Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

AE2001 Fundamentals of Ecology
AE2002 Practical Ecological Skills
AE3010 Introduction to Ecotoxicology
AE3013 Practical Field Ecology
AE4001 Advanced Ecotoxicology
AE4012 Landscape Conservation and Management
AE4015 Biology & Management of Alien Species
AE6001 Ecological Site Assessment
AE6016 Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)

AE2001 Fundamentals of Ecology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Harrison, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Simon Harrison, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Module Objective: To introduce the fundamental concepts of ecology.

Module Content: This module will provide a general introduction to basic ecological principles and relate them to national and international ecological phenomena and challenges.
It will include topics such as mechanisms of evolution and adaptation, extinction, life history strategies, population growth and demographics, species interactions, physical factors limiting distribution and abundance, communities and species richness.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the underlying ecological principles governing species, communities and ecosystems.
?Apply the theoretical principles of ecology to practical examples of real world species and community biology.
?Describe and give examples of key ecological principles, including predation, competition, herbivory and mutualism, and factors controlling the distribution and abundance of individuals and communities.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (end of module MCQ 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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AE2002 Practical Ecological Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 2 x 4hr(s) Workshops; 2 x 1day(s) Fieldwork; 1 x 1day(s) Practicals (laboratory work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Harrison, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Simon Harrison, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To introduce students to ecological fieldwork skills, data exploration and analysis.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to ecological fieldwork. A number of ecological investigations of plants and animals will be undertaken within a woodland habitat in Co. Cork, using a variety of ecological sampling techniques. There will be a general introduction to the use of taxonomic keys. Students will also be introduced to basic data analysis and data presentation techniques.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate and employ appropriate ecological methods for fieldwork investigations.
?Collect and analyse ecological field data.
?Present ecological data in a scientific form and manner.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (4 Written Practical Reports (25 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AE3010 Introduction to Ecotoxicology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John O'Halloran, Department of VP Teaching and Learning.

Lecturer(s): Prof John O'Halloran, Department of VP Teaching and Learning; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To introduce the concepts of pollution and toxicology as important determinants in environmental quality and ecosystem functioning. To understand pathways of pollutants through ecosystems.

Module Content: This module introduces the concept, terminology and bio-accumulation and bio-magnification of pollutants. The application of Bio-Concentration Factors (BCFs) and Bio-Accumulation Factors (BAFs) will be used to predict the impact of pollutants. Principles of aquatic and terrestrial pollution will be introduced, followed by organic pollution (including eutrophication), acidification, heavy metal and organochlorine pollution. There are practicals on organic pollution and heavy metals. Issues arising from pollution in estuaries (marine and freshwater) are discussed, including oil and TBT pollution.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically evaluate the causes and consequences of pollution.
?Explain how the major types of aquatic pollution enter and move around ecosystems and distinguish toxic pollutants from those that damage the physical environment.
?Understand the effects of pollutants at different levels of organisation.
?Design, conduct, analyse and record in a notebook experiments to assess toxicity including the concept of EC50.
?Interpret water quality standards.
?Write a scientific paper on a pollution topic.
?Communicate in written form and orally.
?List treatment options for organic waste.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Notebook (15 marks); Written scientific paper (15 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Notebook marks carried forward whether passed or failed.).

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AE3013 Practical Field Ecology

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): AE2001 or equivalent practical experience

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1day(s) Fieldwork (Residential Field Course); 2 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 4 x 3hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Javier Delbarco-Trillo, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Javier Delbarco-Trillo, School of BEES; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To teach practical field skills in ecology as applied to European ecosystems.

Module Content: This module is based around lectures and practical sessions in UCC and on a 1-week residential field course abroad, and teaches appropriate field methods for ecological studies. It provides experience in data collection, processing and interpretation through class exercises and small group projects. It introduces students to a range of terrestrial and aquatic habitats in Ireland and Europe.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Determine the most appropriate method to describe and quantify terrestrial and aquatic habitats
?Design and execute a simple experiment in small groups
?Evaluate anthropogenic environmental impacts
?Demonstrate the ecosystem approach to studying the environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Field Notebook (35 marks); 3 fieldwork reports (30 marks each); Project (55 marks); Presentation (10 marks); Attendance at pre course training session 4 days @ 2.5 marks per day (10 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AE4001 Advanced Ecotoxicology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): AE3010

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John O'Halloran, Department of VP Teaching and Learning.

Lecturer(s): Prof John O'Halloran, Department of VP Teaching and Learning; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To evaluate ways in which the impacts of pollutants can be assessed at different levels of biological organisation.

Module Content: Examination of the ways in which organisms cope with heavy metals. Discussion of organic chemicals as a prerequisite to the concept of biomarkers. Discussion of the assessment of pollution effect, using single species toxicity compliance testing, multi-species and microcosm studies. Emphasis will then shift to indicator species (both plant and animals) as ways to assess environmental pollutants. The final sessions look at the ecosystem level approach using biotic indices (both aquatic, environmental and wildlife indices) and integrated population monitoring of birds and restoration ecology will be considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the major types of pesticides and explain how they affect organisms.
?Understand the effects of mixtures of pesticides at the cellular level.
?Design and conduct toxicity range finding tests.
?Write a scientific field report.
?Distinguish different levels of biological organisation and their role in monitoring.
?Identify and list the major strengths and weaknesses in chemical and biological monitoring.
?Critically evaluate a discharge licence of toxicity test report.
?Interpret what out puts from statutory authority re toxicity units.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Presentation (10 marks), Written Practical Report (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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AE4012 Landscape Conservation and Management

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): BL3001 or EV3002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 1day(s) Fieldwork (Field Course); 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures (prior to field course).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma Butler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma Butler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To demonstrate the theory and practice of landscape conservation

Module Content: The module is characterised by a high level of field work conducted during a 5 day residential fieldcourse in the Burren, preceded by College-based introductory lectures on the ethics and socio-economics of conservation. Environmental Impact Assessment procedures will be outlined. Characterisation and mapping of land, water, soils and biotic assemblages will be conducted while landscape evaluation, conservation and management strategies will be discussed. Mapping exercises on past and present land use will be carried out while the influence of farming practice on the landscape will also be discussed. Sustainable use of the natural environment and habitat fragmentation and its associated conservation problems will be explained. Identification of conflict between conservation objectives and land uses, conflict management, stake holder participation and protected area zoning and recreation will be dealt with. Resolution strategies and overall management plan for the Burren will be discussed and formulated.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conduct large-scale fieldwork assessment of Burren landscapes using internationally accepted assessment criteria.
?Apply results from fieldwork assessment of landscapes to a description of landscape values and vulnerable features and the application of these results in the formulation of local authority planning decisions.
?Use and interpret O.S.I maps for field exercises and deskwork.
?Understand the background and protocols associated with the Environmental Impact Assessment process.
?Use mapping exercises to characterise flora, fauna, water bodies, soils, geological formations, archeological heritage and farming practice and assess their influence, over time, on the Burren landscape.
?Be familiar with the range of strategies currently employed in conservation and management of Irish landscapes.
?Appraise the management of protected areas so as to be able to identify potential conflicts of use within them.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ( 3 Written Field Reports (one worth 120 marks; two worth 40 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AE4015 Biology & Management of Alien Species

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): BL3003

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Padraig Whelan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Padraig Whelan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To provide the knowledge to manage alien species within the context of theoretical and applied biology and ecology.

Module Content: Alien species and especially invasive alien species (IAS) will be examined as one of the greatest causes of biodiversity and economic losses. The module will combine and overview of the biology, ecology and management of IAS with case studies of such organisms across a range of taxonomic groups and habitats. The framework of theoretical biology and ecology will provide an understanding of the complexity of ways that IAS insert themselves into habitats and ecosystems while the case studies will provide examples of the effects and successful and unsuccessful management of IAS. Other topics include the vulnerability of ecosystems to invasion, invasion resistance, national and international legal instruments available to manage IAS and prevention/control methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the characteristics of emerging IAS.
?Recognise the potential complexity of the effects of IAS on agriculture/industry and natural /seminatural areas.
?Understand the complexity of the management of alien species in terms of the effects on ecosystems, the impacts of management on ecosystems and the cost of such management.
?Recommend actions to prevent/control of individual IAS.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (2 x 500 word assignments 10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AE6001 Ecological Site Assessment

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 2 x 6hr(s) Fieldwork; 1 x 6hr(s) Other (self directed project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma Butler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma Butler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, and guest lecturers.

Module Objective: To enable students to describe a site for ecological assessment, in terms of its physiochemical parameters, from local site-specific scales to wider landscape scales. In addition to relate current land use to historic social and cultural environment.

Module Content: Measurement and interpretation of physiochemical parametersused in site description of terrestrial and freshwater habitats; Geological, social and cultural interpretation of a site at the landscape level

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recall which physiochemical parameters to measure when seeking to describe a terrestrial or freshwater site.
?Be familiar with the methods used to measure these parameters.
?Describe the wider landscape context of a site, including basic geology, land uses and site history.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (End of module in-class test (50 marks); 1 practical report (25 marks); 1 research report (25 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences).

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AE6016 Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 6hr(s) Fieldwork; 1 x 6hr(s) Other (self directed project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma Butler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma Butler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, and guest lecturers.

Module Objective: The objective of the module is to give students an introduction to the understanding and practice of Ecological Impact Assessment (EcIA) and SEA; the guiding principles and implementation in Ireland and elsewhere.

Module Content: EIA and SEA Directive and guiding principles; tools and methods commonly used in EcIA and SEA; SEA monitoring and follow up; appropriate assessment criteria; SEA and the planning process, public consultation and participation; data availability.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a clear understanding of the SEA Directive and its guiding principles;
?Apply different tools and methods commonly used in EcIA and SEA such as matrices and networks;
?Use appropriate criteria to assess a SEA.
?Apply appropriate methods commonly used in the EcIA proces.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (End of module in-class test 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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