Other (78 hours total - Lectures, Tutorials, Practicals, Directed Study).
Module Co-ordinator: Dr Harriet Schellekens, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience.
Lecturer(s): Dr Harriet Schellekens, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience; Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology; Staff, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience; Staff, Department of Physiology.
Module Objective: To understand the basic principles of medical science at whole body, organ, tissue, cellular and sub-cellular levels, with special reference to the structure and function of the nervous system.
Module Content: The anatomical structure and organisation of the skull and nervous system; including brain, spinal cord, meninges; anatomy of the orbit and ear; clinical anatomy; disorders of the cerebral cortex, basal nuclei and of the motor, sensory and limbic systems, including the special senses. Histology of central nervous system. Physiology and pathophysiology of the nervous system including the cerebral cortex; sensory systems, including pain; the special senses; supraspinal motor control, including motor systems, the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Physiology and pathophysiology of higher neural functions, including consciousness and sleep; learning and memory; the regulation of complex behaviours. Biochemistry of cell signalling and neurotransmission (including membrane receptors: biochemistry of vision: neurodegeneration).