Conference 2007

Conference Details

The First International Making Books, Shaping Readers Conference, - University College, Cork, April 18th - 20th 2007

Conference Theme: "Making an Audience"

This conference encourages a broad interpretation of the notion of an audience in keeping with the etymology of the word. (The term audience, which derives from the Latin audenita, "a hearing, listening", from awis, "to perceive physically, to grasp", and from the nineteenth century transformation of the sense of the word to "readers of a book", reflects the way in which technologies of the word have changed throughout history, from oral, to manuscript, to print).

This conference will explore how different publications of the material text posit not only different audiences, but also different notions of an audience. Papers will focus on the kind of audiences texts invite; on how shifts in the methods of textual production record a shift in the role of the reader from medieval to contemporary times; on how the act of reading is inscribed in the book; ways in which the production of a text defines its ideal audience; and on how a text's transmission over time effects how it is read. We are also concerned with tracing the actual reader / audience of a text through, perhaps, marks and annotations in the text. The analysis of how audiences are both inscribed in, and inscribe, the material book demands an interdisciplinary approach, therefore we invite papers from scholars in all disciplines. We are interested in all aspects of how audiences are made via the various forms of textual materialities, including e-texts. 

Selected papers may be included in an edited volume of essays, and accepted abstracts will be published on the MBSR website prior to the conference.

All queries can be directed to the organisers, Siobhán Collins, Carrie Griffin and Mary O' Connell, at mbsr@ucc.ie.

Newcomers to Cork can get a taste of Cork and UCC by viewing the university's short film about the city and campus here:

Conference Programme 2007

Note: Click the 'Abstract' links under the presentation title to view the abstract.

Wednesday April 18th-Room 1.56 ORB

9.00-11.30

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION – BREAKFAST

 

11.30 -1.00

ORB 1.65 PANEL 1: Reading Circles

Chair: Peter Flynn

Kevin Grace ( University of Cincinnati )

‘Readers at Ringside: How Boxing Literature Reflects the Urban Cultural Environments of the 19th and 20th Centuries.’

Abstract  


April Bullock ( California State University )

‘Addressing the Cook: George Augustas Sala, Alexis Soyer, and the Victorian Cookbook.’

Abstract


Jen Smith (NUI Galway )

Who reads Artefact Books?

Abstract 

1-2

LUNCH

 

2-3.30

 

Panel 3: Readers Making Texts

Chair: Dr Cliona O' Gallchoir


Mary Hammond , (Open University)

New Books, New Readers, New Evidence: Challenging 19th – century Readership Models.

Abstract


Rosalind Crone (Open University)

Rediscovering the eighteenth-century common reader

Abstract


Katie Halsey (Institute of English Studies, University of London )

The Distortion of Reputation: Women who read Jane Austen in the nineteenth century.

Abstract

 

3.30-3.45

TEA/COFFEE

 

3.45-5.15

Panel 3: Materiality and Audiences

Chair: Dr Flavio Boggi


Graham Allen ( University College Cork )

Frankenstein Notebooks. 


Liam Lenihan ( Trinity College Dublin )

Barry, Blake and Fuseli: The Material Difference.

Abstract  


Francis Halsall ( University College Cork )

Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty: Between Text and Non-Text.

Abstract

5.30-7.00

Welcome: Professor Tom Dunne

Wine Reception / Book Launch

7.00-8.00

 

Keynote Speaker I, Dr Bill Bell (Title To Be Confirmed)

Chair: Professor Colbert Kearney

8.30

Dinner: Amicus Restaurant, Paul Street Cork

Thursday April 19th-Room 1.56 ORB/Room 1.32

9.00-9.30

TEA/COFFEE

 

 

9.30-11.00

 

ROOM 1.56

Panel 4: Convincing Audiences?

Chair: Kalene Kenefick


Kate Briggs ( Trinity College Dublin )

Leonard Woolf and the Fabrication of a Writer’s Diary

Abstract


Catherine Smith ( UniversityCollege Cork )

Fact, Fiction and the Longue Durèe: Sylvia Townsend Warner’s The Corner that Held Them and Jane Smiley’s The Greenlanders

Abstract


Jenny McDonnell ( Trinity CollegeDublin )

‘At the mercy of the public’: Katherine Mansfield and ‘The Garden-Party

Abstract

ROOM 1.32

Panel 5: The Ethical Reader

Chair: Letty Nijhuis


Terri L. Snyder ( California StateUniversity)

Listening to Suicide in the Early Modern Anglo-American World

Abstract


Ton van Kalmthout (Huygens Institute)

Reading Aloud and Silent Reading

Abstract


Femke Molekamp ( University ofSussex )

‘Howe to take profite in reading of the holie Scripture’: Interactions between Geneva Bibles and Early Modern Readers

Abstract

11.00-11.30

TEA/COFFEE

 

 

11.30-1.00

 

 

 

ROOM 1.56

Panel 6: Reading the Public

Chair: Dr Mary Pierse


Victoria Kennefick ( UniversityCollege Cork )

“A Good Review is Hard to Find”: Flannery O’Connor’s Early Critics

Abstract


Justin Tonra (NUI Galway ) 

Reading Electronic Texts

Abstract


Ann Steiner ( Lund University ) Private Criticism in Public Sphere: Readers Writing on the Internet

Abstract 

ROOM 1.32

Panel 7: Disparate Audiences

Chair: Dr Francis Halsall


Sabine Kriebel ( University College Cork)

“Stop Reading , Look!”: Revolutionizing the Viewer in 1930s Germany

Abstract


Jill A. Sullivan ( University ofWestminster )

Pantomime Libretti and the ReadingAudience

Abstract


Gudrun Weiland ( University ofGottingen )

 They were the heroes of our childhood and youth”: The role of dime novels in children’s reading in the early 20thcentury.

Abstract

1.00-2.00

 Lunch

 

 

2.00-3.30

 

ROOM 1.56

Panel 8: Global Audiences

Chair: Dr Eibhear Walshe


Robert Morace ( Daemen College ,New York )

Contemporary Scottish Fiction’s Varied and Evolving Audience.

Abstract


Martina Cullen (University College Cork) ‘Dividing an ‘audience’: The Role of Reader as a Geographically Grounded Subject in Postcolonial Literature.

Abstract


Janice Cavell (Carleton University )

‘Regimental History and Soldiers’ Memory of the First World War: Private McQuade Writes in the Margins.

Abstract

ROOM 1.32

Panel 9: Publishing and Print

Chair: Dr Heather Laird


Cronan O' Doibhlin (Library, UCC)Gaelic Manuscripts and their Audience

Danny Kennedy ( University CollegeCork ) Life After Publishing: Reading the New American Small Press.

Abstract

Max McCarthy (Library, UCC) Remnants of the Reader in 18th Century Cork : A Boole Library perspective

3.30-3.45

TEA/COFFEE

3.45-5.15

ROOM 1.56

Panel 10: New Editions, New Audiences

Chair: Dr Jason Harris


Mark Bland (De Montfort University)

Typography, Meaning, and ‘The Workes of Ben Jonson’ (1616).

Abstract


Ruth Connolly ( University ofNewcastle )

Herrick: His Manuscripts, Audiences and Editions.

Abstract

ROOM 1.32

Panel 11: New Medieval Audiences

Chair: Richard Hawtree


Annie S. Davis ( Baylor University )

The Kelmscott Chaucer: William Morris’s Search for the Medieval Reader.

Abstract


Michael Foster ( University ofNottingham )

The Book’s Purpose: The Relationship Between Courtesy Poetry and Romances in Cotton Caligula A.II.

Abstract


Tamar Drukker ( Ben Gurion University )

Jousting for Jews: A Hebrew Tale of King Arthur.

Abstract

6.30-7.30

 

Keynote Speaker II, Professor John Thompson (QUB)

Title: Aglophone Irishness(es): Making Books and Shaping Readers in Early Fourteenth-Century Ireland

Chair: To Be Confirmed

Friday April 20th-Room 1.56 ORB

9.00-9.30

TEA/COFFEE

 

9.30-11.00

 

 

ROOM 1.56

 

Panel 12: Romantic Readers

Chair: Dr James Carney 


Mike Cooper ( Nottingham TrentUniversity )

‘There is no accounting for Editors’: Marketing John Clare.

Abstract


Luke Oines ( Michigan StateUniversity )

The Apostasy of Joan's Faith: The Romantic Mother and the Enlightenment Whore.

Abstract

ROOM 1.32

Panel 13: Remaking Audiences

Chair: Dr Lee Jenkins


Robert McParland ( Felician College)

Material Production and Circulation of Charles Dickens 1837-1870.

Abstract


Mary Pierse ( University CollegeCork )

Taking and remaking the Irish Audience in a Fraught Nineteenth-Century.

Abstract 

Danielle Fuller ( University ofBirmingham ) ‘Getting People Together’?: Producing a “City of Big Readers” in Chicago .

Abstract

11.00-11.30

TEA/COFFEE

 

11.00-1.00

 

Panel 14: Irish Texts, Shaping Readers

Chair: Professor Colbert Kearney


Alistair McCleery ( Napier University , Edinburgh )

The 1969 Edition of Ulysses: The Making of a Penguin Classic.

Abstract


Alex Davis ( University College Cork)

Material Modernism and the Little Magazine.

1.00-2.00

Lunch

 

2.00-3.30

 

Panel 15: Reading Manuscripts

Chair: Leonard Madden


Richard Hawtree, ( University College Cork )

Exaudi Domine: An Approach to Anglo-Saxon Monastic Reading.

Abstract


Órla Murphy ( University College Cork)

Shining a Light into Dark Age Corners: Using Laser Technology to Illuminate Early Texts


Konstantin Doulamis (University College Cork)

A Question of Style? Layered Readership, Rhetoric and Style in the Ancient Greek Novels

3.30-3.45

TEA/COFFEE

 

3.45-5.15

Panel 16: Early Modern Audiences

ChairLouise Denmead


Nelleke Moser (Free University, Amsterdam )

Exchanging Texts, Changing Texts: The Making of Literary Collections in Manuscript and Print in the Netherlands , 1520-1660

Abstract 

Pollie Bromilow ( University of Liverpool )

Books for the Girls? Female Readers in Sixteenth-Century France

Abstract

Conference Information Leaflet

Information for Delegates

Making Books, Shaping Readers

School of English, O' Rahilly Building, University College Cork, Ireland.

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