Carrie Griffin

Biography

Carrie Griffin has a PhD in Medieval & Renaissance English from UCC and has recently been appointed NUI Postdoctoral Fellow, 2007-2009. Her Fellowship will be taken up with the production of an edition of the The Wise Book of Philosophy and Astronomy for the Middle English Texts series. The work will be based on her PhD thesis, which examines the cultural significance of Wise Book texts and manuscripts from the late medieval period, and their transmission and reception, specifically focusing on reading habits. Her interests primarily lie in the contexts and transmission of medieval instructional and scientific texts and medieval codicology, palaeography and the evidence of early readers. She is also concerned with the following: medieval ‘popular’ literature (specifically outlaw myths and tales) and its reception post-medieval; medieval literary theory; the influence of the Middle Ages in the Romantic and Victorian periods and, particularly regarding the latter, the textual (re)presentations of medieval texts by late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century publishers, illustrators and printers (for example, William Morris and Aubrey Beardsley). She has presented at many conferences, including at the Early Book Society and the International Medieval Congress at Leeds. She has published in the Journal of the Early Book Society and in the recent essay collection Transmission and Transformation in the Middle Ages: Texts and Contexts (Ed. K. Cawsey & J. Harris, Four Courts Press, 2007). Carrie was Arts Faculty Scholar at UCC, 2001-2004, and has just completed a year-long contract at UCC's English Department, during which she taught on Medieval and Renaissance literature and culture at undergraduate and graduate level.

 

Research Interests

http://www.ucc.ie/en/english/research/Post-DoctoralFellowships20072008/carriegriffin/

mbsr@ucc.ie

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Carrie Griffin

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Project Director

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Research

Making Books, Shaping Readers

School of English, O' Rahilly Building, University College Cork, Ireland.

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