Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

GV1102 Introduction to Government and Politics
GV1202 Politics of the European Union
GV1204 Democracy, Ideology and Utopia
GV1207 Politics and Government of Ireland
GV1215 Local Government and Politics of Ireland
GV1216 Analytical Thinking Skills in Political Science
GV1217 Introduction to Political Science
GV1218 International Politics
GV1400 Local Development and Public Health
GV2008 Political Corruption: Concepts
GV2009 Political Corruption: Practice and Prevention
GV2218 European Government and Politics
GV2225 International Relations of Asia
GV2229 Citizen Participation
GV2230 Public Management Concepts
GV2231 Public Management in Practice
GV2235 Policy Making in the European Union
GV2239 Chinese Politics
GV2240 International Security
GV2241 Elections and Voting
GV2242 Theories of Political Science
GV3006 Politics in Northern Ireland
GV3102 Work Placement
GV3108 Introduction to Politics of Ireland
GV3206 Politics in Northern Ireland
GV3208 Elections and Voting
GV3210 Conflict and Conflict Resolution
GV3212 Global Political Economy - Trade
GV3215 Politics of the United States of America
GV3216 Contemporary Ecological and Anti-Capitalist Politics
GV3217 Global Political Economy - Finance
GV3219 International Relations of Asia
GV3220 Chinese Politics
GV3222 Transferable Skills - Government - Work Placement
GV3223 Transferable Skills - Government - Research Project
GV3225 Transferable Skills - Government - Entrepreneurial Work Placement
GV3401 Government Placement New York State Assembly
GV3402 US State Government & Legislative Studies
GV3408 The Irish Planning System
GV4000 The Politics of Public Health Management
GV4102 Gender Perspectives on Politics
GV4202 Government Research Dissertation
GV4401 Global Governance
GV4409 Political Ideologies and Social Change
GV4410 Democracy: Theories and Innovations
GV4412 Public Finance - Taxation
GV4413 Public Finance - Public Expenditure
GV4414 Contemporary Debates in Ireland
GV4415 Contemporary Debates in the EU
GV4416 European Security
GV6010 Contemporary Global Politics
GV6011 EU Political System and Policies
GV6012 Global Economic Policies and Institutions
GV6013 Work Placement & Portfolio
GV6014 Dissertation in International Public Policy and Diplomacy
GV6102 Political Science Research Methods
GV6103 Re-imagining Democratic Politics in a Changing World
GV6104 Political Participation and Mobilisation
GV6106 Dissertation in Government
GV6112 The Third Sector and the State
GV6113 Governance and Policy Processes in the European Union
GV6114 Changing Dynamics of Governance
GV6115 European Security
GV6117 Political Science Fundamentals
GV6118 Political Science Research Methods
GV6120 Politics and Policies of the European Union
GV6503 Public Sector Elective

GV1102 Introduction to Government and Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 300 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to government and politics

Module Content: Examination of the theories, principles, dynamics, processes and institutions which shape contemporary politics including a specific focus on the Irish and European Union (EU) political systems

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the roles played by both local and central government in Ireland;
?Explore the concepts of political culture, party systems, electoral systems and political institutions;
?Appraise the applicability of the main theories of political science to the Irish context;
?Assess the significance of Irish political institutions in shaping Irish society;
?Critique the role of political institutions and identify weaknesses;
?Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses;
?Propose potential solutions to the problems raised;
?Research and present information effectively and comprehensively.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (In-class MCQ).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV1202 Politics of the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the European Union, its objectives and current policies.

Module Content: Theories and practice of politics and government in the European Union.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the difference between supra-nationalism and intergovernmentalism;
?Criticise the structure and operation of key EU institutions;
?Evaluate the political and economic impact of selected EU policies;
?Predict the future shape and nature of the EU;
?List the advantages and disadvantages of Irish membership of the EU;
?Research and present information effectively and comprehensively;
?Question the meaning of and motivation for political developments generally;
?Analyse information creatively and imaginatively in seeking solutions to political problems and challenges.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 65 marks; Continuous Assessment 35 marks (in-class test 10 marks; 1 x 1,200 word essay 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by the Department)).

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GV1204 Democracy, Ideology and Utopia

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to the role of ideas in politics by surveying some of the most significant forms of political thinking that underpin and inform political life.

Module Content: The module examines in turn three different but related forms of political thinking and their significance in the contemporary world; first, the analysis of political concepts; second, political ideologies; and third, political utopias. Throughout, the emphasis is on exploring the linkages between political theory and practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse political concepts
?Describe and analyse the concept of ideology
?Distinguish beween different ideological theories
?Contribute to debates about the role of utopian thinking in political life.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 1500 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory attendance at lectures and participation in class discussions.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV1207 Politics and Government of Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the Government and Politics of Ireland.

Module Content: On successful completion of this module, students will have an understanding of the theory and practice of politics and government in the Republic of Ireland.. This module will also provide students with a framework for understanding contemporary political events.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Construct a timeline for important events in the political history of Ireland;
?Describe the significant period from 1916-1922 in terms of the foundation of the State;
?Assess the significance of Irish political institutions in shaping Irish society;
?Evaluate the roles played by central government;
?Critique the role of political institutions and identify weaknessess;
?Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses;
?Propose potential solutions to the problems raised.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Oral Presentation 20 marks, Group Project 20 marks (2,500 words approx).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV1215 Local Government and Politics of Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive introduction to local government and sub-national politics in Ireland

Module Content: On successful completion of this module, students will have an understanding of how local government operates in Ireland and of the political structures and institutions of the State at sub-national level.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between local and central government;
?Construct a timeline for important events in the local political history of Ireland;
?Understand and analyse sub-national structures in Ireland.
?Describe the significant period from 1898-1940 in terms of the foundation of Ireland's local government system;
?Assess the significance of Irish local political institutions in shaping Irish society;
?Evaluate the roles played by central and local government;
?Identify weaknesses in local public institutions;
?Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses;
?Propose potential solutions to the problems raised.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV1216 Analytical Thinking Skills in Political Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide the tools to critical and analytical thinking in political science.

Module Content: On successful completion of this module, students will have studied how to acquire core study skills and develop analytical thinking in academia.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Manage their time effectively
?Carry out primary desk research
?Develop analytical and critical arguments
?Write in an academic style
?Demonstrate oral communication skills
?Analyse information effectively and thoroughly.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Article review (20 marks), oral presentation (20 marks), three separate comprehension exercises (20 marks apiece).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV1217 Introduction to Political Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the discipline of political science.

Module Content: On successful completion of this module, students will have an understanding of the key concepts, theories and methods of the discipline of political science. Students will also be introduced to leading political thinkers in the evolution of and current debates of political science.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Distinguish between different types of political regimes
?Identify and describe various types of electoral systems and political party systems
?Determine the impact of constitutions on contemporary political systems
?Assess the evolving nature of political institutions (i.e. legislatures, executives and bureaucracies)
?Identify and evaluate different political ideologies
?Describe the global context to contemporary politics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Oral Presentation (30 marks), 1 x 1,800 word Essay (40 marks) and 1 x 1,200 word Newspaper Article Review (30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV1218 International Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to international politics and the academic analysis of international politics.

Module Content: The nature of international politics; states and non-state actors; theories of international politics; great powers, the balance of power and great power relations; globalization, the world economy and 'new' issues in world politics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the features of states and non-state actors in international politics.
?Evaluate and apply theories of international politics.
?Discuss the changing global balance of power and changing patterns of great power politics.
?Discuss and evaluate basic concepts and theories of International Political Economy.
?Engaged in independent but guided research on international politics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks ((1 x 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV1400 Local Development and Public Health

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce the key concepts of local development, and health protection and promotion in relation to public policy and to analyse public health issues in a local development framework.

Module Content: Definitions and scope of local development and public health; local development organisations, structures and processes; links between local development and public policy particularly in relation to public health; policy and other influences on the health of the population in developed and developing countries.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the major factors that determine the health of populations at a local, national and global level
?Explain what is meant by "Public Health"
?Identify major public health issues at a local, national and global level
?Recognise interventions employed to research and address public health problems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1500 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV2008 Political Corruption: Concepts

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Blended - combining online or/and web-based learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of political corruption concept with reference to the models and analytical frameworks offered by various social science disciplines.

Module Content: Theories and concepts of political corruption

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between different approaches to political corruption.
?Apply what they have learned to the popular narrative on corruption
?Assess the impact of proposed measures to counter corruption.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((1 x 3,000 word essay (50 marks) and 1 x take-home exam (50 marks)).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV2009 Political Corruption: Practice and Prevention

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Blended ? combining online or/web-based learning supplemented by face-to-face interaction).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of political corruption in practice and of the methods used to prevent it. The module will draw upon contemporary and historical accounts of corruption and reference the dominant frameworks used to analyse them.

Module Content: Methodologies for dealing with political corruption.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between different approaches to preventing and reducing political corruption and be familiar with comparative international practice.
?Interpret and critique the comparative international measures of corruption.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((1 x 3,000 word essay (50 marks) and 1 x take-home exam (50 marks))).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV2218 European Government and Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Anthony Costello, Department of Government; Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Module Objective: Introduce students to the comparative study of European politics.

Module Content: A comparative analysis of political institutions and political behaviour in Europe.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse politics in a comparative manner;
?Describe the differences between the political systems in operation across Europe;
?Identify the role played by political parties in parliamentary democracies;
?Assess the necessity of political parties and the functions they fulfil;
?Evaluate the merits of different electoral systems;
?Differentiate between the workings of different political systems;
?Assess whether politics can be analysed via comparative methods;
?Evaluate the role of non-party actors in parlimentary democracies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Essay 2000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV2225 International Relations of Asia

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the political, security and economic interests of Asia's major powers.

Module Content: The aim of this module is to provide a critical analysis of Asia's major powers as well as its international linkages and dynamics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe Asia's complex history, its geographical reach, bilateral relations and emerging multilateral institutions
?Differentiate between the main theoretical perspectives on the international relations of Asia
?Analyse the political, security and economic interests of the region's major powers
?Identify and assess the role played by external actors
?Evaluate the merits of bilateral and multilateral cooperation
?Evaluate the role of non-state actors for the regional economic and political development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Oral presentation 20 marks, 1 x 1,500 word essay 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV2229 Citizen Participation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To examine political mobilisation and public participation in the democratic process.

Module Content: An examination of political mobilisation and public participation in the democratic process. This will involve an assessment of theories and methods of political participation, facilitation and mobilisation. In particular it will examine democratic innovations to enhance citizen engagement and participation in developing countries.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the so called 'democratic malaise'
?Describe and analyse direct, representative and deliberative forms of democracy
?Outline and critique diverse forms of democratic innovations
?Outline a range of contemporary issues around citizen participation and mobilisation in developing countries.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (50 marks for 2,500 word report).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by the Department.).

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GV2230 Public Management Concepts

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of public management concepts moving from the traditional model of public administration to new public management and beyond.

Module Content: Theories and concepts of public sector management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between the traditional model of public administration and new public management
?Assess the significance of the politics/administration dichotomy and bureaucracy in shaping public administration
?Identify weaknesses in the concept of new public management
?Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses
?Propose potential solutions to the problems raised
?Analyse the tools introduced by new public management, e.g. benchmarking, service indicators.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV2231 Public Management in Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of how public management concepts and theories are applied in practice in the world of public administration.

Module Content: Case study analysis of public managment in practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the roles played by politicians and administrators in the public service modernisation agenda
?Apply new public management to the Irish public service, e.g. civil service, local government, HSE.
?Develop case studies of public sector practice
?Assess the gaps between theory and practice in public administration
?Analyse the public service modernisation agenda in Ireland
?Critically evaluate different aspects of practical public administration such as public private partnerships and freedom of information.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3,000 word written assignment with oral presentation (50 marks- 30 marks for written, 20 marks for oral) and a take-home exam (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV2235 Policy Making in the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 150.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: Introduce students to policies and policy processes of the European Union.

Module Content: An analysis of the complexity of public policy making in a multi-level governance system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the EU's increasingly broad policy portfolio
?Identify the key institutional and policy actors
?Analyse the key features of public policy processes in the European Union
?Evaluate the policy cycle and its coherence
?Assess the different policy-making modes
?Identify key European Union policies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 essay (25 marks); 1 x oral presentation (15 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV2239 Chinese Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: Introduction to the politics of Modern China

Module Content: The evolution of modern China's political and economic system; the Chinese state in comparative perspective; issues and problems of China's political and economic development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the Chinese political system and state administration
?Explain the charateristics of China's socialist market economy
?Analyse the role of the Communist Party of China
?Critically assess different theoretical approaches used in current research on modern China
?Develop and present individual research interests on China's political system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,000 word essay (50 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV2240 International Security

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To introduce students to contemporary security challenges and the academic analysis of international security.

Module Content: The concept of security in international politics; the causes of wars and changing patterns of war; collective security, peacekeeping, intervention and international security institutions; the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and terrorism as global security challenges; non-military security threats.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and evaluate differing definitions of security and alternative approaches to the study of international security.
?Understand and evaluate debates on the causes of war and changing patterns of war.
?Engage in case study based analysis of international security problems.
?Develop and present individual research interests on international security.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay (50 marks) and 1 x take-home exam (50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV2241 Elections and Voting

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Module Objective: On completion of this module, students should have an appreciation and understanding of contemporary political behaviour.

Module Content: Theoretical and comparative approaches to key topics including electoral and party systems, voter choice and turnout, models of voting behaviour, public opinion and the mass media. Country case studies will be used in the course of this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and describe various types of electoral and party systems
?Distinguish between the different theoretical models of voting behaviour
?Relate those models of voting behaviour to country case studies
?Assess the impact of economic voting on elections
?Evaluate the role of political parties and leaders in election campaigning
?Examine the influence of public opinion and mass media on voting behaviour and election outcomes
?Analyse electoral turnout
?Research and present information effectively and comprehensively.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV2242 Theories of Political Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To address theories and approaches to the study of government and political science.

Module Content: This module will deal with the dominant theoretical approaches to the study of political science.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explore the dominant theories of the study of political science;
?List the main features of different theoretical approaches;
?Analyze contemporary issues from a theoretical perspective;
?Critically assess the actions of actors in the political process and determine their motives.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,000 word essays (50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by the Department).

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GV3006 Politics in Northern Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: On completion of this module, students should have a detailed understanding of the government and politics of Northern Ireland

Module Content: This module provides an overview of the actors involved in the Northern Ireland conflict. The conflict is assessed in detail, with a concentration on its causes and effects. The constitutional and institutional structures established under the Good Friday Agreement are critically evaluated. Finally post-Agreement Northern Ireland is studied.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and analyse the origins, roots and causes of the Northern Ireland conflict;
?Identify and assess the key actors in the conflict;
?Document and critically evaluate attempts to manage/resolve the conflict;
?Chart and examine the peace process;
?Critically analyse the Good Friday Agreement and the long-term prospects for peace in Northern Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word Project 60 marks, 1 x 2,000 word Essay 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV3102 Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3. (After Third University Examination. - April to September. Placement course work is to be submitted before the end of September.).

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): GV2204; ECDL, Students should consult the Placement Policy and Procedures for the BSc Government, which is available in the Department of Government.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 14weeks(s) Placements (Work Placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in government and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Each student will be required to undertake a 14-week work placement. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a work placement supervisor in the external organisation. Students will be expected to complete a self-assessment essay and presentation. Students should consult Placement Policy and Procedures for the BSc in Government , which is available in the Department.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Administer their own work and carry out essential organisational responsibilities
?Apply interpersonal skills effectively in their work
?Examine ways of reconciling personal goals with professional demands and organisational realities
?Link theory and practice by providing practical experience of work to reinforce and complement the academic components of the BSc Government
?Show that they have been able to negotiate, implement and evaluate programmes of work
?Develop and exercise thinking in a practical setting
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement
?Communicate their work placement experience in a verbal presentation.

Assessment: Students must complete a Self Assessment Essay and Presentation, which is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis. Students should consult Placement Policy and Procedures for the BSc in Government, which is available in the Department.

Compulsory Elements: A 14 week- work placement. Continuous Assessment (Self-Assessment Essay and Presentation).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement. Students must pass this module in order to graduate.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: In exceptional circumstances, and on the recommendation of the Head of Department of Government, students are granted permission by Faculty to undertake one further placement or its equivalent.

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GV3108 Introduction to Politics of Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the Government and Politics of Ireland.

Module Content: On successful completion of this module, students will have an understanding of the theory and practice of politics and government in the Republic of Ireland. This module will also provide students with a framework for understanding contemporary political events.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Construct a timeline for important events in the political history of Ireland;
?Describe the significant period from 1916-1922 in terms of the foundation of the State;
?Assess the significance of Irish political institutions in shaping Irish society;
?Evaluate the roles played by central government;
?Critique the role of political institutions and identify weaknesses;
?Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses;
?Propose potential solutions to the problems raised.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Term Paper 50 marks; Oral Presentation 25 marks; In-class Quiz 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by the Department).

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GV3206 Politics in Northern Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government; Dr Anthony Costello, Department of Government.

Module Objective: On completion of this module, students should have a detailed understanding of the government and politics of Northern Ireland

Module Content: This module provides an overview of the actors involved in the Northern Ireland conflict. The conflict is assessed in detail, with a concentration on its causes and effects. The constitutional and institutional structures established under the Good Friday Agreement are critically evaluated. Finally post-Agreement Northern Ireland is studied.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and analyse the origins, roots and causes of the Northern Ireland conflict;
?Identify and assess the key actors in the conflict;
?Document and critically evaluate attempts to manage/resolve the conflict;
?Chart and examine the peace process;
?Critically analyse the Good Friday Agreement and the long-term prospects for peace in Northern Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,000 word essay 40 marks; 1000 word article review 30 marks; 1000 word funding application 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV3208 Elections and Voting

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Module Objective: On completion of this module, students should have an appreciation and understanding of contemporary political behaviour.

Module Content: Theoretical and comparative approaches to key topics including electoral and party systems, voter choice and turnout, models of voting behaviour, public opinion and the mass media. Country case studies will be used in the course of this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and describe various types of electoral and party systems
?Distinguish between the different theoretical models of voting behaviour
?Relate those models of voting behaviour to country case studies
?Assess the impact of economic voting on elections
?Evaluate the role of political parties and leaders in election campaigning
?Examine the influence of public opinion and mass media on voting behaviour and election outcomes
?Analyse electoral turnout
?Research and present information effectively and comprehensively.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500 word essay (50 marks) and in-class test (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV3210 Conflict and Conflict Resolution

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Ms Yvonne Murphy, Department of Government; Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of conflict, conflict prevention and conflict resolution.

Module Content: An analysis of the concepts, developments, successes, failures and challenges in the study of conflict and conflict resolution.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and describe key concepts in the study of conflict and conflict resolution.
?Chart key developments in the study of conflict and conflict resolution.
?Evalutate successes and failures in the field of conflict resolution, conflict management, peace-keeping and peace-building.
?Assess the main contemporary challenges and debates around conflict and conflict resolution.
?Research and present information effectively and comprehensively.
?Analyse information creatively and imaginatively in seeking to manage and resolve political conflicts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,000 word Article Review 20 marks, 1 x 2,000 word Project 40 marks, 1 x 2,000 word Essay 40 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by Department).).

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GV3212 Global Political Economy - Trade

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an appreciation for the theories and practices of international political economy.

Module Content: This module will explore the evolution of the global trading system, contemporary issues in trade politics and the governance of the global trading system. It will also consider globalization and its consequences for the operation of the international economy in the twenty first century.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Trace the development of the global economy;
?Explore the causes and consequences of globalization;
?Critique theoretical approaches to the study of political economy;
?Document the evolution of the global trading system.
?Discuss contemporary debates in trade politics.
?Evaluate the role of international organisations in the management of the world trading system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Coursework: 3,000 word report (70 marks), in-class test (30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV3215 Politics of the United States of America

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Module Objective: The chief aim of this module is to acquaint students with the essential features of United States government and politics.

Module Content: The module examines the basic structures and functioning of the formal institutions of United States government, among them the Presidency, the Congress and the Judiciary. It also explores some of the most important social forces that affect how United States government works, such as the media, public opinion, interest groups and social movements. Students consider the role of money in United States politics, and how U.S. political culture - including ideas about democracy and the proper role of government in society - influences the functioning of government.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the contemporary structure and operation of the Americal political system
?Contribute to debates about the nature, significance and evolution of American democracy
?Evaluate contemporary Americal political thinking
?Analyse information creatively and imaginatively in seeking insights into the politics of the United States.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Book Review x 1,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV3216 Contemporary Ecological and Anti-Capitalist Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 150.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Module Objective: A notable feature of the contemporary political landscape is the remarkable resurgence of ecological and anti-capitalist mobilisations across the globe. This module provides students with some of the tools necessary to understand, contextualise and critically analyse such mobilisations.

Module Content: Spanning political theory and practice, the module begins with an assessment of influential nineteenth-century critiques of capitalism and industrialism. We then consider the rise of modern ecologism and the recent turn to green capitalism, which in turn sets the stage for in depth engagement with ecology and the politics of technology, contemporary anarchist ecologies, post-capitalist and post-industrial utopian imagination, and contemporary anti-capitalist and ecological social movements.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and critically evaluate key features distinctive to contemporary ecological and anti-capitalist theories
?Analyse the relationship between ecological and anti-capitalist politics in a contemporary context
?Assess the significance of contemporary social movements espousing ecological and anti-capitalist ideals
?Situate contemporary ecological and anti-capitalist politics in a wider historical context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay (50 marks) and oral presentation (50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory attendance at lectures and participation in class discussions.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV3217 Global Political Economy - Finance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 4hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an appreciation for the theories and practices of international political economy.

Module Content: This module will explore contemporary issues of finance and security using a political economy framework. It will consider globization and its consequences for the operation of the international economy in the twenty first century.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Use theories of globalisation to explain patterns and developments in the world economy;
?Discuss financial globalization and asses its impact on the stability of the world economy;
?Appraise theories of financial crises and apply to recent world financial crises;
?Evaluate the role of international organisations in the management of the world financial system;
?Research and present work effectively.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Coursework: 3,000 word essay (70 marks), in-class test (30 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV3219 International Relations of Asia

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the political, security and economic interests of Asia's major powers.

Module Content: The aim of this module is to provide a critical analysis of Asia's major powers as well as its international linkages and dynamics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe Asia's complex history, its geographical reach, bilateral relations and emerging multilateral institutions
?Differentiate between the main theoretical perspectives on the international relations of Asia
?Analyse the political, security and economic interests of the region's major powers
?Identify and assess the role played by external actors
?Evaluate the merits of bilateral and multilateral cooperation
?Evaluate the role of non-state actors for the regional economic and political development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,000 word essays (50 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV3220 Chinese Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: The objective of this course is to develop an in-depth understanding of the modern China's political and economic system

Module Content: The evolution of modern China's political and economic system; the Chinese state in comparative perspective; issues and problems of China's political and economic development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the Chinese political system and state administration
?Explain the charateristics of China's socialist market economy
?Analyse the role of the Communist Party of China
?Critically assess different theoretical approaches used in current research on modern China
?Develop and present individual research interests on China's political system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,000 word essays (50 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV3222 Transferable Skills - Government - Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL Certification

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Placements (Placements.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in business and other relevant organisations

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring examination, students will go on placement from April to September. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in the external organisation. Students will be expected to keep learning logs at agreed intervals. See Placement Handbook for information on devising and submitting logs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the business, its organisational culture and purpose
?Critique the practice of communication in an organisational context.
?Demonstrate ability to function independently and in a workplace team.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of the programme of study to the workplace.
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement.

Assessment: Placement Report to be submitted before the end of September which will be assessed on a Honours/Pass/Fail basis. (See Placement Handbook for exact date).

Compulsory Elements: Work placement in industry, placement report and learning logs. Attendance at work placement advisory sessions; participation at work placement in industry; submission of both placement report and learning logs.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Autumn Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

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GV3223 Transferable Skills - Government - Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL Certification

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6month(s) Other (Research Report to be submitted before the end of September which will be assessed on a Honours/Pass/Fail basis. (See Placement Handbook for exact date).).

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in business and other relevant organisarions

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring Examinations, students will start their research project, commencing April, for 6 months. The industry-based research project will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in the external organisation. The UCC -based research project will be monitored by a UCC acadamic mentor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the research culture, operation and purpose.
?Demonstrate the process of research and enquiry on and purpose.
?Prepare and present a research report
?Demonstrate initiative and/or leadership skills whilst working alone and/or in teams.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of research.
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the research placement.

Assessment: Attendance at research project advisory sessions; submission and presentation of Research Project.

Compulsory Elements: Submission of research project and a presentation thereon.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Autumn Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

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GV3225 Transferable Skills - Government - Entrepreneurial Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL Certification

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6month(s) Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To enable students to work with entrepreneurs at different stages of a new venture while developing their own business idea.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring Examination, students will go on placement in IGNITE from March to August. The placement will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in IGNITE. Students will be expected to blog their experiences at agreed intervals. See Placement Handbook for information on devising and submitting logs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the experience of being part of an entrepreneurial venture.
?Critique the development stages of a new venture.
?Demonstrate the ability to function as part of an entrepreneurial team.
?Demonstrate how their business idea was developed.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of the programme to the placement.

Assessment: Total Marks 200:. Submission of Business Idea (6,000 word report (160 marks) and a presentation (40 marks) thereon before the end of September, which will be assessed on a honours/pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at workshops, meetings with mentors, submission and presentation of Research Report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

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GV3401 Government Placement New York State Assembly

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3. (Teaching/Research Period 2 (January - June)).

No. of Students: Min 3, Max 6.

Pre-requisite(s): Students should consult the Placement Policy and Procedures for the BSc in Government, which is available in the Department of Government.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in US Government.

Module Content: Each student will be required to undertake a 6 month placement. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and the Internship Co-ordinator in the New York State Assembly. Students will be expected to attend orientation; complete a work/learning contract, submit themselves to regular evaluations; participate in policy issue forums and complete an evaluation on their work placement experience.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Administer their own work and carry out essential organisational responsiblities
?Apply interpersonal skills effectively in their work
?Examine ways of reconciling personal goals with professional demands and organisational realities
?Link theory and practice by providing practical experience of work to reinforce and complement the academic components of the BSc Government
?Show that they have been able to negotiate, implement and evaluate programmes of work
?Develop and exercise thinking in a practical setting
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement.

Assessment: Students must complete an evaluation recounting and reflecting upon their work placement experience. Students must also present an oral reflection of their experiences of work placement. This is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: 1 x 6 month Work Placement. A Placement Evaluation Report (approximately 2,000 words); Complete an Oral Presentation of Work Placement Experience.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. In exceptional circumstances, and on the recommendation of the Head of the Department of Government, students are granted permission by Faculty to undertake one further placement or its equivalent.

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GV3402 US State Government & Legislative Studies

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3. (Teaching/Research Period 2 (January - June)).

No. of Students: Min 3, Max 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 2hr(s) Other (Policy Sessions Forums).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: This module is designed to explore how politics influences policy in the New York state legislative process, as well as the role of policy analysis.

Module Content: This module is designed to explore how politics influences policy in the New York state legislative process, as well as the role of policy analysis. We will examine the critical issues confronting New York State and models for understanding how these issues get on the policy agenda. We will focus on the points in the policy process when politics can and does play a role, as well as the various political actors in the process, including legislators, the governor, the attorney general and comptroller, state agencies, citizens, lobbyists and policy entrepreneurs, as well as the media.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the political and cultural diversity of New York State
?Describe the way that the political process functions in the New York State Legislature as well as the constellation of constituent interests, agency rivalries, legislative conflicts and external political factors
?Appraise the role of politics and the role of political actors (the legislative; legislators; leaders, the governor; the attorney general; the comptroller; state agencies; political parties; citizens; lobbyists; policy entrepreneurs; the media) in the policy process
?Describe how issues get on the policy agenda
?Evaluate the role of policy analysis
?Evaluate how policymakers translate their preferred solutions into an agenda that others can work within
?Evaluate how policymakers take political action to advance this agenda
?Communicate effectively orally and in writing on diverse aspects of complex issues
?Undertake and write a research paper.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks ((Six Quizzes on course readings (70 marks); written assignments (150 marks [3 x 50 marks each]; approximately 5,000 word research paper (180 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. A 1 x 6 month Work Placement. Attendance at classes; Participation in Mock Session.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by Department)). In exceptional circumstances, and on the recommendation of the Head of Department of Government, students are granted permission by Faculty to undertake one further placement or its equivalent.

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GV3408 The Irish Planning System

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to develop students' understanding of governmental institutions at local, regional and national level. Particular attention will be paid to the local government arena and the preparation of a Development Plan. The political-administrative relationship, whereby the elected members formulate planning policy and the appointed manager grants or refuses planning, will be closely examined.

Module Content: Students will learn how the Irish land-use planning system operates. The module will also examine the role of strategic policy committees which deal with planning issues. Furthermore, it will place local planning matters in a wider context, i.e. regional planning, the role of An Taisce, National Development Plan, National Spatial Strategy, An Bord Pleanala and the Strategic Infrastructure Division.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess the significance of planning theory.
?Trace the development plan process in Ireland.
?Evaluate the system of development control.
?Identify weaknesses in Irish planning policy and the overall system.
?Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses.
?Propose potential solutions to the problems raised.
?Analyse the role of key institutions involved in planning, e.g. local authorities, An Bord Pleanala, Environmental Protection Agency.
?Apply the concepts raised in the module to critically analyse recent planning legislation, such as the Strategic Infrastructure Act, 2006.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2,500 word case study essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV4000 The Politics of Public Health Management

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To Examine the impact of Public Management on public health services.

Module Content: Theories and practice of Public Management in the context of public health.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between the traditional model of public administration and new public management.
?Assess the significance of the politics/administration dichotomy and bureaucracy in shaping public administration.
?Evaluate the roles played by politicians and administrators in the public service modernisation agenda
?Identify weaknesses in the concept of new public management.
?Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses.
?Propose potential solutions to the problems raised.
?Analyse the tools introduced by new public management, e.g. benchmarking, service indicators.
?Apply new public management to the Irish public service, e.g. civil service, local government, HSE.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Article Review 30 marks, 2,500 word case study assignment (70 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV4102 Gender Perspectives on Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To address differing perspectives in political science.

Module Content: The module will focus on varying themes of importance in political science.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Examine the theory and practice of political science from a gendered perspective;
?Assess whether the political process can be complete without women;
?Demonstrate an understanding of feminist political thought and the complexities pertaining to women's political participation and representation;
?Analyse and explain the causes of women's inequality in the public realm;
?Examine women's current involvement in politics and consider a range of explanations as to why women are under-represented, and possible solutions;
?Develop a coherent argument in the form of well-structured and clearly expressed essays;
?Synthesis and extract key information from written and spoken sources;
?Think critically and develop consistent and well-structured argument supported by appropriate evidence.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Written assignment 25 marks; Oral presentation, 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV4202 Government Research Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (24hrs Seminars and Individual Tuition; 24hrs Tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To analyse issues in government and politics.

Module Content: Research methods and use of analytical models to explore current issues in government and politics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between different approaches to research, e.g. qualitative or quantitative.
?Assess a variety of research methodologies, e.g. case study approach.
?Evaluate the ways to gather primary data, e.g. through interviews, focus groups or questionnaires.
?Formulate an effective research design to answer specific questions.
?Apply research tools and methods in the context of a specific dissertation.
?Analyse the effectiveness of the selected research tools and methods.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (research proposal, 30 marks; 1 x 10,000 word research project, 170 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (Presentation mark), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Research project to be re-submitted if failed.).

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GV4401 Global Governance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of contemporary global governance and its challenges

Module Content: Concepts and theories of global governance; the United Nations; peacekeeping and intervention.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the contemporary institutions of global governance and their decision-making mechanisms;
?Understand and assess competing theoretical perspectives on global governance;
?Evaluate proposals for the development and reform of the institutions of global governance;
?Describe and analyse contemporary debates on peacekeeping and intervention;
?Engage in independent research on global governance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay (50 marks) and 1 x take-home exam (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV4409 Political Ideologies and Social Change

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 150.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Module Objective: The primary aim of this module is to develop an understanding of some of the most significant political ideas and ideologies driving social change in the contemporary world.

Module Content: In this module students critically examine some of the leading political ideologies of our time, and assess their significance as catalysts for social change. In addition to focusing on selected ideologies and the core commitments that underpin and give distinctive shape to them, the module also analyses contemporary popular mobilisations inspired by these ideologies and their linkages to on-going struggles for and against political power.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key distinguishing features associated with some of the major political ideologies of our time
?Critically evaluate selected political ideologies
?Assess the significance of ideology in a contemporary political context
?Analyse the role of selected political ideologies in contemporary popular mobilisations and struggles for and against political power.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay (50 marks) and in-class written examination (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory attendance at lectures and participation in class discussions.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV4410 Democracy: Theories and Innovations

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 150.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop students' understanding of democractic theories and models and introduce them to national and international democratic innovations to widen and deepen citizen participation.

Module Content: Students will examine contemporary 'democratic malaise' and discuss competing definitions and theories of democracy. They will then be introduced to the various models of democracy examining them normatively, empirically and in praxis. This will include an examination of democratic innovations that have emerged in recent decades both nationally and internationally to widen and deepen citizens' participation in political decision making.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss varying definitions of democracy
?Compare and contrast different models of democracy including representative democracy, direct democracy and deliberative democracy
?Critically analyse democratic innovations such as citizens' assemblies, participatory budgeting etc.
?Contribute to debates on the crisis in developed democracies in the twenty first century.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (In class presentation - 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV4412 Public Finance - Taxation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To address the main current theories and practices of public finance in Ireland and other jurisdictions.

Module Content: On successful completion of this module, students will have an understanding of the theory and practice of public finance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Synthesise the findings of the theoretical and empirical literature on the relationship between fiscal institutions and economic performance
?Compare and critique the public financial procedures of OECD countries
?Evaluate the annual budget in EU countries
?Analyse trends in taxation data
?Combine political and economic explanations of the development of taxation systems
?Research and present information effectively and comprehensively.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project Report (70 marks); in-class presentation (30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV4413 Public Finance - Public Expenditure

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To address the main current theories and practices of public finance in Ireland and other jurisdictions.

Module Content: On successful completion of this module, students will have an understanding of the theory and practice of public finance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Document the rise of the intermediary state
?Analyse trends in public expenditure data
?Combine political and economic explanations of public expenditure patterns
?Synthesise the findings of the theoretical and empirical literature on the global public goods and global public private partnerships
?Research and present information effectively and comprehensively.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project Report (70 marks); in-class presentation (30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV4414 Contemporary Debates in Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To analyse current issues in Irish Politics

Module Content: This module examines debates around a number of contemporary issues in Irish politics. These primarily centre on institutional and behavioural issues, such as the constitution, the parliament, political culture and elections. These debates are also placed in a comparative context, using the experience of other countries to assess the Irish political system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key issues in contemporary Irish politics;
?Describe the suggested flaws in Irish political institutions and the proposed remedies;
?Evaluate policies enacted by various Irish governments;
?Assess the workings of the Irish political system;
?Assess whether the key issues are uniquely Irish and/or whether lessons can be learned from the comparative experience.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV4415 Contemporary Debates in the EU

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide an analysis of key EU policies as well as contemporary issues in European Union politics.

Module Content: An examination of key EU policies as well as contemporary issues in the EU including the Common Agricultural Policy, Environmental Policy, Security and Defence policies, the Democratic Deficit and Euroscepticism.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically evaluate key EU policy areas

?Explain and assess the EU's democratic deficit
?Discuss and explore contemporary issues in EU politics such as euroscepticism.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1x 3,000 word project).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GV4416 European Security

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of European security, including issues of war and peace within Europe, non-military security issues and contemporary debates on European security.

Module Content: Theoretical perspectives on European security; European security institutions (in particular NATO and the European Union); relations between Russia and the West; contemporary European security issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply competing theoretical perspectives to European security.
?Describe and critically assess the role of European security institutions (in particular NATO and the European Union).
?Identify and assess current policy debates on European security.
?Engage in independent research on European security.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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GV6010 Contemporary Global Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To enable students to understand contemporary global politics, including: competing theoretical perspectives on global politics, the main trends shaping contemporary global politics and key global policy challenges.

Module Content: This module will examine contemporary global politics. This will include:
Competing theoretical perspectives on global politics (Realism, Liberalism, Marxism and Social Constructivism).
The main trends shaping global politics (e.g., the shifting global balance of power, globalization and the rise of non-state actors).
Global governance and international organizations.
Key global policy challenges (including peacekeeping, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, climate change, energy security and food security) and alternative responses to these challenges.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and evaluate alternative theoretical perspectives on global politics.
?Identify and assess the main political, economic and social trends shaping the contemporary global environment.
?Critically evaluate the main global policy challenges and alternative policy responses.
?Analyse and critically assess the roles of international organisations and institutions in responding to global policy challenges
?Provide the type of advice relevant to decision-makers and present such advice in a variety of formats relevant to different decision-making contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Coursework: policy report (3000 words, 40 marks), international organisation portfolio (2000 words, 30 marks) and in-class presentation (30 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward. Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV6011 EU Political System and Policies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To examine the EU's institutions and policy-making processes.

Module Content: The module will discuss the dynamic between various political actors within the EU, namely EU institutions and member states. It will also analyse how these political relationships apply when it comes to policy-making. The module will familiarize students with a range of existing EU policies as well as core policy challenges.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the processes of political integration in Europe;
?Describe the main institutions of the EU;
?Describe policy-making within the EU;
?Evaluate the range of EU policies;
?Identify the range of core policy challenges facing the EU;
?Explain and assess current developments in the evolution of the European Union.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous assessment: 100 (1 x 3000 word policy-oriented paper (60 marks); 1 oral presentation supported by power point document (40 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Complete alternative assignment as specified by the Department).

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GV6012 Global Economic Policies and Institutions

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To explore the theory and practice of international political economy.

Module Content: This module will examine the development of the global economic system. It will consider globalization and regionalism as competing or complementary dynamics in the international economy. The role of international organizations in the trade and financial systems will be evaluated.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Trace the development of the global political economy,
?Critique theoretical approaches to the study of political economy,
?Explore the causes and consequences of globalization,
?Outline the features of the global trade regime,
?Outline the features of the international financial system,
?Evaluate the role of international organisations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment 100 (Coursework: research project (3000 words, 50 marks) and final presentation (50 marks))).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV6013 Work Placement & Portfolio

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (1 x 3 - 5 month work placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide students with experience of working in an internationally-orientated environment and to enable them to apply knowledge of international affairs in a policy-related work context.

Module Content: Each student will be required to undertake work placement of at least 3 moths duration.UCC, the work placement provider and the student will work together in developing a structured plan for the students work in order to ensure that it is relevant to the MBS International Public Policy and Diplomacy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to work in a policy-oriented international environment.
?Administer their own work and carry out essential organisational responsibilities.
?Apply interpersonal skills effectively in their work.
?Produce a policy-oriented research paper relating to their work placement.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks ((i) Work Placement Portoflio (2,000 words, 250 marks); (ii) Research Paper (6,000 words, 350 marks);).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at Placement; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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GV6014 Dissertation in International Public Policy and Diplomacy

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Supervised Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall Duggan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To enable students to undertake a detailed research project in a policy-oriented international area and to use appropriate research methods in undertaking the research.

Module Content: 15-20,000 word research dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to carry out independent research.
?Identify, assess and apply an appropriate methodology.
?Locate, analyse and synthesise a body of source material appropriate to the topic of his/her dissertation.
?Relate their research to debates on policy choices facing governments, international organisations or other actors.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Research Dissertation 15,000-20,000 works)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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GV6102 Political Science Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 18 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To apply the research methods of political science.

Module Content: Qualitative research methods, quantitative research methods and triangulation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?explore the dominant theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of political science.
?Identify the main features of different research techniques.
?Select and carry out an appropriate research technique,
?conduct a participant observation,
?design and administer a survey,
?conduct a statistical analysis.
?Analyse information creatively & imaginatively in seeking solutions to political problems & challenges.
?Research & present information effectively & comprehensively.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 2,000 word essay (50 marks each) and two in-class presentations (50 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV6103 Re-imagining Democratic Politics in a Changing World

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 12 hours seminars, guest speakers, conferences).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Laurence Davis, Department of Government.

Module Objective: The primary aim of this module is to examine the changing nature, problems and possiblities of democracy in the early 21st century.

Module Content: The module focuses in particular on contemporary democratic theories, ideologies and social movements that seek to recapture the transformative potential of democracy associated with much of its history by closing the gap between ideals of popular sovereignty and the reality of contemporary democratic societies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically analyse competing models of democracy
?Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of contemporary radical democratic ideas and initatives
?Assess the role of social movements and utopian imagination in transforming democratic ideals
?Construct original arguments about democracy and express them cogently in written form.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 2,500 word essays (100 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV6104 Political Participation and Mobilisation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 12 hours seminars, guest speakers, conferences).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To examine theories of political mobilisation and public participation in the democratic process.

Module Content: The module focuses on forms of political participation, theories of democracy and contemporary democratic innovations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explore the relationship between democracy and participation;
?Document and analyse direct, participatory, representative and deliberative forms of democracy;
?List and examine various methods of participation;
?Identify groups that under participate in the political process;
?Classify and assess the institutional and systemic obstacles to participation;
?Make recommendations on how these barriers can be removed.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,500 word report (60 marks); 1 x 3,000 word essay (80 marks) and in-class presentation (60 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GV6106 Dissertation in Government

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentations); Directed Study (Supervised Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To enable students to undertake a detailed research project in government, political science and/or public policy and apply political science methodology to this research.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars to prepare them to produce a dissertation. The topics covered will include: identifying a research question, preparing a literature review, choosing a research methodology, gathering and analysing data. Students will also be asked to make an in-class presentation on their draft research proposal.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to carry out independent research
?Identify a specific research topic and write a research proposal for presentation in class
?Identify, assess and apply an appropriate methodology and place this methodology within a broader research context
?Locate, analyse and synthesise a body of source material appropriate to the topic of their dissertation
?Produce a detailed literature review and say exactly how the proposed research will add to the state of existing knowledge
?Demonstrate ability to write critically, logically and systematically, using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Research Dissertation 15,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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GV6112 The Third Sector and the State

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Clodagh Harris, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To examine the political context in which the voluntary and community sector operates.

Module Content: This module examines the political context in which the voluntary and community sector operates, referring to theories and narratives of governance. Civil society's relationship with and involvement in governance networks and policy networks is discussed with particular focus on local and national partnership processes. Finally, the changing dynamics of Irish governance and its impact on the voluntary and community sector in the post partnership era is assessed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the political context in which the voluntary and community sector operates
?Critically examine competing theories of governance
?Outline and critically assess the changing dynamics of Irish governance with particular reference to the Irish social partnership model
?Identify and analyse the political challenges faced by the voluntary and community sector; in the post partnership era.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GV6113 Governance and Policy Processes in the European Union

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 12 hours seminars, guest speakers, conferences).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: This course provides a deep analysis of policy making and policy processes in the European Union.

Module Content: The module provides an introduction to the European Union policy portfolio, the key policy actors as well as dynamics of EU policy making.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key institutional and policy actors in the European Union
?Define the main features of policy processes in the European Union
?Evaluate the policy cycle and its coherence
?Analyse the European Union's distinctive policy reach
?Discuss the complexity of policy making modes in a multi-level governance system.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (one article review (1,200 words) (60 marks); 1 x 3,000 word essay (80 marks) and in-class presentation (60 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submission Date Specified by Module Coordinator), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Complete alternative assignment as specified by the Department.).

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GV6114 Changing Dynamics of Governance

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 12 hours seminars, guest speakers, conferences).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To critically examine theories of governance and representation.

Module Content: This module will examine competing theories of governance and representation. It will profile Irish governance and critically examine recent developments in Irish governance with particular reference to legitimacy, accountability and gender democracy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically examine competing theories of governance and representation
?Discuss how conceptions modern governance challenge democracy
?Define what is meant by good governance
?Profile Irish governance
?Critically appraise recent developments in Irish governance
?Define gender democracy.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 1,200 word article review (50 marks each) and 1 x, 3,500 word essay (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department), Marks in passed elements of Continuous Assessment are carried forward.

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GV6115 European Security

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 12 hours seminars, guest speakers, conferences).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To enable students to understand the dynamics shaping the contemporary European security environment and Europe's role in global security, the main security challenges facing European governments and the nature and role of European security institutions.

Module Content: This module will examine: debates on the nature of the European security order of the early twenty-first century; key policy challenges facing European governments; the main European security institutions (the EU, NATO, and the OSCE); relations between the West and Russia; and Europe's role in addressing global security issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically analyse debates on the nature of the contemporary European security order.
?Describe the main European security institutions and evaluate their on-going development.
?Analyse the main security policy challenges facing European governments and critically assess alternative policy responses to these challenges.
?Identify and make use of relevant academic and policy-oriented literature.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word policy report (80 marks); 1 x 3,000 word essay (80 marks) and in-class presentation (40 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV6117 Political Science Fundamentals

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Blended (combines online or/and web-based learning with face-to-face delivery)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the discipline of political science.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to a range of ways of constructing and understanding politics and political science. It will discuss the language of political science and present key themes, concepts, ideas and theories. It will consider key contemporary debates and literatures in political science.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Distinguish between the practice of politics and the discipline of political science;
?Be familiar with the language of political science;
?Identify the key debates and literatures in political science;
?Identify a variety of theoretical approaches to research in political science.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3,000 word paper (140 marks) and poster presentation (60 marks))).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV6118 Political Science Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Blended (combine online or/and web-based learning with face-to-face delivery)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the qualitive and quantitative research techniques which are employed in the study of politics as well as the theoretical principles which underpin these techniques.

Module Content: This module will deal with the dominant theoretical approaches to the study of politics and methodological approaches to research in the discipline. It will introduce students to a range of qualitative and quantitative research techniques and will guide students in developing their own research agenda.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explore the dominant methodological approaches to the study of political science;
?List the main features of different techniques;
?Develop research questions and design ways to answer them;
?Explore the dominant qualitative methods to the study of political science;
?Conduct quantitative approaches to research;
?Dissect academic literatures and research.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Continuous Assessment 200 marks (4,000 word project).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV6120 Politics and Policies of the European Union

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Blended (combines online or/and web-based learning with face-to-face delivery)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary C. Murphy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of the EU's political and policy system.

Module Content: This module will explore the dynamics and dimensions of the EU's political system. It will introduce stduents to the EU policy environment and familiarise them with core policy challenges.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the processes of political and economic integration in Europe;
?Describe and evaluate policy-making within the EU;
?Identify the range of core policy challenges facing the EU;
?Understand the theoretical underpinnings of the EU political and policy environment;
?Appreciate the broader international context to policy development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3,000 word paper (140 marks) and poster presentation (60 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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GV6503 Public Sector Elective

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1. (Part 2, Year 1, MBA).

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aodh Quinlivan, Department of Government.

Module Objective: This module aims to introduce the theories and ideas of public sector management and new public management and apply them in a meaningful way to the workings of the public service in Ireland.

Module Content: Topics covered will include: classical public administration, new public management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between the traditional model of public administration and new public management.
?Assess the significance of the politics/administration dichotomy and bureaucracy in shaping public administration.
?Evaluate the roles played by politicians and administrators in the public service modernisation agenda.
?Identify weaknesses in the concept of new public management.
?Formulate problems based on the identification of weaknesses.
?Propose potential solutions to the problems raised.
?Analyse the tools introduced by new public management, e.g. benchmarking, service indicators.
?Apply new public management to the Irish public service, e.g. civil service, local government, HSE.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essays/Projects).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit New Continuous Assessment Essay, as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

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