Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

ES1002 Introduction to Europe and the European Union
ES1003 The Nature and Political Evolution of the EC/EU
ES1004 Europe: Rural Societies, Economies & Policies
ES2022 The European Union and the International System
ES2027 Comparative European Politics I
ES2029 EU: Political & Institutional Development
ES2031 Methodologies, Data Analysis & Research
ES2032 Mediterranean Politics
ES2033 Model European Union
ES4022 Research Dissertation
ES4025 Ireland & International Relations: From independence to globalisation
ES4027 Capitalism, Communism and the Cold War: East and West Germany from the 'Hour Zero' to the 1989 Revolution (1945-1990)
ES4028 EU Common Foreign Policy: Issues & Approaches

ES1002 Introduction to Europe and the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jerome Aan De Wiel, School of History; Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse key developments and challenges in the evolution of European Integration since 1945.

Module Content: Examination of significant issues and themes in the development of Europe and the EC/EU since 1945.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the origins and consequences of the Cold War on Europe and on the European Integration process.
?Discuss contemporary developments associated with the European Integration Process.
?Analyse contemporary challenges associated with the European Union.
?Understand the valuable nature of relevant primary and secondary source material.
?Construct and advance coherent arguments through tutorial group discussion and through clear, succinct prose.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay, 40 marks; 2 x in-class tests (60 marks - 30 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (in-lieu of in-class tests) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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ES1003 The Nature and Political Evolution of the EC/EU

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse the main developments in the evolution of European Integration from 1945 to circa 2000.

Module Content: Examination of the main issues and themes in the development of the EU from 1945 to circa 2000; appreciation of the unique nature of this polity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the unique nature of the EU polity.
?Evaluate the origins & developments of European integration from 1945 to circa 2000.
?Explain the evolving role of key EC/EU institutions from the 1950s to circa 2000.
?Outline the main features & objectives of key EU treaties during this period.
?Discuss challenges associated with the enlargement process during this period.
?Engage in debates about Ireland's membership of the EU.
?Articulate and develop well-structured arguments, supported by relevant primary and/or secondary evidence, through clear and succinct prose.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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ES1004 Europe: Rural Societies, Economies & Policies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce students to EU Rural Development and Cohesion Policies and their impact on rural, social and economic development patterns and trends.

Module Content: Examination of evolving rural and territorial cohesion policies throughout twentieth century Europe; investigating the agricultural, rural development and cohesion policies of the EU; assessing contemporary rural change and trends in Europe.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the evolution of European and Irish Rural Development and Cohesion Policy.
?Discuss contemporary rural, social and economic trends in Europe.
?Explain significant differences in rural development trends within Europe.
?Evaluate the impact of EU policies on rural and regional development.
?Formulate and elaborate logical arguments, supported by appropriate evidence, through clear and coherent prose.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the coordinating School).

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ES2022 The European Union and the International System

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History; Dr Jerome Aan De Wiel, School of History.

Module Objective: To survey the international role and context of the European Union.

Module Content: This module will provide an introduction to the study of international relations with special reference to the role of Europe in world politics. It will include a study of EU foreign policy and the EU as an actor in the international system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Debate the changing nature of European relations.
?Appraise key International Relations and European integration theories.
?Evaluate how unique the EU is as an international actor.
?Explain the development and implications of European common foreign and security policy.
?Formulate and elaborate logical arguments through clear and coherent prose.
?Select and analyse relevant sources of information.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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ES2027 Comparative European Politics I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce key concepts, theories and issues involved in the study of Comparative European Politics.

Module Content: This module introduces some of the vocabulary and tools used in comparative politics. These are debated in a European context.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the key concepts, theories and issues involved in the study of comparative politics.
?Analyse the following topics in the context of Western Europe: representative and liberal democracy, audience democracy; state, nation and sovereignty.
?Analyse the following topics in the context of post-war Western Europe: political institutions; constitutions and political culture.
?Analyse the following topics in the context of post-war Western Europe: political & socio-economic cleavages and party systems; parties and party families.
?Reflect upon popular disenchantment with democratic politics and upon the challenges facing established parties.
?Formulate and elaborate logical arguments, supported by appropriate evidence, through clear and coherent prose.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,500 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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ES2029 EU: Political & Institutional Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Module Objective: To analyse key developments in the evolution of European Integration from 1945 to the Lisbon Treaty; to assess the workings of EU institutions and investigate the nature of EU policies.

Module Content: Examination of the main issues and themes in the development of the EU since 1945; appreciation of the unique nature of this polity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the unique nature of the EU polity.
?Evaluate the origins & developments of European integration since 1945.
?Explain the evolving role of key EU institutions.
?Outline the main features & objectives of key EU treaties.
?Discuss the challenges associated with the enlargement process.
?Engage in debates about Ireland's membership of the EU.
?Articulate and develop well-structured arguments, supported by relevant primary and/or secondary evidence, through clear and succinct prose.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,500 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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ES2031 Methodologies, Data Analysis & Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (including a Seminar Presentation and Practicals (computer technology and research skills)).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History; Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To guide students in the preparation of their Second Year and Fourth Year Research Projects by familiarising them with a variety of techniques to collect, analyse, interpret, represent data.

Module Content: Enables students to acquire practical and academic skills in the collection and evaluation of material for the writing of a second year project on a European Studies topic to be approved by the Module Co-ordinator. Students develop a proficiency in data gathering techniques, computer-based methods of data presentation, data analysis and research design.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Formulate a viable research question.
?Develop strategies for data collection, interpretation, analysis and presentation.
?Evaluate the problems and difficulties of interpreting and analysing the data and results obtained by qualitative and quantitative means.
?Identify and access biblographical resources, primary material, databases and other sources of relevant information.
?Employ the practical skills necessary to design, plan and present a written dissertation. This involves submitting a proposal for a significant piece of research.
?Write a 2,500 word report on a European Studies topic to be approved by the Module Co-ordinator.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word Report 50 marks; Practical Exercises 35 marks; Research Proposal and Seminar Presentation 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Schools).

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ES2032 Mediterranean Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Module Objective: To develop a detailed knowledge of the government and politics of certain Mediterranean member states of the European Union.

Module Content: The module examines democratic politics in the Mediterranean area of the EU. Its primary focus is on the national political systems of France, Spain and Italy. Some attention is also given to political developments in Portugal.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss key developments in the post-war government and politics of the following countries: France, Spain and Italy, in the main, and also Portugal.
?Analyse the constitutions in place.
?Describe the main features of these regimes.
?Investigate the development of parties and party systems in the cases under consideration.
?Construct and advance coherent arguments, supported by appropriate evidence, through clear and succinct prose.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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ES2033 Model European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Lecturer Meetings with individual students and with individual country groups); 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals (1 x 2 day Model EU).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the Councils of the EU, key EU policies and current EU affairs. To give students an opportunity to develop communication and negotiating skills by participating in simulated Summit Meetings, over two days, of the European Council and the Council of the EU.

Module Content: Examination of the Councils of the EU, key EU policies and current EU affairs. Students will be divided into country groups representing members of the European Union, and each will take responsibility for a ministerial portfolio. The Model EU / Simulation itself will take place over 2 days. A press communique will be prepared by press teams each day. On the final day of the exercise, there will be a press conference. A position paper must also be submitted.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand the roles and key functions of the European Council and the Council of the EU.
?Discuss key EU policies and current EU affairs.
?Participate in simulated two-day Summit Meetings of the European Council and the Council of the EU.
?Articulate their country's policies in a coherent manner on current European Union affairs and effectively negotiate their positions in both small groups and in plenary sessions.
?Chair a meeting.
?Write a clear and succinct press communique.
?Prepare a well-structured, coherent position paper.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,000 word paper regarding the Model EU Exercise 20 marks; Participation in the Model EU Exercise 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 1,000 word paper 20 marks; and 4,000 word essay in lieu of participation in the Model EU Exercise 80 marks, to be submitted as prescribed by the School).

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ES4022 Research Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Independent research, in consultation with the assigned Supervisor; class meetings).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, School of History.

Module Objective: The submission of a 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic.

Module Content: Students are required to submit a 10,000 word research dissertation on an approved topic. This dissertation will draw substantially on sources and research undertaken during the year abroad (e.g. foreign language sources). It will be supervised by a staff member. The dissertation, and drafts thereof, should be submitted on dates prescribed by the co-ordinating School.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Carry out independent research, especially while studying abroad in Third Year.
?Locate, analyse and synthesise a body of primary source material appropriate to the dissertation topic.
?Integrate a range of secondary literature incorporating the appropriate depth and breadth of materials.
?Write an extended dissertation of c.10,000 words to the appropriate standard.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 10,000 word dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit dissertation in the Autumn, as prescribed by the coordinating School).

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ES4025 Ireland & International Relations: From independence to globalisation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine Ireland's place in the world.

Module Content: Irish foreign policy (political, diplomatic and economic); role of regional and international institutions; case studies; the relationship between values, interests, identity and foreign policy; foreign policy formulation; theoretical approaches.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Interpret, analyse and assess Ireland's place in the world.
?Examine the impact of European integration on Irish foreign and defence policy.
?Analyse Ireland's policies towards major international crises and events both past and present.
?Assess the role of international institutions, and global developments, on Ireland's place in the world.
?Identify, sift, select and analyse relevant forms of information (original documents, official publications, newspapers, books, articles & audiovisual sources).
?Present arguments effectively in a written and verbal form.
?Demonstrate the ability to work independently under the constraints imposed by the components of assessment, for example: word limit, time limit and deadlines.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 70 marks; 1 in-class presentation 10 marks; 1 x 1,500 word book review 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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ES4027 Capitalism, Communism and the Cold War: East and West Germany from the 'Hour Zero' to the 1989 Revolution (1945-1990)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1hr(s) Other (Directed & self-directed study (associated primary source analysis)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jerome Aan De Wiel, School of History; Dr Detmar Klein, School of History.

Module Objective: To examine the political evolution in East and West Germany and intra-German relations within the context of the Cold War.

Module Content: The module examines the formation and development of the two German states between 1945 and 1990, with a particular focus on their ideological characteristics. Relations between state and citizen, with their components of state supervision, conformism, protest and counter-culture, will be studied. A major element of the module is the genesis of intra-German relations and the lead-up to the Fall of the Berlin Wall. Secret police (Stasi) activities are analysed in detail, with the use of original documents.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse the formation and workings of a totalitarian system.
?Analyse the formation of West Germany's capitalist parliamentary democracy.
?Investigate the integration of West and East Germany in their respective alliances.
?Evaluate the difficulties and contradictions of a democratic system.
?Discuss the evolution of international relations around the 'German Question'.
?Investigate the challenges to Communist rule in the Eastern Bloc in the 1980s.
?Evaluate the process that led to the Fall of the Berlin Wall.
?Evaluate the role of the two Germanys in the context of the Cold War in Europe.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word critique/analysis of primary sources).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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ES4028 EU Common Foreign Policy: Issues & Approaches

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jerome Aan De Wiel, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jerome Aan De Wiel, School of History.

Module Objective: To survey the creation of a common EU foreign policy and to analyse its implementation.

Module Content: The module examines questions relating to the following: what constitutes EU foreign policy; a historical overview of EC/EU foreign policy; instruments of foreign policy; promoting regional cooperation; promoting human rights; promoting democracy and good governance; promoting conflict prevention; combating international crime; the EU's relations with the USA, Russia, China and emerging powers; the Franco-German tandem in the EU.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Give an overview of historical developments that led to the formulation of a common foreign policy.
?Demonstrate an understanding of the genesis of EU foreign policy.
?Discuss various challenges facing EU foreign policy.
?Examine the interactions between EU institutions and member-states in the formulation of a common foreign policy.
?Discuss certain crises and interpret the reaction(s) of individual member-states or certain regional groupings of member-states to same.
?Critically assess the inherent strengths and weaknesses of particular approaches in EU foreign policy.
?Evaluate the EU's relations with 'super-powers' (USA, Russia and China).

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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