Book of Modules - Modularisation

What is a Module?

A module represents a self-contained fraction of a student's workload for the year and carries a unique examination/assessment mark. The size of a module is indicated by its credit weighting. Under modularisation, each academic year (9 months) of an undergraduate degree programme is worth 60 credits and each calendar year (12 months) of a taught postgraduate programme is worth 90 credits. This is based on the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS), which provides common procedures to guarantee academic recognition of studies at institutions offering ECTS-based programmes. Credits are the value allocated to modules to describe the student workload required to complete them. The number of credits allocated to each module will vary depending on the fraction of programme workload it accounts for. An undergraduate module may equal 5, 10, 15 or 20 credits. Each module has a unique 6-character code, which contains information about the module. The first two characters EN in the module EN1001, for example, indicate the subject area of the module (in this case an English module), the third character indicates the year or level (in this case a First Year or Level One module), and the remaining three characters 001 identify the particular module within the subject area.

Individual modules are grouped together to make up degree programmes. They may also be grouped together to make up subjects, which in turn may be grouped together to make up degree programmes. Modules carry the subject code of the subject they belong to (see the Book of Modules).

Book of Modules

Module descriptions are contained in the Book of Modules, which is available at http://www.ucc.ie/modules/ The Book of Modules is designed for use with the Undergraduate and Postgraduate University Calendars, which contain the regulations relating to undergraduate and postgraduate programmes and indicates which modules belong to which programmes. Students should refer to the Book of Modules to find out about individual modules and to the University Calendar to find out about how modules are grouped together to make up degree programmes. The Undergraduate University Calendar may be found at http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/and the Postgraduate University Calendar at http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate.

Key to Terms used in Module Description

Each module is described in detail in the Book of Modules using the following headings:

Module Code and Title: Each module has a unique 6-character code, which contains information about the module. The first two characters EN in the module EN1001, for example, indicate the subject area of the module (in this case an English module), the third character indicates the year or level (in this case a First Year or Level One module), and the remaining three characters 001 identify the particular module in the subject area. The module code is followed by the title of the particular module.

Credit Weighting: The size of a module is indicated by its credit weighting. The number of credits allocated to each module will vary depending on the fraction of programme workload it accounts for. An undergraduate module may equal 5, 10, 15 or 20 credits. A postgraduate module may equal 5, 10, 15 or 20 credits. The research element of a taught Master's programme may equal 30 credits or more.

Semester(s): Modularised programmes will be taught in Semesters. Semester dates are available here.

No. of Students: Indicates the maximum quota and/or minimum number of students required for the module to be taught, where applicable.

Pre-requisite(s): Pre-requisites relate specifically to individual modules and indicate any prior requirement for admission to a particular module. A pre-requisite is represented by a module code. Minimum entry requirements and programme/subject requirements are contained in the General Information section of the Undergraduate University Calendar under "Admission to Undergraduate Programmes".

Co-requisite(s): Indicates the code(s) of module(s) that must be taken in conjunction with a particular module. Co-requisites do not include core modules, which must be taken by all students in the programme and which are listed in the University Calendar under each programme.

Teaching Methods: The information under this heading details how the module is taught in hours per lecture, tutorial, laboratory session, field work, etc.

Module Co-ordinator: This section indicates the name and department of the academic staff member with responsibility for teaching and examining the module.

Lecturer(s): Indicates the name(s) and department(s) of staff teaching the module.

Module Objective; Module Content; Learning Outcomes: These sections outline the objective and content of each module. More detailed information is available from the Module Co-ordinator, whose name is indicated in the module description.

Assessment: This section indicates the total marks for the module, as well as giving a breakdown of each element of assessment associated with it, e.g. Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Oral Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment (2 x 1,000 word essays; 1 Multiple Choice Questionnaire [MCQ]) 50 marks.
Continuous Assessment may include any of the following: Practicals, Projects, Laboratory Reports, Essays, Seminars, In-Class Tests, and/or any other elements specified by the department.

Compulsory Elements: Indicates compulsory elements associated with the module such as End of Year Written Examination, Continuous Assessment etc. Regulations governing attendance etc. may be found in the General Information section of the Undergraduate University Calendar.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Indicates the penalty, if any, to be imposed e.g. for late submission of Continuous Assessment.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: This indicates the pass standard as a percentage of the total marks for the module overall (usually 40%) and indicates any special requirements for passing the module. For example, in some modules, students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently to pass the module.

Formal Written Examination: Indicates the, time of year, number and duration of the Formal Written Examination paper(s). "No Formal Written Examination" is stated where a module is assessed wholly by Continuous Assessment. Formal Written Examinations usually take place in Winter for Semester 1 modules or Summer for Semester 2 modules, but in some instances they take place in Spring or at other times of year, as indicated in the module descriptor.

Requirements for Autumn Supplemental Examination: Indicates the requirements for repeating a module examination at the Autumn Supplemental Examination, including any differences from the Winter/Summer Examination.