Dr Jodie Crane

Dr Jodie Crane

Contact Details:

Position:

Research Assistant

Supervisor:

Prof John Quinn

BIOGRAPHY

I obtained my BSc in Ecology in 2009 from the University of East Anglia, during which I also studied for an additional year at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. I then went on to complete my PhD at the University of Sheffield, where I studied vocal communication in the chestnut-crowned babbler, a cooperatively breeding bird endemic to south-eastern Australia. Whilst working as a Research Associate on Skomer Island in 2013, I pursued my interest in seabird ecology whilst working on a long-term population study of guillemots. Since then I have been the Ornithological Warden at the Calf of Man Bird Observatory where, amongst other things, I was involved in a large scale conservation project aiming to recover seabird populations on the island, and a Senior Research Assistant with the RSPB, where I led a team tracking seabird movements on Fair Isle. I am a highly experienced field ornithologist and active bird ringer, and hold a British Trust for Ornithology A-permit with training endorsement.

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My primary research interests are in bioacoustics and seabird ecology. During my PhD I worked on the structure and function of call repertoires in birds, and how vocal communication mediates social behaviour within groups. I am particularly interested in whether social complexity drives vocal complexity, and in relationships between the different calls comprising a species’ repertoire. More recently, I have developed interests in the relationship between communication and cognition which I hope to explore using wild great tits as a model system, during my work with Professor John Quinn. My interests in seabird ecology have led to me becoming involved in a number of tracking projects around the UK and Ireland, and I currently lecture on seabird conservation in the postgraduate ‘Marine Megafauna’ module at UCC.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Crane, J M S, Savage, J L, & Russell, AF (2016). Diversity and function of vocalisations in the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler. Emu 116(3) 241-253.

Engesser, S†, Crane, J M S†, Savage, J L, Russell, A F, Townsend S W (2015). Experimental evidence for phonemic contrast in a nonhuman vocal system. PLOS Biology 13(6) e1002171. († Joint first authorship.)

Crane, J M S, Pick, J L, Tribe, A J, Vincze, E, Hatchwell, B J, Russell, A F (2015). Chestnut-crowned babblers show affinity for calls of removed group members: a dual playback without expectancy violation. Animal Behaviour, 104, 51-57.

Crane, J M S (2014) Vocal communication in the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler. PhD Thesis, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield.

School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences

An Scoil Eolaíochtaí Bitheolaíocha, Domhaneolaíocha agus Comhshaoil

University College Cork, Distillery Fields, North Mall, Cork, Ireland T23 N73K

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