Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

CM0003 Peer Assisted Tutoring Sessions
CM1001 Chemistry for Engineers
CM1003 Introductory Chemistry for Environmental Scientists
CM1005 Introductory Chemistry for Food and Nutritional Sciences
CM1006 Introduction to Chemistry for Physicists and Mathematicians
CM1007 Introduction to Chemistry for Physicists
CM1200 Fundamentals of Modern Chemistry Part 1
CM1201 Fundamentals of Modern Chemistry Part 2a
CM2001 Main Group and Transition Element Chemistry
CM2002 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
CM2003 Energetics and Kinetics
CM2004 States of Matter
CM2005 Structures and Reactions of Main Group Compounds
CM2006 Aromatics, Carbonyls and Alkenes
CM2007 Spectroscopy
CM2008 Structure, Bonding and Quantum Mechanics
CM2009 Introduction to Forensic Science
CM2010 Introduction to Organic Chemistry for Process and Chemical Engineers
CM2101 Introductory Organic Chemistry for Environmental Scientists
CM2201 Fundamentals of Modern Chemistry Part 2b
CM3016 Physical Chemistry Part 1
CM3017 Physical Chemistry Part 2
CM3021 Inorganic Chemistry
CM3022 Synthesis, Structure and Reactivity of Organic Compounds
CM3024 Analytical Chemistry
CM3025 Materials Chemistry
CM3028 Scientific Communication and Information Literacy Skills
CM3029 Organic Chemistry II for Process and Chemical Engineering
CM3030 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry
CM3101 Natural Products and Reaction Mechanisms
CM3102 Introduction to Pharmaceutical Chemistry
CM3104 Environmental Chemistry and Analysis
CM3108 Forensic Analysis
CM3110 Pharmaceutical Solids and Technology
CM4017 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Part 1
CM4018 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Part 2
CM4019 Lasers, Photochemistry & Spectroscopy
CM4020 Interfaces, Microscopy & Modelling
CM4022 Advanced Organic Synthesis, Biosynthesis and Reactivity
CM4025 Advanced Nano Materials
CM4026 Advanced Analytical Chemistry Part 1
CM4027 Advanced Analytical Chemistry Part 2
CM4100 Advanced Methods of Forensic Science
CM4101 Physical Organic Chemistry
CM4108 Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry
CM4109 Pharmaceutical Chemistry Drug Design and Development
CM4112 Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution
CM4203 Research Project : Chemistry of Pharmaceutical Compounds
CM4204 Work Placement
CM4206 Chemistry Research Projects
CM4207 Chemistry with Forensic Science Research Project
CM4208 Research Project 2: Chemistry of Pharmaceutical Compounds
CM6001 Teaching Periodic Table, Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding
CM6002 Teaching Stoichiometry and Volumetric Analysis
CM6003 Teaching Organic Chemistry
CM6004 Teaching Rates of Reaction, Chemical Equilibrium and Electrochemistry
CM6005 Teaching Environmental Chemistry
CM6006 Teaching Industrial Chemistry
CM6007 Teaching and Demonstrating Skills for Chemistry Postgraduate Students
CM6010 Introductory Pharmaceutical Chemistry
CM6011 Modern Methods in Analytical Chemistry
CM6012 Modern Analytical Techniques, Chemical Data Analysis and GLP
CM6013 Separation Science, Sensors and Process Analytical Technology
CM6014 Materials, Pharmaceutical and Bio-analysis
CM6015 Practice of Analytical Chemistry
CM6019 Research Project in Analytical Science
CM6020 Research Project and Dissertation in Analytical Chemistry
CM6021 Research Project and Dissertation in Environmental Analytical Chemistry
CM6022 Research Project and Dissertation in Pharmaceutical Analysis
CM6026 Industry Led Workshop
CM6027 Taught Postgraduate Transferable Skills Development
CM6101 Basic Postgraduate Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Problem Solving and Presentation Skills
CM7002 Intermediate Posgraduate Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Problem Solving and Presentation Skills
CM7003 Advanced Postgraduate Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Problem Solving and Presentation Skills
CM7004 Postgraduate Internship in Pharmaceutical Sector
CM7005 Theory and Application of Computational Chemistry
CM7006 Advanced Postgraduate Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Problem Solving and Presentation Skills II
CM7007 Research Standard Spectroscopic Methods for Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Research : Molecular Structure Determination, Compound Characterisation and Analysis

CM0003 Peer Assisted Tutoring Sessions

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): Science 1 Chemistry

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 26hr(s) Other (12 one-hour training sessions plus 1 two-hour training session; delivery of 12 one-hour sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ian O'Connor, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce students to teaching techniques and methods. To reinforce and revise their basic chemistry understanding through transferral of knowledge to their peers. To develop necessary skills in order to facilitate group discussion and learning.

Module Content: To deliver three blocks (Inorganic, Organic & Physical Chemistry) of four weekly sessions through directed activities supported by module notes, sample MCQ solutions, examination preparation (working through previous exam papers). Attendance at 12 one-hour training sessions plus 1 two-hour training session. Each student is given the opportunity and encouraged to develop their teaching skills and reinforce their own basic knowledge of Chemistry. Students will also be introduced to active learning by helping fellow students understand the module content. Completion of End of Year Project.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Develop basic skills for planning/preparation of course material
Manage both group and classroom activities by keeping the session on track/structured and specifically encouraging student participation
Consolidate, revise and gain a greater comprehension of fundamental chemistry concepts
Enhance personal skills such as leadership, communication, facilitation and presentation
Gain confidence in teamwork situations, team interaction and public speaking
Improve academic performance.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Performance and attendance at all PAL sessions (a minimum of 80% attendance at training sessions) and End of Year Project (1 x 800-word Self-Reflective Essay plus 1 x Seminar Presentation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and submission of End of Year Project (1 x 800-word Self-Reflective Essay plus 1 x Seminar Presentation).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM1001 Chemistry for Engineers

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 21 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dara Fitzpatrick, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry; Dr Dara Fitzpatrick, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce the basics of Chemistry to Engineering students.

Module Content: Introductory structure and bonding, basic physical chemistry (thermodynamics, pH, acidity, electrochemistry and corrosion, kinetics, solubility), states of matter, solid state chemistry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Define the structure of an atom and illustrate the uses of quantum numbers in describing the structure of an atom
Discuss thermodynamics, entropy and enthalpy in their role for predicting the spontaneity of reactions
Distinguish between oxidation and reduction, their role in corrosion and energy cells
Describe the basic principles of x-ray crystallography and determine the lattice parameters for cubic lattices
describe and sketch generic crystal structures of metals, alloys and simple inorganics and perform simple calculations based on these structures
Define metallography and sketch typical microstructures of metals and alloys
Recognise and interpret selected binary phase diagrams for metals.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practical).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Marks based on four practical write ups.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the practical component of the module by attending, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 70% of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when he/she has failed to fulfill the above criteria for more than 20% of practical sessions.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM1003 Introductory Chemistry for Environmental Scientists

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 12 x 3hr(s) Practicals; Workshops (16 x 1hr Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry; Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce chemistry to science students and illustrate its relevance to living systems, industry and protection of the environment.

Module Content: Fundamental and Inorganic Chemistry: elements and compounds, structure of atoms, chemical bonding, the Periodic Table, structures of compounds and chemistry of selected elements and groups. Physical Chemistry: states of matter, energetics, solutions, equilibria, kinetics, acids and bases.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
explain atomic theory and use the electronic structure of atoms to explain the line spectra of elements and predict the geometry and polarity of covalent molecules
calculate the molecular formulae of substances and use the periodic table to predict the chemical and physical properties of elements and chemical compounds
predict the behavior of ideal gases and qualitatively describe the differences between solids, liquids, and gases at a molecular level
apply the basic thermodynamic concepts of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy to chemical processes and chemical equilibria
describe solutions, solubility of substances, and colligative properties
define acididy and basicity and calculate the pH of solutions of strong and weak acids or bases and account for the behaviour of buffer solutions
apply basic concepts in chemical kinetics, including rate equations, reaction order, and the effect of temperature and catalysts on the reaction rate
demonstrate basic laboratory skills, make accurate observations and write reports, and work safely in the chemical laboratory.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 100 marks (12 x Practicals, 40/12 marks each; 2 x MCQ Examinations, 15 marks each; 16 x Homework Assignments, 30/16 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the practical component of the module by attending, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 70% of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when he/she has failed to fulfill the above criteria for more than 20% of practical sessions.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM1005 Introductory Chemistry for Food and Nutritional Sciences

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 72 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Tutorials ((Computer-aided learning)); 50 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce the fundamentals of chemistry relevant to food science and technology.

Module Content: Elements and Compounds; Molecules and Moles. The Periodic Table. Elements and Group Chemistry. Structures of compounds. Energetics and kinetics. Acids and bases. Organic chemistry: functionality, reaction mechanism and stereochemistry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
explain atomic theory and use the electronic structure of atoms to explain the line spectra of elements and predict the geometry and polarity of covalent molecules
calculate the molecular formulae of substances and use the periodic table to predict the chemical and physical properties of elements and chemical compounds
predict the behavior of ideal gases and qualitatively describe the differences between solids, liquids, and gases at a molecular level
apply the basic thermodynamic concepts of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy to chemical processes and chemical equilibria
describe solutions, solubility of substances, and colligative properties
define acididy and basicity and calculate the pH of solutions of strong and weak acids or bases and account for the behaviour of buffer solutions
apply basic concepts in chemical kinetics, including rate equations, reaction order, and the effect of temperature and catalysts on the reaction rate
identify organic functional groups, systematically name organic compounds, describe the behaviour and reactivities of different molecules, derive appropriate mechanisms for a given reaction and predict the products of organic and inorganic reactions
demonstrate basic laboratory skills, make accurate observations and write reports, and work safely in the chemical laboratory.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 150 marks (Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 150 marks (Practicals 60 marks; MCQ Examinations 45 marks; Online assignments 45 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the practical component of the module by attending, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 70% of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when he/she has failed to fulfill the above criteria for more than 20% of practical sessions.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM1006 Introduction to Chemistry for Physicists and Mathematicians

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 16 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 12 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce chemistry to science students and illustrate its relevance to modern life.

Module Content: Fundamental and Inorganic Chemistry: elements and compounds, structure of atoms, chemical bonding, the Periodic Table, structures of compounds and chemistry of selected elements and groups. Physical Chemistry: states of matter, energetics, solutions, equilibria, kinetics, acids and basis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
explain atomic theory and use the electronic structure of atoms to explain the line spectra of elements and predict the geometry and polarity of covalent molecules
calculate the molecular formulae of substances and use the periodic table to predict the chemical and physical properties of elements and chemical compounds
predict the behavior of ideal gases and qualitatively describe the differences between solids, liquids, and gases at a molecular level
apply the basic thermodynamic concepts of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy to chemical processes and chemical equilibria
describe solutions, solubility of substances, and colligative properties
define acididy and basicity and calculate the pH of solutions of strong and weak acids or bases and account for the behaviour of buffer solutions
apply basic concepts in chemical kinetics, including rate equations, reaction order, and the effect of temperature and catalysts on the reaction rate
demonstrate basic laboratory skills, make accurate observations and write reports, and work safely in the chemical laboratory.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 100 marks (12 x Practicals, 40/12 marks each; 2 x MCQ Examinations, 15 marks each; 16 x Homework Assignments, 30/16 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM1007 Introduction to Chemistry for Physicists

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 72 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 50 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce the fundamentals of chemistry relevant to scientists.

Module Content: Elements and Compounds; Molecules and Moles. The Periodic Table. Elements and Group Chemistry. Structures of compounds. Energetics and kinetics. Acids and bases. Organic chemistry: functionality, reaction mechanism and stereochemistry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
explain atomic theory and use the electronic structure of atoms to explain the line spectra of elements and predict the geometry and polarity of covalent molecules
calculate the molecular formulae of substances and use the periodic table to predict the chemical and physical properties of elements and chemical compounds
predict the behaviour of ideal gases and qualitatively describe the differences between solids, liquids, and gases at a molecular level
apply the basic thermodynamic concepts of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy to chemical processes and chemical equilibria
describe solutions, solubility of substances, and colligative properties
define acidity and basicity and calculate the pH of solutions of strong and weak acids or bases and account for the behaviour of buffer solutions
apply basic concepts in chemical kinetics, including rate equations, reaction order, and the effect of temperature and catalysts on the reaction rate
identify organic functional groups, systematically name organic compounds, describe the behaviour and reactivities of different molecules, derive appropriate mechanisms for a given reaction and predict the products of organic and inorganic reactions
demonstrate basic laboratory skills, make accurate observations and write reports, and work safely in the chemical laboratory.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 150 marks; Continuous Assessment 150 marks (Practicals 60 marks; MCQ Examinations 45 marks; Online assignments 45 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the practical component of the module by attending, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 70% of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when he/she has failed to fulfill the above criteria for more than 20% of practical sessions.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Practicals is carried forward.

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CM1200 Fundamentals of Modern Chemistry Part 1

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 350.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 8 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To outline Chemistry and its importance to society and the universe.

Module Content: Elements and compounds, atoms, chemical bonding, the Periodic table; molecules and covalent bonds, types of carbon atoms and hydrocarbons; states of matter and energetics; environmentally, biologically, and economically important chemicals and materials; laboratory training in volumetric analysis, calorimetry, recrystallisation and separation by solvent extraction.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
State the atomic numbers, electronic configurations and masses of atoms; and determine the molecular formulae and masses of molecules
Predict types of bonding between atoms and the polarity of covalent bonds
Name hydrocarbons and predict their geometries
Apply the basic thermodynamic concepts of enthalpy, entropy and free energy to chemical equilibria
Predict the molecular level behaviour of substances undergoing solid-liquid-gas phase transitions
Analyse solutions volumetrically
Measure enthalpy changes by calorimetry
Recrystallise solids and analyse by melting point and separate mixtures of molecules by partitioning between solvents
Identify important materials, pharmaceuticals and environmental substances and processes and discuss the social and economic roles of materials and chemicals.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (Practicals 40 marks;1 x MCQ 10 marks; on-line assignments 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Marks of 40% or greater in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment are carried forward to the Autumn. There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM1201 Fundamentals of Modern Chemistry Part 2a

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 350.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): CM1200

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 8 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive introduction to chemistry for science students.

Module Content: Physical chemistry: solutions, equilibria, kinetics, acids and basis. Inorganic chemistry: structure of atoms, chemical bonding, the periodic table and chemistry of selected elements and groups. Organic chemistry: functional groups and classes of compounds, reaction mechanisms, functional group interconversions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain atomic theory and use the electronic structure of atoms to explain the line spectra of elements.
Use the periodic table to predict the chemical and physical properties of elements and chemical compounds.
Predict the behaviour of ideal gases and describe solutions, solubility of substances, and colligative properties
Define acidity and basicity and calculate the pH of solutions of strong and weak acids or bases and account for the behaviour of buffer solutions.
Apply basic concepts in chemical kinetics, including rate equations, reaction order, and the effect of temperature and catalysts on the reaction rate.
Identify organic functional groups, systematically name organic compounds, and describe the behaviour and reactivities of different molecules.
Derive appropriate mechanisms for a given organic reaction and predict the products of organic and inorganic reactions.
Demonstrate basic laboratory skills, make accurate observations and write reports, and work safely in the chemical laboratory.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (Practicals 40 marks; 1 x MCQ 10 marks; On-line assessments 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Marks of 40% or greater in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment are carried forward to the Autumn. There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2001 Main Group and Transition Element Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201 or CM1006 or CM1007

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Practicals (18hrs Practicals).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the fundamentals of main group and transition element chemistry.

Module Content: Main Group elements; electronic properties. Simple compounds. Molecular shape. Chemistry of hydrogen, Group l - and Group 2 elements, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine. Transition element Chemistry. Electronic configurations and oxidation states. Coordination complexes. Shape and isomerism. Introduction to crystal-field theory. Electronic spectra and magnetic properties. Systematic chemistry of representative transition elements.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify the oxidation states and electronic configuration of transition elements in coordination complexes.
Predict the shape of transition element coordination complexes and identify possible isomers.
Describe in detail the splitting of d-orbitals in tetrahedral, octahedral and square planar transition element complexes using crystal field theory.
Utilize their knowledge of crystal field theory to predict the electronic and magnetic properties of transition element coordination complexes.
Utilize their knowledge of the trends in the periodic table to predict the bonding in molecules.
Analyse a molecular formula and thus determine the 3-D shape and hybridisation of a molecule.
Demonstrate between the various approaches to acid/base chemistry and thus enable a prediction of the pKa of a given compound.
Discuss the trends of the elements in the first row of the periodic table and compare their properties and reactivities.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals 20 marks; Coursework 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2002 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 180.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 18 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stuart Collins, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stuart Collins, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To learn the fundamentals of organic chemistry.

Module Content: The chemistry and reactivity associated with the common functional groups with an emphasis on functional group interconversions and acidity/basicity. Stereochemistry: chirality; configuration; molecules with two stereogenic centres. Conformational analysis of acyclic, cyclic and bicyclic molecules.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand and describe the concepts of stereochemistry, isomerism and conformational analysis
Explain the different concepts affecting the acid-base reactions of organic compounds
Understand and describe the theory and mechanisms of nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions
Describe and understand the structure and reactivity of alkenes, alkynes and nitriles
Demonstrate the practical skills required to be a competent organic chemist.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals (25) and MCQ (5)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2003 Energetics and Kinetics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201 or CM1006 or CM1007

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (30 Lectures/Tutorials/Workshops); 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Wenger, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Prof John Wenger, Department of Chemistry; Prof Justin D. Holmes, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To convey the concepts of energetics and kinetics by reference to Life, the Universe and Everything.

Module Content: (i) Energy, enthalpy, work and entropy; (ii) laws of thermodynamics and their applications; (iii) rates of reaction: their quantitative dependence on concentration and temperature; (iv) the steady-state approximation: mechanisms related to the atmosphere and combustion.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics in the context of chemical reactions.
Carry out thermochemical calculations involving enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy.
Calculate equilibrium constants from thermodynamic data.
Analyse experimental data for the determination of reaction orders and rate coefficients.
Derive integrated rate equations and apply the steady state approximation.
Show an understanding of activation barriers and apply the Arrhenius equation.
Use mathematical procedures and graphs for quantitative data analysis and problem solving.
Demonstrate competent laboratory skills related to the measurement of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Practicals 20 marks; Coursework 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2004 States of Matter

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 90.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201 or CM1007

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dean Venables, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide a fundamental appreciation of the physical chemistry associated with gases, liquids and solids in both ideal and non-ideal systems.

Module Content: Intermolecular interactions and how these relate to the formation of liquids and solids are described. Dipole-dipole, Debye and dispersion forces are considered, as is the role of repulsive forces in the formation of minima on potential energy diagrams. Fundamental aspects of the liquid phase that are described include chemical equilibria in aqueous solutions, proton transfer/acid base equilibria, buffers, polyprotic acids and bases, complexation equilibria, solubility equilibria, migration of ions and electrical conductivitiy. The discovery of gases and their ideal behaviour, the kinetic theory of gases, molecular kinesis and non-ideal gas theory are described.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Calculate the dipole moment and induced dipole moment of molecules
Determine the strength of intermolecular interactions arising from coulombic, dipole-dipole, dipole-induced dipole interactions, dispersion forces, and hydrogen bonding
Describe the total intermolecular potential and its contributions from repulsive and attractive interactions
Interpret single component and multi-component phase diagrams
Describe the concept of the chemical potential in relation to mixtures of gases and solutions
Account for the behaviour of non-ideal solutions in terms of activities and activity coefficients
Describe the discovery of gases and their ideal behaviour
Describe the non-ideality of gases and mathematically describe the non-ideal behaviour of gases.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Practicals 20 marks; Coursework 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2005 Structures and Reactions of Main Group Compounds

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201

Co-requisite(s): CM2001

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Lawrence, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Simon Lawrence, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to some fundamental chemistry of Main Group Elements and their compounds.

Module Content: Comparative Main Group Chemistry of the elements in Groups 13 - 17 with emphasis on structure and bonding relationships; simple crystal chemistry. Organometallic chemistry of selected main group elements and its applications in organic synthesis

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the chemistry of the elements in Groups 13-18.
Compare and contrast the chemistry of the elements of Groups 13-18.
Recognise a selection of volumetric equations and apply them in problems.
Describe the properties of selected main group organometallic compounds and thus predict the compounds formed.
Discuss the structures and reactivities of organometallic compounds of selected main group elements.
Explain the principles that define selected synthetic processes for organometallic compounds of the main group elements.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals 20 marks; Coursework 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2006 Aromatics, Carbonyls and Alkenes

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 140.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201

Co-requisite(s): CM2002

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stuart Collins, Department of Chemistry; Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop the students knowledge in the important areas of aromatic chemistry, alkenes,carbonyl compounds, organic analysis and spectroscopy.

Module Content: Structure, synthesis, and reactivity of aromatic compounds. Synthesis, structure and reactivity of carbonyl compounds - tautomerism, nucleophilic addition, aldol, and related condensation reactions. Reactions of alpha, beta -unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Organic spectroscopy and analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the practical skill required to be a competent organic chemist.
Use the principles of organic chemistry to explain the chemistry of aromatic, alkene and carbonyl functional groups in terms of their reactivity.
Predict the reactivity of aromatic, alkene and carbonyl functional groups in a given situation.
Justify the mechanisms of electrophilic aromatic substitution and nucleophilic aromatic substitution, acyl nucleophilic substitution, enolisation, Grignard reactions and the addition reactions of alkenes.
Account for reactions involving aldol and related condensations, reactions of alpha, beta -unsaturated carbonyl compounds, oxidations of alkenes and reactions of substituted aromatic compounds.
Engage with organic spectroscopy and its applications to molecular structure.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2007 Spectroscopy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201 or CM1006 or CM1007

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals; Other (30 Lectures/Tutorials/Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dara Fitzpatrick, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To show how the interaction of light with matter provides a powerful method of determining molecular structure and composition. Chemists term this phenomenon, spectroscopy.

Module Content: The physical principles, which underlay the spectroscopic techniques called: (i) ultraviolet/visible (uv/vis) spectroscopy (ii) infrared (vibrational) spectroscopy; (iii) nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy, will be considered. Applications of these techniques to the determination of molecular structure, particularly for organic molecules will be discussed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand the nature of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and matter.
Apply this knowledge to understand interactions between ultraviolet (UV), visible, infrared (IR) or radio-wave frequencies of light and atoms/molecules. (The overall study being termed, Spectroscopy.)
Develop abilities to assign (interpret) and/or predict the IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectra of organic compounds.
Employ IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy to distinguish between organic molecular structures.
Use IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy (in conjunction with chemical reaction data/chemical tests) to identify unknown compounds.
Perform laboratory measurements (including sample preparation) of the IR spectra of organic liquids and solids as thin films and liquid mulls/solid dispersions, respectively.
Apply all the above learned skills to the quantitative analysis of compounds.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals 20 marks; Coursework 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2008 Structure, Bonding and Quantum Mechanics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201 or CM1006 or CM1007

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other (6 x 1hr Problem-solving sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Ni Dhubhghaill, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To study the relationships between structure and bonding in molecules.

Module Content: Properties of ionic compounds. Lattice energy, Born-Haber cycle, Hard-sphere model of ionic bonding. Calculation of lattice energies. Solubility of ionic compounds. Enthalpy and entropy driven reactions. Redox reactions in aqueous solution. Properties of covalent molecules. Qualitative molecular orbital theory approach to bonding in simple molecules. Introduction to quantum mechanics. The Schroedinger equation and solutions of chemically relevant problems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Predict the percentage ionic character in the bonding of Main Group compounds by comparing theoretical and calculated values of lattice energies
Use Born-Haber cycles in the determination of thermodynamic parameters for Main Group chemical reactions
Distinguish between entropy- and enthalpy-driven reactions
Predict the bonding and magnetic properties of diatomic molecules from qualitative molecular orbital diagrams
Describe the reasons for needing a quantum mechanical description of the atom and discuss the basic concepts, including operators, eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, required in quantum mechanics.
State and describe the postulates of quantum mechanics
Describe simple models for translational and vibrational motion of electrons and relate to spectroscopy and microscopy experiments
Use quantitative atomic/molecular orbital theory to describe the structure of a
diatomic molecule.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Coursework -detailed mark breakdown will be given at the beginning of the module.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM2009 Introduction to Forensic Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1201

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jeremy Glennon, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce students to forensic science and to the theory and practice of physical evidence analysis.

Module Content: Science in the service of law. Origins of Forensic Science. From crime scene to court. Crime Scene Management. Evidence gathering and sampling procedures. Scientific analysis of physical evidence - generation of physical evidence by criminal activity; collection and preservation of physical evidence; analysis of physical evidence by the forensic science laboratory. Blood patterns and analysis. Trace evidence - 'every contact leaves a trace'. Microscopic identification of hairs, fibers, pollen, etc. Identification of fingerprints, marks and impressions. Color tests and qualitative analysis. Fire, types of combustion, pyrolysis, ignition temperature, flash point and fire residues. Chemistry, classification and detection of explosives. Introduction to techniques and processes in analysis of physical evidence including spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Assess the importance of circumstantial evidence in the court, the chain of custody, and proper procedures for handling the evidence
Find, collect, preserve, document, and analyze physical evidence from a crime scene, including arson evidence, traces of explosives and gunshots, body fluids, fingerprints, marks and impressions
Determine the origin of trace evidence such as hair, fiber, soil, fragments of paint, glass, etc.
Practically operate as a member of a Crime Scene Investigation team
Apply a good and safe practice in running a forensic laboratory.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM2010 Introduction to Organic Chemistry for Process and Chemical Engineers

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1001

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials ((Problem Solving)); 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops (6 x 1hr Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry, Dr.G. P. McGlacken.

Module Objective: To introduce organic chemistry to process and chemical engineering students and illustrate its application to living systems, pharmaceutical and chemical industry processes and the environment.

Module Content: Historical aspects, molecular structures of organic compounds, functional groups and functional classes of compounds, functional group reactions, organic reaction mechanisms.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Supply names for organic molecular structures according to IUPAC rules and draw molecular structures of named organic compounds.
Recognize and name common functional groups and functional classes of compounds
Evaluate the molecular formulae and unsaturation numbers of organic molecular structures.
Describe elementary structures and bonding properties or organic compounds.
Draw conformations of representative alkanes and cycloalkanes.
Propose reagents to achieved functional group reactions and identify the outcome of reactions of functional groups of specified reagents
Draw (write) reaction mechanisms for functional group reactions.
Solve problems involving organic molecular structures, reactions/reagents and functional group chemistry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Continuous Assessment, 30 marks( Practicals and Assignments 30 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40%in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment element of the module. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM2101 Introductory Organic Chemistry for Environmental Scientists

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1003 or CM1006

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 8 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce chemistry to science students and illustrate its relevance to living systems, industry and protection of the environment.

Module Content: Historical aspects of organic chemistry, functional groups and classes of compounds, reaction mechanisms, functional group interconversions

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Recongnize and name common functional groups and functional classes of compounds.
Supply names for organic molecular structures according to IUPAC rules and draw molecular structures of named organic compounds.
Evaluate the molecular formulae and unsaturation numbers of organic molecular structures.
Describe elementary structure and bonding properties or organic compounds.
Draw conformations of representative alkanes and cycloalkanes.
Propose reagents to achieve functional group reactions and identify the outcome of reactions of functional group reactions.
Draw (write) reaction mechanisms for functional group reactions.
Solve problems involving organic molecular structures, reactions/reagents, functional group chemistry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals and Assignments 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the practical component of the module by attending, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 70% of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental examination in the module. A student will be warned when he/she has failed to fulfill the above criteria for more than 20% of practical sessions.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM2201 Fundamentals of Modern Chemistry Part 2b

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 350.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1200

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 8 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive introduction to chemistry for science students.

Module Content: Physical chemistry: solutions, equilibria, kinetics, acids and basis. Inorganic chemistry: structure of atoms, chemical bonding, the periodic table and chemistry of selected elements and groups. Organic chemistry: functional groups and classes of compounds, reaction mechanisms, functional group interconversions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain atomic theory and use the electronic structure of atoms to explain the line spectra of elements.
Use the periodic table to predict the chemical and physical properties of elements and chemical compounds.
Predict the behaviour of ideal gases and describe solutions, solubility of substances, and colligative properties
Define acidity and basicity and calculate the pH of solutions of strong and weak acids or bases and account for the behaviour of buffer solutions.
Apply basic concepts in chemical kinetics, including rate equations, reaction order, and the effect of temperature and catalysts on the reaction rate.
Identify organic functional groups, systematically name organic compounds, and describe the behaviour and reactivities of different molecules.
Derive appropriate mechanisms for a given organic reaction and predict the products of organic and inorganic reactions.
Demonstrate basic laboratory skills, make accurate observations and write reports, and work safely in the chemical laboratory.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (Practicals 40 marks; 1 x MCQ 10 marks; On-line assessments 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Marks of 40% or greater in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment are carried forward to the Autumn. There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3016 Physical Chemistry Part 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2007; CM2008

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dean Venables, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide an higher level appreciation of the interaction of molecules and radiation

Module Content: Molecular and atomic spectroscopy

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify rotational, vibrational, and electronic energy levels of molecules and relate spectra to transitions between these levels.
Connect the quantum mechanical description of molecules to spectroscopy using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and the band shapes of transitions using the Franck-Condon principle
Calculate the energies and relative populations of different energy levels and the energy differences between them and use the spectra to determine the properties of molecules such as the bond length, bond strength and dissociation energy.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Practicals 20 marks; Coursework 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3017 Physical Chemistry Part 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2007; CM2008

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Martyn Pemble, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide an higher level appreciation of chemical reactivity and electrochemistry.

Module Content: (i) Statistical thermodynamics, (ii) Kinetics, and (iii) Electrochemistry

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the electrode/electrolyte interface at the atomic and molecular level
Outline how simple batteries are constructed and predict reaction schemes based on the Electrochemical Series.
Explain the kinetic (microscopic) basis of Simple Collision Theory and Activated Complex Theory
Demonstrate an introductory appreciation of reaction molecular dynamics
Describe the basic postulates of statistical thermodynamics
Demonstrate that the Internal Energy of a thermodynamic system is a statistical average of energy of the individual molecules in the system relating the two through the Canonical and Molecular Partition Functions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Practicals 20 marks; Coursework 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3021 Inorganic Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2001

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (60 x 1hr Lectures/Tutorials/Workshops); Practicals (54hrs).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Ni Dhubhghaill, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Ni Dhubhghaill, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of transition elements in coordination, bioinorganic and organometallic chemistry; to introduce lanthanide chemistry.

Module Content: Transition and lanthanide element chemistry - electronic and magnetic properties, qualitative molecular orbital description of bonding in transition element complexes. Biological chemistry of metals. Transition metal organometallics - metal carbonyls, metallocenes and related complexes, stoichiometric applications in organic synthesis Symmetry in inorganic chemistry - IR and Raman Spectroscopy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of electronic spectroscopy of transition element complexes and predict their magnetic properties including the effect of orbital contribution, where appropriate.
Utilise qualitative molecular orbital theory to explain trends in the spectrochemical series with reference to octahedral transition element complexes.
Apply coordination chemistry concepts to biocoordination chemistry and selected areas of medicinal chemistry.
Provide an overview of the biological processes involved in uptake and storage of selected essential elements and demonstrate an understanding of the roles of both metal and protein in metalloenzyme catalysis.
Demonstrate an understanding of lanthanide chemistry with particular reference to the lanthanide contraction and compare the electronic and magnetic properties of lanthanide complexes with those of transition element complexes.
Describe the structures of transition metal organometallic compounds of various ligand types, demonstrate an understanding of the modified reactivity of unsaturated ligands when coordinated to transition metal centres and describe the application of transition metal complexes to synthesis.
Describe qualitatively the nature of the metal to ligand bond in transition metal organometallic compounds generally and the evidence for the proposed models.
Identify the symmetry elements of a molecule and the symmetry group of a molecule.
Use the character table of the symmetry group to identify the symmetry representations of orbitals, vibrations, and other molecular properties.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (Practicals 40 marks; Coursework 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3022 Synthesis, Structure and Reactivity of Organic Compounds

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2002 and CM2006

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 42 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 18 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 54 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce the fundamental strategies of organic synthesis, explore the structures (including molecular structure determination) and reactivity of organic compounds; organosulphur and organophosphorus compounds, reactive intermediates and heterocyclic systems.

Module Content: Synthesis, structure and reactions of heterocyclic aromatic compounds including pyrrole, furan, thiophene, pyridine, pyridine N-oxide, indole quinoline and isoquinoline. Functional group chemistry of organosulphur and organophosphorus compounds. Structure and reactivity of free radicals, carbenes, nitrenes and benzynes. Introduction to the design of organic synthesis; disconnections, synthons and synthetic equivalents and survey of synthetic methods. Functional group chemistry based on oxygen and nitrogen. Advanced stereochemistry. Amino acids and related compounds. Advanced 1H NMR spectroscopy. Introduction to 13C NMR. Mass spectrometry of organic compounds.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Devise synthetic strategies for target molecules of intermediate complexity and evaluate which reagents are most suitable in a given reaction sequence.
Predict the products of reactions involving heteroaromatic compounds and those involving organosulfur and organophosphorous functional groups.
Illustrate how certain reactions proceed by radical mechanisms.
Elucidate the molecular structures of new chemical entities by use of combined spectroscopic techniques.
Anticipate the occurrence of stereochemical issues due to the presence of polycyclic or pro-chiral groups.
Select conditions for the controlled rearrangement of molecular structures.
Prepare and utilize organometallic reagents in the synthesis of samples of organic compounds.
Purify samples of organic compounds by means of crystallization, distillation and chromatography.
Engage in interactive peer group discussion on issues of reaction methodology, synthesis, molecular structure and mechanism.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (Practicals 50 marks; Coursework 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the practical component of the continuous assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3024 Analytical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1000 or CM1003

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 60 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 30 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dara Fitzpatrick, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the principles of analytical chemistry; to introduce chemometrics, chemical equilibria, methods and instrumentation of importance in chemical analysis; to provide hands on training in analytical techniques applicable in chemical, pharmaceutical, forensic, biomedical and environmental matrices.

Module Content: Introduction to analytical chemistry; role in biomedical, pharmaceutical, forensic and environmental analysis. Sampling, sample preparation, and choice of analytical method. Chemometrics and statistical data handling. Solution equilibria, chemical species in solution as a function of pH. Solvent extraction, supercritical fluid and solid phase extraction. Chromatography and separation methods; gas and liquid chromatography. Electrochemical methods including potentiometry (ion selective electrodes) and conductometry. Introduction to spectrometric methods, instrumentation for atomic absorption spectrometry, mass spectroscopy. Applications: trace metal analysis, bioanalysis and metabolomics, analysis of selected drugs, metal complexes, bioactive compounds and metabolites in biological systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Select and optimise most suitable analytical procedures for given samples, including sampling, sample preparation, and analytical methods
Apply the theory of solution equilibria in acid-base and complexometric titrations and in the design and application of buffers
Assess the percentage species distribution for simultaneously existing chemical species in solution as a function of pH
Assess and use basic electrochemical methods including potentiometry, conductometry and voltammetry in inorganic and organic analysis
Design the analytical procedure with respect to the optimum data analysis, use appropriate statistical methods for the data analysis, to assess and evaluate the performance of two or more methods, laboratories, and personnel, to perform validation studies
Determine the optimum conditions for the solvent extraction of organic and inorganic analytes from aqueous solution
Identify and appreciate the roles of the instrumental components of gas and liquid chromatographs in the chromatographic process
Identify the working components and applications of Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Graphite Furnace AAS.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (Practicals 40 marks, Coursework 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3025 Materials Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2001

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30hr(s) Other (Lectures/Tutorials/Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Lawrence, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Simon Lawrence, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce solid-state chemistry, and the properties and uses of solid materials.

Module Content: Crystal chemistry, defect chemistry, simple band structure, synthesis and characterisation of solid state materials.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the crystal structures of simple inorganic minerals.
Apply analytical methods for the investigation of inorganic minerals.
Demonstrate an understanding of defect chemistry.
Recognise the chemical ideas underpinning main group semi-conductors.
Apply synthetic methodology to the synthesis of solid state materials.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

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CM3028 Scientific Communication and Information Literacy Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM1000 or CM1003/CM2101

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 15 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 9 x 1hr(s) Other (Problem Solving Sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry, with Chemistry and Library Staff.

Module Objective: To provide an opportunity for students to engage in background scientific research, to communicate their findings and to develop pertinent professional life skills.

Module Content: Use of electronic databases, journals and other resources, reviewing the scientific literature, use of general and specialised software packages (word processing, graphics, spreadsheets, referencing, drawing chemical structures etc.), preparation of reports, poster and oral presentations, group work, effective presentation skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Fully use the appropriate software programs to produce high quality scientific posters, reports and presentations
Give a clear and effective presentation on a chemistry topic
Search for, interpret and utilize chemical knowledge using hard copy and electronic sources
Work effectively in small groups to solve a defined chemical/scientific problem
Exhibit professional behaviour by meeting all scholarly requirements in a professional and timely manner.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3 Assigments of equal weighting (1 each of report, poster, presentation)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM3029 Organic Chemistry II for Process and Chemical Engineering

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2010

Co-requisite(s): CM3030

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 9 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop the students knowledge in the important areas of aromatic chemistry, alkenes,carbonyl compounds, organic analysis and spectroscopy.

Module Content: Structure, synthesis, and reactivity of aromatic compounds. Synthesis, structure and reactivity of carbonyl compounds - tautomerism, nucleophilic addition, aldol, and related condensation reactions. Reactions of alpha, beta -unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Organic spectroscopy and analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the practical skill required to be a competent organic chemist.
Use the principles of organic chemistry to explain the chemistry of aromatic, alkene and carbonyl functional
groups in terms of their reactivity.
Predict the reactivity of aromatic, alkene and carbonyl functional groups in a given situation.
Justify the mechanisms of electrophilic aromatic substitution and nucleophilic aromatic substitution, acyl
nucleophilic substitution, enolisation, Grignard reactions and the addition reactions of alkenes.
Account for reactions involving aldol and related condensations, reactions of alpha, beta -unsaturated
carbonyl compounds, oxidations of alkenes and reactions of substituted aromatic compounds.
Engage with organic spectroscopy and its applications to molecular structure.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the Practical mark, calculated as a percentage of the total mark for the module, will be returned.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3030 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 90.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2010

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 18 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stuart Collins, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stuart Collins, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To learn the fundamentals of organic chemistry.

Module Content: The chemistry and reactivity associated with the common functional groups with an emphasis on functional group interconversions and acidity/basicity. Stereochemistry: chirality; configuration; molecules with two stereogenic centres. Conformational analysis of acyclic, cyclic and bicyclic molecules.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explore and discuss the concepts of stereochemistry, isomerism and conformational analysis
Evaluate the different factors affecting the acid-base reactions of organic compounds
Recognize different organic reaction mechanisms and illustrate these for nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions
Illustrate the structure and predict the reactivity of alkenes, alkynes and nitriles
Demonstrate the practical skills required to be a competent organic chemist.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals (25) and MCQ (5)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3101 Natural Products and Reaction Mechanisms

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2002; CM2006

Co-requisite(s): CM3022

Teaching Method(s): 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other (3 x 1hr Small Group Problem-solving Sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr J J Keating, School of Pharmacy.

Lecturer(s): Dr J J Keating, School of Pharmacy.

Module Objective: To explore reaction mechanisms, including rearrangements, and natural products.

Module Content: Molecular Rearrangements. Natural Product Chemistry: classification of biological molecules on the basis of chemical structure, (carbohydrates, terpenes, etc.).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand and explain the mechanistic pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis.
Have an appreciation of the structural diversity of natural products, their chemical characteristics and applications.
Understand the physical and chemical properties of amino acids, proteins and carbohydrates and strategies towards their syntheses.
Actively engage in peer group sessions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Three problem-solving sessions of equal weighting (20 marks split between three sessions)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM3102 Introduction to Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: None.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2002; CM2006

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 21 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 27 x 1hr(s) Practicals; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry; Dr Florence McCarthy, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce fundamental aspects of medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry.

Module Content: Development of pharmaceutical chemistry; basic drug design and development; basic structure-activity relationships; anti-inflammatory, antifungal and antibiotic drugs; drug stability and accelerated stability testing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Propose synthetic methods for obtaining samples of established antibiotics, adrenergics, antimicrobial and anti-histamines.
Interpret pharmacological data in terms of drug-target pharmacodynamics.
Reject physicochemically unfavourable drug candidates.
Prepare, purify and characterize samples of selected active pharmaceutical ingredients.
Determine the stereochemical consequences of variations in process parameters.
Generate representations of molecular structures using appropriate software.
Predict possible routes and causes of molecular degradation of active pharmaceutical ingredients.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Laboratory Practicals 30 Marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3104 Environmental Chemistry and Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2007

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Experiments); 30 x 1hr(s) Other (30 Lectures/Tutorials/Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Wenger, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry; Prof John Wenger, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To teach students about the chemistry of the environment and the impacts of our activities on the earth-air-water-system.

Module Content: The following topics will be discussed; (i) the atmosphere, its composition, properties and pollution; (ii) the hydrosphere, its composition, properties and contamination; (iii) geochemical cycles and soil chemistry; (iv) persistent organic pollutants.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the chemical and physical characteristics of natural and polluted environments.
Describe dominant classes of pollutants and their associated environmental hazards.
Explain types of chemical transformations that occur in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere.
Anticipate the impact of pollutants in the environment.
Apply concepts and qualitative models based on spectroscopy to understand atmospheric phenomena.
Apply concepts and models based on chemical kinetics to predict the rates of transformation of species in the environment.
Demonstrate competent laboratory skills in environmental chemical analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals (20) and assignments (10)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attain not less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination.).

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CM3108 Forensic Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2009

Co-requisite(s): CM3024

Teaching Method(s): 30 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jeremy Glennon, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To teach students advanced methods of forensic science and interpretation of evidence.

Module Content: Analysis of firearms and ammunition. Analysis of skeletal remains. Forensic drug analysis - overview of drugs and pharmacology, methods for drug analysis. Chemical analysis of physical evidence - evidence associated with combustion, chemistry of colour and colourants, forensic analysis of inks, paints, paper, fibers and polymers.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe how to implement simple quality assurance procedures at the crime scene, whilst collecting and preparing evidential material for subsequent analysis.
Analyse skeletal remains
Explain why a system for the classification of ignitable liquids (accelerants) is required; know the nine principal catergories and be able to quote representative examples of the main classes.
Describe the analytical procedures for the examination of fire debris, weathering of same; the importance of using validated methods; and the role of Standard Accelerant Mixtures in GC caibration procedures, during the identification of possible ILR's.
Explain the analytical approach to drug evidence; apply sample preparation methods, including extraction, for forensic drug analysis.
Sketch out the chemistry behind, and apply presumptive colour tests for, drug substances.
Discuss and apply special photographic techniques.
Apply methods of ballistic analysis and firearm identification.
Explain the methods of forensic examination of documents.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM3110 Pharmaceutical Solids and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM2002, CM2004

Co-requisite(s): CM3102

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Lawrence, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Simon Lawrence, Department of Chemistry; Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce the properties and analysis of pharmaceutical solids, and related pharmaceutical technology.

Module Content: Crystal chemistry, particle formation, characterisation of pharmaceutical solids, current technology in pharmaceutical manufacturing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe and rationalise the crystal chemistry of pharmaceutical
Design processes for the formation of pharmaceutical particles.
Analyse pharmaceutical solids by a variety of techniques.
Crystallise and characterise samples of pharmaceutical solids with specific form.
Recognise and apply the principles pertaining to current regulatory and manufacturing issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (Examination); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practical 15 marks, Coursework 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (There is no Autumn Supplemental Examination for students who have obtained less than 40% in the Practical component of the Continuous Assessment at the Summer Examination).

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CM4017 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Part 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3021

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 1hr(s) Other (problem solving sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Ni Dhubhghaill, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Ni Dhubhghaill, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop the application of spectroscopic techniques to the characterisation of inorganic compounds. To develop the application of crystallography to chemical structure analysis.

Module Content: Inorganic applications of spectroscopic techniques (including IR, NMR and ESR) and of mass spectrometry. Structural chemistry

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify inorganic compounds using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.
Interpret NMR data for dynamic chemical systems.
Apply ESR spectroscopy to the identification of paramagnetic compounds
Analyse and explain methodologies and techniques in crystallography and structural chemistry
Critically assess crystallographic literature
Demonstrate problem-solving skills and the ability to critically evaluate ideas and information.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (2 tests, 1 from each lecturer and SGT marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4018 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Part 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3021

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1hr(s) Other (problem solving sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: .To develop ideas of bonding and chemical reactivity in organometallics. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis of important synthetic processes.

Module Content: Transition metal organometallic compounds in catalysis and hetero-/homo-geneous systems,

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Utilize the 18-electron rule to predict stabilities of transition metal organometallic compounds
Analyze in detail the role of transition metal organometallic compounds in the catalytic synthesis of important organic compounds
Assess the use of different transition metals in synthesis and which metals are particularly suitable for the different reactions
Demonstrate problem-solving skills and the ability to critically evaluate ideas and information.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (2 tests, 1 from each lecturer and SGT marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4019 Lasers, Photochemistry & Spectroscopy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3023

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Other (Lectures/Tutorials/Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dean Venables, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide "real-world" contexts for the applications of Physical Chemistry using photochemical/photophysical processes, laser spectroscopy and molecular spectroscopy as vehicles.

Module Content: Jablonski photoprocesses (radiative, non-radiative and photochemical events); their relation to aromatics; carbonyls and small molecules. Principle of laser operation, different types of lasers, and their applications. Advanced techniques in optical and mass spectrometry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the terminology which underpins studies of photochemistry and photophysics
Apply the concepts of kinetics and models to understand excited state behaviour of atoms and molecules
Explain how lasers operate and how they can be applied to a variety of observed molecular and atomic spectroscopic and kinetic phenomena
Define how molecular spectroscopy techniques can be utilised to characterise molecules and solid state materials, including molecular interactions at surfaces.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Continuous Assessment = 20% of overall module mark).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4020 Interfaces, Microscopy & Modelling

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3023

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Other (Lectures/Tutorials/Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Justin D. Holmes, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Prof Justin D. Holmes, Department of Chemistry; Prof Martyn Pemble, Department of Chemistry; Dr Nikolay Petkov, Tyndall Institute; Dr Michael Nolan, Tyndall Institute; Dr Damien Thompson, Tyndall Institute.

Module Objective: To provide "real-world" contexts for the applications of Physical Chemistry using microscopy, computer modelling and surface/interfacial science as vehicles.

Module Content: Electron and scanning probe microscopies and associated elemental analysis techniques. Surface absorption and rates of surface reactions; the role of surfaces in catalysis and electrochemistry; phenomena associated with self-organising entities and the stabilisation of nanomaterials in solution, theory and applications of computational chemistry

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Define how microscopy techniques can be utilised to characterise molecules and solid state materials, including molecular interactions at surfaces
Describe the operation of microscopes and their use in the analysis of morphology, crystallinity, defects and elemental mapping at the nanoscale
Describe the mechanisms underpinning the techniques of Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and be able to compare and contrast the application of these two methods in surface science
Discuss the essential features of adsorption processes and the basic principles behind surface reactions
Describe the underlying science and properties of colloids, including the design of new materials using computer models
Describe simple concepts in computational chemistry and apply this to chemical problems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Continuous Assessment = 20% of overall module mark).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4022 Advanced Organic Synthesis, Biosynthesis and Reactivity

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3022

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 44hr(s) Lectures; 24hr(s) Tutorials; 10hr(s) Other (Small-Group Tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To expand knowledge of organic synthesis, synthetic methodology, biosynthesis, enantioselective synthesis, pericyclic reactions, heterocyclic chemistry and organic reactivity.

Module Content: Modern synthetic methods, photochemical reactions of organic compounds, organophosphorus, sulphur, selenium and palladium reagents; organic synthesis; design and strategy, retrosynthetic analysis, multistep partial and total synthesis; stereoselective reactions and asymmetric synthesis; chiral auxiliaries, reagents, catalysts; concerted pericyclic reactions; analysis base on orbital symmetry considerations; synthesis and reactions of heterocyclic compounds; natural products chemistry;biosynthesis and chemical transformations; structure reactivity relationships in organic chemistry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Predict the outcome of synthetic transformations based on modern reactions and reagents and propose reagents to achieve advanced synthetic transformations.


Write reaction mechanisms of advanced organic chemistry transformations.


Analyse organic synthesis molecular targets using the principles of retrosynthetic analysis and propose synthetic routes based on the foregoing analysis.
Outline the use of strategy, chiral auxiliaries, reagents and catalysts in asymmetric synthesis.


Recognise, identify and predict (based on orbital symmetry considerations) if individual concerted pericyclic reactions are thermally or photochemically allowed and identify the products of such reactions, including their stereochemical properties.


Identify and describe the principal classes of heterocyclic compounds, their synthesis and characteristic reactions.


Recognise the main classes of natural products and their characteristic molecular structural features. Describe their mechanisms of biosynthesis and biodegradative processes from a chemical perspective.
Rationalise molecular behaviour using structure-reactivity principles.


Engage in interactive peer-group discussion of issues synthesis methodology, molecular reactivity and reaction mechanisms.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 180 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4025 Advanced Nano Materials

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3025

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 Lectures (Lectures/Tutorials/Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colm O'Dwyer, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colm O'Dwyer, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide a fundamental understanding of surface imaging methods for nanotechnology, methods of nanomaterials synthesis and properties, lithography for nanomaterial and device fabrication, and how dimension can lead to new emerging materials, properties and applications.

Module Content: Atomic force and scanning tunnelling microscopy, basics of surface analysis and nanoscale imaging methods. Introductory materials nanochemistry for nanoparticles and nanowire and their optical characteristics. Modern semiconductor technologies including optical and electron beam lithography for creating nanoscale materials for new devices including nano transistors. To provide a fundamental understanding of the relationship between materials chemistry, size, composition and how this leads to new and emerging materials, physical properties and applications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain how the physical and chemical properties of materials relate to the band structure optical, mechanical and thermal properties of nanomaterials
Explain how charge based transistor devices operate, the limitations in their performance, how they operate, and the basics of how nanoscale dimensions are created
Explain how an understanding of modern methods for atomic scale imaging resolution using surface scanning probes
Explain how material properties change as the dimensions of a solid are reduced and outline possible applications of reduced dimensions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4026 Advanced Analytical Chemistry Part 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3024

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dara Fitzpatrick, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To expand knowledge and understanding of analytical principles and of modern and emerging analytical techniques.

Module Content: Analytical spectroscopy (atomic and molecular), revision of fundamentals and advanced applications. Speciation in analytical chemistry. Chromatography: theory, master resolution equation, stationary phase classification and selection. Selected topics in separation science: bonded phase chemistry, capillary electrophoresis (CE, CEC), biomedical analysis, miniaturisation and on-chip rapid separations and sensing. Advanced electroanalytical techniques: voltammetry in inorganic and organic analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Utilise the theory and nomenclature of chromatography in assessing chromatographic performance.
Classify and select suitable stationary phases, mobile phases and detectors for targeted analytes in gas and liquid chromatography.
Assess and apply advanced electrochemical methods in inorganic, organic, biochemical, forensic, and environmental analysis
Outline the inorganic and organic electrochemical reactions in potentiostatic, potentiodynamic, and amperostatic techniques including coulometry, amperometry, chronoamperometry, polarography, differential pulse votammetry and chronopotentiometry.
Describe multi elemental analysis using Inductively couple plasma spectroscopy (ICP)
Outline the integration of ICP and Mass Spectrometry Instruments.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Coursework).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4027 Advanced Analytical Chemistry Part 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3024

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jeremy Glennon, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To expand knowledge and understanding of analytical principles and of modern and emerging analytical techniques.

Module Content: Advanced methods of analytical chemistry. Biomedical analysis, miniaturisation and on-chip rapid separations. Biosensors for medical monitoring and pharmaceutical analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Outline the integration of ICP and Mass Spectrometry Instruments.
Describe the principles and applications of hyphenated techniques
Outline the principles and applications of bioanalytical techniques.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Coursework).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4100 Advanced Methods of Forensic Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3108

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jeremy Glennon, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Provide knowledge of new method developments in analytical and forensic science.

Module Content: Quality assurance principles for forensic scientists. Analysis of digital evidence. Advanced methods in forensic analyical chemistry for application to the analysis of controlled substances, materials, flammable and explosive residues, with an emphasis on new methods and method development. Leading edge developments in analytical and forensic techniques including topics such as micrototal analytical systems (u-TAS), surface enhanced Raman spectrometry, elemental X-ray microanalysis, hyphenated techniques such as CE-MS, LC-MS and GC-MS. Case studies in forensic science.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Assess and apply advanced analytical methods in forensic, and trace analysis.
Identify and appreciate leading edge developments in analytical science that advance the state of the art in forensic science.
Outline Spectroscopic techniques and their roles in forensic analysis.
Classify and select suitable chromatographic techniques for trace analysis in forensic science.
Outline new developments in forensic analysis, including the power, importance, and application of miniaturised analytical systems.
Secure and interpret digital evidence.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (1 x essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4101 Physical Organic Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3022

Co-requisite(s): CM4022

Teaching Method(s): 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other (4 x 1hr Small Group Problem-solving Sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr J J Keating, School of Pharmacy.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To outline the principles of physical organic chemistry and its applications in the investigation of organic structure and reaction mechanisms.

Module Content: Review of relevant mechanistic and kinetics material, linear free energy relationships, isotope effects, kinetic versus thermodynamic control, catalysis, medium effects, bio-organic mechanisms. Essentials of QSAR, structure-reactivity principle, Hammond postulate.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
State (write) the common mathematical forms of linear free energy relationships employed to investigate organic reaction mechanisms in solution.
Analyze and interpret the outcomes of linear free energy relationship based investigations of organic reaction mechanisms.
Apply linear free energy relationships for lead optimization in drug discovery.
Apply advanced organic spectroscopy for investigations of structures and reaction mechanisms involving organic compounds in solution.
Analyze and interpret the kinetic isotope investigations of reaction mechanisms.
Recognize the issues of, and factos influencing kinetic versus thermodynamic control in organic reactions and write mechanisms for the processes involved.
Differentiate between the various forms of catalysis applicable to organic reaction mechanisms in solution.
Ennuciate the Hammond Postulate and its significance for organic molecular reactivity.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Assignment (10 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4108 Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1. (Starting week 9).

No. of Students: Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3022, CM3102

Co-requisite(s): CM4022

Teaching Method(s): 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Workshops (1 Computer Workshop); Other (2 1hr Problem-solving).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Florence McCarthy, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Florence McCarthy, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop a greater understanding of pharmaceutical and medicinal chemistry.

Module Content: The chemistry of cardiovascular drugs - calcium antagonists, potassium channel blockers, beta-blockers, anti-coagulants, diuretics and vasodilators; the chemistry of CNS drugs - anti-convulsants, anti-depressants, anti-psychotics, stimulants; chemotherapy alkylating agents, nitrosoureas, folate antagonists, pyrimidine antagonists, cytotoxic antibiotics; anti-viral agents - mode of action, synthesis and protection strategies, aspects of nucleoside SAR.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify the principal classes of antiviral agents, cardiovascular drugs and cancer chemotherapeutic agents.
Outline the history of development of representative antiviral agents, cardiovascular drugs and cancer chemotherapeutic agents.
Describe the principal laboratory and industrial synthesis of representative antiviral agents, cardiovascular drugs and cancer chemotherapeutic agents.
Propose reagents, detailed reaction mechanisms and sterochemical outcomes for key reaction steps in the synthesis of antiviral agents, cardiovascular drugs and cancer chemotherapeutic agents at a molecular level.
Describe the molecular structure and chemical properties of DNA.
Engage in problem solving and interactive peer-group discussion of issues of synthesis, reaction mechanism, mode of action and structure-activity relationships of antiviral agents, cardiovascular drugs and cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Tutorials x 3).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4109 Pharmaceutical Chemistry Drug Design and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3022, CM3101; CM3102

Co-requisite(s): CM4022, CM4101, CM4108

Teaching Method(s): 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Workshops (1 Computer Workshop); 2 x 1hr(s) Other (Problem-solving).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Florence McCarthy, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Florence McCarthy, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To explore aspects of drug design and development.

Module Content: Aspects of parallel synthesis - combinatorial chemistry and solid phase synthesis; the development of peptidomimetic drugs from proteins; metallodrugs- inorganic drugs as therapeutic and diagnostic agents; industrial aspects of medicinal chemistry - synthesis of bulk pharmaceuticals, quality, safety, scale-up and manufacturing protocols.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the comprehension of pharmaceutical chemistry required to complete large scale synthetic work.
Use the fundamental principles of chemistry to explain the chemistry of drugs for the central nervous system, inorganic drugs and diagnostics and for industrial chemistry processes.
Apply coordination chemistry concepts to the area of biocoordination chemistry.
Explain the factors involved in the design of ligands for chelation therapy.
Demonstrate an understanding of the role of selected metals in medicinal chemistry.
Justify the mechanisms of functional group transformations required for complex synthesis.
Account for reactions used in industrial processes commenting on the specific reagent used with respect to large scale synthesis.
Engage in interactive peer-group discussions of issues relating to pharmaceutical chemistry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Tutorials x 3).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4112 Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3104

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Other (36 Lectures/Seminars/Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Wenger, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Prof John Wenger, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide a fundamental understanding of the atmosphere and the processes that occur in it, which give rise to compositional and climate change.

Module Content: (i) The troposphere and stratosphere; (ii) trace species; (iii) smogs; (iv) The Greenhouse effect; (v) Ozone depletion at mid-latitudes and at the Poles; (vi) field measurements.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the chemical and physical characteristics of the natural and polluted atmosphere
Apply concepts and models based on spectroscopy and photochemistry to understand atmospheric phenomena
Apply concepts and models based on chemical kinetics to predict the rates of transformation of species in the atmosphere
Explain types of chemical transformations that occur in the atmosphere
Explain the atmospheric processes responsible for the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, acid rain and smog formation
Describe different approaches to the measurement of trace gases in the atmosphere
Describe the importance, sources, and characterisation of particulate matter in the atmosphere.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (coursework (10)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM4203 Research Project : Chemistry of Pharmaceutical Compounds

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Research Project Module; students take module in Semester 1 or Semester 2. Only half of class can be accommodated in either Semester).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Laboratory Work and Library Research for 16 hrs per week for 6 weeks).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry; Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training in Chemistry research and problem-solving skills, library searching and presentation skills.

Module Content: The project requires students to research an area of interest in Chemistry, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, write a concise scientific report and make an oral presentation of the work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Co-ordinate and execute a programme of independent investigative methodology.
Survey the peer-reviewed literature.
Present the findings of investigation in written, poster and oral formats.
Document any procedures, experimental methods and outcomes in appropriate formats.
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on investigative findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Laboratory work (40), Written (50) and Oral Presentation of Research (10)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM4204 Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1. (June-October after Third Year University Examination).

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (5 months Placement in Industry); Workshops (Preparatory Lectures).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To gain experience in the workplace.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Summer Examinations, each student will, whenever possible, go on work placement to an external organisation on an agreed work programme. The placement period will normally be 5 months. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC staff member and an employee of the external organisation. Any students not so placed will be assigned an equivalent programme by a UCC Chemistry staff member. Each student will be required to submit a report.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Co-ordinate and execute a programme of research.
Survey the peer-reviewed research literature.
Present the findings of research in written, poster and oral formats.
Document experimental procedures and outcomes in appropriate formats.
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on experimental findings.

Assessment: Assessment is based on Student Report and Assessment Forms from Supervisor(s).

Compulsory Elements: Submission of Industrial Placement Report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement. No Specific Mark will be given.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students failing this module must repeat it after the Final Degree Examination and must pass in order to graduate.

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CM4206 Chemistry Research Projects

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3016, CM3017, CM3021, CM3022, CM3024

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Laboratory Practicals and Library Work for 15 hr per week for 20 weeks; Problem-solving sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Ni Dhubhghaill, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Ni Dhubhghaill, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training in Chemistry research and problem-solving skills, library searching and presentation skills.

Module Content: Research projects, library project, essays, problem-solving sessions, and oral and poster presentations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate skills in problem-solving in the general areas of (i) Analytical Chemistry (ii) Inorganic Chemistry, (iii) Organic Chemistry and (iv) Physical Chemistry
Critically evaluate relevant literature and data
Demonstrate the ability to apply an appropriate research process to a substantial piece of work
Show an ability to acquire knowledge and understanding using independent investigative methodology
Present to peers a critical evaluation of their research work, through poster and oral presentations, and be able to answers questions on their work
Write high quality reports on their research
Assess safety issues associated with a particular research project
Organize time effectively to deliver work to tight deadlines.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Laboratory work; Library work; Written Reports Essays; Oral Presentations; according to guidelines provided).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM4207 Chemistry with Forensic Science Research Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): CM3024

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Method(s): Other (Laboratory Work and Library Research for 15 hrs per week for 8 weeks).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jeremy Glennon, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training in Chemistry/Forensic Science research and problem-solving skills, library searching and presentation skills.

Module Content: The project requires students to research an area of interest in Chemistry/Forensic Science, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, write a concise scientific report and make an oral presentation of the work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Co-ordinate and execute a programme of research
Survey the peer-reviewed research literature
Present the findings of research in written, poster and oral formats
Document experimental procedures and outcomes in appropriate formats
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on experimental findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Laboratory Work (40 marks), Written Report (40 marks), Oral Presentation (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM4208 Research Project 2: Chemistry of Pharmaceutical Compounds

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Research projects running in both Semesters).

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Laboratory Work and Library Research for 16 hrs per week for 12 weeks).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training in Chemsitry research and problem-solving skills, library searching and presentation skills.

Module Content: The project requires students to research an area of interest in Chemsitry, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, write a concise scientific report and make an oral presentation of the work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Co-ordinate and execute a programme of independent investigative methodogy.
Survey the peer-reviewed literature.
Present the findings of investigations in written, oral and poster formats.
Document any procedures, experimentalmethods and outcomes in appropriate formats.
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on investigative findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Laboratory Work, Written and Oral Presentation of Research).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6001 Teaching Periodic Table, Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 12 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (6 x 2 hrs tutorials, 6 x 2 hrs seminars); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of chemistry in the secondary school, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop new approaches to teaching Periodic Table, Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding. These new approaches will involve the use of computer-aided learning (computer datalogging, CD ROM technology, Internet resources etc.). In addition, use will be made of science, technology and society innovations in teaching this topic as well as the methodology of overcoming conceptual difficulties among students in certain areas of this topic.

Module Content: Development of atomic theory, Bohr's Theory, spectroscopy, wave nature of electron, atomic orbitals, development of the modern Periodic Table, use of the Periodic Table, ionic and covalent bonding, shapes of molecules, electronegativity, van der Waals forces, dipole-dipole forces.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss and evaluate the teaching approaches that may be used when introducing the Periodic Table, Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding to second-level chemistry students;
Discuss and synthesise the research that led to the discovery of sub-atomic particles;
Discuss the Bohr Theory of the atom and perform appropriate calculations related to this theory;
Discuss and evaluate the layout of elements in the periodic table of the elements;
Explain the concepts of atomic radius, ionisation energy, and electron affinity and discuss their relevance in the context of atomic structure and trends in the Periodic Table;
Discuss the concepts of wave particle duality, Schrodinger's wave equation, Heisenberg's uncertainty principle electron spin, and quantum numbers and perform appropriate calculations associated with these concepts;
Discuss the concepts of extra ionic resonance energy, bonding, dipole moments, electronegativity, molecular orbital theory, Lewis structures and perform calculations where appropriate;
Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of practical work 1 x 5,000 - 8,000).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit Portfolio, as prescribed by the Department).

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CM6002 Teaching Stoichiometry and Volumetric Analysis

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of chemistry in the secondary school, associated reading assignments); 12 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (6 x 2 hrs tutorial, 6 x 2 hrs seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop new approaches to teaching Stoichiometry and Volumetric Analysis. These new approaches will involve the use of computer-aided learning (computer datalogging, CD ROM technology, Internet resources etc.). In addition, use will be made of science, technology and society innovations in teaching this topic as well as the methodology of overcoming conceptual difficulties among students in certain areas of this topic.

Module Content: The mole concept, properties of gases, Gas Laws, stoichiometric calculations, percentage yields, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, volumetric analysis (acid-base and oxidation-reduction).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss and evaluate the teaching approaches that may be used when introducing concepts in stoichiometry and volumetric analysis to second-level chemistry students;
Perform calculations involving the mole concept;
Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the Gas Laws to carry out appropriate calculations;
Discuss the concepts of balanced equations, limited reagents, neutralisation and volumetric analysis and apply these concepts in solving appropriate problems;
Discuss the kinetic theory of gases and apply a knowledge of this theory to explain the behaviour of real and ideal gases;
Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of practical work 1 x 5,000 - 8,000).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit Portfolio, as prescribed by the Department).

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CM6003 Teaching Organic Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 12 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (6 x 2 hrs tutorials, 6 x 2 hrs seminars); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of chemistry in the secondary school, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop new approaches to teaching Organic Chemistry. These new approaches will involve the use of computer-aided learning (computer datalogging, CD ROM technology, Internet resources etc.). In addition, use will be made of science, technology and society innovations in teaching this topic as well as the methodology of overcoming conceptual difficulties among students in certain areas of this topic.

Module Content: Fuels, oil refining and its products, chloroalkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, aromatic compounds, organic natural products, organic chemical reaction types - addition reactions, substitution reactions, reaction mechanisms, redox reactions, reactions as acids.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss and evaluate the teaching approaches that may be used when teaching organic chemistry to second-level chemistry students;
Discuss the concepts of bonding, structural formula, isomerism, homologous series, chirality, optical acitivity, enantiomers and racemic mixtures in organic chemistry;
Interpret and discuss key structural features of the structural formulae of various organic compounds including aromatic substances;
Outline the principles of organic synthesis;
Apply a knowledge of organic synthesis to discuss and interpret a variety of given chemical reactions;
Discuss and interpret the mechanisms of selected organic reactions;
Interpret the infra-red and 1H nmr spectra of a wide variety of organic compounds;
Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of practical work 1 x 5,000 - 8,000).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit Portfolio, as prescribed by the Department).

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CM6004 Teaching Rates of Reaction, Chemical Equilibrium and Electrochemistry

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (6 x 2 hr tutorials, 6 x 2 hr seminars); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of chemistry in the secondary school, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop new approaches to teaching Rates of Reaction, Chemical Equilibrium and Electrochemistry. These new approaches will involve the use of computer-aided learning (computer datalogging, CD ROM technology, Internet resources etc.). In addition, use will be made of science, technology and society innovations in teaching this topic as well as the methodology of overcoming conceptual difficulties among students in certain areas of this topic.

Module Content: Factors affecting rates of reaction, Collision Theory and Activation Energy, chemical equilibrium, Le Chatelier's Principle, Kc, Calculations using the Equilibrium Constant, pH and indicators. Electrolysis, electroplating, electrochemical series, corrosion, extraction of sodium, aluminium, iron. Electric arc process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss and evaluate the teaching approaches that may be used when teaching thermodynamics, rates of reactions, chemical equilibrium and electrochemistry to second-level chemistry students;
Discuss, explain and perform calculations on enthalpy, entropy, spontanaeity in chemical reactions. Discuss the concepts of bond energy, lattice energy and Hess's law;
Discuss and explain the factors affecting rates of reactions;
Perform calculations on rates of reactions data including first order and second order reactions and interpret reaction rate data and presenting this interpretation in written and graphical form;
Discuss the concepts of catalysis, Collision Theory and Activation Energy;
Describe the concept of chemical equilibrium, Le Chatelier's Principle and its industrial applications and perform calculations involving equilibrium reactions (including pH calculations) in chemistry;
Discuss the concept of electrolysis from a historical and modern perspective and interpret the results of the electrolysis of various solutions and salts (including the use of electrolysis in the extraction of metals);
Discuss the concepts of electroplating and the electrochemical series and Faraday's laws;
Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of practical work 1 x 5,000 - 8,000).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit Portfolio, as prescribed by the Department).

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CM6005 Teaching Environmental Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 12 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (6 x 2 hrs tutorials, 6 x 2 hrs seminars); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of chemistry in the secondary school, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop new approaches to teaching Environmental Chemistry. These new approaches will involve the use of computer-aided learning (computer datalogging, CD ROM technology, Internet resources etc.). In addition, use will be made of science, technology and society innovations in teaching this topic as well as the methodology of overcoming conceptual difficulties among students in certain areas of this topic.

Module Content: Environmental chemistry - water. Treatment of water, water pollution, sewage treatment. Atmospheric chemistry - liquefaction of air, Greenhouse Effect, atmospheric pollution, ozone layer, CFC's.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss and evaluate the teaching approaches that may be used when teaching environmental chemistry to second-level chemistry students;
Discuss the concepts of hardness of water, water treatment, water pollution and sewage treatment;
Perform calculations to estimate the hardness, BOD and concentration of free chlorine of water samples;
Describe instrumental methods of water analysis and interpret data supplied;
Discuss the work of Ampere, Joule, Biot and Savart, and other relevant scientists;
Discuss key concepts of atmospheric chemistry including the greenhouse effect, atmospheric pollution and the ozone layer;
Evaluate the role of CFCs and CFC substitutes in atmospheric chemistry;
Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of practical work 1 x 5,000 - 8,000).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit Portfolio, as prescribed by the Department).

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CM6006 Teaching Industrial Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 12 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (6 x 2 hrs tutorials, 6 x 2 hrs seminars); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of chemistry in the secondary school, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Otway, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop new approaches to teaching Industrial Chemistry. These new approaches will involve the use of computer-aided learning (computer datalogging, CD ROM technology, Internet resources etc.). In addition, use will be made of science, technology and society innovations in teaching this topic as well as the methodology of overcoming conceptual difficulties among students in certain areas of this topic.

Module Content: General principles of industrial chemistry, case studies - ammonia manufacture, nitric acid manufacture, magnesium oxide manufacture. Organic synthesis. Chromatography and instrumentation. Crystals, polymers, metals. Extraction of metals.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss and evaluate the teaching approaches that may be used when teaching industrial chemistry to second-level chemistry students;
Explain the important role of fuels in industry and discuss oil refining and its products;
Outline the general principles of industrial chemistry and apply these principles to the manufacture of key industrial chemicals;
Outline and evaluate the processes involved in at least three case studies of industrial processes;
Discuss and explain with the aid of suitable examples the properties of crystals, metals and addition polymers;
Describe and interpret the electrolysis of molten salts with particular reference to the extraction of sodium and aluminium;
Outline and discuss the processes involved in the manufacture of iron and steel;
Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of practical work 1 x 5,000 - 8,000).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit Portfolio, as prescribed by the Department).

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CM6007 Teaching and Demonstrating Skills for Chemistry Postgraduate Students

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 3, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 2 x 2hr(s) Other (training sessions); Other (group discussions; supported delivery of a minimum of 50 demonstrating and/or teaching hours; self-directed learning)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Florence McCarthy, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To develop postgraduate students' demonstrating skills and teaching methods in the laboratory/field. To reinforce and revise their basic disciplinary understanding through assisting teaching of undergraduate/postgraduate students. To gain experience of facilitating group activities for improved student learning. To build confidence and enable student-centred teaching. To recognise and accredit a range of demonstrating/teaching skills developed throughout the academic year.??

Module Content: Discussion of the challenges involved in demonstrating, and other forms of teaching in undergraduate/postgraduate laboratory classes/field courses and related directed activities. Attendance at training sessions to explore topics such as student communication, encouraging interaction, course material preparation and assessment and feedback. Each student will be given the opportunity and encouraged to develop their teaching skills and reinforce their own basic knowledge of aspects of their discipline. Postgraduate students will be introduced to active learning techniques, and peer-learning, by helping fellow students reflect on and improve their teaching and demonstrating skills.??

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate a range of basic skills for planning/preparation of class practical material
Manage both small group and classroom activities using a range of skills to encourage student participation
Consolidate, revise and gain a greater comprehension of fundamental disciplinary concepts
Demonstrate confidence in teamwork situations, team interaction and public speaking through presentation
Identify personal challenges in teaching and assessment and where further skills development is needed.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Group work at designated training sessions; reflective log/diary of experiences of minimum of 50 hours of demonstrating and/or teaching to undergraduate/postgraduate students; dissemination of postgraduate experiences of teaching and learning at School/College postgraduate symposium.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6010 Introductory Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 15 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce fundamental aspects of medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry.

Module Content: Molecular structures of compounds, process pharmaceutical chemistry and the analytical methods employed in the pharmaceutical industry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
To explain structure, stereochemistry and reactivity of organic compounds especially in relation to pharmaceuticals.
To comprehend the factors which affect acidity and basicity of pharmaceutical compounds.
To appreciate the information provided by a range of analytical techniques and their limitations
To analyse pharmaceutical processes through selected case studies.
To demonstrate and apply the skills learned at the workshop and tutorial sessions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x Assignments: 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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CM6011 Modern Methods in Analytical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Data Analysis); 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: This module gives an introduction to methods of chemical analysis, specifically chormatographic, classical methods, spectroscopic and electronalytical techniques, alongside statistical data handling.

Module Content: Modern instrumental methods of analysis and sample pretreatment. Spectroscopic methods of analysis, including atomic absorption and emission techniques. Chromatography and extraction methods, solvent extraction. Electroanalytical methods: potentiometry, ion selective electrodes, voltammetric techniques. Classical methods of analysis; functional group analysis, data analysis

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Assess and use basic electrochemical methods including potentiometry, conductometry and voltammetry in inorganic and organic analysis
Assess and apply advanced electrochemical methods in inorganic, organic, biochemical, forensic, and environmental analysis
Apply theoretical principles and practical steps to optimise extraction and chromatographic processes.
Identify and appreciate the roles of the instrumental components of gas and liquid chromatographs in the chromatographic process.
Appy theoretical principles and practical steps in utilising atomic absorption spectroscopy.
Outline functional group analysis of organic compounds
Select suitable conditions for titrimetry and classical methods of analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks (Written); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must obtain an overall grade of 40% in the practicals.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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CM6012 Modern Analytical Techniques, Chemical Data Analysis and GLP

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 42 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Directed Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry, Guest Lecturers.

Module Objective: This module introduces the principles underlying modern analytical tecniques, specifically chromatographic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical techniques, alongside classical methods, statistical chemical data handling, validation, and GLP.

Module Content: Introduction to separation science, liquid-liquid extraction, chromatography (HPLC, GC). Wet chemical analysis and chemical equiibria: redox, acid-base, precipitation, extraction and complexation. Spectroscopic methods, UV/visible, fluorescence, IR, near IR, Raman, atomic spectroscopy, Electroanalytical techniques (potentiometry, ion selective electrodes), voltammetry, conductometry, Statistical chemical data handling, validation and GLP

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Apply theoretical principles and practical steps to optimise extractin and chromatographic processes.
Identify and appreciate the roles of the instrumental components of gas and liquid chromatographs in the chromatographic process.
Explain basic electrochemical methods including potentiometry, conductometry and voltammetry in inorganic and organic analysis
Outline the inorganic and organic electrochemical reactions of the dynamic properties of the electrode/solution interface in potentiostatic potentiodynamic and amperostatic techniques including coulometry, amperometry, chronoamperometry polarography differential pulse voltammetry chronopotentiometry
Select suitable conditions for titrimetry and classical methods of analysis
Explain theoretical principles and practical steps in utilizing Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy.
Utilise statistics for chemical data handling and describe validation and good laboratory practice principles.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

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CM6013 Separation Science, Sensors and Process Analytical Technology

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide an in-depth appreciation of separation and analytical detection, mechanisms, modes, applications and advances. To provide a fundamental understanding of analytical techniques used in an industrial or process setting, emphasizing process control via, on, in and at line monitoring

Module Content: Chromatography, chiral seprations, capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrochromatography, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and chromatography (SFC), ion chromatography; nano LC and Microseparation Techniques, inc. CE-on-chip and ?-total analysis systems; Hyphenated techniques, GC/LC/CE-MS, CE-ICP-MS, LC-NMR. Electrochemical and biosensor devices, use in industry. Process analytical technology (PAT). Process analysis using molecular spectroscopy. Chemometrics as applied to process control. Engineering/chemistry interface in the process environment

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Select suitable chromatographic and electrophoretic modes, extraction methods and detectors for targetted analytes
Develop and optimise separation methods in reversed and normal phase liquid chromatography
Outline the synthesis of and tests for the chromatographic performance of bonded stationary phases
Sketch out chromatographic, supercritical fluid extraction and electrophoretic instrumentation
Outline the validation of LC methods and the importance of drug master files in the pharmaceutical industry
Use the knowledge and principles of operation of sensors and biosensors for the correct choice for applications and assess the performance of industrial sensors
Define the 5 different categories of industrial process analysis and outline the types of instrumentation involved in each category
Illustrate the differences between GC instrumentation used in laboratry v industrial applications
Convey the applications of state of the art fibre optic instrumentation in extending FITR, ATR, and DRS techniques in the process line.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

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CM6014 Materials, Pharmaceutical and Bio-analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 42 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Directed Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry; Prof Jeremy Glennon, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide students with principles and applications of modern methods for solid materials, pharmaceutical and clinical analysis

Module Content: Introduction to solids analysis, Powder X-ray diffraction, electorn microscopy, thermal methods. Surface analysis, XPS, AES, and SIMS. Spectroscopy including FTIR, DRITS, NIR and Raman. Atomic absorpton. Spectroscopic techniques used for the analysis of biological and pharmaceutical compounds. Bioseparations and analysis in biological fluids. Electrochemical methods and biosensors for medical monitoring and pharmaceutical analysis. Data handling and statistical methods relevant to pharmaceutical analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain the fundamental basis and the application of the methods for quantifiable characterization: XPS, XRD, Auger electron spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption techniques, FTIR /ATR / DRS spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy, Secondary electron microscopy.
Demonstrate familiarity with classical methods of sample preparation and modern microwave techniques.
Apply the knowledge of these methods towards choice of the optimum technique(s) for characterisation of a defined materials set.
Recommend appropriate spectroscopic/electroanalytical methods for selected pharmaceutical and clinical analytes.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

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CM6015 Practice of Analytical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 4hr(s) Other (Laboratory work); 3 x 1hr(s) Other (Prepractical Lectures); Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry; Prof Jeremy Glennon, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training in a wide range of methods of chemical analysis and chemometric skills, literature searching and oral presentation skills.

Module Content: Hands-on set experiments on classical, instrumental and advanced methods of analysis, including applications to environmental/pharmaceutical and bio-analysis. Analysis Report writing and preparation for an oral interview on analytical techniques.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Execute a programme of set laboratory analytical procedures.
Choose an appropriate method of analysis for selected analytes in a variety of matrices.
Present the analytical findings in written form, with statistical evaluation.
Gain sufficient knowledge of the practice to effectively discuss analytical methodology in an oral examination.
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on experimental findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 160 marks (Written reports 80 marks and Laboratory work 80 marks); Oral Assessment 40 marks (Oral Interview).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6019 Research Project in Analytical Science

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1weeks(s) Other (Independent Supervised Research Project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training through research in Analytical Science and probelm-solving skills, literature searching and research report writing.

Module Content: The project requires students to carry out research into new methods/applications in Chemical Analysis/Analytical Science, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, work in a team, write and submit a short typed research report. Candidates carry out their research in the laboratories of the University or an approved academic or industrial partner.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Execute a programme of research.
Survey the peer-reviewed research literature.
Present the findings of research in a written, typed report.
Document experimental procedures and outcomes in appropriate formats.
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on experimental findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Project Report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Written Report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6020 Research Project and Dissertation in Analytical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1weeks(s) Other (Independent Supervised Research Project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training through research in Analytical Chemistry/Science research and problem-solving skills, litearature searching and presentation skills

Module Content: The project requires students to carry out innovative research into new methods/applications in Analytical Chemistry/Science, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, work in a team, write and submit a bound research dissertation. The project work should specifically explore new analytical developments, such as new mechanisms, devices, materials or measurements. Candidates carry out their research in the laboratories of the University or an approved academic or industrial partner.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Co-ordinate and execute a programme of research.
Survey the peer-reviewed research literature.
Present the findings of research in a written, bound dissertation.
Document experimental procedures and outcomes in appropriate formats.
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on experimental findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Written Presentation of Research in a Dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Written Dissertation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6021 Research Project and Dissertation in Environmental Analytical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1weeks(s) Other (Supervised Research Project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry; . (Same As 9617), School of Microbiology.

Module Objective: Training through research in Environmental Chemical Analysis/Science and problem-solving skills, literature searching and presentation skills.

Module Content: The project requires students to carry out innovative researchinto new methods/applications in Environmental Analytical Chemistry/Science, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, work in a team, write and submit a bound research dissertation. The project work should address specifically an analytical challenge presented by environmental samples or monitoring. Candidates carry out their research in the laboratories of the Unviersity or an approved academic or industrial partner.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Co-ordinate and execute a programme of research.
Survey the peer-reviewed research literature.
Present the findings of research in a written, bound dissertation.
Document experimental procedures and outcomes in appropriate formats.
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on experimental findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Written Presentation of Research in a Dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6022 Research Project and Dissertation in Pharmaceutical Analysis

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1weeks(s) Other (Independent Supervised Research Project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Prof Jeremy Glennon, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training through research in Pharmaceutical Analysis/Science research and problem-solving skills, literature searching and presentation skills.

Module Content: The project requires students to carry out innovative research into new methods/applications in Pharmaceutical Analysis/Science, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, work in a team, write and submit a bound research dissertation. The project work should address specifically an analytical challenge presented by pharmaceutical substances, trace drug analysis or production. Candidates carry out their research in the laboratories of the University or an approved academic or industrial partner.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Co-ordinate and execute a programme of research.
Survey the peer-reviewed research literature.
Present the findings of research in a written, bound dissertation.
Document experimental procedures and outcomes in appropriate formats.
Draw valid and meaningful conclusions based on experimental findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Written Presentation of Research in Dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6026 Industry Led Workshop

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 9 x 3hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To expose students to the reality of working in Industry by providing valuable insight, skills and knowledge that will bridge the gap between Academic teaching and Industry practice.

Module Content: Several industry champions will deliver 8 x 3 hour workshops. These workshops are structured into a 1 hour lecture followed by an interactive 2 hour session where students put theory into practice and have a more applied approach to learning. The following workshops will be delivered:

Analytical Method Validation - Vince Owens, GSK
Therapetic Proteins - Marion Kennefick, MSD
Process Analytical Technology - Conor McSweeney, Pfizers
Innovation - Peter Hetherington, Pfizers
Clinical Study Phases - Maeve McCarthy, JNJ
Lean Tools - Brenda Canty, JNJ
Medical Device Technology - Hilde Mulvihil, Stryker
Innovation to Product Launch in a SME - Mark Bowkett, Tellabs

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Have a better understanding of Industry practice across several sectors
Be better placed to transition into industry
Have increased knowledge on applied research and industry methods
Understand lean tools and how they are applied in industry
Use tools relating to creativity and innovation to research and industry
Understand business models and commercialisation
Assess market potential and business plans.

Assessment: Workshop assignments and will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Assessments as presribed by the Module Coordinator.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6027 Taught Postgraduate Transferable Skills Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 13 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eric Moore, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Training taught postgraduate students with transferable skills that they can apply to their research and career advancement.

Module Content: The module will be divided into several workshops focused on the following themes:

CV Clinic (2 Workshops)
Interview Skills (2 Workshops)
Presentation and Communication Skills (2 Workshops)
Project management (2 Workshops)
Graduate Information Literacy Skills (3 Workshops)
Scientific Communication Skills (2 Workshops)

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Apply basic principles of scientific research
Understand better the nature of scientific literature
Analyse and critically evaluate research findings (yours & others)
Develop effective approaches to keep up to date with the latest research
Manage research information saving valuable time and effort
Effectively manage time in projects and research
Justify the application of these information literacy skills to your specific research
Translate research into publications and write good scientific English
Prepare CV for industry and develop interview techniques and skills.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment. Students will be assessed on the following assignments: CV Preparation, Mock Interviews, Literature Review, Workshop Assignments and Research Presentation.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM6101 Basic Postgraduate Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Problem Solving and Presentation Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): Registration for Organic or Pharmaceutical Chemistry Research at UCC

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 60 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry, Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Staff; Prof Anita Maguire, Faculty of Commerce.

Module Objective: ? To develop basic problem solving and report writing skills at postgraduate level.
? To develop peer learning at postgraduate level by attending research presentations by third or fourth year Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers and academic staff.
? To develop teamwork skills with peers in problem solving.
? To develop a broadly based understanding of recent developments in chemistry by attending a major national or international conference.

Module Content: Problem solving sessions; attending research presentations by third and fourth-year Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers and academic staff.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Engage in basic problem solving and report writing at postgraduate level.
Participate in peer learning at postgraduate.
Demonstrate teamwork skills with peers in problem solving.
Develop a broadly based understanding of recent research developments in chemistry.

Assessment: Attendance and participation in problem solving and discussion seminars.

Compulsory Elements: 75% attendance. Attendance monitored by class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail based on attendance and participation in problem solving and discussions monitored by academic staff.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Oportunity to repeat the module in the subsequent year; no supplemental examination.

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CM7002 Intermediate Posgraduate Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Problem Solving and Presentation Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): CM6101

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 60 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Prof Anita Maguire, Faculty of Commerce.

Module Objective: ? To further develop basic problem solving and report writing skills at postgraduate level.
? To further develop peer learning at postgraduate level by attending research presentations by third or fourth year Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers and academic staff.
? To further develop teamwork skills with peers in problem solving.
? To further develop a broadly based understanding of recent developments in chemistry by attending a national or international conference.

Module Content: Problem solving sessions; attending research presentations by third and fourth-year Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers and academic staff; chairing problem solving and presentation sessions as required.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Engage in further problem solving and report writing skills at postgraduate level.
Participate in peer learning at postgraduate level.
Demonstrate further development of teamwork skills with peers in problem solving.
Develop further a broadly based understanding of recent research developments in chemistry.

Assessment: Attendance and participation in problem solving and discussion seminars.

Compulsory Elements: 75% Attendance monitored by class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail based on attendance and participation in problem solving and discussion monitored by academic staff.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Opportunity to repeat module in the subsequent year ; no supplementary examination.

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CM7003 Advanced Postgraduate Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Problem Solving and Presentation Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): CM7002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 60 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Prof Anita Maguire, Faculty of Commerce.

Module Objective: ? To develop advanced expertise in problem solving and report writing at postgraduate level.
? To develop peer learning at postgraduate level by attending research presentations by third or fourth year Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers and academic staff.
? To develop good teamwork skills with peers in problem solving.
? To consolidate a broadly based understanding of recent developments in chemistry by attending a major national or international conference.
? To develop presentation skills by giving a research seminar to an audience of staff and research personnel.

Module Content: Problem solving sessions; attending research presentations by third and fourth-year Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers and academic staff and giving a research presentation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Employ advanced expertise in problem solving and report writing at postgraduate level.
Engage in peer learning at postgraduate level.
Demonstrate advanced teamwork skills with peers in problem solving.
Consolidate a broadly based understanding of recent developments in chemistry.
Show evidence of having developed advanced presentation skills.

Assessment: Pass/Fail based on attendance and participation in problem solving and discussion seminars monitored by academic staff.

Compulsory Elements: 75% Attendance monitored by class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail based on attendance and participation in problem solving and discussion seminars.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Opportunity to repeat module in subsequent year; no supplemental examination.

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CM7004 Postgraduate Internship in Pharmaceutical Sector

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (Any time during year).

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): No pre-requisites, but the module is open to postgraduate research students in aspects of Chemistry relevant to the pharmaceutical sector only.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 12weeks(s) Placements (12 weeks in workplace).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Anita Maguire, Faculty of Commerce.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Science, plus external input.

Module Objective: To introduce postgraduate students to the pharmaceutical sector and to provide an opportunity for students to gain relevant work experience in a commercial environment.

Module Content: Students will be placed in an industrial environment for 12 weeks, and will be expected to make a significant contribution to a relevant project under the supervision of industrial and UCC personnel. Students are required to prepare a final report on their placement, and make a presentation on their work.
Technical skills developed include some of the following elements: Process chemistry: what it takes to get from bench to plant, Green Chemistry principles, DoE, Experience the Kilo Technology lab, Engineering / Plant Equipment, Analytical Chemistry: HPLC method development, GC method development, Impurity identification, Impurity isolation, Process Analytical Technology (PAT)

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Display people related skills, presentation skills, communications, influencing, interpersonal, team working, listening and customer care
Display conceptual skills - researching, collecting and organising information, problem solving, project management, learning to learn, innovation and creativity, systems thinking and self-reliance.
Display technical skills, from the list above (module content)

Demonstrate professional behaviour and accept the need for confidentiality and ethical practice in the workplace
Show commercial awareness through knowledge of basic business operations

Where appropriate, operate the required range of equipment and perform the required role in an efficient and safe way.

Understand and appreciate H&S issues in the pharmaceutical sector.

Assessment: Academic mentor's visit, student's final written report, employers assessment report, oral presentation, essay or project on technical areas of choice.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Academic mentor's visit, student's final written report, employers assessment report, oral presentation, essay or project on technical areas of choice.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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CM7005 Theory and Application of Computational Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): No pre-requisites, but the module is open to postgraduate research students registered in Chemistry only.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 20hr(s) Seminars (plus practicals and student assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tim O'Sullivan, School of Pharmacy.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry; Staff, School of Pharmacy, and Staff, Analytical and Biological Chemistry Research Facility.

Module Objective: To familiarise postgraduate students with the variety of computational methods that is available in chemistry.

Module Content: Theoretical overview and practical application of the variety of computational methods available in chemistry and the problems to which they can be applied; the theoretical backgrounds to each method including their assumptions and approximations; practical aspects such as accuracy and computational cost; problem solving sessions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Choose the appropriate computational method for a particular problem.
Analyse chemistry publications incorporating computational methods.
Carry out computational chemistry calculations.

Assessment: Pass/fail judgment based on attendance, participation in the module, and project presentation.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: completion and presentation of final project.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Opportunity to repeat the module in the subsequent year; no supplemental examination.

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CM7006 Advanced Postgraduate Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Problem Solving and Presentation Skills II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): CM7003

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 60 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Humphrey Moynihan, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Prof Anita Maguire, Faculty of Commerce.

Module Objective: ? To further develop advanced expertise in problem solving and report writing at postgraduate level.
? To further develop peer learning at postgraduate level by attending research presentations by third or fourth year Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers and academic staff and visiting lecturers.
? To enhance constructive teamwork skills with peers in problem solving activities.
? To consolidate a broadly based understanding of recent developments in chemistry by attending a major national or international conference.
? To develop presentation skills by giving a conference standard research seminar to an audience of academic staff, research personnel and visitors.
To effectively chair a research seminar.
To prepare for thesis writing and defence.

Module Content: Problem solving sessions; attending research presentations by third and fourth-year Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers, academic staff and visitors; giving a research presentation, chairing a research seminar, thesis writing preparations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Employ advanced expertise in problem solving and report writing at postgraduate level.
Engage in peer learning at postgraduate level.
Demonstrate advanced teamwork skills with peers in problem solving.
Consolidate a broadly based understanding of recent developments in chemistry.
Show evidence of having developed advanced presentation skills.
Effectively chair a research seminar.
Give a conference standard research presentation.
Show evidence of having prepared for thesis writing and defence.

Assessment: Pass/Fail based on attendance and participation in problem solving and discussion seminars monitored by academic staff.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail based on attendance and participation in problem solving and discussions monitored by academic staff.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Opportunity to repeat module in subsequent year; no supplemental examination.

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CM7007 Research Standard Spectroscopic Methods for Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Research : Molecular Structure Determination, Compound Characterisation and Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): CM6101

Co-requisite(s): CM7002

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals; 60 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Anita Maguire, Faculty of Commerce.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: Apply advanced spectroscopic methods in the analysis, molecular structure determination and reactivity of organic and pharmaceutical compounds and substances.

Module Content: Spectroscopic methods - especially nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry and optical methods(IR, UV-Vis, luminescence, optical rotation); sample preparation, dat aprocessing and presentation, acceptance criteria, GMP(GLP) issues, multinuclear NMR, advanced 1D and 2D-NMR, determination of absolute and relative stereochemistry, qNMR - composition and potency of mixtures including enentiomer composition according to pharmacopoeia methods, molecular dynamics, reaction kinetics and equilibria, React NMR

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Efficiently prepare samples for analysis.
Competently measure spectra in an open access environment.
Confidently analyse spectra and make appropriate conclusions
Apply acceptance criteria.
Document and present outcomes in a reliable manner
Apply advanced spectroscopic techniques in consultation with NMR and MS experts to complex molecular structure characterisation, molecular structure elucidation and spectroscopic data assignment problems.
Determine reaction rate -constants, equilibrium data and mixture composition.

Assessment: Pass/Fail based on attendance and participation in training and practicals as monitored by academic staff and 60% mark in MCQ.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail based on attendance and participation in training and practical sessions and a 60% mark in MCQ examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Opportunity to repeat module in subsequent year; no supplemental examination.

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