Heritage Week Event: Pollen, Peas and Pigs

  • 25 Aug 2015

Heritage Week Event at the Department of Archaeology, UCC:

Pollen, Peas and Pigs –
How Palaeo Scientists and Archaeologists Reconstruct the Landscapes and Lives of the Prehistoric Past

Archaeology involves reconstructing our ancestors’ lives. But not all the evidence is visible to the naked eye. Find out in this 'hands-on’ event how microscopic remains help us understand the past.

All welcome!


Archaeological research at UCC opens its doors during Heritage Week on the 25th of August. In our Open Lab you can learn how Palaeo Scientists and Archaeologists reconstruct the landscapes and lives of the Prehistoric Past. Archaeology involves reconstructing the daily activities of our ancestors - what types of grains were grown and processed and what types of animals did people keep in Bronze Age and Iron Age Ireland? Not all the evidence is visible to the naked eye. Find out in this 'hands-on’ event how microscopic remains help us understand the past. We will show what a pollen core looks like, and how they are collected and analysed. Visitors will be able to handle excavated ancient animal remains and artefacts and try milling grain with stone querns. 

This event will take place in the Environmental Laboratory at the Department of Archaeology, UCC.
We are located beside the Granary Theatre on Dyke Parade.

Experience the work of the environmental archaeologist! These 'hands-on' 1-hour sessions will begin at 10am, 11am, 12pm.

Suitable for all ages!

No booking required.

Please contact Caitlin Nagle with any queries at:
caitlin.nagle@ucc.ie or 087-3839329

More about the project:
On Twitter:
@Beyond_the_site
Project page:
http://www.ucc.ie/en/archaeology/research/projects/seeingbeyondthesite/

Find out where we are located:
http://www.ucc.ie/en/archaeology/aboutus/locationandfacilities/

Further details on the Heritage Week Website at:
http://www.heritageweek.ie/whats-on/event-details?EventID=1068

Tamworth pigs are one of the oldest surviving domestic pig breeds, similar to those in use in Later Prehistory.
Photo courtesy of the Irish National Heritage Park, Wexford

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