Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

PT1445 Foundation Pharmacology
PT2101 Chemotherapy and Pharmacology of Inflammation
PT2201 Principles of Dental Pharmacology
PT2448 Cellular and Molecular Basis of Drug Action and Toxicity
PT3001 Introduction to Pharmacology
PT3002 Introduction to Toxicology
PT3005 Chemotherapy and Pharmacology of Inflammation
PT3201 Dental Pharmacology
PT4005 Neuropharmacology
PT4010 Research Project (Intercalated BSc)
PT4011 Literature Research Project
PT4012 Applied Pharmacology & Toxicology
PT6401 Pharmacology

PT1445 Foundation Pharmacology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 5 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anne Moore, School of Pharmacy (Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics).

Lecturer(s): Dr Anne Moore, School of Pharmacy; Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To introduce the basic principles of pharmacology.

Module Content: Pharmacodynamics (drug action, agonism and antagonism, specificity and side-effects); dose-response. Basic pharmacokinetics (drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion). Receptor pharmacology and cell signalling. Neurotransmission and general ANS pharmacology. Application of basic principles in selected examples of drug use. Overview of drug development and testing. Drug nomenclature.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define how drugs and other exogenous chemicals produce effects in living systems.
?Describe the general processes which drugs undergo in the body.
?Identify the main events in neurotransmission and points at which drugs act.
?Construct and interpret dose-response curves.
?Design pharmacological experiments to identify drug-receptor interactions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals 10 marks and MCQ 20 marks (Oral Examination if required)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Students who fail Continuous Assessment in the Summer must submit assignment(s)/undertake MCQ Examination as prescribed by the Department and Oral Examination if required.

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PT2101 Chemotherapy and Pharmacology of Inflammation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): Must have satisfactorily completed the biochemistry and physiology components of year 1 Foundation in Medicine modules or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla P Barry, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla P Barry, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To teach the principles underlying drug management of cancer, infection and inflammation.

Module Content: Cancer and cancer chemotherapy. Chemotherapy of viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections. Inflammation, inflammatory mediators and inflammatory disease. Steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Antihistimines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe acute and chronic inflammatory events, the role of vasodilators and mediators that induce changes in microvascular permeability.
?Compare and contrast the mechanisms of action of steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and identify and understand disease-modifying anti-arthritic drugs.
?Identify and discuss the principles of drugs used to treat viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections.
?Define the characteristics of cancer cells.
?Analyse multiple events in the development of cancer.
?Illustrate the cell cycle and differentiate the different stages and control mechanisms which occur throughout.
?Draw parallels between inflammation and cancer.
?Discuss current and emerging chemo-preventative and therapeutic strategies in the treatment of cancer.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Students who fail continuous assessment in the Winter 2015 must submit assignment(s)/undertake MCQ Examination as prescribed by the Department.

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PT2201 Principles of Dental Pharmacology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 3 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Computer-based practicals/assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla P Barry, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla P Barry, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To introduce the basic principles of dental pharmacology.

Module Content: Pharmacodynamics (drug action, agonism & antagonism, specificity, side-effects, tolerance). Pharmacokinetics (drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion). Drug interaction. Dose-response & inter-individual variation. Therapeutic drug monitoring. Adverse drug reactions. ANS pharmacology. Application of basic principles in selected examples of drug use. Developing new drugs. Drug nomenclature.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Summarize how drugs produce therapeutic and side effects in the body.
?Describe the pharmacokinetic processes which drugs undergo in the body.
?Explain the basis of drug interaction and implications for patient care.
?Outline why individuals may vary in their repsonse to drugs.
?Relate drug mechanism of action to pharmacological management of cardiovascular and central nervous system disease.
?Appraise in general terms the drug development and safety evaluation processes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals/assignments 10 marks, MCQ 20 marks. Oral Examination if required).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Students who fail Continuous Assessment in the Summer must submit assignment(s)/undertake MCQ Examination as prescribed by the Department, and Oral Examination if required.

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PT2448 Cellular and Molecular Basis of Drug Action and Toxicity

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 70 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 40 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 3hr(s) Workshops (Tutorials, Laboratory,); Other (Directed Study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anne Moore, School of Pharmacy.

Lecturer(s): Dr Anne Moore, School of Pharmacy; Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Staff, School of Pharmacy.

Module Objective: To deepen the understanding of the pharmacological basis of the optimal, rational, safe and effective use of medicines at the cellular and molecular level.

Module Content: This module builds on the skills and competencies acheived in the earlier Pharmacy modules. Molecular basis drug action within living systems; molecular, cellular, biological and physical aspects; dose response; therapeutic window; adverse drug reactions; biotransformation;factors affecting metabolism; pharmacogenomics; cellular toxicity, cell stress, carcinogens; organ toxicity; toxicology methods. Receptor structure, function and regulation; receptor classification (G-Protein coupled receptors, Ion channels, Steroid receptors), Enzymes as drug targets, Kinases and phosphatases; receptor theory and pharmacology; receptor binding methodology and analysis; receptor agonists and antagonists; molecular targets of drug action in signal transduction., cell cycle, apoptosis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appraise current drug interventions from a pharmacological and toxicological perspective.
?Identify the molecular mechanisms of action and toxicity of various drug classes.
?Relate mechanisms of drug action to management of specific diseases.
?Interpret and design pharmacological experiments to quantitatively assess the action and toxicity of drugs.
?Assess targeted approaches to rational drug design and development.
?Describe the general toxicokinetic proceses which chemicals undergo in the body and the factors affecting these processes.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks (Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 60 marks (MCQ's; Case Studies; Case Presentations).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. (as prescribed by the School).

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PT3001 Introduction to Pharmacology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): BC2001; BC2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 17 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ashley Allshire, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ashley Allshire, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To teach the basic principles of pharmacology.

Module Content: Cell signalling; neurotransmitters. Pharmacodynamics (drug action, specificity, antagonism). Pharmacokinetics (drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) and pharmacokinetic modelling. Dose-response. Autonomic pharmacology. Application of principles in: CNS, cardiovascular and endocrine pharmacology; drug development and testing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define how drugs and other exogenous chemicals produce effects in living systems.
?Describe the general processes which drugs undergo in the body.
?Identify the main events in neurotransmission and points at which drugs act.
?Relate mechanisms of drugs action to management of specific diseases.
?Construct and interpret dose-response curves.
?Design pharmacological experiments to identify receptors.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals 10 marks and MCQ 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. A passed Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward. Students who failed the Continuous Assessment must submit assignment(s)/undertake MCQ Examination as prescribed by the Department.

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PT3002 Introduction to Toxicology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): BC2001; BC2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Frank Van Pelt, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Frank Van Pelt, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To teach the basic principles of Toxicology.

Module Content: Types of toxic substances. Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of toxicants. Cell injury and cell defence. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Organ toxicity; liver, kidney, skin, nervous system, blood, reproduction system. Toxicity testing and risk assessment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Construct and interpret dose-response curves for toxic agents.
?Describe the general toxicokinetic processes which chemicals undergo in the body and the factors affecting these processes.
?Predict the major metabolic pathways for small molecules.
?Discuss the cellular effects of carcinogens
?Explain the mechanisma by which toxic damage to major organs may occur.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals 10 marks and MCQ 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. A passed Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward. Students who failed the Continuous Assessment must submit assignment(s)/undertake MCQ Examination as prescribed by the Department.

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PT3005 Chemotherapy and Pharmacology of Inflammation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): BC2001, BC2002

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla P Barry, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla P Barry, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To teach the principles underlying drug management of cancer, infection and inflammation.

Module Content: Cancer and cancer chemotherapy. Chemotherapy of viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections. Inflammation, inflamatory mediators and inflammatory disease. Steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Antihistamines. Immunosuppressants.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe acute and chronic inflammatory events, the role of vasodilators and mediators that induce changes in microvascular permeability.
?Compare and contrast the mechanisms of action of steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and identify and understand disease-modifying anti-arthritic drugs.
?Identify and discuss the principles of drugs used to treat viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections.
?Define the characteristics of cancer cells.
?Analyse multiple events in the development of cancer.
?Illustrate the cell cycle and differentiate the different stages and control mechanisms which occur throughout.
?Draw parallels between inflammation and cancer.
?Discuss current and emerging chemo-preventative and therapeutic strategies in the treatment of cancer.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (MCQ 20 marks and Practicals 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. A passed Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward. Students who failed the Continuous Assessment must submit assignment(s)/undertake MCQ Examination as prescribed by the Department.

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PT3201 Dental Pharmacology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): PT2201

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures ((Local Reading)); 2 x 1hr(s) Tutorials ((Local Reading)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla P Barry, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla P Barry, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Staff, University Dental School & Hospital; Staff, College of Medicine and Health.

Module Objective: To teach the Pharmacology of different drug categories and to provide the necessary understanding of Pharmacology & Therapeutics for competency in dental practice.

Module Content: Systematic Pharmacology and its impact on dental practice. Dental use of drugs. Anaesthetics, antimicrobials, antiasthmatic drugs, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, anxiolytics and hypnotics, drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and other drug groups. Dental emergency. Dental prescribing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Develope on the core concepts of Pharmacology
?Discuss the basic and clinical Pharmacology of a significant number of drug areas based
?on both disease-based grouping as well as covering similar areas using a more
?mechanistic approach.
?Identify potential drug interactions and overdose signs and symptoms and their
?management.
?Critically evaluate pharmacological data.
?Perform dental prescribing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 X in class test.). Oral Examination, if required.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Students who fail Continuous Assessment in the Summer must submit assignment(s)/undertake MCQ Examination as prescribed by the Department, and Oral Examination if required.

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PT4005 Neuropharmacology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): PT3001

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 16 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Boland, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barry Boland, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To teach the molecular basis of neuropharmacology.

Module Content: Neurotransmission, neurotransmitters and drug actions. Local and general anaesthetics. Drugs acting on the CNS: pharmacological treatment of anxiety, insomnia, psychotic illness, depression, epilepsy, pain. Drugs in neurodegenerative disease. CNS stimulants. Drug dependence and abuse.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and discuss the basic pharmacodynamic principles of drug action in the CNS.
?Identify the key pharmacokinetic hurdles to drug delivery to the CNS.
?Conceptualise the rational basis for drug discovery of drugs for neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.
?Identify and discuss the utility of animal models in testing the efficacy of CNS drugs.
?Make a presentation on the pharmacology of a specific CNS drug.
?Identify the appropriate drug for the treatment of patients with specific CNS disorders.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (MCQ Exam). (Oral Examination if required).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Students who fail Continuous Assessment must submit assignment(s) as prescribed by the Department and Oral Examination if required.

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PT4010 Research Project (Intercalated BSc)

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): PT4011

Teaching Method(s): 8weeks(s) Other (Laboratory Work and Library Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ashley Allshire, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ashley Allshire, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To provide training in pharmacological research, scientific writing and presentation.

Module Content: The project requires students to research an area of current interest in Pharmacology, plan and execute a programme of investigative research, write a concise scientific report and present the work as a seminar.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Investigate the scientific literature related to a research area.
?Apply scientific method and principles of good experimental design.
?Use a range of methodologies safely and efficiently in the pharmacology laboratory.
?Analyse and interpret data.
?Produce a scientific report.
?Present the methodology and findings of the research project in a oral report.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Laboratory Progress Evaluation (90 marks); 1 x 10,000 word Project Report (180 marks); Oral Presentation (30 marks). (Oral if required).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail Continuous Assessment in the Summer must submit assignment(s) as prescribed by the Department, and Oral Examination if required.

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PT4011 Literature Research Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): PT4010

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Self-directed Library Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ashley Allshire, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ashley Allshire, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To provide training in database searching, critical evaluation of the research literature, and research presentation.

Module Content: The project requires students to research an area of topical interest in Pharmacology, write a concise literature review and make an oral presentation of the work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Work independently and manage their own learning needs.
?Illustrate the scientific process and debate.
?Find, evaluate and summarize literature relevant to a specific topic.
?Distinguish original research papers from reviews.
?Assess published evidence critically.
?Prepare a formal and original scientific report according to norms of the pharmacological literature.
?Communicate orally, using appropriate information technology.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written Report 80 marks. Oral Presentation 20 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail Continuous Assessment in the Summer must submit assignment(s) as prescribed by the Department, and Oral Examination if required.

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PT4012 Applied Pharmacology & Toxicology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): PT3001, PT3002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 5 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Frank Van Pelt, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Frank Van Pelt, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To examine applications of pharmacological and toxicological principles

Module Content: Pharmacological and toxicological profiling in drug development. Model use, predictive value and limitations. Clinical trials and pharmacovigilance. Pharmacological principles in drug formaulation and delivery. Advanced xenobiotic metabolism, prediction of main pathways, implications for drug interaction and toxicity. Pharmacogenetics and toxicogenetics. Measurement of exposure, biological and health effect monitoring. Case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe biotransformation and the factors affecting disposition
?Predict the major metabolic pathways for simple drugs
?Discuss the role of genetics in xenobiotic effect
?Explain the drug development process, its main limitations and the role of pharmacovigilance
?Evaluate the use of models in drug screening and testing
?Analyse preclinical testing of selected drugs to identify how predictive power might be improved
?Interpret a limited set of safety data and outline additional tests required.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Oral Examination if required).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (and Oral Examination if required) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (and Oral Examination if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PT6401 Pharmacology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (run on a biennial basis).

No. of Students: Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 35hr(s) Directed Study (Distance learning); 1 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 1 x 2hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anne Moore, School of Pharmacy.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Module Objective: To teach the basic principles of pharmacology

Module Content: Pharmacodynamics (drug action, agonism and antagonism, specificity and dose effects); dose response. Receptor pharmacology and cell signaling. Neurotransmission and general autonomic nervous system pharmacology. Application of basic principles in selected examples of drug use including drug effects on major body systems. Drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. Introduction to Pharmacokinetics. Drug interaction, side-effects and adverse drug reaction. Drug discovery, development and testing. Clinical trials.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define how drugs and other exogenous chemicals produce effects in living systems.
?Identify the molecular mechanisms of action of various drug classes.
?Relate mechanisms of drug action to management of specific diseases.
?Interpret and design pharmacological experiments to quantitatively assess drug action.
?Appraise current drug interventions from a pharmacological perspective.
?Assess novel approaches to drug design and development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Written Assignments and Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% Students must obtain at least 40% in the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (There will be a special Supplemental Examination for students failing Continuous Assessment).

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