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Graduations back on campus in UCC: MSc Nursing Students celebrate

15 Nov 2021

Photographed is Margaret (Margo) Noonan, Faith Precious Omeokwe, Professor Josephine Hegarty (MSc supervisor) and Marion O’Donovan celebrating outside Áras na Mac Léinn, UCC

Margaret (Margo) Noonan and Marion O’Donovan completed their Advanced Nursing Practice Masters, whilst Faith Precious Omeokwe graduated from her MSc in Nursing Studies programme at the School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork. Advanced practice nursing is a defined career and academic pathway for registered nurses, culminating in the qualification of nurses who are independent autonomous, expert nurses who are highly skilled practitioners and clinical leaders delivering quality care to an agreed group of patients/clients.

Within her thesis Margo Noonan described measuring the Impact of an educational intervention on the male rape myth acceptance level amongst adolescent males. She found that the educational intervention was successful in discrediting male rape myths among adolescent males attending an urban post primary school. Encouraging the challenging of male rape myths may lead to greater recognition of male sexual violence and to an acceptance that male rape is a serious issue that needs to be recognised with service and legislative developments to assist in the recovery of its victims.

Marion O’Donovan reported on a study titled: The impact of an educational intervention on nurses’ knowledge towards the management of inpatients hypoglycaemia: A Pilot Study. The study established that a brief educational interactive intervention on hypoglycaemia and its management significantly improved nurses knowledge towards hypoglycaemia management in the ward setting. Hypoglycaemia ‘Hypo’ is characterized as any low blood glucose level (BGL) that exposes the individual to harm. Overall, Marion concluded that this intervention has the potential to influence and enhance nurses management of hypoglycaemia amongst patients whilst in hospital.

Faith Precious Omeokwe completed a thesis titled: the effects of prenatal breastfeeding education on breastfeeding rate, initiation, duration and exclusivity: a systematic review. Faith concluded that prenatal breastfeeding interventions were effective in promoting breastfeeding outcomes. To scale-up global breastfeeding rates and in light of the Covid-19 pandemic, future studies should consider delivering the prenatal breastfeeding interventions through online means. Also, future prenatal breastfeeding interventions should incorporate partners and other support persons during the intervention delivery in different contexts and settings.

Photographed is Margaret (Margo) Noonan, Faith Precious Omeokwe, Professor Josephine Hegarty (MSc supervisor) and Marion O’Donovan celebrating outside Áras na Mac Léinn, UCC

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Scoil an Altranais agus an Chnáimhseachais

Brookfield Health Sciences Complex College Road Cork, Ireland , T12 AK54

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