BSc (Hons) CK401

BSc (Hons) CK401

BSc (Hons) CK401

What is Computer Science - CK401?

Computer Science encompasses all aspects of computer systems (both software and hardware) as well as information and communication technology (ICT). Topics include software development, database technology, computer networks, operating systems, algorithms, security, web technology and applications. Our graduates understand how computer-based systems work and how to harness the potential of these technologies to develop the kind of useful and sophisticated computer applications upon which our modern world depends. The Computer Science degree at UCC provides a comprehensive grounding in computer and communication technologies that underpins modern ICT systems. Students also develop the expertise and skills required of a
successful professional in today's vibrant computer industry. The degree focuses on software and the concepts, techniques and skills required to develop complex software systems.

Go to Study@UCC pages for more information Click Here

 

The BSc in Computer Science has four streams; all students take the same modules in year one i.e. 50 credits of computer science modules and 10 from other courses.

From year 2 onwards, module selection (60 credits) is based on stream choice.

Computer Science degrees:

  • BSc in Computer Science – flagship computer science degree that equips graduates for any of the exciting and rewarding careers within the IT industry.

Joint Degrees combining Computer Science with another discipline:

  • BSc in Computer Science (Software Entrepreneurship) — a 50/50 blend of computer science and business/economics

The BSc in Computer Science has four streams; all students take the same modules in year one i.e. 50 credits of computer science modules and 10 from other courses.  From Year 2 onwards, module selection (60 credits) is based on stream choice.

Computer Science degrees:

  • BSc in Computer Science – flagship computer science degree that equips graduates for any of the exciting and rewarding careers within the IT industry.
  • BSc in Computer Science (Web Systems Engineering) – specialised variation with a greater focus on web-specific applications and technologies (2016-17 only)

Joint Degrees combining Computer Science with another discipline:

  • BSc in Computer Science (Software Entrepreneurship) — a 50/50 blend of computer science and business/economics

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE CK401 MODULES

FIRST YEAR

First Year Core Modules (50 credits)

CS1106 Introduction to Relational Databases (5 credits) - Dr Kieran Herley, Semester 1

CS1110 Systems Organisation I (5 credits) - Professor John Morrison, Semester 1

CS1111 Systems Organisation II (5 credits) - Professor John Morrison, Semester 2

CS1112 Foundations of Computer Science I (5 credits) - Professor Barry O'Sullivan, Semester 1

CS1113 Foundations of Computer Science II (5 credits) - Professor Barry O'Sullivan, Semester 2

CS1115 Web Development I (5 credits) - Dr Derek Bridge, Semester 1

CS1116 Web Development II (5 credits) - Dr Derek Bridge, Semester 2

CS1117 Introduction to Programming (15 credits) - Dr David Stynes, Semesters 1 & 2

First Year Elective Module Choices (10 credits)

CH1001 Chinese Language (Mandarin) I (10 credits) - Professor Jacqueline Sheehan, Semesters 1 & 2

EC1202 Economic Reasoning for Business (5 credits) - Dr Edel Walsh, Semester 1

EC1203 Macroeconomic Context and Business (5 credits) - Ms Lisa Noonan, Semester 2

FR1105 and FR1107 form a single option

FR1105 Threshold French (5 credits) - Ms Margot Spencer, Semester 1

FR1107 French for Reading Purposes I (5 credits) - Ms Milouda Louh and Mr Eugene O'Sullivan, Semester 2

GE0003 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 1 (5 credits) - Ms Christine Bremer, Semester 1

GE0004 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 2 (5 credits) - Ms Christine Bremer, Semester 2

GE0005 German Language (Intermediate Level B1) Pt 1 (5 credits) - Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Semester 1

GE0008 German Language (Intermediate Level B1) Pt 2 (5 credits) - Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Semester 2

HS0028 Spanish Language (Beginner Level) (10 credits) - Ms Siobhan Nally, Semesters 1 & 2

CS1130 Irish Language for Computer Science I (5 credits) - Dr Ciaran Dawson, Semester 1

CS1131 Irish Language for Computer Science II (5 credits) - Dr Ciaran Dawson, Semester 2

IT1102 Non-Beginners' Written and Spoken Italian (10 credits) - Dr Louise Sheehan, Semesters 1 & 2

IT1109 Introduction to Written and Spoken Italian (10 credits) - Dr Louise Sheehan, Semesters 1 & 2

MA1001 Calculus for Science Part 1 (5 credits) - Mr Martin Quirke, Semester 1

MA1002 Calculus for Science Part 2 (5 credits) - Mr Martin Quirke, Semester 2

MA1059 and MA1060 form a single option:

MA1059 Calculus (5 credits) - Dr Thomas Carroll, Semester 1

MA1060 Introduction to Analysis (5 credits) - Dr Thomas Carroll, Semester 2

 

SECOND YEAR

BSc Single Honours Computer Science

Students take 60 credits as follows:

Modules

CS2501 Database Design and Administration (5 credits) - Mr Humphrey Sorensen, Semester 2

CS2502 Logic Design (5 credits) - Dr Frank Boehme, Semester 1

CS2503 Operating Systems I (5 credits) - Dr James Doherty, Semester 1

CS2505 Network Computing (5 credits) - Professor Cormac Sreenan, Semester 2

CS2506 Operating Systems II (5 credits) - Dr Dan Grigoras, Semester 2

CS2507 Computer Architecture (5 credits) - NL, Semester 2

CS2513 Intermediate Programming (5 credits) - Dr Marc Van Dongen, Semester 1

CS2514 Introduction to Java (5 credits) - Dr Marc Van Dongen, Semester 2

CS2515 Algorithms and Data Structures I (5 credits) - Professor Ken Brown, Semester 1

CS2516 Algorithms and Data Structures II (5 credits) - Professor Ken Brown, Semester 2

plus modules to the value of 10 credits from the following:

Computer Science:

CS2509 XML and the Extended Enterprise (5 credits) - Professor James Bowen, Semester 1

CS2510 Web Servers (5 credits) - Mr Humphrey Sorensen, Semester 1

CS2511 Usability Engineering (5 credits) - Dr Ian Pitt, Semester 2

Languages:

FR1105 Threshold French (5 credits) plus - Ms Margot Spencer, Semester 1

FR1107 French for Reading Purposes I (5 credits) - Ms Milouda Louh, Semester 2

or

FR2105 Towards Vantage French (5 credits) plus - Ms Margot Spencer, Semester 1

FR2107 French for Reading Purposes II (5 credits) - Ms Milouda Louh, Semester 2

(Note: *Modules FR1105 and FR1107 are only available to students who have not already taken French in First Year)

HS0128 Spanish Language (Improver [01] Level) (10 credits) - Ms Ana Siles, Semesters 1 & 2

Mathematics:

MA1057 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (5 credits) plus - Dr Anca Mustata, Semester 2

MA1058 Introduction to Linear Algebra (5 credits) - Dr Andrei Mustata, Semester 1

 

BSc Single Honours Computer Science (Software Entrepreneurship)
Students take 60 credits as follows:

Computer Science (25 credits):

CS2501 Database Design and Administration (5 credits) - Mr Humphrey Sorensen, Semester 2

CS2509 XML and the Extended Enterprise (5 credits) - Professor James Bowen, Semester 1

CS2513 Intermediate Programming (5 credits) - NL, Semester 1

CS2514 Introduction to Java (5 credits) - Dr Marc Van Dongen, Semester 2

CS2515 Algorithms and Data Structures I (5 credits) - Professor Ken Brown, Semester 1

and Economics (35 credits):

EC2113 Quantitative Methods: Skills for Data Collection (5 credits)

EC2114 Quantitative Methods: Interpreting Economic Data (5 credits)

EC2115 Introduction to Mathematical Economic Analysis (5 credits) - Dr Geraldine Ryan, Semester 2

EC2116 Introduction to Statistical Economic Analysis (5 credits) - Dr Brendan McEvoy, Semester 1

EC2200 Economics of Managerial Decision Making (5 credits) - Dr Eleanor Doyle, Semester 1

EC2211 Economics - Production and Costs (5 credits) - Dr Eleanor Doyle, Semester 2

EC2212 Business Cycles and Macroeconomic Policy Debates (5 credits) - Dr Catherine Kavenagh, Semester 1

 

BSc Single Honours Computer Science (Web Systems Engineering)
Students take 60 credits as follows:

Computer Science (50 credits):

CS2501 Database Design and Administration (5 credits) - Mr Humphrey Sorensen, Semester 2

CS2503 Operating Systems I (5 credits) - Dr James Doherty, Semester 1

CS2505 Network Computing (5 credits) - Professor Cormac Sreenan, Semester 2

CS2508 Computer Animation (5 credits) - Professor James Bowen, Semester 2

CS2509 XML and the Extended Enterprise (5 credits) - Professor James Bowen, Semester 1

CS2510 Web Servers (5 credits) - Mr Humphrey Sorensen, Semester 1

CS2511 Usability Engineering (5 credits) - Dr Ian Pitt, Semester 2

CS2513 Intermediate Programming (5 credits) - NL, Semester 1

CS2514 Introduction to Java (5 credits) - Dr Marc Van Dongen, Semester 2

CS2515 Algorithms and Data Structures I (5 credits) - Professor Ken Brown, Semester 1

plus modules to the value of 10 credits from the following:

Computer Science:

CS2502 Logic Design (5 credits) - Dr Frank Boehme, Semester 1

CS2506 Operating Systems II (5 credits) - Dr Dan Grigoras, Semester 2

CS2507 Computer Architecture (5 credits) - NL, Semester 2

CS2516 Algorithms and Data Structures II (5 credits) - Professor Ken Brown, Semester 2

 

Languages:

FR1105 Threshold French (5 credits) plus - Ms Margot Spencer, Semester 1

FR1107 French for Reading Purposes I (5 credits) - Ms Milouda Louh, Semester 2

or

FR2105 Towards Vantage French (5 credits) plus - Ms Margot Spencer, Semester 1

FR2107 French for Reading Purposes II (5 credits) - Ms Sylvie Campion, Semester 2

(Note: *Modules FR1105 and FR1107 are only available to students who have not already taken French in First Year)

HS0128 Spanish Language (Improver [01] Level) (10 credits) - Ms Ana Siles, Semesters 1 & 2

Mathematics:

MA1057 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (5 credits) plus - Dr Anca Mustata, Semester 2

MA1058 Introduction to Linear Algebra (5 credits) - Dr Andrei Mustata, Semester 1

 

Three Year Rule
Students must pass the Second University Examination in Science - Computer Science within three academic years from the date of first registration for Second Year. Failure to comply with this rule would mean that the student would be ineligible to proceed further with his/her studies. Exceptions to this rule may be granted by the College, only for very serious reasons.

 

THIRD YEAR

BSc Single Honours Computer Science
Students take 60 credits Computer Science modules as follows:

Core Module

CS3300 Work Placement (10 credits) - Semesters 2 and 3

or

CS3301 Work Placement (10 credits) - Semesters 1, 2 and 3

CS3305 Team Software Project (10 credits) - Dr James Doherty, Semester 2

CS3306 Workplace Technology and Skills (10 credits) - Dr Steve Prestwich, Semester 2

CS3311 Middleware (5 credits) - Dr Dan Grigoras, Semester 1

CS3500 Software Engineering (5 credits) - Mr Adrian O'Riordan, Semester 1

CS3506 Networks and Data Communications (5 credits) - Professor Cormac Sreenan, Semester 1

CS3508 Algorithms and Non-linear Data Structures (5 credits) - Replaced with CS3318, Semester 1

CS3509 Theory of Computation (5 credits) - Professor Michel Schellekens, Semester 1

CS3514 C-Programming for Microcontrollers (5 credits) - Professor John Morrison, Semester 1

 

BSc Single Honours Computer Science (Web Systems Engineering)
Students take 60 credits as follows:

Computer Science:

CS3300 Work Placement (10 credits) - Semesters 2 and 3

or

CS3301 Work Placement (10 credits) - Semesters 1, 2 and 3

CS3306 Workplace Technology and Skills (10 credits) - Dr Steve Prestwich, Semester 2

CS3311 Middleware (5 credits) - Dr Dan Grigoras, Semester 1

CS3500 Software Engineering (5 credits) - Mr Adrian O'Riordan, Semester 1

CS3505 Web Systems Team Project (10 credits) - Dr Simon Foley, Semester 2

CS3510 Advanced Server-Side Programming (5 credits) - NL, Semester 1

CS3511 Web Security (5 credits) - Dr Simon Foley, Semester 1

CS3512 Advanced XML Technologies (5 credits) - Dr Frank Boehme, Semester 1

CS3513 Client-side Programming (5 credits) - Dr Frank Boehme, Semester 1

 

BSc Single Honours Computer Science (Software Entrepreneurship)

Students take 60 credits as follows:

Computer Science (40 credits):

CS3300 Work Placement (10 credits) - Semesters 2 and 3

or

CS3301 Work Placement (10 credits) - Semesters 1, 2 and 3

CS3306 Workplace Technology and Skills (10 credits) - Dr Steve Prestwich, Semester 2

CS3500 Software Engineering (5 credits) - Mr Adrian O'Riordan, Semester 1

CS3513 Client-side Programming (5 credits) - Dr Frank Boehme, Semester 1

CS3605 E-Enterprise Team Project (10 credits) - Dr James Doherty, Semester 2


and Economics (20 credits):

EC3119 Capital Markets and Asset Valuation (5 credits) - Professor Niall O'Sullivan, Semester 1

EC3129 Health Economics: the role of the Market (5 credits) - Ms Michele Barry, Semester 1

EC3154 Survey Methods: Questionnaire Design (5 credits) - Dr Aileen Murphy, Semester 1

EC3208 Economic Consulting (5 credits) - Mr Don Walshe, Semesters 1 & 2

 

FOURTH YEAR

BSc Single Honours Computer Science
Students take 60 credits of Computer Science as follows:

Core Module

CS4501 Computer Science Project (15 credits)

and 45 credits of electives* from:

CS4092 Special Topics in Computing I (5 credits)

CS4093 Special Topics in Computing II (5 credits) - Professor Ken Brown, Semester 2

CS4150 Principles of Compilation (5 credits) - Dr Kieran Herley, Semester 1

CS4402 Parallel and Grid Computing (5 credits) - Dr Sabin Tabirca, Semester 1

CS4403 Introduction to Embedded Systems (5 credits) - NL, Semester 2

CS4404 Computer Graphics (5 credits)

CS4405 Multimedia Compression and Delivery (5 credits) - Dr John O'Mullane, Semester 2

CS4407 Algorithm Analysis (5 credits) - Professor Gregory Provan, Semester 2

CS4412 Rules-Based Systems (5 credits)

CS4507 Advanced Software Engineering (5 credits) - Mr Adrian O'Riordan, Semester 1

CS4508 Software System Engineering (5 credits) - Dr John Herbert, Semester 2

CS4610 Collective Intelligence and the Adaptive Web (5 credits)

CS4611 Information Retrieval (5 credits) - Professor Michel Schellekens, Semester 1

CS4612 Web Search (5 credits)

CS4613 Games Engines (5 credits) - NL, Semester 2

CS4614 Introductory Network Security (5 credits) - Dr Simon Foley, Semester 1

CS4615 Computer Systems Security (5 credits) - Dr Simon Foley - Dr Simon Foley, Semester 2

CS4616 Distributed Systems (5 credits) - Professor Michel Schellekens, Semester 1

CS4617 Advanced Computer Architecture I (5 credits) - not offered during 2016-17

CS4618 Artificial Intelligence I (5 credits) - Dr Derek Bridge, Semester 1

CS4619 Artificial Intelligence II (5 credits) - Dr Derek Bridge, Semester 2

CS4620 Functional Programming I (5 credits) - Dr Marc Van Dongen, Semester 1

CS4621 Functional Programming II (5 credits) - Dr Marc Van Dongen, Semester 2

CS4622 Advanced Computer Architecture II (5 credits)

* Note that not all elective modules will be offered each year.

 

BSc Single Honours Computer Science (Software Entrepreneurship)

Students take 60 credits of Computer Science as follows:

Core Module
CS4503 Software Enterprise Project (15 credits)

and 20 credits of electives* from:

CS4092 Special Topics in Computing I (5 credits)

CS4093 Special Topics in Computing II (5 credits) - Professor Ken Brown, Semester 2

CS4404 Computer Graphics (5 credits)

CS4412 Rules-Based Systems(5 credits)

CS4506 Advanced Client-side Programming (5 credits)

CS4507 Advanced Software Engineering (5 credits) - Mr Adrian O'Riordan, Semester 1

CS4508 Software System Engineering (5 credits) - Dr John Herbert, Semester 2

CS4610 Collective Intelligence and the Adaptive Web (5 credits)

CS4611 Information Retrieval (5 credits) - Professor Michel Schellekens, Semester 1

CS4612 Web Search (5 credits)

CS4613 Games Engines (5 credits) - NL, Semester 2

CS4614 Introductory Network Security (5 credits) - Dr Simon Foley, Semester 1

CS4615 Computer Systems Security (5 credits) - Dr Simon Foley, Semester 2

CS4618 Artificial Intelligence I (5 credits) - Dr Derek Bridge, Semester 1

CS4619 Artificial Intelligence II (5 credits) - Dr Derek Bridge, Semester 2

CS4620 Functional Programming I (5 credits) - Dr Marc Van Dongen, Semester 1

and 25 credits of Economics from:

EC3100 The Economics of Corporate Strategy 1 (5 credits) - Dr Rosemary Kelleher, Semester 1

EC3109 The Economics of Corporate Strategy 2 (5 credits) - Dr Rosemary Kelleher, Semester 2

EC3147 Economic Growth and Competitiveness (5 credits) - Dr Eoin O'Leary, Semester 1

EC3148 Economic Growth and Innovation (5 credits) - Ms Marie O'Connor, Semester 2

EC4215 Business Econometrics I (5 credits) - Dr Eleanor Doyle, Semester 1

* Note that not all elective modules will be offered each year.

 

BSc Single Honours Computer Science (Web Systems Engineering)
Students take 60 credits of Computer Science as follows:

Core Module
CS4502 Web Systems Project (15 credits)

and 45 credits of electives* from:

CS4092 Special Topics in Computing I (5 credits)

CS4093 Special Topics in Computing II (5 credits) - Professor Ken Brown, Semester 2

CS4402 Parallel and Grid Computing (5 credits) - Dr Sabin Tabirca, Semester 1

CS4403 Introduction to Embedded Systems (5 credits)

CS4404 Computer Graphics (5 credits)

CS4405 Multimedia Compression and Delivery (5 credits) - Dr John O'Mullane - Dr John O'Mullane, Semester 2

CS4412 Rules-Based Systems (5 credits)

CS4506 Advanced Client-side Programming (5 credits)

CS4507 Advanced Software Engineering (5 credits) - Mr Adrian O'Riordan, Semester 1

CS4508 Software System Engineering (5 credits) - Dr John Herbert, Semester 2

CS4610 Collective Intelligence and the Adaptive Web (5 credits)

CS4611 Information Retrieval (5 credits) - Professor Michel Schellekens, Semester 1

CS4612 Web Search (5 credits)

CS4613 Games Engines (5 credits) - NL, Semester 2

CS4614 Introductory Network Security (5 credits) - Dr Simon Foley, Semester 1

CS4615 Computer Systems Security (5 credits) - Dr Simon Foley, Semester 2

CS4618 Artificial Intelligence I (5 credits) - Dr Derek Bridge, Semester 1

CS4619 Artificial Intelligence II (5 credits) - Dr Derek Bridge Semester 2

CS4620 Functional Programming I (5 credits) - Dr Marc Van Dongen, Semester 1

* Note that not all elective modules will be offered each year.

 

Three Year Rule
Students must pass the Second University Examination in Science - Computer Science within three academic years from the date of first registration for Second Year. Failure to comply with this rule would mean that the student would be ineligible to proceed further with his/her studies. Exceptions to this rule may be granted by the College, only for very serious reasons.

Where can I find out about Computer Science at UCC?

Information on Computer Science, what you will study, entry requirements, work placement etc. can be found here

Do I need to have prior knowledge of Computer Science?

No prior knowledge of Computer Science is required.

Is it a disadvantage not to have done programming?

Most of our students have no formal experience of programming; those students who have may have a slight early advantage but for interested students the field levels out pretty quickly.

What are the points for Computer Science?

2016

2015

2014

2013

435

440

430

430

Will they be the same next year?

There is no way to be certain until the points are published by the CAO.  The points are calculated based on the demand for places and the number of places available at UCC.  Increased demand in recent years has pushed the points up.

How many places are there?

We can accommodate up to 85 students in 1st year.

Do I need honours maths?

2017-18: There is no formal requirement for honours maths but you must have at least passed ordinary level maths.

2018-19: From 2019 onwards the mathematics requirement is 02/H6.

Is Computer Science just Programming?

No, Computer Science includes programming but also covers many other topics such as computer applications, networking, multimedia, computer hardware, information storage and processing,  and artificial intelligence to name a few.

What programming languages are taught?

The main languages are Python, Java, C programming, JavaScript and Haskell.

Do I need specialised software and my own laptop?

The laboratory facilities in the Department have the equipment and software needed for assignments and projects.  Much of the software used is open source and free to install on your own PC/laptop.

How much does it cost?

The fees for registration for all courses is set by the government; information can be found on http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/undergrad/cost

What is the demand for ICT graduates like?

The demand for ICT talent is strong and the career prospects are excellent for good ICT graduates.

I hear there is a skills shortage in ICT; what areas are in short supply?

Ireland is likely to face an average increase in demand for high-level ICT skills of around 5% per year up to 2018; with employment of ICT professionals anticipated to rise to just over 91,000 (Forfás, ICT Skills Action Plan 2014-2018). 

Where are our graduates?

The job market for ICT graduates is quite buoyant and varied.  A survey conducted by UCC Careers Services indicated our graduates are employed by companies such as IBM, Cisco, Credit Suisse, Apple, Microsoft, Pilz, VMware, Xerox, as IT analysts, project managers, software engineers and developers, technical consultants, to mention just a few. 

Employment of UCC Computer Science graduates is strong; on average 90-95% of graduates are employed or in further studies the year following graduation (2010-2014).

Where are the jobs?

There is a strong demand for Computer Science graduates nationally and internationally from both SMEs and multinationals.  A degree in Computer Science is recognised all over the globe.  Many of our graduates work in the UK, Europe, the US as well as in Ireland.

Is the degree a full-time course?

YES, the degree programme involves about twelve one-hour lectures per week and about twelve hours of laboratory work.  You will also need to allocate a significant amount of time for study - in total about 40 hours per week.

Can I specialise?

YES, all students take a common 1st year and can choose to specialise after 2nd year graduating with:

  • BSc Computer Science
  • BSc Computer Science (Web Systems Engineering)
  • BSc Computer Science (Software Entrepreneurship)

In years 2, 3 and 4 different modules are offered allowing students focus their studies on areas that interest them.  Many opt for elective modules such as computer security, graphics, and artificial intelligence to name a few. 

Mature Students

I am a mature student; can I study Computer Science at UCC?

Yes, to be considered as a mature student, you must have reached 23 years of age on or before 1st January of the year of proposed entry.  Applications are made through the Central Applications Office (CAO) www.cao.ie

How will my application be assessed?

When you are applying as a Mature Student you will be required to complete a personal statement.  The importance of the personal statement cannot be underestimated as in some cases it is the sole basis for selecting successful applicants for certain degree programmes. It should include: relevant life experience, educational goals and objectives, relevant work experience, voluntary work experience; previous academic history and hobbies & interests.

How many places are available for mature students?

Currently, Computer Sciences offers 12 places to mature students.

Useful links

As part of the BSC Computer Science degree here at University College Cork, students must complete a 6 or 12 month work placement in industry.  This 10 credit module helps students gain practical skills and experience which adds value to their CV.  

Work placement is coordinated by Clodagh Kerr in the Careers Service.  She arranges student interviews with employers from semester one in third year.  Work placement interviews are very competitive and students must prepare high quality CV’s.  Among the companies who take UCC students include EMC, Oracle, Amazon, Microsoft, Laya Healthcare, Intel, VMWare, Pilz, KPMG, and Accenture etc.  In the vast majority of companies students are paid during their employment. 

Work placement is extremely valuable for students learning as well as providing a platform for employment on graduation.  Many students secure employment in their work placement company; a considerable number have secured an employment contract before graduating. 

 

Quotes from Employers

EMC

“I found it a very easy process, with UCC providing great support and in particular a high grade of students to pick from.  In regards to this year’s student, she has proved to be a great resource.  I have placed her in a challenging role coming up to speed on a new Java Development Framework along with other tech components and theory.  I only have good things to say about the experience and also want to thank her academic mentor and lecturer support.”

Laya Healthcare

“We have participated in the UCC work placement programme for a number of years and find it very beneficial for both our business and for the students involved.  It is a valuable source of skilled labour during summer months and also provides the student with much needed experience in a business environment which not only improves technical skills but allows them to develop people skills also.”

Oracle

“Oracle have been engaged with the Careers & Work Placement Service in UCC for a number of years and found it has greatly supported our recruitment efforts for our graduate and intern intakes year on year.  The services on campus means Oracle is seen as a prominent employer to students.  Oracle has employed a number of students in intern programs and all have been key players in projects which have benefited the organization as a whole.  The students coming from UCC have the skills, confidence and professionalism which we look for in all our hiring and I would highly recommend UCC.”

 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

The ICT sector in Ireland is a thriving and growing industry with 9 of the top 10 global ICT companies maintaining a presence in Ireland. This sector is one of the country’s most prevalent employers with over 75,000 people employed by ICT companies in Ireland. There are currently 5,400 ICT enterprises in Ireland, 233 of which are foreign owned. The sector is amongst the top three Irish growth industries, with both indigenous and international companies creating large bases in the country (www.ictireland.ie). 

The National Skills Bulletin published by the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs in the past years have identified that ICT skills are difficult to source. “I would very much encourage those making career choices to focus on the areas of greatest job opportunities and to focus their education and training on specific skills needs in those areas”, said Una Halligan, Chairperson of the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (www.skillsireland.ie). 

Many employment agencies report on typical salaries for different sectors; an example of those reported for careers in computer science are as follows: 

  • Software Engineer: €22,510 - €53,107
  • Senior Software Engineer / Developer / Programmer: €37,095 - €55,218
  • Software Developer: €23,718 - €47,367

(These figures are indicative only; students must satisfy themselves of potential remuneration based on their own research.) WHERE ARE OUR GRADUATES? A survey conducted by UCC Careers Services indicated our graduates are employed by companies such as IBM, Credit Suisse, Apple, Pilz, Xerox, as IT analysts, project managers, software engineers and developers, technical consultants, to mention just a few. Those reported to be seeking employment has decreased significantly: 2011 (3%), 2010 (5.5%), 2009 (11%) and 2008 (17%).

 

What are the career prospects for a Computer Science graduate?

The technology sector in Ireland directly employs over 105,000 people, with 75% employed in multinational companies and the remainder in the indigenous digital technology sector.

Ireland is home to:

10 of the top 10 global technology companies

9 of the 10 global software companies

5 of the 5 top security software companies

3 of the top 3 enterprise software companies

3 of the top 5 games companies

4 of the top 5 IT services companies

The top 10 ‘born on the internet’ companies (Source: ictireland.ie)

“Looking forward, we need to continue efforts across all relevant policy areas to ensure shortages outlined in the report (National Skills Bulletin, 2015), which have been intensifying in some areas, such as ICT, and emerging in other areas such as hospitality, are addressed adequately.” Una Halligan, Chair of the Expert on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN), July 2015.

The report indicated that skills shortages include ICT software developers, cloud, databases/big data, testing, security, technical support, networking and infrastructure.

Association for Computing Machinery: Advancing Computing as a Science and a Profession

The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has compiled helpful information for students considering studying Computer Science from, disciplines of Computer Science, skills acquired, career paths etc.  There is a lot of information on their website: http://computingcareers.acm.org/

 

Recent Press Coverage


HEA Report shows continued improvement in employment opportunities and salaries for graduates

http://irishtechnews.net/ITN3/hea-report-shows-continued-improvement-in-employment-opportunities-and-salaries-for-graduates/

Irish Tech News - http://irishtechnews.net   3rd May 2016

Technologies behind 'smart cities'create privacy challenges

http://www.irishtimes.com/business/technology/technologies-behind-smart-cities-create-privacy-challenges-1.2514106

Irish Times, 28th January 2016

Computer scientists snapped up for jobs while arts graduates struggle

Irish Times, 22nd December 2014

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/education/computer-scientists-snapped-up-for-jobs-while-arts-graduates-struggle-1.2045856

Demand for IT staff up almost a third as Irish employers look beyond EU to fill roles

http://www.siliconrepublic.com/careers/item/40188-demand-for-it-staff-up/

 Silicon Republic, 15.01.2015

Click Here for details on how to apply including entry requirements.

Click Here for information about the Central Applications Office CAO.

GUIDE TO EXAMINATIONS FOR STAFF AND STUDENTS:

The following link outlines many topics including procedures and rules, deferrals of examinations, plagiarism, breach of examination regulations, conduct, mitigation and much more.

Guide to Examinations for Staff and Students

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