Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

UW0002 Science in Society
UW0005 Sustainability
UW0006 Law and Technology
UW0011 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Social Justice, Equality, Diversity and Health
UW0092 Science in Society for Medicine (available to MB, BCH, BAO students only)
UW1006 New Venture Creation

UW0002 Science in Society

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 30, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 21 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Paul Callanan, Department of Physics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Science, and Visiting Lecturers.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of the nature of science and its role in society.

Module Content: Ways of knowing about the world; The Nature of Science; What has Science discovered about the Natural Physical World?; What has Science discovered about the Biological World; The Nature and importance of Technology; New Biological technologies; Ethics and Science; Ethical Issues in Science; When Science goes wrong; Science and Religion; Science and the Environment; Science and Health; Science and the Humanities; Science and the Modern Economy; Science in Irish History; Pseudo-Science and Anti-Science; The Public Understanding of Science; Our Technological Future; Lecture-Demonstrations of Research Facilities and Methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe in outline the nature of science, the type of knowledge discovered by science and the types of question that science cannot answer.
?Describe the role of science in modern society, in the modern developed economy, and the broad ethical issues raised by scientific and technological advances.
?Demonstrate an appreciation of the interface between science and religion and science and the environment.
?Describe some of the ways in which science can be misused.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (End of Module test).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Repeat Assessment(s) as prescribed by the Module Co-ordinator.

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UW0005 Sustainability

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and discussions); 2 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Presentations; Reflective Learning; Online Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS; Staff, College of SEFS, and Staff, College of Business and Law; Staff, College of Medicine and Health.

Module Objective: To provide students with a broadly based interdisciplinary introduction to sustainability issues as a foundation for 'sustainability citizenship'.

Module Content: Module Content: Framing sustainability - what does sustainability mean to you? Changing climate - changing technological systems; Questioning growth - building a sustainable economy; Sustainable agriculture - pathways to sufficiency and food security; Promoting health and well-being for a sustainable society; Heritage and culture - the past and present of the future; Protecting and restoring ecosystems and biodiversity; Regulating change - law, governance and sustainability; Equity, diversity and inclusion for social sustainability; Putting sustainability in its place; Making connections - co-creating a sustainable community.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Show basic sustainability literacy;
?Appreciate the complex challenges associated with sustainability across different domains (Environment, Society, Economy) at global and local levels;
?Demonstrate an understaniding of the systemic nature of sustainability challenges;
?Assess the (un)sustainability of socio-ecological systems and collectively propose solutions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Online weblog (25 marks) learning diary (35 marks) and multimedia group projects (40 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Co-ordinator).

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UW0006 Law and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 21 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Stephen William Hedley, Department of Law (School of Law).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide a critical overview of the legal regulation of new and
emerging technologies.

Module Content: Introduction and general principles of legal regulation; privacy protection
and big data; medical technology and the law; reproduction, genetics and the law; patents and
biotechnology; environmental data and evidence law; humanitarian law and robots in
warfare; innovation and copyright; financial technology and consumer protection; legal
regulation of automated vehicles.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key issues in relation to the impact of law on technology;
?Develop critical perspectives on legal regulation of technology, and an appreciation of the complex issues involved;
?Show awareness of emerging issues in the legal regulation of technology.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (online weblog 30 marks, multimedia group projects 70 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

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UW0011 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Social Justice, Equality, Diversity and Health

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 76 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire Dorrity, School of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Angela Flynn, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Ms Claire Dorrity, School of Applied Social Studies; Staff, School of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To facilitate the development of critical thinking on (1) Cultural competency, cultural appreciation, anti-racism, and anti-discrimatory practice. (2) Social Justice, equality, and human rights. (3) Health and well-being across interdisciplinary practices.

Module Content: This module explores issues relating to social justice, equality, diversity and health from an interdisciplinary perspective. The module invites participants to critically reflect on these issues with an emphasis on activism, agency, empowerment, and advocacy. The module encourages participants to explore the reality of unequal power relationships, discrimination and oppression and the denial of access to opportunities, resources and decision-making processes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key issues relating to culture, race, diversity and difference.
?Develop critical perspectives on social justice.
?Critically evaluate the concept of equality from a rights based perspective.
?Show awareness of differing cultural practices, cultural sensitivities and cultural values.
?Demonstrate a familiarity with anti-racist practice.
?Identify skills that promote the inclusion of minority groups based on principles of equality, cultural awareness and respect.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Group Presentation 75 marks; 1 x 800-1,000 word Written Statement of Learning 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must repeat assignment as prescribed by Module Co-ordinator).

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UW0092 Science in Society for Medicine (available to MB, BCH, BAO students only)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 30, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 21 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William Reville, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.

Lecturer(s): Prof William Reville, Centre for Adult Continuing Education; Staff, Faculty of Science, and Visiting Lecturers.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of the nature of science and its role in society

Module Content: Ways of knowing about the world; The nature of science; What has science discovered about the natural physical world?; What has science discovered about the biological world?; The nature and importance of technology; New biological technologies; Ethics and science; Ethical issues in science; When science goes wrong; Science and religion; Science and the environment; Science and health; Science and the humanities; Science and the modern economy; Science in Irish history; Pseudo-science and anti-science; The public understanding of science; Our technological future; Lecture-demonstrations of research facilities and methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand in outline the nature of science, the type of knowledge discovered by science and the types of question that science cannot answer.
?Appreciate the role of science in modern society, in the modern developed economy, and the broad ethical issues raised by scientific and technological advances.
?Understand the interface between science and religion and science and the environment.
?Appreciate some of the ways in which science can be misused.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1.5hr in-class test).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Repeat Assessment(s) as prescribed by the Module Co-ordinator.

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UW1006 New Venture Creation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O'Flaherty, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Commerce, with External Contributors.

Module Objective: To examine, critique and apply the main elements of business planning as it applies to emerging ventures.

This module will utilise business cases and draw on the experience of Irish entrepreneurs. It will also give students practical experience of business start-up and entrepreneurial behaviour.

Module Content: The Module content will include case studies, lectures covering entrepreneurial processes and supervised team work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate and analyse the strengths and weaknesses of a business plan;
?Develop a range of commercial opportunities;
?Test the commercial viability of the opportunities
?Collaborate on formulating a complete business plan based on an original idea;
?Present and defend the commercial viability of a business plan.

Assessment: Business Plan 3,000 words and 15 minute presentation which will be assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Repeat Assessment(s) as prescribed by the Module Co-ordinator.).

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