Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

PL1001 Introduction to Physiology for Dentistry I
PL1002 Introduction to Physiology for Dentistry II
PL1011 Basic Science for Dental Hygiene
PL1025 Fundamentals of Physiology
PL1400 Introduction to Physiology for Pharmacy I
PL1401 Introduction to Physiology for Pharmacy II
PL2021 Introductory Physiology I
PL2022 Introductory Physiology II
PL2025 Cell and Epithelial Physiology
PL2033 The Nervous System
PL2034 Physiology for Dental Students
PL3005 Cell and Epithelial Physiology
PL3009 Bioenergetics and Endocrinology
PL3020 Neurophysiology
PL3021 Cardiovascular Physiology
PL3022 Respiratory Physiology
PL3023 Renal Physiology
PL3024 Digestive Physiology
PL3025 Literature Review, Experimental Design and Data Analysis
PL4005 Molecular Physiology of Channels
PL4006 Regulation of Epithelial Transport
PL4009 Applied Cardiovascular and Respiratory Physiology
PL4010 Control of Breathing in Health and Disease
PL4011 Learning and Memory
PL4012 Physiology of Calcium Signalling
PL4013 Physiology and Pathophysiology of Vascular Endothelium
PL4014 Endocrine and Gastrointestinal Physiology
PL4020 Research Project
PL6001 Molecular and Cellular Physiology Techniques
PL6002 Integrated Physiology Research Methods I
PL6003 Peer Review and Scientific Communication

PL1001 Introduction to Physiology for Dentistry I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 55.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 23 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory/ Tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To lay the foundation for understanding major physiological processes, their relationship to disease and their particular relevance to dentistry.

Module Content: Body water, transport across membranes and epithelia. Bioelectric potentials, nerve and muscle. Introduction to the nervous system. Cardiovascular physiology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the basic physiological processes of the normal human body.
?Recognize the relevance of these processes to the practice of clinical dentistry.
?Show how some common derangements may interfere with these processes.
?Evaluate the relevant roles of the different physiological systems in this relationship.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (MCQ). Oral if required.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral if required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Essay and MCQ) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both end-of-year written examination and continuous assessment; Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL1002 Introduction to Physiology for Dentistry II

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 55.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 26 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 7 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Labatoratory/Tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To lay the foundation for understanding major physiological processes, their relationship to disease and their particular relevance to dentistry.

Module Content: Respiratory physiology. Renal physiology. Sodium, potassium, water and acid-base balance. Gastrointestinal physiology. Liver and intermediary metabolism. Endocrinology and reproduction.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the basic physiological processes of the normal human body.
?Recognize the relevance of these processes to the practice of clinical dentistry.
?Show how some common derangements may interfere with these processes.
?Evaluate the relevant roles of the different physiological systems in this relationship.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (MCQ). Oral if required.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral if required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) (Essay and MCQ) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both end-of-year written examination and continuous assessment; Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL1011 Basic Science for Dental Hygiene

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Physiology); 30 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Pathology/Microbiology); 5 x 1hr(s) Practicals; 15 x 1hr(s) Other (Self Directed Study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Therese Ruane-O'Hora, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, University Dental School & Hospital; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To develop a knowledge of physiology, pathology, microbiology, as a basis for dental hygiene practice.

Module Content: Introduction to physiological concepts including General Physiology, Cardio-Respiratory physiology, Digestive and Excretory systems, Neurological and Endocrine control mechanisms. Oral Physiology, Nutrition, Dental, Biofilm. Introduction to General and Oral Pathology, Principles of Infection Control

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify important features of organs and relate them to organ function
?Describe the structure and functions of the major body systems - musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive and renal - and their organs and tissue components
?Relate the functions of the above systems to survival and homeostasis
?Explain the pathophysiological processes underlying selected major diseases
?Describe the microbiology of relevance to the dental hygienist
?Identify the formation and composition of dental plaque and its effect on oral health
?Apply the knowledge of cross-infection control in clinical practice
?Identify the systemic diseases of relevance to the dental hygienist
?Describe the pathology of the oral tissues of relevance to the dental hygienist.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (In-class tests (1x 150 marks and 2 x 75 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing Continuous Assessment must undertake alternative assessment(s) as prescribed by the Department).

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PL1025 Fundamentals of Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To arrive at an understanding of Fundamental Physiology and the implications of disordered function.

Module Content: Introduction to physiological concepts; role of body systems in homeostasis, overview of cell to whole body function and implication of derangements thereof.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify important features of organs and relate them to organ function
?Describe the structure and functions of the major body systems - musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive and renal - and their organs and tissue components
?Relate the functions of the above systems to survival and homeostasis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (MCQ); Continuous Assessment 30 marks ((in-class MCQ)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq (in lieu of Continuous Assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL1400 Introduction to Physiology for Pharmacy I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 23 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory/ Tutorial).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To lay the foundation for understanding major physiological processes, their relationship to disease and their potential for modification by drug therapy.

Module Content: Body water, transport across cell membranes and epithelia. Bioelectric potentials, nerve and muscle. Introduction to the nervous system. Cardiovascular physiology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the basic physiological processes of the normal human body
?Recognize the relevance of these processes to the practice of clinical pharmacy
?Show how some common derangements may interfere with these processes.
?Evaluate the relevant roles of the different physiological systems in this relationship.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (MCQ). Oral if required.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral if required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Essay and MCQ) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates both the formal written examination and continuous assessment; Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PL1401 Introduction to Physiology for Pharmacy II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 26 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory /Tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To lay the foundation for understanding major physiological processes, their relationship to disease and their potential for modification by drug therapy.

Module Content: Respiratory physiology. Renal physiology. Sodium, potassium, water and acid-base balance. Gastrointestinal physiology. Liver and intermediary metabolism. Endocrinology and reproduction.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the basic physiological processes of the normal human body.
?Recognize the relevance of these processes to the practice of clinical pharmacy.
?Show how some common derangements may interfere with these processes.
?Evaluate the relevant roles of the different physiological systems in this relationship.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (MCQ). Oral if required.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral if required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Essay and MCQ) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates both the formal written examination and continuous assessment; Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PL2021 Introductory Physiology I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): BC2001; BC2002

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 9hr(s) Other (Laboratory-based tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Therese Ruane-O'Hora, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Therese Ruane-O'Hora, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience.

Module Objective: To lay the foundations for understanding Systemic and Integrated Physiology.

Module Content: Introductory physiology: body water, cells, tissues, systems, transport processes and bio-electric potentials. Nerve physiology. Central Nervous system. Muscle Physiology. Haematology and immunology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the integration of cells into tissues into systems
?Compare and contrast passive and active transport
?Explain the basis of an action potential in terms of membrane transport
?Explain why nerve conduction is unidirectional
?Describe the mechanisms of muscle fatigue in terms of the cross-bridge cycle
?Describe the basic structure of the CNS
?Compare and contrast the mechanism of action of neurotoxins
?Describe the basic characteristics of the immune system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (MCQ).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL2022 Introductory Physiology II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 15hr(s) Other (Laboratory/Tutorial Sessions; self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Vincent Healy, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology; Dr Vincent Healy, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the principles of Systems and Integrated Physiology

Module Content: Cardiovascular and respiratory physiology. Renal system and physiology of the gastroinestinal tract. Endocrinology and reproductive physiology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the structure and functions of the heart and blood vessels.
?Describe how blood is pumped through the heart and into the blood vessels.
?Describe the structure of lung tissue and explain the mechanics of breathing.
?Outline how oxygen and carbon dioxide are transported in the blood.
?Explain how the rate of breathing is regulated.
?Outline how the kidney filters blood.
?Explain how the intestines function to digest food.
?Outline the various hormones & their function in the body.
?Explain the process of human reproduction and growth.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (MCQ).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL2025 Cell and Epithelial Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 5.

Pre-requisite(s): Must have satisfactorily completed the anatomy and physiology components of year 1 Foundations in Medicine modules or their equivalents.

Co-requisite(s): FM2003

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Other (tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Harrison, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick Harrison, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of the cellular and molecular processes that account for the normal distribution of ions and water across cell membranes.

Module Content: Mechanisms of passive and active movement of ions across membranes. Donnan, Nernst and Goldmann-Hodgkin-Katz equations. Ion channel properties and regulation. Mechanisms and Cellular regulation of solute and water absorption and secretion in epithelia. Cell Volume regulation, Intracellular pH regulation, Intracellular Ca regulation. Cellular communication, signalling and cell-cycle. Molecular basis of cell physiology. Genetic disorders of cellular transport.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the importance of monoclonal antibodies in identification of a protein?s location within the cell
?Apply the principles of thermodynamics to ion transport across the plasma membrane
?Compare and contrast the importance of cell junctions and carrier proteins in water transport
?Describe the mechanisms of membrane protein biosynthesis from transcription to vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane
?Describe the signalling pathways which regulate the cell cycle
?Select techniques suitable for the evaluation of cellular and molecular processes that account for the normal distribution of ions and water across cell membranes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Written Test).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL2033 The Nervous System

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 103.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 18hr(s) Other (Practicals, Tutorials and Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dervla O'Malley, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Dervla O'Malley, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To gain insight into the functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

Module Content: Physiology and pathophysiology of the nervous system including the cerebral cortex; sensory systems, including pain; the special senses; supraspinal motor control, including motor systems, the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Physiology and pathophysiology of higher neural functions, including consciousness and sleep; learning and memory; the regulation of complex behaviours.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the basic physiology of the nervous system, including the cerebral cortex; sensory systems, including the special senses; motor system, including the basal ganglia and cerebellum, and higher neural functions.
?Recognize the relevance of these processes to the practice of clinical dentistry.
?Recognize how some common drugs relate to these processes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks ((SAQ 15 marks, MCQ 15 marks)). Oral, if required.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral, if required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (This incorporates assessment of the formal written examination and continuous assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Oral, if required.

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PL2034 Physiology for Dental Students

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 32 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3hr(s) Tutorials; 9hr(s) Other (Laboratories).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dervla O'Malley, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mairead Harding, University Dental School & Hospital; Dr Dervla O'Malley, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To gain insight into important issues in oral physiology.

Module Content: Blood, including haemostasis & coagulation. Introductory immunology. Mastication, salivation, deglutition and vocalisation. Mechanoreception, noiciception, thermoreception, taste and smell. Growth and renewal of oral tissues, the aging process. The biological basis of preventative dentistry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the basic physiological processes of the normal human body,
?Recognize the relevance of these processes to the practice of clinical dentistry,
?Explain how systems integrate and how some common derangements may interfere with these processes,
?Evaluate the integrative relevant roles of the different physiological systems in this relationship.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (SAQs, 40 marks). Oral, if required.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Oral, if required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (This incorporates assessment of the formal written examination and continuous assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Oral, if required.

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PL3005 Cell and Epithelial Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): PL2021; PL2022; AN2003; AN2004; BC2001; BC2002

Co-requisite(s): PT3001: BC3005

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Other (Tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Harrison, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick Harrison, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of the cellular and molecular processes that account for the normal distribution of ions and water across cell membranes.

Module Content: Mechanisms of passive and active movement of ions across membranes. Ion channel properties and regulation. Mechanisms and Cellular regulation of solute and water absorption and secretion in epithelia. Cell Volume regulation, Intracellular pH regulation, Intracellular Ca regulation. Cellular communication, signalling and cell-cycle. Molecular basis of cell physiology. Genetic disorders of cellular transport.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the importance of monoclonal antibodies in identification of a protein?s location within the cell
?Apply the principles of thermodynamics to ion transport across the plasma membrane
?Compare and contrast the importance of cell junctions and carrier proteins in water transport
?Describe the mechanisms of membrane protein biosynthesis from transcription to vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane
?Describe the signalling pathways which regulate the cell cycle
?Select techniques suitable for the evaluation of cellular and molecular processes that account for the normal distribution of ions and water across cell membranes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Written Test).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL3009 Bioenergetics and Endocrinology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): PL2021: PL2022: AN2003: AN2004; BC2001; BC2002

Co-requisite(s): PT3001: BC3005

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Mackrill, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Mackrill, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To lay foundations for energy management by the body and the role of the endocrine system in control of body function.

Module Content: Principles of bioenergetics. Energy storage and utilisation. Efficiency, metabolic function of the liver. Regulation of metabolism. Body temperature control. Principles of endocrine physiology. Pituitary, thyroid, adrenal function. Endocrine function of the pancreas. Growth and Ageing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe how the body obtains, stores and uses energy; the components of the diet; and how feeding behaviour is controlled.
?Detail functions of the liver.
?Explain how body temperature is regulated.
?Outline the principles of endocrine physiology.
?Describe the endocrine functions of the pancreas, pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid and adrenal glands.
?Detail the mechanisms of growth and ageing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (MCQ).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment short questions) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL3020 Neurophysiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): PL2021: PL2022: AN2003: AN2004: BC2001: BC2002

Co-requisite(s): PT3001: BC3005: AN3001

Teaching Method(s): 17 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Julie O'Neill, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mark Rae, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To gain insight into the functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

Module Content: Physiology and pathophysiology of the nervous system including cerebral cortex, sensory systems, including pain, the special senses (vision,balance and hearing), supraspinal motor control, including motor systems, the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Physiology and pathophysiology of higher neural functions, including consciousness and sleep, learning and memory and the regulation of complex behaviours.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?describe and explain the principal structural and function organization of the cerebral cortex
?explain the principals and mechanisms of sensory transduction in the somatosensory (pain), visual, auditory and vestibular systems.
?explain the principals and mechanisms of motor function and the regulation of motor activity by the cerebellum and basal ganglia.
?describe the current understanding of sleep physiology and consciousness
?describe the physiological mechanisms underpinning short and long term memory and learning.
?describe and explain the physiology of the limbic system and how it controls and regulates complex behaviours.
?integrate an understanding of the above mechanisms and explain how the nervous system performs real-life actions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (Formal written examination); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Continuous assessment - (3 x practical based quiz: 10 marks: end of module exam; 20 marks.)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) ((which incorporates assessment of both the formal and written examination and continuous assessment )) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL3021 Cardiovascular Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): PL2021: PL2022: AN2003: AN2004; BC2001; BC2002

Co-requisite(s): PT3001: BC3005

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 3hr(s) Other (Self-directed learning/Problem solving).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Vincent Healy, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Vincent Healy, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To gain an insight into the properties and functions of the cardiovascular system.

Module Content: Cardiac cycle. Electrical activity of the heart. Regulation of cardiac output. Vasculature and blood flow. Arterial system. Regulation of blood pressure. Microcirculation. Regional circulations. Components of
blood.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the events in a cardiac cycle.
?Explain how cardiac action potentials are generated at a molecular level.
?Explain how cardiac output is regulated.
?Explain how cardiac output and peripheral outflow impact on mean arterial pressure.
?Outline the mechanisms underlying fluid and solute transport across capillaries walls.
?Compare and contrast the regulation of blood flow in a number of regional circulations.
?Describe the functions of the different components of blood.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (MCQ).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment short questions) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL3022 Respiratory Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): PL2021: PL2022: AN2003: AN2004; BC2001; BC2002

Co-requisite(s): PT3001: BC3005

Teaching Method(s): 17 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To gain an insight into the properties and functions of the respiratory system.

Module Content: Structure-function relationships in the respiratory system. The mechanics of ventilation. Gas exchange and gas transport. The regulation of breathing, and role of the lungs in acid/base balance. Aspects of comparative respiratory physiology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe how air enters and leaves the lung during a single breath.
?Outline the main characteristics of the pulmonary circulation.
?Describe the mechanism of gas exchange between the alveoli and the circulation.
?Describe how oxygen and carbon dioxide are transported in the blood.
?Describe the role of chemoreceptors in the control of ventilation.
?Discuss the effects high altitude on ventilation.
?Describe the effects of exercise on ventilation.
?Outline the role of the lung in regulation of acid/base balance.
?Compare and contrast the mechanism of ventilation of the mammalian lung and the fish gill.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment short questions) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL3023 Renal Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): PL2021: PL2022: AN2003, AN2004; BC2001; BC2002

Co-requisite(s): PT3001: BC3005

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ahmad Ahmeda, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mohammed Abdulla, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To gain insight in the fundamentals of renal physiology.

Module Content: Kidney blood flow. Structure and function of nephron. Glomerular filtration. Renal tubular function. Renal handling of water, sodium balance, potassium balance, clearance. The role of the kidney in acid-base balance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the role of the nephron in the reabsorption of water.
?Outline how the kidney absorbs and secretes organic compounds.
?Explain renal handling of electrolytes.
?Describe the role of the kidney in the maintenance of acid-base equilibrium.
?Outline the role of the kidney in the regulation of osmolality.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (2 x MCQ Examinations 15 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment short questions) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL3024 Digestive Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): PL2021: PL2022: AN2003, AN2004; BC2001; BC2002

Co-requisite(s): PT3001: BC3005

Teaching Method(s): 15 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 1 x 6hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dervla O'Malley, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Dervla O'Malley, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To gain insight into the fundamentals of the digestive system.

Module Content: Structure and organisation of the alimentary tract, salivary secretion, mastication, taste & smell, swallowing, vomiting, gastrointestinal secretion, digestion and absorption. Muscle movements, control of movement and secretions. Exocrine function of stomach, pancreas and liver. Immune role of the digestive system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Detail the structure of the gastrointestinal tract.
?Outline the basic functions of the various gastrointestinal hormones and neurotransmitters.
?Describe salivary, gastric, pancreatic and bilary secretion.
?Discuss how proteins, fats and carbohydrates are digested and absorbed in the gut.
?Detail the role of the liver in metabolism.
?Discuss the immune function of the gut.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (End of Module MCQ).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Which incorporates assessment of both the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment short questions) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL3025 Literature Review, Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): PL2021, PL2022 or equivalent learning

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Self Directed Learning); 120hr(s) Directed Study (Literature Reviews, Data Analysis, Experimental Design, Report and Scientific Paper Writing).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Vincent Healy, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Vincent Healy, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the process of literature review, experimental design, data analysis and writing a scientific report.

Module Content: The student is assigned to a supervisor who in discussion with the student selects the topic of the project and one of two options for conducting the project. Option 1 is a literature review, where the topic can either be a general field of research or a specific research article or set of articles. Option 2 involves a short review of the literature, the development of an informed hypothesis and the design of an experimental protocol. Students may conduct a pilot study and will be provided data sets to learn the process of data and statistical analysis. The student will be expected to draw conclusions from the analysis of the data set(s).
The purpose of Option 1 is to write a review of the current knowledge and recent advances in a research field or to write a review on the background, methods and results from a research paper or set of papers. The student is advised to consult library textbooks and to search online databases to find research papers and other information relevant to the topic of the project. The finished project should be approximately 20 typed pages, including diagrams and references.
The purpose of Option 2 is to exploit a short literature review to develop a testable hypothesis. The student will learn how to design an experiment or experimental series, with appropriate controls; students may also conduct pilot experiments under supervision. The student will learn how to analyse and compare data sets in an appropriate fashion.
Students registering for this module will also attend a tutorial on useful methods for information retrieval from online databases and how to search online for relevant research articles and reviews.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Search online journals available via the UCC library.
?Search databases which yield research papers and reviews relevant to a specific topic.
?Extract relevant information from research papers and reviews.
?Analyse findings from research papers.
?Produce a report on a topic in a scientific writing style.
?Outline the main findings of a paper without plagiarism.
?Develop a hypothesis and design an experiment to test the hypothesis.
?Analyse data sets and utilise simple statistical tests to compare data.
?Produce a report in the style of a research paper.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 20 page Library Project Report (Option 1) or 1 x 10 page Project Report in the style of a research paper in the field (Option 2).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submission of Library Project Report by a date specified by the Department).

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PL4005 Molecular Physiology of Channels

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): PL3005 or equivalent learning

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (Computer Based); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Directed Learning (Review of Relevant Research Literature)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Mackrill, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Mackrill, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide an advanced understanding of how channels operate at the molecular level and their contributions to pathological and physiological states.

Module Content: Ionic gradients in cells. Techniques used to study the structure and function of channel complexes. Classification and evolution of channels. Bioinformatic approaches. Molecular features of channels: conductance pathways, selectivity filters and gates. Kinetic, energetic and computational modelling of channel characteristics. Channel accessory proteins. Post-translational modification of channel proteins. Channelopathies: physiological consequences of channel dysfunction.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the molecular mechanisms by which channel proteins regulate the concentrations of ions and other solvents in cells.
?Critically evaluate techniques employed to analyse channel structure and function.
?Discuss energetic, kinetic and computational approaches for modelling channel properties.
?Relate molecular features of channel proteins to their conductance, gating and selectivity characteristics, particularly in terms of three-dimensional structure.
?Use bioinformatic approaches to identify key structural features within the primary structures of channel proteins and to explore evolutionary relationships between them.
?Explain how alterations in channel structure alter ion fluxes and cause disease.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (End of Semester); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Written Assignments).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL4006 Regulation of Epithelial Transport

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Directed Learning (Review of Relevant Research Literature)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Vincent Healy, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Vincent Healy, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide an advanced and solid understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate transport of ions and molecules across epithelial cells.

Module Content: Epithelial functional organisation. Cell signalling pathways. Membrane transporters. Regulation of epithelial transport.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the structure and function of epithelial layers in various systems in the body.
?Explain the underlying principles of cell signalling.
?Demonstrate a clear understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate epithelial transport.
?Describe experimental techniques suitable for the analysis of the membrane transporters and the signalling pathways that mediate transport across epithelial cells.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Formal Written Examination).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL4009 Applied Cardiovascular and Respiratory Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Directed Learning (Review of Relevant Research Literature)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide an advanced understanding of central control and coordination of respiration and cardiovascular function as well as non-classical autonomic transmission and regulation of cardiovascular function.

Module Content: Principle of respiration as a three phase event, central nervous integration of cardiorespiratory control, neural regulation of breathing, and the cardiovascular system; the existence of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmitters (NANC) in the autonomic peripheral nerves. Their reported effects and possible roles in cardiovascular regulation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a clear understanding of the regulation of breathing
?Describe the discharge patterns of central neurons involved in the regulation of respiration
?Discuss the historical background which led to the discovery of NANC transmitters
?Outline the various NANC transmitters and their role in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology
?Discuss the role of the central nervous system in cardiovascular function.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL4010 Control of Breathing in Health and Disease

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): PL3022; FM1030 or equivalent learning

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Directed learning (Review of Relevant Research Literature)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ken O'Halloran, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Ken O'Halloran, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To gain an insight into current concepts and controversies in the field of respiratory control. Students will be introduced to respiratory control disorders with a focus on sleep-disordered breathing. To introduce students to scientific writing and presentation, data and statistical analyses.

Module Content: Neuromuscular control of breathing and upper airway patency; Sleep and breathing; Sleep-disordered breathing; Translational models of human sleep apnoea; Diaphragm and upper airway muscle remodelling in disease; Physiological and pathophysiological effects of chronic sustained and chronic intermittent hypoxia. Additional relevant material chosen by participants.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the factors that influence the physiological control of pharyngeal calibre during wakefulness and sleep.
?Discuss the role of the upper airway muscles in the human sleep apnoea syndrome.
?Describe key morbidities in human sleep apnoea and animal models of the disorder.
?Describe examples of respiratory plasticity in health and disease and discuss the evidence for respiratory muscle remodelling in animal models of chronic hypoxia.
?Describe current hypotheses in the literature on the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) of aberrant remodelling in the respiratory control system of patients with sleep-disordered breathing.
?Critically analyse, review and discuss data from prescribed and self-selected publications from the literature.
?Perform data analysis on a variety of data sets.
?Write a scientific abstract integrating a data analysis exercise.
?Write editorial and research review-style articles.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Group work/presentations (2 x 5%); data analysis exercises (2 x 10%); research literature review and critique; scientific writing exercises (abstract (2 x 10%), editorial (2 x 10%), research papers); research review (30%). (Oral, if required).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PL4011 Learning and Memory

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): PL3020 or equivalent knowledge of neurophysiology

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Directed Study (Review of Relevant Research Literature)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mark Rae, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mark Rae, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide advanced information and understanding about different aspects of learning and memory, in both mammalian and non-mammalian species.

Module Content: Declarative and non-declarative memory. Learning and memory formation at both whole animal and molecular levels. The different brain regions involved in learning and memory. Comparison of mechanisms of memory formation between species. Alzheimer's disease and Fragile X syndrome. Critical analysis of selected peer-reviewed publications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe what is meant by declarative and non-declarative (procedural) learning and memory formation, and list the areas of the mammalian brain involved in the acquisition and storage (consolidation) of these types of memories.
?Discuss and explain the principal theories underlying mechanisms of short-and long-term learning and memory formation and degradation at both a whole animal and molecular level.
?Describe the principal concepts of Hebbian learning.
?Compare the physiology of selective synaptic strengthening and weakening in response to 'learning stimuli' in selected mammalian (human and non-human) and non-mammalian species.
?Describe the symptoms of, and neuropathology associated with, Alzheimer's disease.
?Discuss how the neuropathology associated with Alzheimer's disease may lead to the characteristic cognitive deficits associated with the disease.
?Critically analyse, review and critique data from selected peer-reviewed publications.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Written Assignment (20 Marks), MCQ (10 Marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL4012 Physiology of Calcium Signalling

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): PL3005, PL3021, or equivalent learning

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Directed Learning (Review of Relevant Research Literature)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Mackrill, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Mackrill, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide an advanced understanding of the mechanisms and physiological consequences of calcium signalling.

Module Content: Introduction to the scientific discovery of the use of calcium ions as a second messenger and the evolution their use by biological systems. Subcellular distribution of calcium ions. Organelles. Techniques used to measure calcium ion concentration. Calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins. Calcium buffering. Generation of calcium signals, second messengers and modulators. Decoding of calcium signals. Processes regulated by calcium ions: excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles; secretion; fertilisation; gene expression.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the role of calcium ions as a second messenger.
?Describe the participation of cellular organelles in regulating intracellular calcium concentrations.
?Compare different techniques used to monitor calcium ion levels.
?Describe the components of the protein `toolkit? involved in generating and shaping calcium signals.
?Explain how changes in intracellular calcium levels are decoded by cells.
?Describe how cellular processes are regulated by calcium ions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (End of Semester); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Written Assignments).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL4013 Physiology and Pathophysiology of Vascular Endothelium

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): PL3021 or equivalent learning

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Directed Learning (Review of the Relevant Research Literature)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Therese Ruane-O'Hora, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Therese Ruane-O'Hora, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide an advanced understanding of the importance of the endothelium and glycocalyx in vascular health; to subsequently explore some of the physiological consequences of alteration/damage to the glycoclayx.

Module Content: Detailed examination of the structure of the glycoclayx: A detailed study of selected aspects of its physiological function, to include a review of the contribution to vascular permeability and mechanotransduction: Applied pathophysiology, selected evidence that glycocalyx damage is a feature of certain disease states: Repair/renewal of this vascular compartment in disease states?

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the historical background which led to the discovery of the vascular glycocalyx and describe its structure in detail.
?Discuss the role of the glycocalyx in regulation of vascular permeability, with particular emphasis on a review of The Starlings Forces acting on the capillary wall.
?Compare and contrast the experimental evidence both in vitro and in vivo which cites a role for the glycocalyx in acting as a mechanotransducer for blood flow, and why this is important.
?Explore some evidence from the literature which suggests that damage to the glycocalyx in conditions such as diabetes and hypovolaemic shock contributes to the morbidity and mortality of these conditions.
?Discuss some of the emerging evidence regarding how the type of resuscitation fluid administered to patients following e.g trauma, surgery etc may impact on glycocalyx structure and function.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL4014 Endocrine and Gastrointestinal Physiology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): PL3024 or equivalent learning

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Directed Learning (Review of the Relevant Research Literature)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dervla O'Malley, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Dervla O'Malley, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide advanced information and understanding on how circulating hormones regulate physiological function in normal and stress situations, with a particular focus on their effects on gastrointestinal function.

Module Content: The hypothalamopituitary neuroendocrine axis. Regulation of food intake. Brain-gut axis. Stress and other neuroendocrine interactions in the enteric nervous system. Critical analysis of selected peer-reviewed publications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Give an account of the hypothalamopituitary axis.
?Discuss the neuroendocrine regulation of food intake, with particular emphasis on the role of the hypothalamus.
?Discuss the physiological role of brain-gut communication, including the effects of activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis on normal gut function.
?Describe the regulation of gut function by the enteric nervous system including neuroendocrine and immune interactions.
?Analyse, review and critique data from selected peer-reviewed publications.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (End of Semester); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Written Assignments).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Oral if required) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PL4020 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1weeks(s) Other (Laboratory Work, Literature Research); 4 x 1weeks(s) Other (Report Writing & Seminar Presentation).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Therese Ruane-O'Hora, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Therese Ruane-O'Hora, Department of Physiology; Staff, Department of Physiology; Staff, School of Medicine.

Module Objective: To introduce students to research methodology and develop skills in report writing.

Module Content: A Laboratory Research/Literature Research Project.
The finished project should be not more than 25 x A4 pages including diagrams and references, typed and double-spaced.
The project should include:
An introduction to the topic being researched:
A comprehensive section on the materials and methods used in the experiments:
A record of the results obtained, this to include diagrams and statistical analysis:
A discussion of these results and their implications, this section should include projections for future experiments in the area.
Finally a comprehensive list of references and a list of non-standard abbreviations must be included.
A one page summary of the results and conclusions should be included at the beginning of the work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Formulate research ideas and hypotheses
?Identify and access relevant bibliographical resources and databases
?Critically evaluate research publications
?Discuss current knowledge in their research area
?Design experiments with appropriate controls
?Interpret laboratory findings and perform appropriate statistical analysis
?Communicate research findings orally and in writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Assessment of practical research ability (40 marks); supervisor's assessment of student ability (160 marks); oral presentation (40 marks); project report (160 marks). (Oral, if required).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PL6001 Molecular and Cellular Physiology Techniques

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Harrison, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students a practical and theoretical intoduction to basic molecular and cellular physiology techniques in the context of a physiology research project.

Module Content: Working safely with genetically modified organisms. Analysis of nucleic acids by garose gel electrophoresis. PCR. Retrieval of DNA/RNA/Protein sequence information from databases. RNA extraction and quantification. Reverse-transcriptase PCR. Western-blot. Quantification of Ca2+ signals using fluorescent dyes. Growth and maintenance of mammalian cell lines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?perform the listed techniques in a safe and competent manner;
?design experiments using the listed techniques in an appropriate manner;
?maintain a clear and concise record of each technique in a laboratory notebook;
?evaluate data generated and identify any conclusions in a critical manner;
?present an oral report in which one or more of the techniques could be used to address a physiologically relevant research problem.

Assessment: 6 practical write-ups; oral presentation which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PL6002 Integrated Physiology Research Methods I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Farouk Hazim Markos, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To provide postgraduate students an overview of the theory and practice of in vitro isolated organ and in vivo small and large mammal physiological research techniques.

Module Content: The ethics of animal use in research, animal handling. Small and large animal anaesthesia and care under anaesthesia, blood vessel cannulation, instrumentation of anaesthetised animals, chronic instrumentation and recovery. Understanding transducers and amplifiers. Working with isolated organs and tissue in vitro.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?communicate clearly the necessity of using animals and animal tissue in biomedical research;
?have knowledge of the importance of choosing the correct anaesthetic;
?be able to apply aseptic techniques in recovery experiments;
?be able expose, prepare and cannulate blood vessels;
?explain the theory underlying the instruments used to measure various biological variables e.g. heart rate, blood pressure, blood flow, organ function;
?maintain an isolated organ and tissue in an in vitro experiment.

Assessment: 6 practical write-ups; presentation which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PL6003 Peer Review and Scientific Communication

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 4 x 1hr(s) Other (Guided Review Tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Mackrill, Department of Physiology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students experience in developing a critical approach to analysing current research literature in physiology, and in communicating the content of specialised papers to a general audience of physiologists.

Module Content: Peer review in context of the publication process; critical review of current journal articles; presentation of reviewed articles with feedback from lecturers and students.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Review an article
?Identify its strengths and weaknesses
?Suggest revisions and additional experiments that could strengthen the article
?Assess its suitability for publication and usefulness to the field
?Communicate clearly the findings of an article or articles to an audience of general physiologists.

Assessment: Two Presentations and One Review Paper which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Presentations and Review Paper.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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