Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

HI0090 Personal Development and Review
HI1002 The Making of Modern Ireland
HI1003 East and West: The Origins of European Identity
HI1004 First Year Inquiry Based Research Project
HI1005 Pilgrims and Crusaders
HI1006 US History since 1865
HI1007 Anti-Semitism in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Holocaust
HI1008 The Age of Extremes: Early Twentieth-Century Europe in Global Perspective
HI1009 History of Science, Technology and Society
HI1010 History: Tools, Methods and Practices
HI2003 Culture and Power: Renaissance Intellectual History, 1450-1650
HI2014 Women in Early Modern Europe 1500-1800
HI2017 Geography and Imagination in the Middle Ages
HI2022 The History of the Media in Ireland
HI2025 The Vikings
HI2031 Ireland and Rome: History, Culture and Contact
HI2036 Sport and Society in Modern Ireland
HI2038 The Tudors and Ireland
HI2043 Digital History
HI2044 Crime and Media in Ireland
HI2045 Crime, Violence, and Revolutionary Ireland, 1913-1925
HI2046 Policing and Popular Justice in Ireland, 1803-1960
HI2047 Hitler, Nazism and the Holocaust
HI2048 1989 Revolutions: Poland and East Central Europe - Transition to Democracy
HI2103 The long nineteenth century: Europe, Ireland and the Wider World II
HI2104 Special Research Project
HI2105 Case Studies in Research Skills
HI2108 From Reformation to Enlightenment: Europe, Ireland and the Wider World I
HI2109 The Global Renaissance: 1300-1600
HI3001 Historical Debate
HI3024 Northern Ireland
HI3026 Irish Economic and Social History during the Union
HI3028 State and Economy in Independent Ireland 1922-2010
HI3033 Irish Film History
HI3042 Ascendancy Ireland 1690-1800: Culture and Society in the Georgian Age
HI3043 Politics, Society and the Irish Novel: from union to independence
HI3044 International Relations I
HI3045 The Politics of Church and State
HI3051 Ireland and the Beginnings of Europe
HI3052 From Pagans to Christians
HI3082 Armadas: The Anglo-Spanish Conflict, 1585-1604
HI3095 European Imperialism, 1450-1750
HI3116 Culture and ideology in nineteenth-century Europe
HI3120 The United States and the Vietnam Wars, 1945-1975
HI3124 Cold War China
HI3125 Nuclear Politics and Proliferation
HI3127 Religion and Magic in Reformation Europe: Witches, Demons, Jews and Heretics
HI3128 Censorship in Twentieth-Century Ireland
HI3133 Digital History
HI3200 History Research Seminar
HI3302 Special Research Project
HI6018 Digital History
HI6026 US Foreign Policy and Contemporary History
HI6027 Research Dissertation in Local History
HI6028 Independent Research I
HI6029 Independent Research II
HI6030 Perspectives on Cork Local History
HI6031 Local History Research: Sources and Methods
HI6035 Foreign Policy and Diplomacy: Case Studies in Crises and Decision Making
HI6042 Sources and Debates in the Irish Revolution
HI6045 War and Peace: the European State System from 1648 to 1990
HI6049 Historiography of the Irish Revolution
HI6050 Public History, Commemoration, and the Irish Revolution
HI6056 Issues in World Politics
HI6060 The Politics of Terrorism
HI6063 Work Placement and Portfolio
HI6064 Dissertation in Strategic Studies
HI6065 The Making of Modern War and Strategy, 1450-1945
HI6066 Nuclear Strategy and Diplomacy
HI6067 Small States, Peacekeeping and Peace Support Operations
HI6068 Strategic Studies Summer School
HI6069 Terrorism, Insurgency and Political Violence
HI6070 US Grand Strategy since 1940
HI6071 Introduction to Strategic Studies
HI6074 Debates in the Irish Revolution
HI6075 Making History Public
HI6076 Changing Directions in History: Transformative Historians and Their Work
HI6077 The Classical Revival 1250-1500
HI6078 New Worlds, Ancient Texts
HI6079 Schola Latina
HI6080 Dissertation in Renaissance Latin Culture
HI6081 History on Screen: Film, Television and History
HI6082 Female Activism and Feminism in Ireland, c. 1860-1983
HI6083 Radicalism, Dissent and the Print Media in Modern Ireland
HI6084 From Wireless to the World Wide Web: Radio as Historical Source
HI6085 Research Project
HI6087 Healthcare in Ireland, 1750-present
HI6088 Historical Contexts for Medievalists
HI6089 Insular Encounters with the Wider World
HI6090 The Insular World in Text and Image
HI6091 Skills for Medieval Historians
HI6092 International RelationsTheories and Approaches
HI6100 History Dissertation

HI0090 Personal Development and Review

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): First Year History or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (Meetings with module coordinator (no less than 2 per semester).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: The aim of the module is to allow students to apply the research, analysis and communication skills of history to extra-curricular activity and to award credit where the student has demonstrated that they have engaged in reflective learning arising from their participation in those activities.

Module Content: History as a discipline develops a set of research, analysis and communication skills geared towards understanding complex real world problems on the basis of often incomplete information. Historical events are driven forward by human action - choices made by historical actors who seek to transform their current context. This module offers undergraduates an opportunity to explore how to apply the skills of the historian to everyday problems and to demonstrate this in a portfolio which will enhance their organisational, leadership and lifelong learning, analytical and problem-solving skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a knowledge of a range of readings on the skills of the historian.
?Demonstrate an ability to gather and analyse information on real world problems or challenges.
?Present an action plan to positively affect those problems or challenges.
?Reflect on the outcomes of that activity, with particular reference to their learning and self-development.
?Demonstrate the ability to organise their work so that they can work effectively and independently.
?Demonstrate that they can bring the critical thinking, analytic and presentation skills of the discipline to bear in their assessed work in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent. This may include initial project proposal, reflective journal, action plan and other materials).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the module coordinator, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI1002 The Making of Modern Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History; Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to underlying themes, issues and events that have characterised modern Irish history.

Module Content: The module acts as a foundation level course, introducing students to the broad developments of modern Irish history, from the 1850s to the 1990s.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Show an understanding of specific major themes in modern Irish history.
?Demonstrate knowledge of key events, organisations and personalities that influenced the course of Irish history from the mid nineteenth century.
?Construct a relevant argument that demonstrates an analytical use of evidence and a familiarity with various historical interpretations.
?Communicate in writing effectively and present work in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.
?Demonstrate the ability to work under the constraints imposed by the component of assessment, such as word limits and deadlines.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 50 marks; 1 x 2,000-word document study to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI1003 East and West: The Origins of European Identity

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: The course introduces students to key developments in European history from the late Roman Empire to the First Crusade.

Module Content: The module acts as a foundation level course, introducing students to the skills and techniques of historical research in general, with particular reference to medieval Europe.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Show knowledge and understanding of key events in the history of medieval Europe.
?Develop analytical reading and writing skills through essay preparation.
?Communicate in writing effectively and present work in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.
?Develop analytical skills through investigation of primary historical sources, both textual and visual.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI1004 First Year Inquiry Based Research Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 6 x 2hr(s) Tutorials ((Group Research)); 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Office hour consultations; self-directed learning centred on inquiry based research project/project management).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce First Year History students to undergraduate research

Module Content: The module is centred on student research from the First Year. Students are introduced to historical research and the tools and methods that historians employ to study and interpret the past. Students will learn how to undertake a historical inquiry by exploring a diverse range of physical and electronic primary source materials. Initial workshops will focus on the development of key Research, Writing, and Presentation Skills, while fostering student awareness of the Conventions of Historical Scholarship.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conceptualise a viable research project and create appropriate research questions.
?Acquire informed research methods and skills appropriate to the task.
?Critically evaluate existing literature and primary sources.
?Use contemporary media to facilitate the research process and management.
?Analyse historical material and evidence to construct and advance arguments through essay writing.
?Evaluate the validity and merit of contrasting forms of historical judgement.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 60 marks; 1 x 1,000 wiki entry: 20 marks; 1 x 5 slide PowerPoint: 10 marks; tutorial and group participation: 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (any failed or non-submitted essays, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI1005 Pilgrims and Crusaders

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jeremiah D Scully, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: The course explores the history of pilgrimage and the Crusading movement and chronologically spans from the fourth to the fourteenth centuries.

Module Content: The module acts as an introduction to the skills and techniques of historical research in medieval history, in particular in culture contact and identity formation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an insight into key events and processes in the history of medieval Western culture and its interaction with the world of Islam.
?Accurately demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of medieval culture contact, identity formation and expression, and religious conflict.
?Locate, gather, select and synthesise source material relevant to the key issues of the course.
?Construct a relevant argument that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI1006 US History since 1865

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other (3 office hour consultations; self-directed learning centred on module outline).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the history of the United States since 1865.

Module Content: 'US History since 1865' will provide first year students with an introduction to the key events, ideas, and movements that shaped US history from the years 1865 to 2008. It will explore the relationships between culture and politics, foreign and domestic policies, and how the United States interacted with the world around it. This course will move from an examination of post-Civil War Reconstruction and the socioeconomic transformations of westward expansion and industrialisation, to the transition from isolationism to super-power from World War I to the Cold War, to consider the 'unipolar moment' when, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the US seemingly stood alone in the world in terms of its power and prestige. Key areas: Reconstruction; industrialization; immigration; expansion and Empire; World War II, the Cold War and the emergence of a superpower; the struggle for Civil Rights; dissent and protest movements; the post-Cold War world: the unipolar moment and the debate over American decline.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand the processes of continuity and change in US history and the problems involved in identifying and explaining these processes.
?Acquire an expanded knowledge base about particular periods, themes and issues in the study of US history.
?Gather, sift, select, organize and synthesize appropriate quantities of evidence.
?Appreciate the range of problems involved in the interpretation of historical material.
?Analyse historical material and evidence and construct and advance arguments through essay writing, document analysis.
?Evaluate the validity and merit of contrasting forms of historical judgement through a book review.
?Solve problems by devising and formulating the appropriate questions to ask of the evidence in preparation of the essay.
?Analyse the context, form and content of primary sources and also to judge their relative importance to the topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 60 marks; 1 x 1,500 word reflection on 'major problem' in US history: 20 marks; 1 x 750 word review of 'published scholarly work': 10 marks; seminar participation: 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI1007 Anti-Semitism in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Holocaust

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Module Objective: To explore the genesis of anti-Judaism and anti-Semitism from medieval times up to the Third Reich and the Holocaust and analyse the reasons behind this development .

Module Content: The module acts as a foundation level course, introducing students to the skills and techniques of historical research in general and of the historiography of anti-Semitism in particular.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Show knowledge and understanding of key events and historiographical debates relating to 1) the history of European anti-Semitism; and 2) the Third Reich and the genesis of the Nazi persecution and Holocaust of the Jews.
?Demonstrate an ability to contextualise major themes of the history of anti-Semitism in a broad chronological scope.
?Communicate in writing effectively and present work in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.
?Develop analytical skills through investigation of primary and secondary sources.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI1008 The Age of Extremes: Early Twentieth-Century Europe in Global Perspective

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to underlying themes, issues and events that have characterised particular periods of history.

Module Content: It will focus on the ideas, influences, institutions, and individuals of the era, and explore the connections between events within Europe and the world outside. Key topics will include imperialism, nationalism, revolution, Marxism, authoritarianism, militarism, democracy, emancipation, World Wars, civil wars, interventions, markets, and modernity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Show knowledge of specific themes in the history of modern Europe.
?Accurately demonstrate knowledge in specific topics within the history of modern Europe.
?Relate within these specific topics the relevant key historical issues, concepts, dates, figures, evidence and historiographical debates.
?Communicate in writing effectively and present work in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.
?Construct a relevant argument that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise an adequate body of source material.
?Demonstrate the ability to work independently under the constraints imposed by the component of assessment, for example: word limit, time limit and deadlines.
?Think critically and creatively and to bring the necessary skills to their assessed work in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (in-class test).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who failed or failed to attend the in-class test are required to submit a 2,000 word essay on a topic prescribed by the School. This essay must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI1009 History of Science, Technology and Society

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: The course surveys key developments in the history of the interaction of science, technology and society in the Modern World.

Module Content: The module is a foundation level survey course, introducing students to major developments in the history of science and technology, their impact on society and their historical context. Major topics covered will include the scientific, gunpowder, agrarian, demographic and first and second industrial revolutions, and twentieth century developments in the organisation of science and research, the impact of technology on society and the accelerating pace of change arising from new developments in technology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to contextualise major themes and events in the history of Science, technology and society in a broad chronological scope.
?Develop analytical reading and writing skills through document analysis, critical reading and essay preparation.
?Actively participate in class discussions, face to face and online, on historical debates on topics in the area.
?Solve problems by devising and formulating the appropriate questions to ask of the evidence in preparation of the essay.
?Construct and advance arguments through essay writing and other presentations.
?Communicate in writing effectively and present work in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Active participation in online discussions: 40 marks; one group presentation: 20 marks; 2 x 1,500 word essays: 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI1010 History: Tools, Methods and Practices

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to historical methods.

Module Content: This small group course introduces students to the tools, methods and practices which the professional historian uses to research, assess and analyse evidence, review historical debates and construct explicatory and interpretive narratives which make sense of historical events.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate awareness of the different types of historical evidence.
?Demonstrate knowledge of the range of methods which the historian uses to analyse sources and frame narratives.
?Be aware of the role of debate in the discipline.
?Demonstrate an ability to engage in critical analysis of historical sources and debates.
?Acquire and apply a range of skills associated with research, writing, analysis, argument, evaluation of sources and historiography to produce a mid-length critical essay at the appropriate level.
?Effectively deliver a short oral presentation related to his/her essay.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay to be submitted in Semester 2 on a date prescribed by the School: 80 marks; Case Study Participation/Oral Presentation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI2003 Culture and Power: Renaissance Intellectual History, 1450-1650

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Hiram Morgan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Hiram Morgan, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine culture as political, religious and social propaganda.

Module Content: This module seeks a deeper insight into the Renaissance and Reformation period by looking at examples of art, literature, architecture, music and science. Topics include: the iconography of piety; the new information technology of printing (which facilitated not only diffusion of knowledge but also questioning of received knowledge); new learning and new theologies; the similarities in the Protestant and Catholic Reformations (attacking popular culture, enforcing social control, domesticating women); the consolidation of anciens regimes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the major intellectual and cultural developments of Renaissance and Reformation period.
?Relate the evidence presented in the Culture and Power course to the relevant chronology and historiographical debates.
?Communicate in writing effectively and to present work about the Culture and Power course in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.
?Construct a relevant argument about the Culture and Power course that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise source material presented during the Culture and Power.
?Work independently on the Culture and Power course under the constraints imposed by the component of assessment, for example: word limit, time limit and deadlines.
?Think critically and creatively about the Culture and Power course so as to bring the necessary skills to their assessed work in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI2014 Women in Early Modern Europe 1500-1800

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clare O'Halloran, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Clare O'Halloran, School of History.

Module Objective: To enable students engage with some of the most interesting and well-researched aspects of recent women's history of the early modern period in Europe.

Module Content: This module will examine aspects of the lives of women of all classes in the context of major socioeconomic, political and cultural changes of the early modern period in Europe. Particular attention will be paid to key areas such as work, marriage, childbirth, education and changing notions of the 'ideal woman'.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the impact of broad historical trends on the lives of women in the period.
?Summarise the implications of class structure for women's life experiences.
?Apply the methods of gender history to the study of the period.
?Discuss recent writings in the field.
?Analyse original documents from the period.
?Recognise the dangers of anachronistic thinking in the study of the past.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2017 Geography and Imagination in the Middle Ages

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jeremiah D Scully, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jeremiah D Scully, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine Ancient and Medieval approaches to sacred and secular geography; real and imagined landscapes and seascapes, places and peoples.

Module Content: This course examines real and imagined places, landscapes, seascapes, peoples, monsters and animals in Medieval texts and images. It explores Western ideas about world-geography up to and including Christopher Columbus and looks at speculation concerning remote and unknown places and their inhabitants. The course will further consider the geography of Heaven, Hell and Purgatory in the Medieval imagination.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key themes and issues underlying the Medieval conceptualisation of world-geography.
?Relate Medieval geographical thought to its Classical and Judaeo-Christian heritage.
?Construct a detailed analysis and evidence-based assessment of relevant textual and visual source material.
?Demonstrate the appropriate level of critical judgement in the assessment of relevant geographical-historical issues.
?Demonstrate an awareness of the relevant specialist literature.
?Demonstrate an ability to carry out independent library-based research.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of Continuous Assessment , as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2022 The History of the Media in Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Finola Doyle-O'Neill, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Finola Doyle-O'Neill, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the political, social and cultural history of the mass media in Ireland.

Module Content: This module explores the history of the print media, the development of local radio and the evolution of a national television station. This module will develop an analysis of the relationships of these different media with the political and social institutions of our time, and the implications of these relationships for modern Ireland.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise the diminution of the power of the press in Ireland.
?Assess the different remits of public service broadcasting and commercial broadcasting.
?Discuss the role of television in the creation of a national culture.
?Explore the significance of the television talk show The Late Late Show.
?Discuss the importance of television soap operas such as The Riordans, Glenroe and Fair City.
?Assess and contextualize the complexities of the media portrayal of Northern Ireland.
?Select films which have impacted on the representation of the Irish on screen.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Writing a History/Broadcast/Historical 1,500-word Book Review).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2025 The Vikings

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To discuss the central problems of the history of the Vikings, especially in the islands: Ireland, Britain and Iceland.

Module Content: The general history of the Vikings outside their Scandinavian homeland and especially their activities in the West; the impact of the Vikings on Britain and Ireland; the political and economic results of that impact, and the consequence of cultural interaction between the Vikings and their hosts, especially in the later Viking period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Be aware of the general history of the Vikings from the eighth to the twelfth centuries. Assess the impact of their expansion into Western Europe, as well as possible motivations for their migratory activity.
?Develop an understanding of the material culture associated with Viking settlement in Scandinavia, Ireland and Britain.
?Examine the primary historical documents and the conventions they deploy in their presentation the Vikings.
?Demonstrate an awareness of the modern historigraphy of Viking studies, as well as a capacity to interpret Viking history objectively.
?Critically interpret Viking material culture and the literary sources for Viking history.
?Carry out independent library-based research relating to the Vikings.
?Employ discipline specific conventions for the representation of evidence and the formulation of an argument.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2031 Ireland and Rome: History, Culture and Contact

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Damian Bracken, School of History; Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To examine the links between Ireland and Rome in their historical context.

Module Content: Using textual and visual sources and a study-visit to the city itself, this course will investigate the key elements and turning points in Rome's history as a cultural, political and spiritual world-capital. It will examine Rome's impact on the wider world and in particular consider its relationship with Ireland.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse the changing relationship between Ireland and Rome, and explore Irish conceptualisations of Rome as the centre of authority.
?Interpret the themes and issues underlying the relationship between Ireland and Rome.
?Participate in a class study-visit to Rome to identify key aspects of the city's cultural heritage.
?Construct a detailed analysis and assessment of relevant source material.
?Carry out independent library-based research on this topic.
?Employ discipline specific conventions for the representation of evidence and the formulation of an argument.
?Communicate their ideas in an oral presentation accompanied by documentation.
?Construct an evidence-based argument founded upon analysis of sources, consideration of secondary literature, and sensitivity to anachronism.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written assessment, to be completed by a date prescribed by the School: 50 marks; Field Report to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Supplementary Assessment as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2036 Sport and Society in Modern Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Gabriel Doherty, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Mr Gabriel Doherty, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse the development of sport in Ireland since the nineteenth century

Module Content: This module investigates the evolution of sporting practices and organisations in Ireland from the second half of the nineteenth century to date. It focusses in particular (but not exclusively) on the major sporting codes on the island, with special emphasis upon their structures of governance, evolution in playing styles, and their social, political, cultural and economic ethos, placing these developments within the context of wider changes in Irish society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Convey a mature comprehension of how sport changed from an informal leisure pursuit to an organised, codified pastime in Ireland.
?Demonstrate a sound working knowledge of the histories of Ireland?s major sporting organisations.
?Exhibit an understanding of how sport played a significant role in people?s lives in Ireland during the period in question.
?Identify the major events in modern Irish sporting history.
?Make manifest a clear knowledge of the means by which sport was used to further certain social, political or cultural ideas in Ireland.
?Identify the process by which sport became increasingly commercialised.
?Demonstrate a familiarity with recent writings on the subject.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (mid-term assessment to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2038 The Tudors and Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Edwards, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Edwards, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse Anglo-Irish relations during the Tudor period (c. 1450-1603)

Module Content: This module examines the various ways in which the Tudor monarchs attempted to incorporate Ireland into a more centralised English state, experimenting with strategies of aristocratic 'self rule', administrative reform, colonisation, military occupation, and conquest. Special emphasis will be placed on Ireland as a security problem in English foreign policy, and how this was exacerbated first by ethnic and cultural differences (English Vs Gaelic) and later by religious discord (Protestant Vs Catholic).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Possess a good foundation knowledge of the main developments in Irish, English and wider British history in the period covered.
?Employ library skills to prepare for assignments and research.
?Write analyses of the history of the period.
?Appreciate the role of differing concepts of sovereignty, civilisation, territoriality and religion in the forging of a new Anglo-Irish and 'British' political order during the sixteenth century.
?Appreciate the changing nature of historical interpretation both in general and in relation to this period.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (mid-term assessment (1,500 word essay) to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2043 Digital History

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); Directed Study (online collaboration and discussion, group work and self-directed learning to fulfil the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce basic core concepts in digital history, lay foundations for collaboration in digital history work.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the practice of 'Digital History' - history using contemporary digital tools. It will survey the development of digital history, introduce students to the capture of historical data in digital forms, and apply some basic digital methods to conduct simple analyses of digital sources. The course will look at current international approaches and projects, and explore how they might be applied to local primary data. In the course students will begin to develop skills in online and collaborative work which are an important part of the contemporary practice of digital history, and build the foundations for their own digital personal learning environments.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the main developments in the use of digital tools for historical research.
?Demonstrate awareness of a range of contemporary research in digital history.
?Locate and evaluate sources in the online environment.
?Create a digital version of a text based source.
?Create a digital version of a non-text source.
?Conduct basic qualitative and quantitative exploration of both text and non-text sources in History using digital tools.
?Collaborate on research based learning using digitised primary sources in history.
?Explore tools and methods to create their own personal learning environment to locate and mange knowledge digitally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (portfolio of individual and group creation of digital historical archives, analysis of digital sources, presentation of results of analysis of digital sources, use of digital tools to locate, evaluate and manage research, active participation in online networks and class discussion forums, documented in reflective writing by blogging. Equivalent to about 5,000 words in total).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2044 Crime and Media in Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Finola Doyle-O'Neill, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Finola Doyle-O'Neill, School of History.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to the historiography of media portrayal of crime in Ireland from the 1970s to the present.

Module Content: Newspaper reportage of crime; the broadcast media and emotive reporting; the role of the Garda Press Office; US and Irish TV Crime dramas; Missing Persons reportage; Media ownership and white collar/blue collar crime.; the rise of the crime correspondent in both the print and broadcast media.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and articulate the diverse sources of crime reporting in Ireland.
?Assess the blurred distinctions between fiction and reality in both US and Irish TV crime dramas.
?Examine the nature of newspaper reporting of crime in Ireland.
?Evaluate media stereotyping of crime and its influence on public discourse.
?Understand the complexities of media ownership in Ireland and the notion of ethical gate-keeping.
?Appraise and interpret the role of the crime correspondent in both the print and broadcast media.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1,500 word assignment to be submitted on a date specified by the lecturer).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI2045 Crime, Violence, and Revolutionary Ireland, 1913-1925

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Borgonovo, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Borgonovo, School of History.

Module Objective: To explore how the political revolutionary environment affected occurrences of violence and ordinary crime during the 'long' Irish Revolution.

Module Content: Ireland experienced a judiciary and policing vacuum during the revolutionary period. This course examines the collapse of the British police and court systems, and attempts by the IRA and Irish Free State to replace them. Different manifestations of the breakdown of law and order will be studied, such as land seizures, rural terrorism, sectarian violence, armed robberies, labour strife, sexual violence, and urban crime. These developments will be placed in their social, political, and economic contexts. The participation of policing authorities and armed forces in such 'lawlessness' will also be considered, as will the violent and non-violent responses to the legal vacuum by state actors and elements of civil society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Provide a basic chronology of the functions and status of policing and judiciary systems during the revolutionary period.
?Understand why certain institutions declined and how they were replaced.
?Consider critically the popular legitimacy of state and non-state legal systems and institutions presented in the course.
?Discuss forms of `lawlessness' experienced during this period.
?Identify and assess different state, civil, and communal responses to these developments.
?Locate, gather, and synthesise source material presented during the course.
?Construct an argument about `lawlessness' in the Irish Revolutionary period that is supported by evidence and includes, if relevant, a selection of historical interpretations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 30 marks; 1 x 3,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 70 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2046 Policing and Popular Justice in Ireland, 1803-1960

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Borgonovo, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Borgonovo, School of History.

Module Objective: To identify and explore forms of state and communal justice practised in Ireland from the Act of the Union through the first fifty years of the new state.

Module Content: This course investigates community policing by state and non-state forces in both pre and post-independence Ireland. Government policing is compared with different forms of 'people's justice' visible during the same period. These include agrarianism, vigilantism, boycotts and other violent and non-violent expressions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess key government policing methods and challenges in urban and rural Ireland.
?Identify and discuss different forms of communal censure, mediation, and resistance in Ireland.
?Contextualise popular justice during such mass mobilizations and upheavals as the Tithe War, the Repeal Movement, the Great Famine, the Land War, the Ranch War, the Irish Revolution, and the Economic War.
?Illustrate the topics of the course's selected case studies.
?Locate, gather, and synthesise source material presented during the course.
?Construct an argument about popular justice that is supported by evidence and includes, if relevant, a selection of historical interpretations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 30 marks; 1 x 3,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 70 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2047 Hitler, Nazism and the Holocaust

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse the characteristics and historical context of the ideology and practice of National Socialism.

Module Content: This course looks at Hitler's and National Socialism's ideology and explores its practical implications in the Third Reich, notably the persecution of the Jews and the Holocaust. It introduces the students to some of the relevant debates in this context.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recount the most important facts of pre-1933 (Weimar Republic) German history.
?Outline the various racial and anti-Semitic ideas from the early nineteenth century until the end of the Third Reich.
?Identify the major personalities, facts and developments with respect to the history of Nazi Germany.
?Discern the fundamental principles of National Socialist ideology in general and of Hitler's ideology (Mein Kampf) in particular.
?Illustrate the practical implications of Nazi ideology in the Third Reich, notably with respect to racial policies and the persecution of the Jews and the Holocaust.
?Delineate the basic tenets of the major historiographical debates concerning Hitler, the Third Reich and the Holocaust.
?Construct an argument that is backed up with secondary as well as (if relevant and accessible) primary source evidence and includes, if relevant, a selection of historical interpretations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (in-class test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who failed or did not attend the in-class test are required to submit a 1,500 word essay, as prescribed by the School. This essay must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2048 1989 Revolutions: Poland and East Central Europe - Transition to Democracy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bozena Cierlik, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Bozena Cierlik, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the collapse of communist system in East Central Europe and the post-1989 struggle for democrcy in the region. The Polish case will be examined closely as the exemple of this process.

Module Content: The module will examine the process of transition from communism to democracy in East Central Europe and global significance of 1989 revolutions. It will provide analysis of the core issues that shaped the region's politics: regime change, creation of civil society, economic reforms and the changing nature of the post-communist system. It will study different paths to democracy using case studies of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Yugoslavia. It will invite reflection on the nature of politics in ECE and the future of liberal values at the end of the 20th century.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define and outline the key historical issues, concepts and historiographical debates, within the context of the 1989 revolution.
?Demonstrate an ability to critically examine the process of transformation from communism to democracy in Poland and ECE.
?Explain different trajectories or paths to democracy that have been followed in ECE.
?Critically analyse the power and diversity of cultural traditions in the countries of ECE.
?Demonstrate an ability to locate, assess and synthesise an adequate body of secondary source material.
?Present a warranted interpretation of selected primary source material.
?Construct a relevant argument that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.
?Demonstrate the ability to work independently under the constraints imposed by the components of assessment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 70 marks; 1 x 2,000 word document analysis: 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI2103 The long nineteenth century: Europe, Ireland and the Wider World II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Detmar Klein, School of History; Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Module Objective: To survey European and western history in the 'Long Nineteenth Century'.

Module Content: The course will survey the major developments in modern history from the American and French Revolutions through the major changes in politics and society in the Nineteenth Century.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a good foundation knowledge of the main developments in European and world history in the period covered.
?Employ library and digital skills to prepare for assignments and research as individuals and members of teams.
?Write analyses of the history of the period.
?Formulate arguments based upon evidence.
?Comprehend the role of ideas, power politics, and economics in defining Europe and in the creation of modern world.
?Understand the changing nature of historical interpretation both in general and in relation to this period.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2104 Special Research Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Module Objective: To foster independent research skills.

Module Content: Independent research on an approved historiographical topic.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability at the appropriate level to present a cogent, sustained argument on selected historical subject in a substantial essay.
?Demonstrate a competence in using the standard citation and bibliographic conventions of the Historian.
?Demonstrate an understanding of the key principles in the historical interpretation of primary sources.
?Demonstrate an ability to carry out directed research on a selected historical subject in consultation with supervisor.
?Present evidence of ability in key historical skills in a variety of examining situations: examinations, class exercises and written assignments.
?Employ discipline specific conventions for the representation of evidence and the formulation of an argument.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 5,000 word research project, on an agreed topic, to be submitted on a date specified by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . There has to be written approval of the title and supervisor of the project before the project can be marked.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed project, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2105 Case Studies in Research Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To study historical methodology and interpretation with particular attention to the use of primary sources in the writing of history.

Module Content: Lecturers are assigned a small group (if possible, no more than 15 per group) for intensive tuition in historical sources and methods. The core of this module will be an historiographical and methodological study of a major historical work, and/or of the work of a major historian, and/or a set of sources.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to engage in critical analysis of modern historical writing.
?Present a critique of the methods employed in interpreting a particular set of historical sources.
?Explain the relationship between primary source material and historical interpretation in relation to the case studied in class.
?Demonstrate knowledge of the way in which history writing is related to historiographical debate with reference to the specific case studied in class.
?Relate this work, historian or set of sources to relevant historical issues, concepts, dates, figures, evidence and historiographical debates.
?Acquire and apply a range of skills associated with research, writing, analysis, argument, evaluation of sources and historiography to produce a mid-length critical essay at the appropriate level.
?Effectively deliver a short oral presentation related to his/her essay.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word Critique to be submitted in Semester 1 on a date prescribed by the School: 80 marks; Oral Presentation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% It is obligatory to (a) attend at least two-thirds of scheduled case study classes and (b) give an oral presentation to the class on the case-study. Both of these requirements are a pre-requisite for the submission and marking of the critique. Students who fail to fulfil either of these requirements will be required to repeat the assessment in the autumn with their overall mark capped at 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (students failing Oral Presentation must submit a 1,500 word essay on a prescribed topic. Students failing the critique must submit a 3,000 word critique. Both must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2108 From Reformation to Enlightenment: Europe, Ireland and the Wider World I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clare O'Halloran, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To survey European, Irish and Atlantic history from the Reformation to the mid-eighteenth century.

Module Content: The course surveys the major developments in the history of Europe and the European world from the Reformation to the Enlightenment, and places Irish history within this broader context. It discusses the growth of Protestantism and the spur this gave to Catholic Reform; the emergence of confessionalised states at a time of mounting royal absolutism; as well as the growing global impact of Europe's overseas empires.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a good foundation knowledge of the main developments in European and Atlantic history in the period covered.
?Employ library skills to prepare for assignments and research.
?Write analyses of the history of the period.
?Formulate arguments based upon primary evidence.
?Comprehend the role of political ideas, religion and economics in defining Europe and in the creation of the early modern world.
?Understand the changing nature of historical interpretation both in general and in relation to this period.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay to be submitted on a date specified by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI2109 The Global Renaissance: 1300-1600

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Harris, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To survey European History from the era of the Black Death to the age of Reform, alongside key developments in Asian, African and American history, demonstrating the international dynamics that fuelled the Renaissance and laid the foundations for European global hegemony.

Module Content: The course surveys the development of the European Renaissance in a global context from the Black Death to the age of Reform. It discusses the impact of the decline of the Mongol Empire and the rise of European powers and the Ottoman Empire after the demographic catastrophe of 1348, examining the causes and consequences of the Age of Discovery and the emergence of European overseas empires in Africa, Asia and the Americas. It traces the impact of the Renaissance on social, political, religious and cultural life, before examining its transformation and eventual decline in the context of the European Reformation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a good foundation knowledge of the main developments in European and Atlantic history in the period covered.
?Employ library skills to prepare for assignments and research.
?Write analyses of the history of the period.
?Formulate arguments based upon primary evidence.
?Comprehend the role of political ideas, religion and economics in defining Europe and in the creation of the Renaissance world.
?Demonstrate an understanding of the changing nature of historical interpretation both in general and in relation to this period.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay to be submitted on a date specified by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3001 Historical Debate

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse the nature of debate among historians.

Module Content: Following a critique of the nature of historical debate, this module will examine a number of major debates, relating mainly, but not necessarily exclusively, to Irish and international history.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate engagement with the historiography related to key debates in both international and Irish history.
?Appreciate the nature of historical debate through engagement with the historiographical contributions surrounding the debates covered.
?Critically analyse a variety of historical contributions.
?Present a concise summary in essay format of a number of complex and wide-ranging historical debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word mid-term assignment: 40 marks; 1 x 3,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted on a prescribed date by the School).

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HI3024 Northern Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Gabriel Doherty, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Mr Gabriel Doherty, School of History.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of the history of Northern Ireland.

Module Content: This module deals with the history of Northern Ireland from its foundation to the present day. It is designed to introduce students to the principal areas of debate regarding developments within the area, focusing on the social and economic as well as the political and religious dimensions of the region's history.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Be able accurately to demonstrate knowledge on the historical evolution of the Ulster question, and on the development of Northern Ireland since its creation.
?Relate within these specific topics the relevant key historical issues, concepts, dates, figures, evidence and historiographical debates.
?Communicate in writing effectively and to present work in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.
?Construct a relevant argument in response to specific questions that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.
?Review competently a significant work on the history of Northern Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay to be submitted in Semester 1 on a date prescribed by the School: 80 marks; mid-term assessment: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI3026 Irish Economic and Social History during the Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andy Bielenberg, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andy Bielenberg, School of History.

Module Objective: To survey Irish social and economic history from 1800 to 1922.

Module Content: This module broadly traces social and economic change in Ireland during the period of the Union. Themes examined include the decline of landlordism and the rise of the middle class, the labour movement, diet, the British Army, religion, print culture, the fishing industry, emigration and marriage, the transport revolution, poverty, industrial development, war and revolution: 1914-1922.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Acquire a knowledge of the major historical debates in Irish economic history during the Union.
?Investigate the Irish experience in a wider European and global comparative context.
?Acquire a knowledge of the methods applied in different branches of historical research (economic, social, gender related, historical geography, and politics).
?Identify and utilise appropriate sources.
?Organise complex historical information in coherent narrative form, utilising research results, with reference to the canons of the discipline.
?Synthesize information generated from research in a structured format which incorporates coherent evaluation which can be clearly presented in a short and medium length essay.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3028 State and Economy in Independent Ireland 1922-2010

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andy Bielenberg, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andy Bielenberg, School of History.

Module Objective: To survey the economic and social history of independent Ireland.

Module Content: This module traces economic transformation and its social impact from Independence down to the present day, focusing on how the state has attempted to influence economic development. The module follows the shift in Ireland's international trading relationship from the inter-war years when trade with Britain predominated, through the growing influences of Europe and the USA since the Second World War, through late industrialisation from the 1960s, the impact of the EEC entry and greater integration into the EU, until the economic crash of 2007.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Interpret debates in Irish economic history in relation to independent Ireland since 1922.
?Employ methods utilised by different branches of historical research (economic, social, and gender related).
?Identify and analyse appropriate sources.
?Organise complex historical information in coherent narrative form, utilising research results, with reference to the canons of the discipline.
?Identify connections between recent economic development and economic policies implemented in the past.
?Synthesize information generated from research in a structured format which incorporates coherent evaluation, which can be clearly presented in a short essay and an examination.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3033 Irish Film History

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Finola Doyle-O'Neill, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Finola Doyle-O'Neill, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the history of Irish film from the silent period of early Irish cinema to the present.

Module Content: This module will thematically link the recurring narrative motifs in Irish cinema and the cinemas of the Irish Diaspora. The dominant presence of Irish history and politics in cinematic images of Ireland and the Irish will also be assessed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Trace the origins of cinema in Ireland.
?Assess the differing representations of the War Of Independence in the films Irish Destiny, The Dawn, Guests of the Nation.
?Evaluate film as an important historical source.
?Assess the contribution of Irish Independent/First Wave filmmakers such as Pat Murphy and Bob Quinn in Ireland's filmography.
?Explore the contrasting perspectives of Ireland and the Irish by filmmakers Neil Jordan and Jim Sheridan.
?Discuss the representation of Catholicism on screen.
?Locate the place of Irish cinema within world cinema.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3042 Ascendancy Ireland 1690-1800: Culture and Society in the Georgian Age

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clare O'Halloran, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Clare O'Halloran, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine significant aspects of 18th-century Irish elite culture and society in the context of complex social and political change.

Module Content: The Irish Protestant political and social elite presented a facade of stability and permanence during the 18th century, symbolised by the grand public buildings and private dwellings that they erected. This module focuses on the challenges and opportunities presented by their position as a tiny but politically all-powerful minority in a country that was overwhelmingly Catholic. Topics include their changing sense of identity and its cultural expression, their relations with government in London and with the rising middle classes who began agitating for a share of political power. The module also includes a field trip.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key characteristics of Ascendancy culture of the time.
?Recognise the forces promoting stability and instability in the period.
?Evaluate the importance of international as well as national factors in political change in eighteenth-century Ireland.
?Analyse original documents from the period.
?Demonstrate a familiarity with recent writings in the field.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3043 Politics, Society and the Irish Novel: from union to independence

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Rory O'Dwyer, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Mr Rory O'Dwyer, School of History.

Module Objective: To explore major social and political issues through the analysis of literary texts.

Module Content: Major Irish writers from union independence. This module examines novels as historical sources, as well as the social, political and cultural contexts in which they were written. It explores the influences on and objectives of novelists, taking into account intended audiences and readers' reactions. Themes covered include identity, nationality, conquest, colonisation and dispossession, and history and memory. Texts to be decided.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the political culture in Ireland in the period examined through literature.
?Analyse the historical subtexts and themes of a number of key novels.
?Recognise the colonial dimension of a colonial literature written about Ireland but mainly for an English audience.
?Apply the skills of a historian in analysing key novels.
?Recognise influences on and objectives of novelists, taking into account intended audiences and readers reactions.
?Research and present information effectively and comprehensively.
?Construct a relevant argument that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of literary criticisms and historical interpretations.
?Demonstrate the ability to think critically and creatively and to bring the necessary skills to their assessed work in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in August on a date specified by the School).

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HI3044 International Relations I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To apply the concepts of international relations to the development of the post-1945 world.

Module Content: This module surveys the international scene from the breakdown of the wartime alliance and the origins of the Cold War up to the present. Particular attention is paid to select examples of US intervention in the 'Third World'. Case studies include the development of the United Nations, decolonization and the ideology of US foreign policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply various theories of international relations to the post-war world.
?Describe the relationship between decolonization and the Cold War.
?Evaluate the ideological basis of US foreign policy.
?Integrate the historical, ideological and political legacy of Cold War international relations into the contemporary security climate.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,000 word document analysis: 40 marks; 3,000 word essay: 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI3045 The Politics of Church and State

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the handling of primary source material for the study of church and state in twentieth-century Ireland.

Module Content: This course examines selected themes in the history of church-state relations and focuses on the role of the churches in the political, social, educational and cultural life of the country. The lectures will also examine the question of tolerance in Irish society with particular reference to case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Acquire a critical awareness of specific issues of Church-State relations in modern Ireland.
?Understand the role of religious minorities in Irish society.
?Examine the relevant legislation governing church/state relations in Ireland.
?Evaluate the main church/state crises in twentieth-century Ireland.
?Communicate effectively in writing, presenting work in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.
?Construct relevant arguments, demonstrating adequate use of evidence.
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise an adequate body of source material.
?Acquire the skill to work independently for the completion of a 3,000 word written assignment, meeting deadline and constraints of word limit.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay to be submitted in Semester 1 on a date prescribed by the School: 70 marks; in-class test: 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School, 2 x 1,500 word essays, in lieu of the failed in-class test, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3051 Ireland and the Beginnings of Europe

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the coming of literacy and Christianity and the forging of identity in early Ireland.

Module Content: The coming of literacy and Christianity brought Ireland into contact with the civilisation of the Mediterranean world. The new learning was rapidly internalised, and resulted in a creative literary culture that contributed significantly to European civilisation. This literature adds a new dimension to our understanding of the early Irish - how they understood their past and reconciled it with the Christian present. It places Irish learning in its proper European context, showing how Irish ideas spread to the Continent, shaping and influencing attitudes there.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Interpret the effects of the formative impact of Classical, and especially early Christian, writings on early Irish literary culture.
?Demonstrate an ability to interpret critically the early Irish primary sources (in translation) in the broader context of the civilisation of the Mediterranean world.
?Demonstrate knowledge of the role of key Insular writers in the creation of the learned culture of early Ireland and in transmitting that learning to continental Europe.
?Construct an evidence-based argument founded on interpretation of sources in their historical and cultural contexts.
?Demonstrate an ability to criticially interpret the Irish historical sources and to contextualise the sources in the broad inheritance of learning from Late Antiquity.
?Demonstrate an ability to carry out independent library-based research.
?Employ discipline specific conventions for the representation of evidence and the formulation of an argument.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay to be submitted on a date specified by the School: 80 marks; 1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date specified by the School: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3052 From Pagans to Christians

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the transition from paganism to Christianity in Western Europe.

Module Content: The emergence of Christianity as the religion of early medieval Europe is one of the most significant events in Western civilisation. This module examines reasons put forward for its success, contemporary attitudes to its development and attempts to bridge the gap between the pagan and the Christian. The module will examine how Christianity, moving from its base in the Mediterranean, encountered and won over other societies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Interpret the effects of the emergence of Christianity as the dominant religion of Europe in the Late Antique and early medieval periods.
?Demonstrate an ability to recognise major Late Antique influences that shaped the literary culture of the West from the second century to the early medieval period.
?Present an argument demonstrating a critical understanding of the central themes of the course and of the primary sources (in translation), and evidence of consideration of the secondary literature.
?Construct an evidence-based argument founded on interpretation of sources in their historical and cultural contexts.
?Demonstrate ability in the critical interpretation of the primary sources and an understanding of the conventions of the literature.
?Demonstrate an ability to carry out independent library-based research.
?Employ discipline specific conventions for the representation of evidence and the formulation of an argument.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3082 Armadas: The Anglo-Spanish Conflict, 1585-1604

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Hiram Morgan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Hiram Morgan, School of History.

Module Objective: To undertake a case-study in early modern international relations.

Module Content: Using a mix of primary and secondary sources this module examines the causes, course and conclusion of the wars between Elizabeth I and Philip of Spain. The Spanish campaign in the Netherlands and English interference in the Indies will be considered as the main causes of conflict. The Armada of 1588 is regarded in popular myth as the end of the Spanish threat against England but in fact the war continued with not only further armadas and counter-armadas but also proxy wars in the Low Countries, France and Ireland. After the Battle of Kinsale in the winter 1601-2 came the difficult job of making peace.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the main causes, features and consequences of Anglo-Spanish war, 1585-1604.
?Relate the evidence presented in the Armadas course to the chronology and historiographical debates of the period.
?Communicate in writing effectively and to present work about the Armadas course in a manner that conforms to scholarly conventions and subject conventions.
?Construct a relevant argument about the Armadas course that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise source material presented during the Armadas course.
?Work independently on the Armadas course under the constraints imposed by the component of assessment, for example: word limit, time limit and deadlines.
?Think critically and creatively about the Armadas course and to bring the necessary skills to their assessed work in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted in Semester 1 on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI3095 European Imperialism, 1450-1750

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Edwards, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Edwards, School of History.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamental issues of European colonial expansion, from the Age of Discovery to the mid 18th century; and to heighten student interest in, and awareness of, cultural contact and exchange.

Module Content: The central theme of world history between 1450 and 1750 is European colonisation of non-European territories. The module will analyse the importance of individual pioneers of empire in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans (Columbus, Cortes, Drake, etc.) and attempt to measure the impact of the colonies on both colonisers and colonised. Major themes will include the international slave trade, the demographic collapse of the native societies in the Americas and the emergence of separate colonial identities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a good foundation knowledge of the main developments in European and world history in the period covered.
?Employ library skills to prepare for assignments and research.
?Write analyses of the history of the period.
?Formulate arguments based upon evidence.
?Appreciate the role of dynasticism, economics and not least intellectual curiosity in defining Europe's impact on the early modern world.
?Appreciate the changing nature of historical interpretation both in general and in relation to this period.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI3116 Culture and ideology in nineteenth-century Europe

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Module Objective: To explore the period from the Enlightenment to the outbreak of the First World War in Europe in terms of its ideologies and cultural movements and analyse the links between ideology/culture and politics in Europe.

Module Content: This course focuses on French and German history in the 'long nineteenth century' (1789-1914/18), investigating the content of major ideologies and of political and cultural ideas and movements and looking at select case studies which explore political and cultural ideas and their impact on politics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discern the key concepts of culture, civilization, and ideology.
?Analyse the major ideologies and political and cultural ideas and movements (from the Enlightenment until the beginning of the twentieth century) and assess their repercussions in the political arena in the `long nineteenth century'.
?Illustrate the topics of the course's selected case studies.
?Outline the major tenets of the relevant historiographical debates in the context of the course's case studies.
?Construct an argument that is backed up with evidence and includes, if relevant, a selection of historical interpretations.
?Locate, assess and synthesise an adequate amount of secondary source material, and (if relevant and accessible) analyse primary source material.
?Present work in a scholarly manner and show an ability to think critically and creatively.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 30 marks; 1 x 4,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 70 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3120 The United States and the Vietnam Wars, 1945-1975

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 Other (Blended Learning Exercises).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Module Objective: (1) To examine US policy on the Vietnam Wars 1945 - 1975; (2) To investigate the pertinent sources and historiography.

Module Content: This module will investigate the origins, evolution and conclusion of the US involvement in the Vietnam Wars, 1945 to 1975. It will examine US co-operation with French occupation, the division of Vietnam in 1954, the growing commitment to South Vietnam. It will analyse US relations with a host of regional and international protagonists. It will analyse US policy, the impact of war in Vietnam, the US and international arena. Finally, it will examine the phased process of Vietnamization and withdrawal.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Interpret, analyse and assess US involvement in the Vietnam Wars.
?Demonstrate a knowledge (through essay writing and examination) of the issues, evidence and arguments on the Vietnam Wars.
?Explain the US policy process and basis for the various decisions taken by the US administrations.
?Demonstrate an ability to creatively search for sources and analyse the methods used by historians of this topic.
?Demonstrate an understanding of the main historiographical approaches to the subject and to use the electronic archival material available.
?Communicate in writing effectively and to present work in a manner which conforms to scholarly and subject conventions.
?Construct a relevant argument that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 60 marks; document analysis: 25 marks; literature review: 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3124 Cold War China

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the role played by the People's Republic of China in the Cold War, and the effects of the Cold War on the domestic politics of the P.R.C.

Module Content: This module will examine the interaction between the dynamics of the Cold War and the domestic and international policies pursued in China between 1949 and 1989. Topics to be covered include the Korean War, mass mobilization campaigns, the Taiwan Straits Crises, Soviet interventions in Eastern Europe in 1956 and 1968, the Great Leap Forward, the Sino-Soviet split, the Vietnam War, the Cultural Revolution, Sino-Soviet border conflicts, Sino-American Rapprochement, the rise of Deng Xiaoping, the Third Indochina War, the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe, and the 1989 Tiananmen Incident.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appraise the role of foreign powers in the establishment of the P.R.C.
?Analyse the reasons for China's entry into the Korean War, its initiation of the Taiwan Straits Crises, and its involvement in the Vietnam War.
?Evaluate the evolving relationship between the P.R.C., the Soviet Union, and the United States.
?Explain Mao's concept of continuous revolution.
?Explain the connections between China's foreign and domestic policies during this period.
?Assess China's overall importance in the Cold War.
?Describe the historiographical trends relevant to this topic.
?Critically assess relevant primary source materials.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3125 Nuclear Politics and Proliferation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History; Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To investigate the international and domestic politics of nuclear weapons and nuclear power. Key nuclear debates and controversies are elucidated.

Module Content: The concept of the 'First' and 'Second' nuclear ages are introduced in addition to questions about proliferation's impact on world security, crisis decision making, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, deterrence, arms control, civil-military nuclear links, the non-proliferation regime, nuclear safeguards, and 'new' nuclear threats (smuggling and terrorism). Recent and contemporary case studies such as Iraq, Iran and North Korea will be considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the role of nuclear weapons in regional and global contexts since World War II.
?Evaluate why states do or do not acquire nuclear weapons.
?Identify and explain the nuclear strategies and deterrence postures adopted by states.
?Assess the interplay between domestic and international factors in the shaping of policy.
?Explicate contemporary debates with reference to case studies such as Iraq, Iran, North Korea, India, and Pakistan.
?Contextualise the controversies about weapons of mass destruction, particularly nuclear weapons, within the broader debates about the theory and practice of international relations.
?Apply logic, reasoned argument and evidence to test the validity of political approaches, theories and arguments.
?Communicate effectively in written form.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3127 Religion and Magic in Reformation Europe: Witches, Demons, Jews and Heretics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Harris, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jason Harris, School of History.

Module Objective: To encourage students to undertake a critical reappraisal of the Reformation in the light of recent research.

Module Content: Despite the prominence of secular thought in the Renaissance, early-modern Europe was repeatedly swept by rumours and conspiracies about the end of the world. These fuelled increasingly intense and wide-spread efforts to hunt down witches and heretics or to persecute the Jews, who were believed to be bound by a demonic pact to pervert the Church. The advent of the Reformation served only to magnify the sense that Christendom was under siege and that Armageddon was near. This course examines the increased frequency of exorcisms, witch trials, pogroms and persecutions - and the attempts of church leaders to regulate them - in order to explain the fanaticism of early-modern Europe, its battle with 'superstition', and the gradual backlash of scepticism, materialism, and intolerance of religious 'enthusiasm' that slowly unfolded into the Enlightenment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate understanding of the origins and development of the Reformation.
?Describe the historiographical trends relevant to this topic.
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise an adequate body of secondary literature relevant to the topic.
?Identify and evaluate primary source materials in the light of the thematic concerns of the course.
?Construct and communicate appropriately a relevant argument that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and the exercise of historical judgement.
?Employ discipline specific conventions for the representation of evidence and the formulation of an argument.
?Construct an evidence-based argument founded upon analysis of sources, consideration of secondary literature, and sensitivity to anachronism.
?Work independently under the constraints of disciplinary norms, word limit and deadlines.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay: 70 marks; 1 x 2,000 word essay: 30 marks (both to be submitted on dates prescribed by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI3128 Censorship in Twentieth-Century Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Module Objective: To critically examine the operation of state censorship of the media, literature, film and theatre in twentieth-century Ireland.

Module Content: This course examines key themes and events in the history of twentieth-century Irish censorship, from 1900 to independence and partition, and in the two Irish states after 1922. It covers the two main strands of censorship - cultural/moral and political/security - as they have related to literature and periodicals; film and theatre; and newspapers, radio and television. It will end with an examination of current issues, with a particular focus on the challenges posed by the internet and information technologies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Show a critical knowledge of the historiography of Irish censorship.
?Demonstrate detailed empirical knowledge of one of the major topics or themes in the history of 20th-century Irish censorship.
?Understand the evolving legislative framework of Irish censorship.
?Communicate an understanding of the practical and symbolic role of censorship in the changing political, social and cultural dynamics of 20th-century Ireland.
?Compare and contrast the operation of censorship in pre-independent Ireland, the Free State/Republic and Northern Ireland.
?Place the historical Irish censorship experience in a comparative international context.
?Demonstrate the ability to work independently under the constraints imposed by the assessment demands.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 20 marks; 1 x 4,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3133 Digital History

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); Directed Study (online collaboration and discussion, group work and self-directed learning to fulfil the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce basic core concepts in digital history, lay foundations for collaboration in digital history work.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the practice of 'Digital History' - history using contemporary digital tools. It will survey the development of digital history, introduce students to the capture of historical data in digital forms, and apply some basic digital methods to conduct simple analyses of digital sources. In the course students will begin to develop skills in online and collaborative work which are an important part of the contemporary practice of digital history, and build the foundations for their own digital personal learning environments.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the main developments in the use of digital tools for historical research.
?Demonstrate awareness of a range of contemporary research in digital history.
?Locate and evaluate sources in the online environment.
?Create a digital version of a text based source.
?Create a digital version of a non-text source.
?Conduct basic qualitative and quantitative exploration of both text ad non-text sources in History using digital tools.
?Collaborate on research based learning using digitised primary sources in history.
?Explore tools and methods to create their own personal learning environment to locate and mange knowledge digitally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (portfolio of individual and group creation of digital historical archives, analysis of digital sources, presentation of results of analysis of digital sources, use of digital tools to locate, evaluate and manage research, active participation in online networks and class discussion forums, documented in reflective writing by blogging. Equivalent to about 5,000 words in total).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI3200 History Research Seminar

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 Seminars; 24hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To engage students in independent historical research.

Module Content: The module seeks to familiarise students with the range of tasks required for independent historical research, with particular emphasis upon the use of original documentary evidence. To this end special, thematic discussion sessions are organised on a range of topics in the first semester, to introduce students to the historiography of the topic under review. Thereafter, and following consultation with, and under the guidance of the seminar co-ordinator, the student researches a specially-chosen topic, delivering the final conclusions in both written and oral form.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to exercise discipline specific conventions including: identification, analysis and evaluation of key historical issues, concepts, causation, chronology, evidence, argument, interpretation and historiography.
?Demonstrate the acquisition of a body of knowledge directly related to the topic of the seminar.
?Construct, at the appropriate level, a body of knowledge associated with the writing of a dissertation that adheres to the discipline conventions in conjunction with the analysis of an appropriate range of primary sources.
?Demonstrate an ability to carry out independent research using an appropriate methodology.
?Locate, analyse and synthesise a body of primary source material appropriate to the topic of his/her dissertation.
?Demonstrate an ability to integrate a range of secondary literature incorporating the appropriate depth and breadth of materials.
?Write an extended dissertation to the appropriate standard.
?Acquire and demonstrate the necessary skills associated with the delivery of an oral presentation related to his/her dissertation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Oral Presentation on the student's research project: 40 marks, 1 x 8,000 word dissertation to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 160 Marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . It is obligatory to (a) attend at least two-thirds of scheduled seminar classes and (b) give an oral presentation to the class on the research project. Both of these requirements are a pre-requisite for the submission and marking of the seminar dissertation. Students who fail to fulfil either of these requirements will be required to repeat the assessment in the autumn with their overall mark capped at 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted dissertation and a 1 x 1,500 word essay, as prescribed by the School, in lieu of failed seminar participation/presentation, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI3302 Special Research Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Selection of supervisor is dependent on the title of the research project chosen).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Module Objective: To foster independent research skills

Module Content: Independent research on an approved historiographical topic

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability at the appropriate level to present a cogent, sustained argument on selected historical subject in a substantial essay.
?Demonstrate a competence in using the standard citation and bibliographic conventions of the Historian.
?Demonstrate an understanding of the key principles in the historical interpretation of primary sources.
?Demonstrate an ability to carry out directed research on a selected historical subject in consultation with supervisor.
?Present evidence of ability in key historical skills in a variety of examining situations: examinations, class exercises and written assignments.
?Employ discipline specific conventions for the representation of evidence and the formulation of an argument.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (5,000 word research project, on an agreed topic with the relevant supervisor, to be submitted on a date specified by the School).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . There has to be written approval of the title and supervisor of the project before the project can be marked.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed project, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6018 Digital History

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 24.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Critical reading and study and reflective, collaborative online discussion of key texts and artefacts.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: To provide students with skills to make appropriate use of digital tools in their research and writing.

Module Content: Digital history and humanities, aims, objectives, philosophies, approaches; debates and controversies. Capturing and analysing textual and quantitative sources using text scanning, markup, spreadsheet and database tools as appropriate.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Know about the range of digital technologies available for analysis and writing in history.
?Know about the development of digital techniques in historical scholarship, and the debates about the appropriate use of computing in historical research.
?Know how to accurately create a digital version of a primary historical source using appropriate methods.
?Demonstrate an ability to use digital tools for scholarly analysis.
?Demonstrate the ability to present primary sources and research outcomes using digital technologies.
?Demonstrate an awareness of the community of practice in digital history, and an ability to participate in the community.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assessments based on a portfolio of work including digital versions of primary sources: 200 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6026 US Foreign Policy and Contemporary History

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Visiting speakers series; seminar and discussion; face-to-face); 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (Reflection, Reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse the history of US foreign policy through a particular focus on contemporary themes and issues pertinent to US power and foreign policy. To analyse the foundations of US power: political, diplomatic, military, economic, ideological and cultural.

Module Content: This option will examine the history of contemporary US foreign policy. It will analyse key issues during the Cold War and after. It will engage with the primary concerns in the superpower relationship, and the changing contexts after the end of the Cold War and after 9/11. Contemporary issues and concepts pertinent to contemporary history will inform the structure and content of the module. Concepts and phenomena including relative power, hegemony and empire, multilateralism, leadership and credibility, nationalism and self-determination, revolution, war and military intervention, decline and issues such as 'soft' and 'smart' power will inform our analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the content, method, archives and sources of US policy in contemporary history.
?Demonstrate knowledge of the issues, evidence and arguments on US foreign policy.
?Display ability to apply relevant methods within the assessment strategy.
?Demonstrate an understanding of the various US relationships with its allies and adversaries.
?Develop a personal perspective on their work and to be able to articulate this clearly as well as critique it.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,000 word conceptual essay: 75 marks; 1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; seminar participation: 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6027 Research Dissertation in Local History

Credit Weighting: 60

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (undertaken during Years 1 and 2 of the Programme).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: Completion of a research dissertation in the area of local history.

Module Content: Research and write a dissertation (25,000-30,000 words) on an approved topic in local history, carried out under the direction of a relevant member of the School of History.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to undertake wide-ranging primary research.
?Show an ability to synthesise research findings.
?Articulate a thesis based on a synthesis of the research material.
?Deliver a dissertation that reflects the student's mature consideration of the research topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 1200: Continuous Assessment 1200 marks (25,000-30,000-word dissertation submitted for Winter Examination Board).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Submission of dissertation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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HI6028 Independent Research I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Year One).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12weeks(s) Directed Study (incorporating directed archival research and in-class primary source workshops); 1 Other (archival field trip).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: The development of the requisite research skills and methodologies to complete a dissertation related to local history based on independent research.

Module Content: Development of research skills through direct engagement with archives in field trips and in departmental workshops.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct an independent research project.
?Demonstrate engagement with a range of relevant primary and secondary sources.
?Illustrate an understanding of key methodological issues.
?Produce a detailed research proposal.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Detailed research proposal and plan: 100 marks, to be submitted by the end of the first semester).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6029 Independent Research II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2. (Year One).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12weeks(s) Directed Study (incorporating directed archival research and in-class primary source workshops); 1 Other (archival field trip).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: The development of the requisite research skills and methodologies to complete a dissertation related to local history based on independent research.

Module Content: Development of research skills through direct engagement with archives in field trips and in departmental workshops.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a critical understanding of the literature.
?Complete a detailed literature review.
?Illustrate a familiarity with archival sources.
?Present their research findings in a professional manner in a class presentation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Literature review and bibliography: 50 marks; class presentation: 50 marks; to be completed by the end of the second semester).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6030 Perspectives on Cork Local History

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the historical development of the Cork region from medieval to modern times, incorporating political, social, economic and cultural perspectives.

Module Content: The history of the Cork region from medieval to contemporary times is examined by a range of specialists. The course covers topics such as: the medieval city; Cork traditional foods; emigration from Cork; the Famine; sport; folklore; labour history; revolutionary Cork.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a familiarity with the key phases in the historical development of Cork region.
?Illustrate an understanding of Cork history from a variety of perspectives (social, cultural, economic, political).
?Historically locate and contextualise Cork's historical development within the broader sweep of national and international history.
?Present a detailed research essay on a chosen aspect of Cork history.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000-word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6031 Local History Research: Sources and Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (/workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the wide range of sources and methods available to local historians, and to familiarise them with source criticism and basic research methodologies.

Module Content: This introduces students to the range of archival and other sources for local history research. It will incorporate presentations by archivists and librarians from the main repositories in the Cork area. The possibilities and potential of digital archives and sources are also explored. Specialists in various periods and different aspects of local history will then lead seminars on research methodology as it relates to their respective areas.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the location of the key primary sources for the study of local history.
?Carry out digital research relating to local history.
?Critically engage with a range of primary sources, documentary and visual.
?Produce a coherent research diary and learning journal.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (learning journal: 100 marks; research diary: 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6035 Foreign Policy and Diplomacy: Case Studies in Crises and Decision Making

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (Associated readings).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: This module analyses how governments make and implement foreign policy.

Module Content: Introduces the contributions that history, International Relations and models of foreign policy analysis make to the examination of national foreign policies, decisionmaking and international crises. Diverse national case studies and international crises are examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the shaping and making of foreign policy by governments
?Appraise diplomacy and foreign policy formulation in crisis situations
?Apply a comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the study of foreign policy.
?Debate effectively in a group setting
?Identify, sift, select and analyse sources of valid information (original documents, official publications, electronic newspapers, books, articles and audiovisual resources)
?Present arguments effectively in a written and verbal form
?Demonstrate the ability to complete a research project independently under the constraints imposed by the components of the assessment, for example, word limit, deadline.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 125 marks; document-based exam: 75 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6042 Sources and Debates in the Irish Revolution

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Fieldwork (visits to archives and respositories); Directed Study (associated reading and consultation hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Gabriel Doherty, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To acquaint students with the extent and use of primary source material, and with significant historiographical debates, relating to the revolutionary period in modern Irish history.

Module Content: The module consists of a series of visits to, and briefings on the operation, holdings and use of major archives and other repositories, and of a series of discussion sessions focussing, in turn, on major historiographical debates on significant aspects of the revolutionary period in modern Irish history, with sessions devoted to the work of, among other figures, Erskine Childers, A.C. Dicey, Leo Amery, Tom Kettle, John Redmond, Edward Carson, James Connolly, Padraig Pearse, Arthur Griffith, Terence MacSwiney, Aodh de Blacam, Darrel Figgis, C.J.C. Street.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appraise the operation and holdings of major archives and other repositories relating to the revolutionary period in modern Irish history.
?Relate this source material to the historiography of the revolutionary period.
?Divine within this historiography the relevant key theoretical and historical issues, concepts, dates, figures, and source material.
?Construct the views and arguments propounded by prominent participants in the political, ideological, and cultural exchanges that occurred during the Irish revolutionary period.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Written assignments 5,000 words: 180 marks; fieldwork report 1,000 words: 40 marks; on-going participation and contribution: 60 marks; seminar presentation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6045 War and Peace: the European State System from 1648 to 1990

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Module Objective: Critical analysis of the development of the European state system from the Peace of Westphalia to the present.

Module Content: An evaluation of war and peace-making in European history since the seventeenth century including European conflicts and peace settlements from the Thirty Years War to the end of the Cold War. Includes a consideration of the 'German Question' in European and International Relations. Students learn to think conceptually and historically, based on a critical analysis and evaluation of primary sources and repositories, set against the background of International Relations theories.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss selected themes in the history of International Relations since the Thirty Years War.
?Evaluate selected case studies investigating forms of international diplomacy and conflict management from the Peace of Westphalia to the end of the Cold War.
?Assess the Congress of Vienna and the functioning of the European state system in the nineteenth century.
?Analyse the debate on the origins of the First World War.
?Evaluate the treaties of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference and their effects on the interwar period, with a special focus on `Versailles'.
?Explain the role of the two Germanies and of Berlin in the context of European and International Relations from 1945 to 1990.
?Scrutinise the language of diplomacy in peace treaties.
?Analyse diplomacy and foreign policy positions of the major European powers (plus, from the early 20th century onwards, the US) throughout the modern period in terms of International Relations theories.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks (3-hours in duration); Continuous Assessment 60 marks (2,000 word Critique).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) (end of semester) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted 1,500 word critique must be submitted on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6049 Historiography of the Irish Revolution

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 4hr(s) Seminars; 24hr(s) Directed Study (Associated Reading and Consultation Hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Gabriel Doherty, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To acquaint students with the principal historiographical debates relating to the Irish revolutionary period.

Module Content: The module consists of a series of discussions focussing on the work of particularly significant historians, and on the content of influential historical studies, pertaining to the Irish revolutionary period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appraise the principal lines of historiographical investigation of the Irish revolutionary period.
?Evaluate the distinctive contributions of particularly influential historians to these historiographical debates.
?Assess the manner on which the historiography of the Irish revolution compares with and contrasts to the historiography of revolutionary periods in the history of other countries.
?Recognise the current state and faultlines of historical scholarship of the revolutionary period.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Written assignments 7,000 words: 240 marks; on-going participation and contribution: 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6050 Public History, Commemoration, and the Irish Revolution

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 3hr(s) Seminars; 24hr(s) Directed Study (Associated Reading and Consultation Hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Gabriel Doherty, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To acquaint students with the methodological issues arising from the practice of 'public history', with particular emphasis upon the public commemoration of historical events.

Module Content: The primary focus of this module is an analysis of the processes involved in the production and interpretation of public history, which is defined in this context as the presentation of historical knowledge to a non-academic audience, with a particular attention given to public commemoration of historical events.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the uses of history in non-academic environments.
?Appraise the value of the source material for the study of 'public history'.
?Summarise the significance of the commemoration of the events of the revolutionary decade in the subsequent history of the island of Ireland.
?Defend the conclusions of their research in front of a non-academic audience.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Written assignments 6,000 words: 220 marks; on-going participation and contribution: 60 marks; public presentation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (A failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6056 Issues in World Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (Associated readings and presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Module Objective: This module examines contemporary issues in world politics in the context of IR theoretical and political discourse.

Module Content:
Introduces students to the most important issues in contemporary world politics and the contribution of the academic discipline of International Relations (IR) to their discussion and resolution. The module will also provide students with an opportunity to make a presentation on their own research project and how this relates to the discussions of the seminar.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss a range of issues in contemporary world politics
?Evaluate the contribution of IR to the discussion and resolution of these issues
?Analyse and criticise key IR texts on contemporary world politics
?Present, communicate and debate effectively in a group setting
?Formulate a proposal on their own dissertation research that relates their project to debates about contemporary issues within the IR discipline
?Identify, sift, select and analyse sources of valid information
?Present arguments effectively in a written and verbal form
?Demonstrate the ability and discipline to work to prescribed deadlines and time constraints.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (class participation: 25 marks; 1 x 2,000 word Research Project's Proposal: 75 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6060 The Politics of Terrorism

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of different conceptual interpretations in this field.

Module Content: This course is an investigation into the historical basis of terrorism. It will analyse the many examples of terrorism in an Irish, European and International context as well as examining the ideological, political and social basis of terrorist action. The module will be examined through a variety of seminars, readings, original documents and multi-media presentations including DVD documentaries.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explore the historical background to twentieth century terrorism with specific attention to ethno-nationalist and revolutionary terrorism from the Second World War to the present;
?Identify the typological similarities in various terrorist campaigns in the period under review.
?Appraise the geo-political significance of terrorism in the context of contemporary global challenges.
?Construct, at the appropriate level, a body of knowledge associated with the writing of papers in conjunction with the analysis of an appropriate range of primary sources.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay - 150 marks; Seminar participation and presentation - 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School.).

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HI6063 Work Placement and Portfolio

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 140 x 1hr(s) Placements (supervised placement practice in a work placement relevant to the programme of study; normally one day or two days a week over a period of not more than six months); 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 10 x 1hr(s) Other (supervisions); 48 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (completion of work placement portfolio and reflection).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To enhance students' employability and transferable skills through work experience and critical reflection. Students gain learning opportunities in relevant work settings.

Module Content: Students are provided with, or arrange, approved learning and placement opportunities in work settings relevant to the programme of study in the School of History. They demonstrate a critical integration of theory, knowledge and practice. The placement can be paid or unpaid, or supported by external funding, and can occur in a variety of relevant campus, local, national or international settings (e.g. academic, cultural, heritage, statutory, NGO, research etc.). The module is assessed on the basis of an ongoing reflective portfolio maintained by the students in conjunction with the placement provider and their academic supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to contribute constructively in the work of a placement provider in an area relevant to the programme of study.
?Apply skills and knowledge from the programme of study to complete work placement tasks/activities.
?Articulate and reflect on the key skills and attributes that they have acquired or enhanced during their placement.
?Reflect on the experiential learning and personal development experienced on the placement and summarise in a work placement portfolio.
?Evaluate their effectiveness in terms of the role and the requisite skills and attributes required to fulfil its objectives.
?Articulate a deepened knowledge of transferable skills and their applicability in both academic and workplace settings.
?Produce a portfolio detailing preparation, participation and post-placement evaluation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Reflective Portfolio (200 marks); Placement Practice Report (Pass Judgement).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. and Participation in the work placement/internship (confirmed by brief mentor's report).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students cannot repeat unless conditions are met (Students failing the Reflective Portfolio can resubmit only having received a Pass Judgement in the Placement. Students failing the Placement may be permitted to repeat the Placement only once in a repeat year).

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HI6064 Dissertation in Strategic Studies

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (undertaken during Year 2 of the programme).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Workshops (online).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To train students in research.

Module Content: A dissertation (up to 20,000 words) written under supervision on an approved topic in strategic studies, international relations or history. To assist in the preparation of the dissertation, a series of online workshops will be constructed to assist students in formulating appropriate questions and methodologies for their dissertations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a valid research topic.
?Propose a line of study that will facilitate this research.
?Engage in systematic study of primary and secondary source material.
?Articulate a thesis based on a synthesis of the research material
?Deliver a dissertation that reflects the student's mature consideration of the research topic.
?Identify, assess and apply an appropriate methodology.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (dissertation max. 20,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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HI6065 The Making of Modern War and Strategy, 1450-1945

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning based on online lectures); 96hr(s) Directed Study (online moderated activities); 56hr(s) Other (written assignment reflection and development (submitted online)); 30hr(s) Other (reading and reflective practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Module Objective: To evaluate the changing nature and art of military strategy and warfare as an instrument of Western state policy.

Module Content: The module will introduce major ideas, theories and debates relating to the development of Western military strategy between 1450 and 1945. It will uncover and analyse major shifts in military strategy and the practice of war. It will focus on the interaction of society, technology, geography and politics in the development and implementation of Western military strategy. The role of war in the making of the modern state will be explored.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the significant developments in Western warfare and strategy.
?Analyse the role key factors such as technology, geography, society, and politics play in the character of warfare.
?Explain major shifts in the patterns of war and military strategy.
?Communicate in writing effectively and present work in a manner which conforms to scholarly and subject conventions.
?Collaborate in scholarly analysis using digital tools.
?Work independently under the constraints imposed by the components of assessment, for example: word limit, time limit and deadlines.
?Demonstrate an ability to review, interpret and evaluate the work of authors in the field.
?Assess and synthesise an adequate amount of secondary source material, and (if relevant and accessible) analyse primary source material.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; 2,000 word contribution to online discussion groups: 50 marks; 1,500 word book review: 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6066 Nuclear Strategy and Diplomacy

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1. (During Year 2 of the Programme).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning based on online lectures); 96hr(s) Directed Study (online moderated activities); 56hr(s) Other (written assignment reflection and development (submitted online)); 30hr(s) Other (reading and reflective practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the nature, dynamics and problems of the nuclear era from the angle of war, politics and diplomacy as expressed in the development of strategic theory, military doctrine and policy.

Module Content: The module will examine key concepts, thinkers and changes in nuclear strategy during the Cold War and the post-Cold War including deterrence, bargaining, arms control, first/second nuclear ages, nonproliferation and crisis control. It will examine both historical and contemporary cases studies of small, medium and major nuclear powers and their nuclear diplomacy and strategy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the main nuclear strategies adopted by states in regional and global contexts.
?Analyse key thinkers in the evolution of nuclear strategy.
?Link the debates about nuclear strategy and weaponry to broader debates in the fields of History, Strategic Studies and International Relations.
?Participate in collaborative scholarly communities using digital tools.
?Research information effectively and comprehensively.
?Construct, at the appropriate level, a body of knowledge associated with the writing of papers in conjunction with the analysis of an appropriate range of primary sources.
?Formulate a relevant argument that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; contribution to online discussion groups (1,500 words): 40 marks; 2,000 word document analysis: 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6067 Small States, Peacekeeping and Peace Support Operations

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1. (During Year 2 of the programme).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning based on online lectures); 96hr(s) Directed Study (online moderated activities); 56hr(s) Other (written assignment reflection and development (submitted online)); 30hr(s) Other (reading and reflective practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse the role of small states and their contribution to peacekeeping and peace support operations.

Module Content: This module explores the origins of contemporary peacekeeping and peace support operations and the challenges these missions face in ending conflicts. It will focus both on the experiences of peacekeepers and the role that small states play in providing security in the international system. Through a variety of case studies, the module will explore issues such as the distinction between peacekeeping and peace enforcement operations, civil-military relations in peace support operations, and challenges that contemporary peacekeeping faces, such as the protection of civilians, prevention of gender-based violence and the role of peacekeepers in peace-building initiatives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the principles of peace support operations.
?Articulate the differences between various forms of peace support operations.
?Analyse the role of small states in the provision of international security.
?Explain and evaluate the various challenges that peace support operations face.
?Participate in collaborative scholarly communities using digital tools.
?Research information effectively and comprehensively.
?Construct, at the appropriate level, a body of knowledge associated with the writing of papers in conjunction with the analysis of an appropriate range of primary sources.
?Investigate a particular case study and synthesise theory, method, context and knowledge on the particular case.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; Contribution to online discussion groups (2,000 words): 40 marks; Collaborative case study: 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6068 Strategic Studies Summer School

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 15 x 2hr(s) Seminars (classroom); 85hr(s) Directed Study (assigned pre-reading, independent research); 85hr(s) Other (written assignment reflection and development).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic.

Module Content: The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics in Strategic Studies and will assist students in formulating appropriate questions and methodologies for their dissertations. Content varies from year to year to accommodate key trends and new critical
theories and methods in Strategic Studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critique topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Summer School.
?Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
?Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
?Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
?Analyse aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School.
?Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories presented in Summer School.
?Critique topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.
?Present material and communicate effectively using a variety of techniques and software.
?Contribute effectively to the group to critique and enhance draft written work.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay: 120 marks; Presentation: 40 marks; Group Work: 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (To be taken in Autumn).

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HI6069 Terrorism, Insurgency and Political Violence

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning based on online lectures); 96hr(s) Directed Study (online moderated activities); 56hr(s) Other (written assignment reflection and development (submitted online)); 30hr(s) Other (reading and reflective practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Module Objective: To develop critical awareness of the multiple forms of collective violence and their relationship to strategy.

Module Content: This module explores various manifestations of non-state and intra-state violence. It will use historical case studies to examine a range of phenomena such as civil wars, insurgencies, non-state and state terrorism, as well as exploring state responses to these forms of violence. The module will assess the sources and characteristics of sub-state violence, and the problems the liberal states in particular face in responding to terrorism and insurgency.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss critically the various debates surrounding the ontology of terrorism.
?Analyse a variety of manifestations of political violence through historical case studies.
?Participate in collaborative scholarly communities using digital tools.
?Research information effectively and comprehensively.
?Construct, at the appropriate level, a body of knowledge associated with the writing of papers in conjunction with the analysis of an appropriate range of primary sources.
?Demonstrate intellectual leadership and an ability to effectively negotiate and synthesise online discussion and to summarise and build conclusions from group discussions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; Contribution to online discussion groups (2,000 words): 50 marks; Leading one online discussion section: 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6070 US Grand Strategy since 1940

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning based on online lectures); 96hr(s) Directed Study (online moderated activities); 56hr(s) Other (written assignment reflection and development (submitted online)); 30hr(s) Other (reading and reflective practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine US 'Grand Strategy' / national strategy since 1940.

Module Content: The module will examine the formation of US grand strategy since 1940. It will combine the crucial factors contributing to the strategy such as national security and the use of military force, economic policy and its foundations, ideologies and soft power through to foreign policy and diplomacy. It will assess the various strategies of certain presidencies and examine how they combined and implemented these crucial elements. It will assess the relative success or otherwise of US grand strategy across this period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain and evaluate the interconnectedness between these elements: security, economy, ideology.
?Form a theoretical understanding of US grand strategy that is rooted in historical research and evidence.
?Outline particular strategies adopted by presidents and their foreign policy principals.
?Research information effectively and comprehensively.
?Construct, at the appropriate level, a body of knowledge associated with the writing of papers in conjunction with the analysis of an appropriate range of primary sources.
?Communicate effectively online and to negotiate topics under discussion to enhance the final presentation of assessed material.
?Collaborate and produce a group report.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; Contribution to online discussion groups (2,000 words; 4 assessed postings): 50 marks; A group report on Strategy or Doctrine (2,000 words [for each contributor]: 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6071 Introduction to Strategic Studies

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18hr(s) Directed Study (self-directed learning based on online lectures); 96hr(s) Directed Study (online moderated activities); 56hr(s) Other (written assignment reflection and development (submitted online)); 30hr(s) Other (reading and reflective practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Fitzgerald, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to some of the key debates in contemporary strategic studies.

Module Content: The module will provide an introduction to the key concepts, theories and debates in strategic studies. It will examine the debate over the nature of war and its changing character by interpreting the ideas of some of the classic thinkers on strategy such as Clausewitz, Corbett, Liddell Hart and Boyd. The module will also assess the contemporary debate over the lost meaning of strategy and the extent to which 'strategy' has been superseded by 'security' as a lens for understanding contemporary conflict.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a critical awareness of the key concepts and debates in the field of strategic studies.
?Appraise the arguments of classical and contemporary strategic theorists.
?Analyse the changing character of war.
?Participate in collaborative scholarly communities using digital tools.
?Explore the various historical research and social scientific methodologies associated with strategic studies.
?Input and participate in the construction of a wiki.
?Construct, at the appropriate level, a body of knowledge associated with the writing of papers in conjunction with the analysis of an appropriate range of primary sources.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; Contribution to online discussion groups (2,000 words): 60 marks; Contribution to group wiki entry (1,500 words): 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6074 Debates in the Irish Revolution

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Gabriel Doherty, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To acquaint students with significant contemporary debates relating to the revolutionary period in modern Irish history.

Module Content: The module consists of a series of discussion sessions focussing, in turn, on major intellectual and ideological debates on significant aspects of the revolutionary period in modern Irish history, with sessions devoted to the work of, among other figures, Erskine Childers, A.C. Dicey, Leo Amery, Tom Kettle, John Redmond, Edward Carson, James Connolly, Padraig Pearse, Arthur Griffith, Terence MacSwiney, Aodh de Blacam, Darrel Figgis, C.J.C. Street. Relevant methods and primary source materials are integrated into the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically analyse sources for the history of the Irish `revolution decade? in their historical and historiographical contexts;
?Locate, identify and analyse a range of primary source material;
?Demonstrate contextual knowledge of the debates about Irish history and contemporary Irish history that were current during the `revolutionary decade?;
?Deliver an oral presentation on an aspect of these contemporary intellectual debates;
?Research and write an essay, employing appropriate disciplinary methods and standards, that analyses particular aspects of these debates;
?Interrogate the evolving patterns of the subsequent historiography focussed on the revolutionary decade;
?Demonstrate an adequate knowledge of the different forms by which the events of the `revolutionary decade? have been commemorated in the intervening century.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignments 5,000 words: 160 marks; seminar participation: 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6075 Making History Public

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Prof David Ryan, School of History; Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To explore the concept of Public History and its contested knowledge and to examine the production and consumption of Public History.

Module Content: The module will examine a wide variety of Public History including film, museums, monuments, buildings and public artefacts, history on radio and television, documentary and history in the media. It will examine particular case studies as illustration of the ways in which Public History is produced, the economic and cultural constraints and conditions under which it is produced, and the social agency involved in its production. Further, it will examine the debates on the consumption of Public History. It will explore opportunities involved in making history public.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse and interpret various historical artefacts within the public realm;
?Demonstrate a knowledge of the debates on Public History and the contested meaning of its products;
?Analyse the process and production of Public History through one or more of its forms;
?Identify and interpret history produced for the public and compare and contrast it to academic historiography;
?Explain the different approaches to evidence, narrative and popular appeal;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the debates and methods associated with interpretation of heritage;
?Produce a piece of history for public consumption through either the web, short film, report, photographic essay / exhibition, blog or equivalent;
?Communicate in writing effectively and present work in a manner which conforms to scholarly and subject conventions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 120 marks; 1 x 2,000 word report on a historical artefact: 80 marks OR 1 x 2,000 word web or blog or visual equivalent display: 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI6076 Changing Directions in History: Transformative Historians and Their Work

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Hiram Morgan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the principal changes in historical method and historiography that have made a lasting impact on the discipline.

Module Content: The module will examine central features of historiography from ancient to modern times, examining the major historians, historical trends and associated scholarly methods in context. Building on classical, medieval, renaissance and enlightenment developments, this course concentrates on the modernisation of history-writing with the work of Ranke, Burckhardt, Bloch, Braudel and Ladurie and its diversification away from political narrative into a variety of themes and forms. It also examines theoretical approaches to history, from Vico and Hegel through Marx, Weber and Toynbee to the end-of-history announced by Fukuyama. In addition to examining specific history books, the course employs a general reader as a source book for students.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Read, interpret and analyse the evolution of historical texts within the context of their time;
?Demonstrate a knowledge of key issues and developments in historiography;
?Analyse the methodologies and key features of certain types of History;
?Explain why changes in historical interpretation and methodology occur;
?Identify key historical texts and analyse their content;
?Communicate in writing effectively and present work in a manner that conforms to scholarly and discipline conventions;
?Debate issues and interpretations in the Seminar;
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise an adequate body of source material.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay to be submitted on a date prescribed by the School: 60 marks; 1 x 15 minute presentation on a key text, historian or method: 20 marks; seminar participation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI6077 The Classical Revival 1250-1500

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Harris, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the origins and development of renaissance humanism and the formation of Neo-Latin literature and scholarship.

Module Content: Close analysis of selected sources, written and visual, from Lovato to Erasmus, focusing upon linguistic and stylistic self-fashioning in the context of the evolution of renaissance society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Locate and critically analyse sources for renaissance intellectual culture in their historical and historiographical contexts;
?Appreciate and apply appropriate methods to analyse renaissance humanism and Neo-Latin scholarship;
?Demonstrate contextual knowledge of renaissance arguments for the reform and revival of classical Latin;
?Demonstrate detailed knowledge of the ways in which humanists promoted the value for society of cultivating study of the arts and humanities;
?Deliver an oral presentation on an aspect of renaissance humanist self-fashioning;
?Write an imaginary funding application from the perspective of a renaissance humanist trying to promote the value of his or her work and its broader relevance to society;
?Research and write an essay, employing appropriate disciplinary methods and standards, to analyse aspects of the development and spread of renaissance humanism.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay: 60 marks; in-class presentation: 40 marks; 1 x 3,000 word research project: 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date specified by the School).

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HI6078 New Worlds, Ancient Texts

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Harris, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the way in which ancient frames of reference were used to interpret new discoveries during the Renaissance.

Module Content: Close analysis of selected sources, written and visual, from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, relating to education, civic culture, ethnography, and science. Classes will examine the application of ancient language, genres and ideas to describe new phenomena first encountered during the Renaissance. Students will also examine how renaissance humanist methods of interpretative representation can be reflected in modern exhibition design and, accordingly, will contribute to a collaborative online exhibition on a topic relevant to their studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and critically assess renaissance humanist strategies of citation and imitation;
?Evaluate the deployment of ancient ideals of civility in the context of early-modern ethnographic writing;
?Identify and examine linguistic strategies employed by renaissance Latin writers to represent new phenomena in ancient language;
?Locate, identify and analyse a range of source material;
?Design an exhibition in digital format for online publication that explains and demonstrates renaissance use of ancient texts to explicate early-modern phenomena;
?Deliver an oral presentation on an aspect of Neo-Latin vcabulary;
?Research and write an essay, employing appropriate disciplinary methods and standards, to analyse aspects of humanist thought.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 80 marks; in-class presentation: 40 marks; exhibition design: 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6079 Schola Latina

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): LT1001 or LT6001 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Other (1-week summer school in Spoken Latin).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Harris, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To refine knowledge of Latin grammar and develop active skills through study and application of renaissance Latin teaching methods.

Module Content: Introductory classes on grammar, idiom and pronunciation, using blended learning and exercises in Latin prose composition, are followed by readings from sixteenth-century educational texts. Students are taught to discuss texts through the medium of Latin using exercises drawn from renaissance textbooks. The course includes a week-long immersion course in Spoken Latin, during which the language, methods and cultural goals of Erasmus of Rotterdam are examined through active application of his pedagogical works.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise, understand and employ all basic Latin grammatical constructions;;
?Identify and employ Restored Classical Pronunciation of Latin;
?Conduct a basic conversation through the medium of Latin;
?Identify, examine and employ renaissance and modern resources for teaching active use of the Latin language;
?Conduct a basic textual analysis through the medium of Latin;
?Demonstrate the methods, context and significance of the pedagogical works of Erasmus of Rotterdam.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (in-class participation: 100 marks; written exercises: 100 marks; oral exam: 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School.).

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HI6080 Dissertation in Renaissance Latin Culture

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Harris, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To train students in historical and linguistic research appropriate to investigation of the renaissance and early-modern world.

Module Content: A project on an approved topic in Neo-Latin or Renaissance Studies, written under the direction of a relevant member of staff in the School of History.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise a substantial body of source material on one specific topic;
?Construct a coherent research proposal and devise a working hypothesis drawn from existing perspectives;
?Evaluate critically the original sources relevant to a topic in depth;
?Demonstrate competence in identifying, interpreting and analysing the existing body of secondary material relevant to the topic under consideration;
?Illustrate the interplay between the original sources and the secondary literature in the topic under consideration;
?Present arguments, articulate ideas and communicate judgements in clear and coherent prose;
?Demonstrate competence in the key technical skills - referencing, bibliographies, abstracts, tables - appropriate to the topic under consideration.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (1 x 15,000-word dissertation submitted for Winter Examination Board).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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HI6081 History on Screen: Film, Television and History

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation; fieldwork including visits to archives and repositories); Fieldwork (visits to archives and repositories, film viewings); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History; Staff, School of History, and visiting lecturers.

Module Objective: To explore the historical value of historically-themed feature films, television dramas, and documentaries, particularly, but not exclusively, in an Irish context.

Module Content: Historically-themed feature films, television dramas and documentaries will be viewed and analysed with a view to assessing their contributions to historical understanding. The limitations of these forms will also be explored by comparing their representation of history with historical scholarship and primary sources.They will be examined under four main thematic headings: political history; social history; military history; cultural history. Irish-made and Irish?themed productions will form the majority, but significant international films, series and documentaries will also be featured. A number of documentary and feature film directors and writers will participate occasionally.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically assess the historical content of a variety of forms of `history on screen?;
?Appreciate and apply the research methods of film and television history;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the limitations and advantages of historically-themed productions;
?Compare and contrast the historical value of various forms of history-themed films and programmes;
?Comparatively analyse history films/programmes from different eras;
?Comparatively analyse history films/programmes from different countries/cultures;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the historical context in which a work was produced, as well as an appreciation of its historical content ;
?Communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing, in relation to the main course themes.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignments - 4,000 words: 100 marks; 2,000 word historical assessment of a screen production: 50 marks; seminar participation: 30 marks; seminar presentation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6082 Female Activism and Feminism in Ireland, c. 1860-1983

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (including preparation for fieldwork and archival visits); 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation; fieldwork including visits to archives and repositories); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Clare O'Halloran, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Clare O'Halloran, School of History.

Module Objective: To explore and evaluate the nature of female activism in Ireland and to situate it in the context of First and Second Wave Feminism.

Module Content: Through the use of selected case studies, this module explores the evolution of women's activism in Ireland, from its Victorian beginnings in the campaigns against the Contagious Diseases Acts and for female suffrage, right through to the struggle for equal employment rights and for the control of their fertility in the 1970s and '80s.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse, in the context of their activism, the impact of broad historical trends on Irishwomen in the period.
?Appreciate and apply the research methods of gender and women's history to the module topic.
?Evaluate recent writings in the field.
?Identify and analyse a range of primary source material (including archival holdings, official publications, newspapers, memoirs, witness statements and audiovisual resources).
?Write up a considered report on a selected case study.
?Make an effective oral presentation based on that report.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; 2,000 word report: 50 marks; seminar participation: 30 marks; presentation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6083 Radicalism, Dissent and the Print Media in Modern Ireland

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation; fieldwork including visits to archives and repositories); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Donal O Drisceoil, School of History; Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To explore the history of radicalism and dissent in modern Ireland through the print media.

Module Content: This course will explore how the print media has provided both an organisational and propaganda tool for radicals in modern Ireland. It will also examine key examples of dissenting voices in the mainstream media. From the Nation in the 1840s to Magill and Hot Press in the 1980s and 1990s, the role of the print media as a historical force, as well as historical source, will be revealed. The methods of media historians will be explored. Key archives for Irish media history will be introduced.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key phases in the historical development of the Irish print media;
?Recognise and historically contextualise the key radical and dissenting journalists, editors and publications of modern Ireland;
?Identify and analyse relevant primary materials for the study of Irish radicalism and the media (e.g., archives, online databases, government records);
?Interpret the content of the various publications examined in their political, social and cultural contexts;
?Evaluate newspapers and periodicals as historical sources;
?Critically engage with the historiography of the Irish media and Irish radicalism;
?Present arguments effectively in a written and verbal form.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 100 marks; 2,000 word evaluation of print media accounts of a selected radical event: 50 marks; seminar participation: 30 marks; seminar presentation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6084 From Wireless to the World Wide Web: Radio as Historical Source

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation; fieldwork including visits to archives and repositories; film viewings); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Finola Doyle-O'Neill, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Finola Doyle-O'Neill, School of History; Staff, School of History, and visiting lecturers.

Module Objective: To explore the historical value of radio archives and the role of radio as a tool of propaganda predominantly, but not exclusively, in a national context.

Module Content: Charts radio as an agent of both culture and propaganda via radio archives and podcasts. Assesses key moments in Irish radio history (e.g., de Valera's riposte to Churchill, the recordings of Lord Haw Haw). Considers the effect on Irish culture and society of pioneering programmes on RTE Radio One (e.g., Dear Frankie, Woman Today and the Gay Byrne Show). Draws on BBC7 and RTE Radio One archives. Radio as a historical source is examined. Apt methods to analysing radio as a historical source are introduced. Practices in making documentaries are introduced.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply the skills and methods of the historian to studying the radio as a source (`text?);
?Appraise the historical value of radio programmes down through the decades (both historically-themed as well as non-historically themed programmes, e.g., current affairs and cultural programming);
?Appreciate the limitations and advantages of historically-themed radio productions;
?Comparatively analyse programmes from diverse eras, countries and cultures;
?Evaluate the historical context in which a work was produced, as well as an appreciation of its historical content;
?Use radio archives as primary sources;
?Communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing, in relation to the main module themes.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,000 word radio archive project: 50 marks; 1 x 2,000 word essay: 50 marks; group project (10 minute radio documentary): 100 marks. Students will collaborate on a 10-minute radio documentary on an historical theme to be aired on UCC's Campus Radio. All of the group will be allocated a designated area of research on the documentary and will individually participate in the broadcast, in conjunction with a written overview of each of their individual contributions to the radio documentary).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6085 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 1hr(s) Other (Supervision); 150 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (literature review, proposal, research design, drafting); 150 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading, research/data collection).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To train students in historical research.

Module Content: A project on an approved topic, written under the direction of a relevant member of staff in the School of History. The identification, selection and analysis of sources in appropriate repositories, and the application of apt historical methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise a substantial body of source material on one specific research topic;
?Construct a coherent research proposal and devise a working hypothesis drawn from existing perspectives;
?Evaluate critically the original sources relevant to a topic in depth;
?Demonstrate competence in identifying, interpreting and analysing the existing body of secondary material relevant to the topic under consideration;
?Illustrate the interplay between the original sources and the secondary literature in the topic under consideration;
?Present arguments, articulate ideas and communicate judgements in clear and coherent prose;
?Demonstrate competence in the key technical skills - referencing, bibliographies, abstracts, tables - appropriate to the topic under consideration.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 6,000 word project submitted for Winter Examination Board).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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HI6087 Healthcare in Ireland, 1750-present

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew McCarthy, School of History; Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To explain how modern healthcare in Ireland has evolved from a long-term historical perspective; and chart the evolving roles of state and voluntary (religious) bodies, and social attitudes towards health issues.

Module Content: This module examines key developments in health in Ireland from 1750, charting the manner in which disease was tackled, the role of the state and the origins/growth of voluntary (religious) bodies and the function of their institutions; it will delineate the main contours of the public health apparatus, from its origins in the Poor Law System to its evolution into modern form; case studies on mental health; evaluates the role of institutions and the impact of key individuals on policy formation and delivery of services. It will consider primary historical sources and key archives relevant to the field. It will also explore apt historical methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and understand the main trends in health in Ireland.
?Appreciate the role of state and voluntary institutions in Irish healthcare and the evolution of both.
?Explain evolving attitudes of society to health related issues.
?Analyse the role of individuals in policy formation.
?Evaluate current literature in the field of health history.
?Identify, sift, select and analyse sources of valid information - original documents, official publications, digital repositories, books, articles and audio-visual resources.
?Present arguments effectively in class and in a formal oral presentation.
?Research and present an essay, utilising primary and secondary sources, on a significant theme within healthcare development in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word assignment: 80 marks; 1 x 2,000 word essay: 60 marks; seminar participation and presentation: 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6088 Historical Contexts for Medievalists

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to key research contexts for themes and topics in medieval history.

Module Content: Identification of fundamental turning points and transformations in the history and culture of medieval Western Europe from Late Antiquity to the High Middle Ages. Introduces relevant primary sources, methods and repositories.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise the major turning points and developments in medieval European history and culture;
?Interpret a range of historical sources in their medieval European contexts;
?Evaluate the validity of historical methods and interpretations of historical sources in modern scholarship;
?Engage with existing scholarly debates concerning the cultural milieu and historical understanding of the period;
?Produce advanced critical essays in their chosen topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay: 60 marks; 1 x 15 minute presentation: 20 marks; seminar participation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6089 Insular Encounters with the Wider World

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine actual and virtual Insular encounters with real and imagined peoples and places, focusing on the exotic and sacred.

Module Content: Close reading of selected sources, textual and visual, exploring the Insular experience of the wider known world and other worlds beyond; analysis of Insular narratives and visual images, including maps, concerned with mission, pilgrimage, journeys, voyages of discovery and other encounters; the identification and evaluation of relevant depositories; the application of appropriate historical methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain and discuss the Insular understanding of real and imagined human, physical and spiritual geography, journeys, voyages and encounters with the wider world and other worlds;
?Identify key Insular texts and images, including maps, relevant to the themes and topics of the module;
?Critically analyse sources in their historical and historiographical contexts;
?Produce an advanced critical essay;
?Deliver an advanced critical in-class presentation on the themes and topics of the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay: 80 marks; seminar participation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6090 The Insular World in Text and Image

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Damian Bracken, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To develop skills in the interpretation of primary historical sources for understanding the culture of medieval Ireland and Britain.

Module Content: Close analysis of selected sources of fundamental importance for understanding the medieval history and culture of the Insular world, viewed in historiographical context. Discussion of key repositories of primary sources. The application of appropriate methods to analyse sources relating to the Insular world.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Interpret Insular sources with particular reference to their authors' creative appropriation of late antique learning;
?Critically analyse Insular sources with reference to issues of authorial intent, contemporary cultural changes, and identity formation and expression;
?Identify and address issues of genre, reading strategies, and intertextuality;
?Deliver an extended analysis of the literary and historical features of Irish and British medieval sources;
?Produce advanced critical essays;
?Deliver an in-class presentation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 120 marks; 2 x 15 minute presentations (image analysis): 60 marks; seminar participation: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6091 Skills for Medieval Historians

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops (including reading, research, writing of blogs and editorial work); 80hr(s) Placements; 15hr(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Malgorzata Krasnodebska - D'Aughton, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To explore and evaluate historical sources available to medieval historians and to enhance students' employability and transferable skills through work experience.

Module Content: Practical study on the application of historical knowledge and skills outside academia, combined with work placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Contextualise historical sources and techniques.
?Evaluate historical sources as a medium of informing non-specialists about the past.
?Design an online exhibition based on resources available in the UCC Special Collections and present it as a series of blog posts.
?Explore an archive, a library, a museum, a digital repository.
?Expand their transferable skills through the practical work experience gained, including writing about public history, editing, dealing with copyright issues, working to deadlines, marketing and publicity of their work.
?Expand their soft skills of communication, collaboration, team work.
?Reflect on the value and use of their historical knowledge for wider audiences.
?Learn to present their historical knowledge in an informative, imaginative and accessible manner.
?Reflect on career options outside academia.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (student learning journal including blog posts, equivalent of 2,000 words: 100 marks; work placement portfolio of 2,000 words: 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6092 International RelationsTheories and Approaches

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 4hr(s) Directed Study (pre-assigned readings for seminar; preparation for assigned seminar duties and presentation); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (reflection, reading and research); 88hr(s) Other (written assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Module Objective: Introduces the major controversies and debates in International Relations (IR) to orientate students in the field of study.

Module Content: Key IR issues, debates, concepts and theories. Critical IR paradigms such as Realism, Liberalism, Radicalism and Constructivism are explored. International organizations, globalization and transnational actors are taken into consideration. Change, continuity and empiricism are introduced from historical approaches to assist in the evaluation and development of theories. The module will be taught using a variety of readings and presentations for seminars, as a complement to summative introductory lectures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify actors, processes and structures in international politics;
?Evaluate theories and approaches to the study of IR;
?Apply theories and concepts to questions relating to contemporary world politics as well as international history;
?Research, organise and interpret problems effectively and comprehensively;
?Communicate in oral and verbal form according to scholarly conventions;
?Demonstrate the discipline to work to deadlines;
?Present findings to the peer group;
?Respond effectively to oral questions and interact in classroom discussions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay: 150 marks; seminar presentation, including summative report, and participation: 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (a failed or non-submitted element of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted in the autumn on a date prescribed by the School).

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HI6100 History Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 45

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 1hr(s) Other (Supervision); 440hr(s) Other (literature review, proposal, research design, drafting); 450hr(s) Other (reflection, reading, research/data collection).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof David Ryan, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To train students in historical research.

Module Content: A minor dissertation on an approved topic in History, written under the direction of a relevant member of the School of History. It involves the selection and analysis of sources in appropriate repositories, and the application of apt historical methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Locate, gather, sift and synthesise a substantial body of source material on one specific topic;
?Construct a coherent research proposal and devise a working hypothesis drawn from the existing perspectives;
?Evaluate critically the original sources relevant to the topic in depth, where appropriate;
?Demonstrate competence in identifying, interpreting and analysing the existing body of secondary material relevant to the topic under consideration;
?Illustrate the interplay between the original sources and the secondary literature in the topic under consideration;
?Present arguments, articulate ideas and communicate judgements in clear and coherent prose;
?Demonstrate competence in the key technical skills - referencing, bibliographies, abstracts, tables - appropriate to the topic under consideration.

Assessment: Total Marks 900: Continuous Assessment 900 marks (20,000-word dissertation submitted for Winter Examination Board).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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