Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

FE1006 Poverty and Development
FE1008 Data in Development Studies
FE1013 Introduction to Development Studies I
FE1014 Communication and Facilitation Skills in Development
FE1015 Rural Development Theory, Policy and Practice
FE1016 Introduction to Food Business
FE1017 Introduction to Food Marketing
FE1018 Introduction to Development Studies II
FE1019 Introduction to Food and Agricultural Economics
FE1020 Principles of Agricultural and Resource Economics
FE1021 Development, Conflict and Peace I
FE1022 Development, Conflict and Peace II
FE1023 Socio-Economic Concepts for International Development and Food Policy
FE1030 Introduction to International Food Policy
FE1101 Introduction to Food Business and Development
FE1301 Introduction to the Food Supply System
FE1314 Introduction to Rural Development
FE1315 Rural Organisations
FE1316 Rural Economy
FE1317 Rural Society
FE1318 Rural Environment
FE1319 Communications for Rural Development
FE1321 Social Farming
FE1322 Food Business
FE2002 Globalisation, Trade and Development
FE2003 Introduction to Sustainable Livelihoods Analysis
FE2200 Introduction to Food Supply Chain Management
FE2201 International Food Policy
FE2203 Food Economics
FE2204 Quantitative Research for Food
FE2311 Rural Research Methods
FE2312 Integrated Rural Development - Policy and Practice
FE2313 Rural Enterprise
FE2314 Integrated Rural Community Planning
FE2315 Professional Placement
FE2316 Rural Tourism
FE2318 Social Economy
FE2401 Principles of Food Marketing
FE3008 Programme Planning and Management
FE3009 Development Management and Organisations
FE3010 Gender and Development
FE3013 Work Placement
FE3014 Concepts of Development
FE3015 Socio-Economic Research in Development
FE3016 Micro-Finance and Development
FE3018 Agriculture and Natural Resource Use in the Developing World
FE3101 SME and Local Development
FE3201 Market-oriented New Food Product Innovation
FE3203 Food Market Research Methods
FE3204 Food Enterprise Management
FE3205 Food Marketing Management
FE3206 Transferrable Skills - Food Business and Development - Research Project
FE3222 Transferable Skills - Food Business and Development - Work Placement
FE3223 Transferable Skills - Food Business and Development - Research Project
FE3225 Transferable Skills ?Food Business and Development ?Entrepreneurship Work Placement
FE3300 Food Management and Marketing
FE3308 Marketing and Business Skills for Rural Enterprise
FE3310 Financial Management
FE3311 Project Planning and Management
FE3312 Research Project/Minor Thesis
FE3313 Marine Resources
FE3314 ICT and Rural Development
FE3315 Conservation and Management of the Rural Landscape
FE3824 People Management in Member-Based Organisations (online)
FE4002 Global Food Policy
FE4005 Advanced Programme Planning and Policy Processes
FE4006 Macro-Economic Issues and Development
FE4008 Food Security and the Developing World
FE4009 Co-operative Business and the Rural Economy
FE4012 Humanitarian Action in Development
FE4015 Co-operative Enterprise (not on offer until 2019/20)
FE4205 Consumer Behaviour in Food Markets
FE4206 International Food Retail Marketing
FE4207 Global Food Supply Chain Management
FE4405 Food Choice Analysis
FE4412 Sustainable Development: Food, Natural Resources and Gender
FE4414 Co-operative Banking
FE4415 Research Project and Analytical Skills
FE4416 Rural Development Policy
FE4417 Contemporary Issues in Development
FE4418 Dissertation
FE4450 European Food Business
FE4475 Food Marketing and Entrepreneurship
FE5201 Foundation in Lean Supply Chain Management
FE6001 Advanced Food Consumer Behaviour
FE6002 Food Marketing Channel Theory
FE6004 Food Research Management and Methods
FE6005 Strategic Food Marketing
FE6006 Food Marketing Dissertation
FE6008 Food Marketing Channel Analysis Part 1
FE6009 Food Marketing Channel Analysis Part 2
FE6012 Social Entrepreneurship
FE6100 Dissertation in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development
FE6101 Food Business: Markets and Policy
FE6104 Practical Training Placement
FE6109 Co-operative Organisation: Theory and Concepts
FE6110 Food Markets and Policy
FE6111 Co-Operative Organisation: Theoretical Application and Practice
FE6112 Rural Development: Theory and Policy
FE6113 Rural Development: Application and Practice
FE6114 Introduction to Food Marketing
FE6115 Food Marketing and the Consumer
FE6116 Local Food Marketing: Application and Practice
FE6117 Introduction to Food Marketing
FE6118 Food Business Research Methods
FE6120 Food Business Analysis
FE6121 Food Business Project
FE6122 Food Industry Centred Research Project
FE6123 Dissertation in Food Business
FE6125 Economics of the Agri-food System
FE6201 Globalisation Issues - Food and Bioprocess Supply Chains
FE6202 Dissertation in Supply Chain Management
FE6501 Business Processes Across the Supply Chain
FE6502 Trends and Dynamics Across Dairy Markets
FE6503 Food Business Elective
FE6600 An Introduction to the National and Global Food Sector
FE6601 Co-operatives and the Third Sector
FE6602 Social Enterprises and Local Development
FE6701 Co-operative and Social Enterprise
FE6702 Social and Co-operative Entrepreneurship
FE6703 Co-operative and Social Enterprise Governance
FE6704 Education and Marketing for Co-operatives and Social Enterprise
FE6705 Innovation and Enterprise in Financial Co-ops and Mutuals
FE6706 Community Co-operatives and Social Enterprises
FE6707 Worker Co-operative Strategies
FE6708 Co-operative Food Processing and Supply
FE6709 Social Enterprises and the Developing World
FE6710 Dissertation in Co-operative and Social Enterprise
FE6711 Research Methodology
FE6712 Leadership and Change Management in Co-operative and Social Enterprises
FE6902 Global Food Policy Issues
FE6903 Food Security and Sustainable Livelihoods in the Developing World
FE6904 Co-operative Business and Food Supply
FE6905 Food Choice and Innovation

FE1006 Poverty and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures ((including seminar discussions)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the linkages between poverty and development

Module Content: Introduction to poverty and development; poverty measurement; analysis of extent and nature of poverty; poverty and income distribution; poverty and development linkages.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the different meanings and dimensions associated to the term 'development'
?Distinguish between the different concepts and approaches to measuring development
?Describe the global distribution of poverty and factors of differences in the distribution and incidence of poverty
?Outline the linkages between poverty reduction, economic growth and income distribution
?Examine the linkages between poverty, hunger and food security
?Describe the basic needs approach to development
?Discuss the linkages between poverty and the environment
?Appraise the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as a framework for development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Essay - approximately 2,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory Attendance at Lectures and Participation in Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1008 Data in Development Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Computer-Lab Practical Classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Stephen Thornhill, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Stephen Thornhill, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce the use and relevance of data analysis in development studies.

Module Content: Introduction to the scientific method of enquiry; uses of data, types of data used in development analysis; information quality; principles of sampling and survey design; data presentation; basic statistics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create reading lists for course projects using UCC's Catalogue to identify books and Electronic Resources to identify journal articles
?Search the internet in a critical way to identify quality and reviewed sites as sources of information for course projects/essays
?Reference various sources of information within the text of course projects/essays
?Write up a bibliography for a course projects/essays
?Source and download electronic sources of secondary data from recognised International Development Agencies' sites
?Manipulate electronic source data for presentation in tables, graphs and charts
?Outline the main features of an argument using secondary data and literature research
?Use spreadsheets for developing and presenting budget.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Assignment(s).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. (including computer lab-based assignments) and Satisfactory Attendance and participation at Lectures and Practicals.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination:

[Top of page]

FE1013 Introduction to Development Studies I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (including seminar discussions).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: (i) To introduce students to the field of development studies (ii) To develop an understanding of concept of development, especially in the majority world context (iii) To explore alternative strategies for economic and social development.

Module Content: Various definitions of development are examined. The following are explored through theoretical and/or case-study approaches: principle development theories; linkages between poverty and development; colonialism and post-colonialism; corruption; gender and development; race and ethnicity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and discuss theoretical perspectives on development
?Identify and analyse views on poverty and development
?Identify the legacy of colonialism and impacts of post-colonialism
?Discuss and analyse gender in the context of development approaches
?Analyse the concepts of "race" and ethnicity in the context of modern mobility and migration.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 1,500 word written assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1014 Communication and Facilitation Skills in Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To give the student a good understanding of the theories and principles of communications. To impart communications skills implicit in development situations. To familiarise the student with technologies useful to communications.

Module Content: Theories and models of communications. The communications process - media/methods. Communications in the organisation. Written and verbal media skills, presentation skills, and group facilitation. Press releases and using multimedia for communications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the theoretical background to human communication.
?Identify and analyse problems and difficulties associated with crossing cultures in the context of communications.
?Discuss and analyse the flow of communication within organisations, and deterrents to effective communication, and the means to improving communications.
?Discuss the benefits and shortcomings of current media utilisation within developing country contexts.
?Analyse the various means of managing group communications and practical group facilitation in development situations.
?Discuss the ethical underpinning for research and development in the South.
?Identify the key tasks associated with delivering professional presentations.
?Identify the key tasks required for participatory group facilitation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous assessment comprising a group research project: group report, 70 marks; individual research diary, 20 marks; group presentation, 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1015 Rural Development Theory, Policy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick Enright, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to introduce and familiarise the student with a theoretical, policy and practical context for rural development.

Module Content: Interpretation of the Rural Development Problem
Defining Rural Development and Rural Development Policy
Evolution of Rural Development Policy (EU and Ireland): an examination of the driving forces of change
Theories of Rural Development
Current Rural Development Policy (EU and Ireland)
Current Rural Development Practice - Comparative Case Studies (EU and Ireland)
An introduction to some of the contemporary issues in Rural Development
Sustainable Rural Development - The role of Fair Trade Social Enterprise.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the major concepts and definitions of rural development.
?Outline and explain the evolution of EU and Irish rural development policy.
?Describe some of the contemporary problems facing local and rural communities.

?Describe and discuss the rural development policies and strategies that have been implemented in response to contemporary rural problems.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay-).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE1016 Introduction to Food Business

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 6 x 1 hr(s) tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the food business chain by evaluating the salient issues addressed by various stakeholders.

Module Content: An examination of the factors that influence the Food Business system from production to consumption. The module will also examine food policy issues and their effect on information flow.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and consider the implications of macro trends on consumer food demands;
?List the key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing the food sector;
?Describe the current market environment for food manufacturers and explain how this might impact on food manufacturers' activities;
?Demonstrate how government intervention in food supply impacts supply chain stakeholders.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks ( 5 In-Class quizzes).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE1017 Introduction to Food Marketing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 6 x 1 hr(s) small group meetings).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Mary McCarthy, Department of Management and Marketing.

Lecturer(s): Prof Mary McCarthy, Department of Management and Marketing.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the key marketing concepts and apply these to the food industry.

Module Content: This module also provides an introduction to food marketing and addresses the following topics: the marketing concept, marketing research, market segmentation, marketing strategy and target marketing, product choice, pricing, promotion and distribution in relation to the food industry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define what food marking is and demonstrate the tasks undertaken in food marketing;
?Explain and illustrate how consumer markets can be broken down into smaller more manageable groups;
?List and describe the components of the marketing mix. Illustrate their relevance in the food products category;
?Summarise market information and use this information to develop simple research questionnaires.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (60 marks group project, and 40 marks 5 in-class quizzes).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE1018 Introduction to Development Studies II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): FE1013

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (including seminar discussions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: (i) To develop an advanced understanding of concepts of development (ii) To engage with the debate among practitioners and academics concerned with economic and social progress in the developing world.

Module Content: Key development themes and issues are explored through theoretical and/or case-study approaches; global health; impacts of HIV/AIDS on development; interventions such as microfinance and microenterprise; participative approaches; race and ethnicity; conflict.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply the concept of global health to issues of unequal access to health services and health outcomes
?Demonstrate understanding of the causes of food insecurity and famine, and responses to these
?Identify and discuss the impacts of HIV/AIDS on development
?Identify and analyse the linkages between conflict and development
?Define the different approaches to microfinance and microenterprise.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x1,500 word assignment (30 marks); group work and presentation (20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1019 Introduction to Food and Agricultural Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To gain an understanding of the fundamentals of economic problems, develop an understanding of economic theory especially price and output determination; cost and production theories, demand and supply and evaluating the implications for agri-food in relation to small farms or peasant farming systems and managing emerging issues in agriculture.

Module Content: The module introduces the application of microeconomics for a diverse set of firms ranging from farms to food and agribusiness organisations. The behaviour of firms as prices and outputs are determined, applied production theories with respect to subsistence farming, choice of technique, analysis of technical change, and risk and uncertainty; agricultural demand, prices and markets; and farm management economies applied to subsistence agriculture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, concepts, and expression of production economics, as applied to problems in agriculture and the food system;
?integrate principles and practice to develop the capacity to conceptualize and analyze problems within the agricultural system and a wide variety of other contexts;
?Analyse the behaviour of final consumers with respect to agricultural food products;
?Manage emerging issues in agriculture, food production and the industrialization of agriculture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE1020 Principles of Agricultural and Resource Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To understand the nature and behaviour of agricultural markets and price relationships among markets. Why they are different from the markets for other consumer goods. Why market structure matters to market outcomes and to develop effective analytical tools for thinking about the business environment in which buying and selling decisions are made.

Module Content: The module explores different types of markets; perfect competition; the most fundamental of the market structures; applied production theory with respect to subsistence farming, choice of technique, analysis of technical change, farm size questions; agricultural transformation and rural development; developing and implementing a marketing plan; The Agricultural Business System and farm management economies applied to smallholder agriculture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse traditional problems relating to developing and implementing a marketing plan, evaluate the relationship between agri-food business industries and smallholder farmers;
?Understand agricultural development and food supply;
?Apply marginal analysis to predict the optimal use of economic resources by consumers and producers of goods and services;
?Use economic criteria to critically examine agricultural transformation policy;
?Manage emerging issues in agriculture, agricultural systems and the industrialization of agriculture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE1021 Development, Conflict and Peace I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): FE1022

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the causes and effects of conflict, the means used to mitigate conflict, and post-conflict consequences with particular reference to development and developing country contexts.

Module Content: Development of conflict frameworks and other modelling tools that explain conflict and conflict-resolution processes. Approaches and issues in conflict resolution and peace-making and peace keeping; issues related to post-conflict recovery. The role of the media in conflict. Race, ethnicity, racisms and genocide.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and use conflict frameworks
?Describe the main approaches to conflict resolution
?Define and discuss "race" and ethnicity in the context of conflict
?Define genocide and identify the causes of recent genocides
?Critique the role of the media in the creation and mitigation of conflicts and disputes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Report - 1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

FE1022 Development, Conflict and Peace II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): FE1021

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the causes and effects of conflict, the means used to mitigate conflict, and post-conflict consequences with particular reference to development and developing country contexts.

Module Content: The gendered issues and impacts of conflict; the relationships between food security, famine and conflict; the development of sustainable livelihoods in societies emerging from conflict; conflict and children; the impact of terrorisms on development; relevant human rights legislation; asylum, refugees, and internally displaced people. Case studies covering each of these areas are used to develop understandings.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between the nature of refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people.
?Identify the linkages between conflict, food security and famine
?Identify the similarities and differences between refuges, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people.
?Discuss the impacts of conflict on development, gendered impacts of conflict and impacts on children
?Discuss the main international human rights legislations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Report - 1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1023 Socio-Economic Concepts for International Development and Food Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the socio-economic concepts relevant to the study of international development and food policy; to develop the student's ability to apply such concepts throughout their subsequent course of study.

Module Content: The module introduces students to a range of socio-economic concepts relevant to the study of international development and food policy in a manner suitable for those with no prior study of the field. These include: growth, poverty, inequality and redistribution; individual and market-wide demand; concepts and measures of national income; producers and market theories; structure of the economy; markets, prices and market failures; economics of food demand; human capital and human development; globalisation and trade; the economic development process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Provide basic definitions of key socio-economic concepts;
?Demonstrate how these concepts are applicable in the field of international development and food policy;
?Discuss the assumptions underlying these concepts and the possible bias they might contain;
?Explain where further and more detailed information on these concepts might be found.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x In-class tests 20 marks, written paper 1,500 words 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the department.).

[Top of page]

FE1030 Introduction to International Food Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To inform students of key elements of contemporary international food policy.

Module Content: Introduction to the scope of food policy; absolute and comparative advantage; food policy and trade linkages; developing and developed world food trade patterns; the WTO; and case studies of food policies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the importance of food policy in development;
?Describe the influence of WTO in food policy;
?Link changes in food policy to processes of globalization; and
?Link food policy in action to specific examples.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Essay of 1,500-2,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development).

[Top of page]

FE1101 Introduction to Food Business and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of food business chains, an appreciation of the role of cooperatives in food business and development and an understanding of the interlinkages between food security and development

Module Content: Introduction to food supply chains. Introduction to cooperative organisation and management issues in food business and development situations. Introduction to issues in food security and development

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key components of a marketing strategy for a new food firm;
?Differentiate between successful and unsuccessful marketing strategies;
?Evaluate the role marketing plays in a new food product success;
?Explain the most important differences between co-operative businesses and conventional businesses;
?Classify co-operatives according to their prime beneficiaries and give examples of the kinds of businesses operated within each category;
?Identify the financial dilemmas confronting co-operatives and explain how successful co-operatives have managed to resolve those dilemmas;
?Identify the inter-linkages between HIV/AIDS and poverty, agricultural development and sustainable livelihoods; and
?Evaluate the policies that allow people to break out of the poverty-hunger-malnutrition trap.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Seminar Presentation and Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1301 Introduction to the Food Supply System

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide the student with an understanding of the development of and characteristics of the food business chain.

Module Content: Development of the contemporary food system. Key issues for the global food system. Factors that influence the food business system from production to consumption. Profile and structure of the European and Irish agri-food sectors. Food company case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the development of the contemporary food supply chain.
?Identify key challenges for the global food system.
?Explain the key influences on the contemporary food system.
?Describe key characteristics of the European food industry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (in-class test (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1314 Introduction to Rural Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of the key aspects of rural development in an Irish and European Context.

Module Content: This introductory module provides a context for many of the ideas and concepts explored in later modules. The key content areas include:
? Key concepts, approaches, theories and practices associated with rural development;
? Evolution of rural development in Ireland and EU;
? Current issues of development in rural Ireland; and
? Role and functions of organizations and agencies involved in rural development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define and explain the major concepts and approaches associated with rural development;
?Describe the evolution of rural development in Ireland and EU;
?Discuss the current issues of development in rural Ireland;
?Identify the most significant organizations and agencies involved in rural development and discuss their role; and
?Participate in debates on rural development in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay/project - 1,500-2,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1315 Rural Organisations

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To outline to the students the diversity of organisations that contribute to the sustainable development of rural areas.

Module Content: The module will examine the different types of organisations that exist and will investigate the distinguishing features of these organisation. In addition the module will explore the factors that led to the emergence of these organisation and how they contribute to sustainable rural development

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate different types of organisations in a rural context;
?Describe and discuss the different legal structures available to rural based organisations;
?Discuss differences between conventional and alternative forms of organisations;
?Compare and contrast different forms of organisations;
?Discuss the development of the partnership approach to rural development; and
?Classify co-operatives according to their prime beneficiaries and define the concept of the co-operative according to co-operative principles and according to the co-operative theory of action.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (essay/project - 1,500-2,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1316 Rural Economy

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the economic elements of consumption, production, and trade in rural areas and to provide the tools to analyze them.

Module Content: The module explores basic micro and macroeconomic concepts and empirical methods related to agricultural and nonagricultural activities in rural areas, the role and impact of regional, national and international policies, and the implications of the changing economic landscape for social and political development in rural areas.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the components of the rural economy;
?Describe and be able to discuss the changing role of agriculture in rural economies;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the economic linkages at the local, national and international level;
?Understand the concepts of production functions, production costs, and the interaction of businesses in a marketplace;
?Identify current and potential alternative income sources in a rural area (multifunctionality);
?Analyse the drivers of rural labour demand and labour supply and how they interact;
?Identify and evaluate issues of income distribution in the context of rural development; and
?Analyse the role and impact of policy incentives on rural economic activity.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay/Project - 2,500-3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1317 Rural Society

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce the student to a sociological interpretation of the changing nature of rural society.

Module Content: Includes an introduction to rural sociology and an examination of rural social change and the related consequences for rural society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Competently describe the key aspects of rural society in a state of change;
?List the changes that have taken place in rural society in Ireland over time;
?Relate social theory to traditional, modern, and post-modern rural society;
?List the differentiations between urban and rural sociology; and
?Enumerate the challenges for rural society globally and locally.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay/project - 2,500-3,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1318 Rural Environment

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the Irish rural environmental heritage and to develop skills and tools for its analysis, utilization, and sustainable management.

Module Content: The module provides tools for the economic evaluation of the environment and of natural resources, and the rationale and impact of key environmental policies affecting rural stakeholders.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define and describe the structural organisation and processes of natural and agricultural ecosystems;
?Analyse the role of natural resources, such as renewable energies, in the economic base of a rural area;
?Demonstrate skills to critically analyze the role of sustainability and biodiversity and rural resource management;
?Discuss the theories that underlie environmental policies to correct market failures;
?Discuss and evaluate global and national environmental policies and their impact on local rural communities;
?Explain and evaluate basic measures of environmental sustainability;
?Discuss the sources of greenhouse gas emissions and the contribution of the various sectors nationally and internationally; and
?Appraise the environmental impact of rural enterprises and rural actions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay/Project - 2,500-3,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1319 Communications for Rural Development

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the key role of communications in rural development as well as providing the student with practical communications skills and knowledge.

Module Content: The module examines the role of communications in rural development and presents the main theories related to communications. This module will provide the student with an insight into the main communication methods used in rural development and will help in developing skills in disseminating information. Particular communication media and methods are addressed in the context of rural development processes. Specifically skills related to the use of mass media; public speaking, group communications and written communications methods are developed due to their importance in enabling rural development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the critical role of communications in the development process;
?Understand the theory of human communications;
?Describe the media and methods used in professional communications and evaluate the appropriateness of each for given situation;
?Plan a communications campaign;
?Analyse how groups work and how they achieve their goals;
?Demonstrate the skills to participate effectively as a group member, lead group processes and facilitate meetings; and
?Demonstrate skills related to the use of selected communications methods (individual communication / consultations, group methods such as lecture presentations and meetings, mass media such as preparing press articles and radio presentations, write effective project proposals and reports.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,500-3,000 words) 100 marks. Student lecture presentation 100 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1321 Social Farming

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine social farming in the Irish and international context and explore the emerging role of social farming in rural development.

Module Content: This module develops participants' awareness and understanding of the concepts, the applications and the policy environment that surround the use of social farming practices in an Irish and European context. The term social farming covers all activities that use agricultural resources to promote, or to generate, social services in rural areas. Examples of these services include rehabilitation, therapy, sheltered employment, life-long education and other activities that contribute to social inclusion.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define Social Farming and describe how it has emerged as a form of service provision in rural areas;
?Explain the principles of Social Farming how it may be applied both for the benefit of people using services and for rural development;
?Map the nature, extent and range of settings in which social farming initiatives are being undertaken within Ireland and in the broader European context;
?Outline the drivers of Social Farming from a Rural Development and Health and Social Care Policy perspective;
?Critically assess the relevant national and European policy context across a wide range of policy domains and analyse how it impacts on the operation and development of Social Farming; and
?Evaluate the development requirements to establish a Social Farm from the perspective of multiple stakeholders.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay/Project - 2,500-3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE1322 Food Business

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of food business chains through an examination of the food business chain from producer to consumer with an emphasis on the roles and needs of the various stakeholders, particularly the rural producer and consumer.

Module Content: The module will examine the roles and needs of stakeholders along the food chain, in the context of the farmer viability, consumer demand and niche markets, retail structures, quality and traceability of food, environmental impact and sustainability. Both conventional and alternative approaches to addressing these issues will be discussed including CSA.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand the functions of the food supply chain and the role of the actors in the chain;
?Identify the ethical and environmental implications of the current food business model;
?Assess the role of the emerging models in the context of sustainable development;
?Explain the dimensions of organic food production, shortening the supply chain and the role of the consumer; and
?Analyse the policy framework directing the sector.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (essay/project - 2,500-3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2002 Globalisation, Trade and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development, and Dr Philip Dobie (Adjunct Professor).

Module Objective: (i) To develop an understanding of selected topics in international of development (ii) To analyse the process of globalisation and its impact on lives and livelihoods in the developing world.

Module Content: The international architecture of aid and development; key global challenges in development: climate change, population, migration; transnational corporations and international trade; globalisation of agriculture; debt; and aid.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Relate the impact of globalisation in developing country economies and societies;
?Interpret how the terms of trade, unequal exchange and the activities of trans-national corporations effect international trade and local economies;
?Explain the architecture of international and multi-lateral organisations involved in global development, trade and finance; and
?Explain the importance of key global challenges, such as change, population, migration.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (one research report - 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory Attendance at Lectures and Participation in Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2003 Introduction to Sustainable Livelihoods Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (plus student seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce students to sustainable livelihoods analysis.

Module Content: Concepts and definitions of sustainability; meaning of sustainable livelihoods; analytical frameworks; linkages of sustainable livelihoods to poverty reduction and development; sustainable natural resource management; applications and case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define sustainability and the concept of sustainable livelihoods
?Draw and explain the sustainable livelihoods framework
?Apply the sustainable livelihoods framework in the analysis of development issues
?Demonstrate the use of the sustainable livelihoods framework in addressing poverty and natural resource management issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Assignment(s) and student presentations).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory Attendance at Lectures and Participation in Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination:

[Top of page]

FE2200 Introduction to Food Supply Chain Management

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 3 x 1 hr(s) practicals).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop appropriate methods and constructs to enable students examine forces operating within food supply chains.

Module Content: Supply Chain analysis, vertical coordination, power and analytical frameworks.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe a supply chain and explain its role in bridging the production-consumption gap
?Explain the role of inventory, logistics and information along the supply chain
?Explain the relationship between supply chain configuration and inventory levels
?Apply the concepts of pipeline mapping, speculation and postponement to supply chains
?Evaluate the appropriateness of different relationship types with a supply chain
?Explain and apply Porter's five forces model
?Explain the sources of power within vertical food chains.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE2201 International Food Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To inform students of key elements of contemporary international food policy.

Module Content: Introduction to the scope of food policy; absolute and comparative advantage; food policy and trade linkages; developing and developed world food trade patterns; the WTO; case studies of food policies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define food policy;
?Describe the importance of food policy in development;
?Describe the influence of WTO in food policy;
?Link changes in food policy to processes of globalization; and
?Link food policy in action to specific examples.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Essay of 1,500-2,000 words.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory attendance at lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE2203 Food Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 3 x 1 hr(s) tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Stephen Thornhill, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop appropriate methods and constructs to enable students to examine issues dealing with the agri-food sector.

Module Content: Economic theory of household food consumption, profit-maximising food producers, commodity and food markets and agricultural policy impacts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain household food production and consumption decisions
?Explain the economic theory behind profit maximising investment and production decisions among food firms
?Explain the theory behind commodity and food price formation
?Explain how agricultural and food policies influence food prices and social welfare
?Explain the weaknesses of the economic supply and demand model from a food sector perspective.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE2204 Quantitative Research for Food

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Combined Lectures and Computer Lab sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To enable the student design and complete food marketing research projects and reports based on quantitative data

Module Content: The role of research and the research brief, research design, primary and secondary data sources, descriptive research, questionnaire design and analysis, report writing and excel.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate proficiency in the use of excel.
?Develop a research design for quantitative studies;
?Identify food related data sources;
?Design a questionnaire;
?Analyse a questionnaire;
?Write up a structured food market research report.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word group inductive research report, 50 marks; 1 x 2,000 group market research report 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development).

[Top of page]

FE2311 Rural Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with knowledge and skills on all aspects of socio-economic research.

Module Content: This module focuses on developing students' socio economic research capacity. The issues selected for study include: research approaches; problem/topic identification; literature review;
development of objectives; sampling; questionnaire design; questionnaire delivery; data coding and data entry; data analysis and presentation of research findings.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the role and principles of research in rural development;
?Discuss the theoretical underpinning of quantitative and qualitative research;
?Differentiate and critically assess the role of secondary and primary data in research;
?Critically analyse a variety of research methods and techniques;
?Write research proposals for given rural development contexts (needs analysis, monitoring and evaluation);
?Develop data collection schedules;
?Prepare a database, perform simple data analysis tasks using MS Office software and write a research report;
?Present research findings to diverse audiences; and
?Critically analyse research reports and papers.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In-Class test 80 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2312 Integrated Rural Development - Policy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine and review contemporary integrated rural development policy within a European context.

Module Content: The key content areas include:
? The development of a theoretical and policy context for the understanding of contemporary European rural development strategies; and
? Case study analysis of contemporary European integrated rural development strategies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the practice of integrated rural development with reference to Irish and European policy & practice;
?Explain and describe the emergence of the integrated rural development approach to local rural development at a national and European level;
?Discuss the current policy issues of integrated rural development strategies; and
?List the skill and knowledge sets required for effective integrated rural development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In Class test 80 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2313 Rural Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the unique characteristics of rural enterprises and the nature and importance of the rural business and policy environment in stimulating a thriving enterprise environment in rural areas.

Module Content: The module identifies the many ways in which rural SMEs can serve a variety of rural stakeholders as well as the role of socio-economic development agencies and policies conducive to entrepreneurship and innovation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the concepts of entrepreneurship and innovation and the social, economic and political factors that impact them;
?Explain and evaluate the reasons why governments and enterprise supporting agencies intervene to develop and support rural enterprises;
?Critically evaluate national and international enterprise and innovation policies in their historic context and their impact on rural enterprises;
?Demonstrate and understanding of the role of statutory and non-statutory agencies at the national and international level in supporting small and medium businesses in rural Ireland; and
?Evaluate why and how enterprises develop in response to market demand.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2314 Integrated Rural Community Planning

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding and critique of the processes, procedures and requirements of effective and sustainable rural planning and development.

Module Content: Stakeholder and consultative processes. Sustainable planning and development in rural area.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the process, procedures and requirements for effective rural area planning;
?Critique practice of area planning in rural areas;
?Appraise the role of the range of stakeholders involved in integrated planning for rural areas;
?Debate a holistic planning approach incorporating social, economic, cultural and environmental aspects of sustainable rural planning; and
?Demonstrate skills of managing a community driven integrated rural community planning process.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2315 Professional Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop professional and transferable skills and experience by working in a rural development environment/organisation.

Module Content: This module will provide students with exposure to, and experience in, an rural development environment/organisation relevant to the degree and to a working environment. Performance will be monitored by both the employer and academic staff.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evidence their rural development skills in a professional rural development environment for at least 6 working weeks;
?Have completed the required assignments, portfolios, or learning journals required to evidence professional practice skills;
?Demonstrate application of rural development degree learning to practice in a working environment;
?Demonstrate cross programme competence in a placement situation; and
?Reflect on the value of work placement in the context of learning from the course.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay - 2,000-2,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2316 Rural Tourism

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module seeks to locate economic opportunities and provide analysis tools for promoting rural tourism sector.

Module Content: The module provides in-depth knowledge and understanding of the various aspects of Irish rural tourism and tourism policies, analyzes the set of complex challenges and relevant solutions faced by the sector, and provides applied research methodology appropriate to the study of rural tourism.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse the role of the tourism sector as part of the wider economy;
?Discuss the evolution of tourism policy in Ireland;
?Identify different sources of rural tourism (cultural, heritage, eco-tourism, marine, food, etc.);
?Analyse the direct, indirect and induced effects of tourism on a local rural economy and outline the methods to measuring the local economic impact of tourism;
?Discuss the elements of sustainable rural tourism development and how it can be implemented; and
?Evaluate national and international case studies of successful rural tourism and their applicability to Irish rural communities.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2318 Social Economy

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Face to face on site tutorials.Online tutorial & student support/mentoring. Course material associated readings available on line through Blackboard.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is discuss the role of the social economy in rural development.

Module Content: The key content areas include:
? A theoretical approach to understanding the social economy and in particular the emergence of social enterprises;
? A critique of the Irish and European policy and legislative environments which have given rise to social economy initiatives; and
? A case study approach to the evaluation of rural based social economy initiatives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand and explain the concept of the social economy and its potential for rural development;
?Discuss the policy environment of the social economy in general and social enterprises in particular;
?Explain the role of the social economy as a strategy for local rural based social and economic development;
?Discuss the survival strategies of rural based social enterprises through case study analysis; and
?Discuss, evaluate and illustrate the impact of rural based social economy initiatives through specific case study material.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) project and or essay 120 marks. In class test 80 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE2401 Principles of Food Marketing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide a grounding in Food Marketing principles, which underlie decision-making at each stage of the Food Sector.

Module Content: Application of Food Marketing principles at consumer, retail, manufacturing and production levels in the Food Sector.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and consider the implications of macro trends on consumer food demands and explain how these might impact on food manufacturers' activities;
?Describe the current market environment for food manufacturers and analyse the consequences of this;
?Define what food marketing is and describe the components of the marketing mix. Illustrate their relevance in the food products category and demonstrate the tasks undertaken in food marketing;
?Explain and illustrate how consumer markets can be broken down into smaller more manageable groups;
?Summarise the benefits and costs of marketing to food companies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

[Top of page]

FE3008 Programme Planning and Management

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce and appraise methods of programme planning and management in development

Module Content: Contemporary programme planning and management in development organisations; programme cycle and management; application of logical framework analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the different stages of the project cycle.
?Outline the advantages and difficulties of participatory and non-participatory approaches to programme planning and management.
?Develop programme proposals including developing budgets, activity charts and stakeholder tables
?Summarise a programme proposal using a logframe and outline how the different components of the logframe relate to a programme.
?List key components of best practise in establishing monitoring & evaluation systems.
?Outline the key features of mainstreaming issues such as gender, environment, human rights and HIV/AIDS into programme.
?Identify the different types of risks to be considered in developing programme proposals.
?Appraise programme proposals according to established criteria.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Class Exam 20; Individual Pratical Projects 80; Group Project 80).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3009 Development Management and Organisations

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To analyse the nature and role of development organisations in development

Module Content: International development and the role of development assistance; nature of development organisations; bilateral and multilateral agencies; critiques of development aid agencies; new roles for civil society; effectiveness in development organisations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the origins of development assistance
?Explain what development assistance is intended to achieve
?Classify different types of development organisations
?Explain the roles of civil society organisations in development
?Describe and explain the different modalities for delivering development assistance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (one individual essay of approximately 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory Attendance at Lectures and Participation in Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3010 Gender and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the ways in which gender inequalities are constructed and the impact of mainstream development on gender relations

Module Content: Gender concepts (Women in Development, Gender and Development etc.); practical and strategic gender needs and their limitations; public and private theories and limitations regarding gender in practice; production and reproduction; gender policies at national and international levels; methods for gender analysis; gender in developing country contexts; conflict and gender in developing countries: masculinities; gender audits; mainstreaming gender issues in development institutions, in project/programme planning; monitoring and evaluation.An analysis of gender at local, national and international levels; ways of responding to gender needs; how discrimination operates within different societies; why development initiatives have so often failed to help women; the immediate and long-term needs for cultural and social change.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and analyse practical and strategic gender needs.
?Discuss the principal factors involved in gender mainstreaming.
?Identify and discuss the ways that gender and discrimination operates at local, national an international levels.
?Critique gender policies at national and international levels.
?Identify ways to respond to gender imbalances.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x individual assignments 1,500 words each, 50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at Lectures and Participation in Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3013 Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1 and 3. (After Third University Examination - April to September).

No. of Students: Min 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (22 week work placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an opportunity for students to gain practical experience of development practices and processes.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring examination, students will go on placement for 22 weeks with a development organization following an agreed programme of work. This programme will be jointly monitored by a work supervisor in the external organisation and by a UCC academic mentor. Students will be expected to keep and submit a weekly log book for examination by work supervisor and the academic mentor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply the theory and methods they have learned to date in the BSc International Development and Food Policy to a practical situation.
?Utilise skills in research and other work practices which they have developed during the placement.
?Negotiate, implement and evaluate programmes of work.
?Provide evidence in written work and presentations of an enhanced understanding of key development issues and contexts.

Assessment: Attendance at preparatory classes, 22 week work placement, maintenance of a weekly log book, submission of work placement report and a presentation thereon. This module will be assessed on a Pass/Fail Basis.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at preparatory classes, 22 week work placement, maintenance of a weekly log book, submission of work placement report and a presentation thereon.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students failing this module must repeat it after the Final Degree Examination and must pass it in order to graduate.

[Top of page]

FE3014 Concepts of Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None. Students who take this module cannot subsequently take FE4412

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (including Seminar Discussions).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: (i) To develop an understanding of concept of development, especially in the majority world context. (ii) To explore alternative strategies for economic development. (iii) To engage with the debate among practitioners and academics concerned with economic and social progress in the developing world.

Module Content: The various definitions of development are explored. The strengths and weaknesses of each strategy are assessed and then compared. Evaluation of the strategies, based on their performance as regards resource utilisation and the level of income; savings, investment and growth; human capital formation; poverty and inequality; the role of the state; and participation, democracy and freedom, is undertaken to introduce these particular aspects and to demonstrate their impact on the development process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the basic concepts of development;
?Discuss the strength and weakness of different development strategies;
?Assess the relevance of key strategies in efficient resource utilisation;
?Evaluate the key contributions of key resources such as human capital, savings in development;
?Summarise the contributions of the state in development; and
?Justify the impact of participation, and democracy in development process.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous assessment comprising 1 x 3,000 word research report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory attendance at lectures and participation in seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3015 Socio-Economic Research in Development

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures (plus lab-based work and fieldwork).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To give students an understanding of the aims and process of socio-economic research in development, and the various approaches to data collection, statistics and computerised data analysis; to introduce students to technical report writing.

Module Content: Introduction to uses of socio-economic research in development. Types of approach to research. Developing a research framework and research proposal. Using secondary data, preparing a literature review. Methods of primary data collection. Questionnaire design for computer-based analysis. Introduction to SPSS, preparing data for computer, entering and coding data and running SPSS. Analysing, interpreting and displaying results. Preparing a report; structure of a report, report layout.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?State different types of socio-economic research used in development research;
?Define quantitative and qualitative research;
?Develop a research framework;
?Identify research methods appropriate to specific research issues;
?Design questionnaires and other survey instruments;
?Use SPSS for data entry and analysis;
?Interpret data output from SPSS; and
?Prepare a research report.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Continuous Assessment - Research Plan 40 marks; Group Project 120 marks; and Poster/Presentation 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory attendance at lectures, practical classes and fieldwork.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department). None.

[Top of page]

FE3016 Micro-Finance and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To review and evaluate innovative approaches for increasing the supply and range of financial services to the poor and their contribution to economic and social development.

Module Content: The theoretical foundations of microfinance and its role in development. This will include: (i) defining microfinance and distinguishing it from traditional financial services; (ii) understanding the different paradigms associated with microfinance and development; (iii) distinguishing between different approaches to measuring impact of microfinance programmes; and (iv) evaluating the contribution of microfinance to poverty reduction, gender empowerment, social and economic development. The different factors, at a micro level, that influence the design and operation of microfinance programmes will be examined. These will include: (i) the influence of the national and sectoral context; (ii) identifying market, clients and services; and (iii) designing microfinance products. Specific case studies of microfinance will be reviewed and evaluated against the macro and micro theoretical foundations influencing microfinance design eg Credit Unions, Grameen Bank, Islamic Approaches to Microfinance, and LETS schemes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the principles, scale and impact of micro-finance in a developing and developed world context.
?Evaluate the link between micro-finance and poverty reduction.
?Distinguish between the poverty lending and financial systems approaches to micro-finance.
?Discuss and analyse the characteristics and application of a wide range of micro-finance initiatives, including Grameen Banking, Islamic finance, credit unions, and local economic trading systems (LETS).
?Describe and assess the link between gender issues and micro-finance.
?Categorise the main factors that influence the design of micro-finance services.
?Provide examples of how different factors influence the design of micro-finance services.
?Evaluate the main features of well-designed micro-finance programmes.
?Conduct research on micro-finance initiatives.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x Discussion Board Postings 10 Marks and Individual Essay 20 Marks (1 x 1,500 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance and participation at lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3018 Agriculture and Natural Resource Use in the Developing World

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an in-depth understanding of agricultural systems, natural resource use and related policy issues in developing countries.

Module Content: Introduction to agriculture in the developing world: theories and concepts; agrarian transformations in the contemporary world; integrated crop and animal production systems; natural resource regimes, land tenure and water rights; common property resources; natural resource conservation; agricultural support services; technology transfer; policy issues for agricultural development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the differences between various farming systems worldwide.
?Identify and discuss a variety of natural resource tenure systems;
?Explain the principles of natural resource conservation in agricultural systems;
?Critically assess contemporary agrarian transformations and their implications for social and economic development;
?Identify the range of agricultural support systems and service delivery mechanisms;
?Evaluate the potential for new technologies, such as improved seed varieties, mechanisation and irrigation, to bring about agricultural growth in low and middle-income countries;
?Summarise the main policy options available to governments for development of the agricultural sector.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 written assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3101 SME and Local Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the role of SME in development, the unique characteristics of SME Development, the SME business environment and key factors influencing successful SME development strategies.

Module Content: SME development principles, characteristics, structures and processes; the many ways in which SMEs can serve a variety of stakeholders, strategies for supporting SMEs, the role of socio-economic development agencies in supporting SMEs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define the nature and extent of SMEs and describe their importance in relation to development
?Describe and evaluate business development supports for SMEs
?Describe the nature and scope of industrial districts/clusters and outline their contribution to SME competitiveness
?Distinguish between the formal and informal economy
?Describe the role of the informal economy in developing countries
?Evaluate the relevance of local strategies such as Local Economic Development (LED) and co-operatives to SME development
?Analyse the advantages and disadvantages of fairtrade as an SME development strategy.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Essay, 30 marks and presentation, 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

[Top of page]

FE3201 Market-oriented New Food Product Innovation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an in-depth practical understanding of important elements (such as marketing, technical and financial) underpinning the development and marketing of successful ideas from the ideation stage to commercialisation.

Module Content: Focuses on the principles underpinning successful NPD including stages of the NPD process, NPD success factors, new food product design issues, market-oriented NPD methodologies, knowledge management, the integration of market and sensory analysis for NPD success and food innovation case studies focusing on novel foods. Factors that influence NPD success worldwide are identified and innovation case studies highlight best practice in terms of market-oriented approaches to food innovation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key NPD success factors across sectors worldwide;
?Design and operationalise an NPD process for a novel food product;
?Critically analyse the different commercialisation strategies that food firms utilise in competitive markets;
?Appreciate the role of knowledge management and effective strategic marketing in new food product success.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Essay - 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE3203 Food Market Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 3 x 1 hr(s) tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To enable the student to explain and engage in qualitative food marketing research and write a market research report.

Module Content: The role of research, research paradigms, qualitative research and data analysis, indepth interviewing, focus groups, netnography and report writing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the epistemological differences between qualitative and quantative research;
?Develop a qualitative research design;
?Identify food related data sources;
?Conduct and analyse food related focus groups and in-depth interviews;
?Collect and analyse online/social media materials;
?Establish marketing insight from qualative research data collection techniques;
?Write up a food market research report.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 2,000 group market research report).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE3204 Food Enterprise Management

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To enable students to evaluate the strategic and operational challenges faced by food enterprises and provide an understanding of the impact of internal and external factors on enterprise establishment, development and performance.

Module Content: The changing European and global food industry along with a rapidly evolving policy environment provides the context for this module. The entrepreneurial process and phases of enterprise development are explored. Analytical frameworks are used to evaluate small, medium and large-scale organisation development and performance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the entrepreneurial process and phases of enterprise development and evaluate how these influence enterprise strategy and structure in the food sector;
?Outline and evaluate different business model options available to food enterprises to develop their businesses;
?Examine the role of support agencies in food enterprise establishment and development;
?Use suitable analytical frameworks to evaluate the performance of food enterprises.
?Deliver professional presentations on business topics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (oral presentation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE3205 Food Marketing Management

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module provides an insight into supply chain management challenges in both local and international markets. It also provides the perspective and management tools to support the development and implementation of marketing strategies.

Module Content: Global food supply chains - trends and challenges are explored. The impact of market trends on supply chain strategy and configuration is considered. Various analytical frameworks are used to study supply chains flows (material, finance and information), such as value stream mapping, order fulfilment processes and process improvement tools and techniques. The role of logistics in contemporary food supply chains is also considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and consider implications of key business environment trends on supply chain strategy and configuration;
?Use analytical frameworks to improve process management;
?Describe various types of logistics providers and recommend solutions for various food supply chains.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (in-class exam).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE3206 Transferrable Skills - Food Business and Development - Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3. (The research project is to be submitted before the end of September).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Other (Research project either based in industry or UCC).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Enright, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to work processes.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring examination, students will start their research project, commencing April, for 6 months.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the research culture.
?Demonstrate the process of research and enquiry.
?Prepare and present a research report.
?Demonstrate initiative and /or leadership skills whilst working alone and / or in teams.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of research.
?Reflect on and alalyse the learning experience from the research placement.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (research project (6,000 words) and presentation which will be assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Research Project and Presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% A pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development.).

[Top of page]

FE3222 Transferable Skills - Food Business and Development - Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL Certification

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in business and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring Examination, students will go on placement from April to September. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in the external organisation. Students will be expected to keep learning logs at agreed intervals. See Placement Handbook for information on devising and submitting logs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the business, its organisational culture and purpose.
?Critique the practice of communication in an organisational context.
?Demonstrate ability to function independently and in a workplace team.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge , skills and competencies of the programme of study to the workplace.
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement.

Assessment: Placement Report to be submitted before the end of September which will be assessed on a Honours/Pass/Fail basis. (See Placement Handbook for exact date).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at work placement advisory sessions; participation at work placement in industry; submission of both placement report and learning logs.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

[Top of page]

FE3223 Transferable Skills - Food Business and Development - Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL Certification

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Other (Research Project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in business and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring examination, students will start their research project, commencing April, for 6 months. The industry-based research project will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in the external organisation. The UCC-based research project will be monitored by a UCC academic mentor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the research culture.
?Demonstrate the process of research and enquiry.
?Prepare and present a research report.
?Demonstrate initiative and /or leadership skills whilst working alone and / or in teams.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of research.
?Reflect on and alalyse the learning experience from the research placement.

Assessment: Research Report to be submitted before the end of September which will be assessed on a Honours/Pass/Fail basis. (See Placement Handbook for exact date).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at research project advisory sessons; submission and presentation of Research Report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. No Autumn Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module or in a Repeat Year. Students in receipt of a Fail grade for this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

[Top of page]

FE3225 Transferable Skills ?Food Business and Development ?Entrepreneurship Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL Certification

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6month(s) Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To enable students to work with entrepreneurs at different stages of a new venture while developing their own business idea.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring Examination, students will go on placement in IGNITE from March to August. The placement will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in IGNITE. Students will be expected to blog their experiences at agreed intervals. See Placement Handbook for information on devising and submitting logs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the experience of being part of an entrepreneurial venture.
?Critique the development stages of a new venture.
?Demonstrate the ability to function as part of an entrepreneurial team.
?Demonstrate how their business idea was developed.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of the programme to the placement.

Assessment: Total Marks 200:. Submission of Business Idea (6,000 word report (160 marks) and a presentation (40 marks) thereon before the end of September, which will be assessed on a honours/pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at workshops, meetings with mentors, submission and presentation of Research Report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

[Top of page]

FE3300 Food Management and Marketing

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 180.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 38 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (12 hours online lessons).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Mary McCarthy, Department of Management and Marketing.

Module Objective: To provide a grounding in food management and marketing principles underlying decision-making at each stage of the food marketing channel.

Module Content: Application of food management and marketing principles at the various stages in the food marketing channel. Principles will be elucidated through the use of case studies highlighting the strategic options available and chosen within the food sector.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key factors driving food sector competitiveness and their impact on food supply chain configuration;
?Examine the evolution of organisational excellence programmes and employ analytical frameworks to assess organisational excellence in the food sector;
?Determine the impact of major operational movements over the last 100 years and consider the implications for future operational effectiveness in the food sector;
?Identify the main elements of a supply chain management framework and evaluate key decisions that a food firm must make if they are to contribute to an efficient and responsive supply chain;
?Summarise the motives and potential outcomes of food company engagement in the new product development process;
?Propose solutions for food companies to the ever changing demands of food consumers;
?Apply a theoretical framework to explain consumer behaviour in food markets and illustrate how such a framework can aid in the development of a marketing strategy;
?Assess the marketing strategies of key food supply chain stakeholders.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (in-class assessment at the end of Semester 1).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head of the Department of Food Business and Development).

[Top of page]

FE3308 Marketing and Business Skills for Rural Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide the student with an understanding of the role enterprise plays in the rural economy, the importance of stimulating a thriving enterprise environment in rural areas, the role marketing plays in the rural enterprise and how this supports sustainable rural development.

Module Content: The importance of a positive enterprise culture in the development of rural areas. Different types of rural enterprise. Stimulating rural enterprise. Financial aspects of rural enterprise, Marketing and the Small Rural Enterprise. Marketing and the Marketing Concept. The Marketing Strategy and Marketing Planning. Market Information and Business Development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss how businesses get started and evaluate the different stages of business development;
?Discuss the types of business ventures that are most likely to succeed and the support needs of businesses at various stages of development;
?Discuss the marketing concept and describe the role marketing plays in the development of the small-scale rural enterprise and the basic activities of marketing;
?Formulate a marketing strategy and set marketing objectives;
?Evaluate the potential of new enterprise proposals; and
?Prepare a business plan for a new venture, including production, marketing and financial plans.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3310 Financial Management

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To give participants an understanding of financial accounting systems. To present the student with a methodology for the preparation and interpretation of financial plans and final accounts.

Module Content: Annual reports, financial statements, profit and loss accounts and balance sheets with particular relevance to rural development projects and rural based enterprises. Financial management and accounting tools, financial proofing and risk assessment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate competence in interpretation of annual reports, financial statements, profit and loss accounts, and balance sheets relevant to rural development programmes and rural businesses;
?Identify familiarity with performance indicators relevant to financial management of rural programmes;
?Appraise the strengths and weaknesses of the application of financial management tools to the holistic approach of integrated rural development;
?Demonstrate competence in writing financial reports and completing funding application forms; and
?Demonstrate competence in financial proofing and risk assessing rural development projects in conjunction with financial and business specialists.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3311 Project Planning and Management

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the concepts and practices of project planning and management in the rural development context.

Module Content: The purpose of this module is to introduce the student to the concept and practice of Project Planning and Management. Project Planning and Project Management are two practices that are critical to the successful implementation of rural development programmes and projects. The module deals with: definitions and concepts of planning and management; composition of projects
factors that affect project success; types of planning and approaches to planning; the process of planning and the planning cycle.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the composition of a project and how it is assembled;
?Explain the links that exist in a policy to project hierarchy and be able to apply this to rural development scenarios;
?Analyse the contextual factors that impact on project success;
?Apply the concepts and methods of needs analysis as they relate to project identification;
?Design and present a project proposal which comprises goal to inputs linkages, indicators and means of verification as well as critical underpinning assumptions;
?Explain and apply through examples the flows and sequencing associated with the Logical Framework Approach to planning, appraising and managing projects;
?Illustrate the key roles and functions associated with project management;
?Demonstrate an understanding of people management and motivation theories as they relate to rural development projects.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written assignment (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3312 Research Project/Minor Thesis

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce the student to research metholology and design issues and to apply specific research tools and techniques.

Module Content: Various approaches to quantitative and qualitative research will be reviewed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conduct an analytical review of relevant scientific literature in a national and international context;
?Develop specific research questions and present a research proposal;
?Conduct comprehensive secondary and primary research;
?Design, develop and deliver a quantitative study and a qualitative study as appropriate;
?Complete detailed interpretation and analysis of data;
?Coordinate and manage a research project;
?Analyse data using appropriate techniques with supporting statistics; and
?Present the outcomes of data analysis in appropriate formats.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (CA - Dissertation - 12,000-15,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

FE3313 Marine Resources

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To study the Irish marine resouces, integrated economic, social and natural sciences, within the context of understanding how to utilize and sustainably manage these assets, and characterize how they are impacted by policy.

Module Content: The module describes and analyzes the economic potential of the marine environment (eg transportation, recreation, energy) and ecological value (eg fisheries, aquaculture) derived from the productivity of associated ecosystems and associated policy, planning and management approaches.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define and the describe the structural organization and processes of marine ecosystems;
?Discuss the political, social, economic and natural science perspectives of natural resources management;
?Analyse the contribution of marine/coastal resources to the local resource base and evaluate different policy, planning and management approaches; and
?Demonstrate an understanding of the marine tourism environment and its various elements (ecotourism, fisheries, marine environmental education, parks and protected areas, etc.).

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written essay/project (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3314 ICT and Rural Development

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the current usage and emerging opportunities of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in rural development both in Ireland and internationally.

Module Content: This module provides participants with an understanding of how Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) contribute to sustainable rural development. The module allows students:
to explore the European, Irish and International policy environment governing the development of ICT; examine issues relating to current ICT infrastructure in rural areas; assess the contribution of ICT to Rural Development; and examine development and management of community portals and websites.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the European, Irish and International policy context for the growth and development of ICT as a sector;
?Describe and analyse the current ICT infrastructure in a specified country;
?Explain the nature, scale, scope, growth, benefits and potential of IT and e-business;
?Evaluate the potential contribution of ICT to rural areas, with a particular emphasis on rural business and Community Economic Development;
?Evaluate websites and portals and participate in web site development;
?Discuss the role of Social Media in contributing to communications in rural areas; and
?Discuss the contribution of ICT to social inclusion through the aspects such as eLearning, employment, eCommerce and eGovernance.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written essay/project (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3315 Conservation and Management of the Rural Landscape

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Tutorials (Distance Education Module, Continuous Assessment)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to the principles of ecology and the evolution of the Irish agricultural landscapes in the context of rural development.

Module Content: Students will be introduced to the principles of ecology and the evolution of the Irish agricultural landscape. Topics covered include: definition and components of biodiversity; importance of biodiversity and contribution to sustainable rural development; threats to biodiversity; current and prospective legislation to protect biodiversity within the rural landscape; relationships between farm management practices and the resultant ecological status of rural ecosystems; current issues in agri-environmental research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the components of biodiversity;
?Appreciate the functions and ecological services which are facilitated through biodiversity in the rural environment;
?Assess the principal threats to biodiversity both at global and national scales;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the national, EU and international legislation currently in place to protect biodiversity within the rural landscape;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of the relationships between farm management practices and the resultant ecological status of rural ecosystems; and
?Be aware of the fundamental issues currently being addressed through agri-environmental research.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written essay/project (2,000-2,500 words) 120 marks. In class test 80 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE3824 People Management in Member-Based Organisations (online)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (This module is taught twice. MSc and MSocSc students take this module in Semester 2. BSc Credit Union Studies students take it in Semesters 1.).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 125hr(s) Directed Study (online).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To explore human resource management in member-based organisations

Module Content: Prevailing human resource theories, special nature of human resource management in member-based organisation, key causes of human resource problems in member-based organisations, employment legislation impacting on member-based organisations, solutions to human resource problems, supports available to enable member-based organisations to ensure effective human resource relations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe prevailing human resource theories and their application in member-based organisations
?Explain the special nature of human resource management in member-based organisations
?Identify key causes of human resource problems in member-based organisations
?Identify the main employment legislation impacting on member-based organisations
?Propose and evaluate solutions to human resource problems in member-based organisations
?Discuss the supports available to enable member-based organisations to ensure effective human resource relations;
?Devise a strategy to support the learning and development of personnel in member-based organisations.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Online discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit coursework, as prescribed by the Head, Dept. of Food Business and Development).

[Top of page]

FE4002 Global Food Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To analyse both the development and the impact of food policy in Europe, the USA and other selected countries.

Module Content: The impact of food policy and of regulatory framework on price, production, trade flows, incomes, rural communities, the environment, agriculture, food processing and retailing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the different approaches to policy analysis;
?Employ different theoretical approaches to the study of food policy;
?Describe contemporary food and agricultural policies in selected developed market economies;
?Assess the impact of contemporary food and agricultural policies in selected developed market economies;
?Assess the implications of current policy developments for the Irish agricultural and food sectors.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE4005 Advanced Programme Planning and Policy Processes

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce advanced methods of project and programme planning, and provide an overview of environmental and other policy processes.

Module Content: Advanced project and programme planning methods: cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, multi-criteria analysis, EIA/SEA; theories of the policy process; environmental policy processes; environmental mainstreaming; case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conduct simple cost-benefit analyses of development projects;
?Explain the difference between CBA and multi-criteria analysis;
?Explain the steps in conducting Environmental Impact Assessments;
?Explain the uses of EIA and Strategic Environmental Assessments;
?Discuss some different theories of the policy process; and
?Describe ways of mainstreaming environmental issues at policy level.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (20 marks - computer-lab exam; 30 marks - 1st essay; 50 marks - 2nd essay.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory attendance at lectures and participation in seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must contact the Department regarding arrangements for any such new assignment(s), which must be submitted by the end of July).

[Top of page]

FE4006 Macro-Economic Issues and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (including seminar discussions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To become familiar with contemporary debates and policy-making in major areas of development.
Actively participate in policies and strategic paper development
Promote balanced sustainable and equitable development.

Module Content: Developing countries are vulnerable to internal and external shocks and regularly suffer from periods of economic instability. Stabilisation policies are required to prevent and manage such shocks. However, macroeconomic stability is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for growth and poverty alleviation. Many developing countries suffer from endemic poverty, slow economic growth, unequal distribution of income and wealth, and poor environmental conditions caused by low and inefficient investment, shortage of foreign exchange, and the lack of effective government services.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Use the power of abstraction to focus upon the essential features of macro-economic problems in development ;
?Produce a framework for the evaluation of the effects of policy on economic stabilisation;
?Demonstrate the use of aggregates and index in measuring economic growth development ; and
?Show how income and inefficient investment contributes to slow economic development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must contact the department regarding arrangement for new assignment. New assignment to be submitted by the end of July.).

[Top of page]

FE4008 Food Security and the Developing World

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To explore the impact of changing patterns of world food trade, structural adjustment and other intervention programmes on rural livelihoods and survival strategies in the developing world.

Module Content: The economic and environmental sustainability of livelihood portfolios and the impact on food security of structural adjustment programmes, trade liberalisation, bilateral and multilateral donors and changing governmental policies and roles.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess the impact of institutional policy on developing countries e.g. SAP, PRSP etc;
?Summarise the contributions of financial institutions to food security;
?Measure various changes in governmental policies in trade liberalisation, privatisation and donor agencies;
?Evaluate the sustainable livelihood framework using livelihood portfolios;
?Debate the roles of bilateral and multi-lateral agencies in developing countries;
?Predict the forces and nature of sustainable livelihoods in a complex world;
?Describe the differences between the North and South on issues of sustainable development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (30 marks In-class Group presentation; 70 marks essay 2,500 word group essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE4009 Co-operative Business and the Rural Economy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (up to 6 x 1 hr(s) tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To evaluate the role of cooperative businesses in the development of the rural economy.

Module Content: This module will evaluate the impact of cooperative businesses as effective vehicles for rural development in Ireland and overseas. Issues covered will include case studies examining the role and effectiveness of a wide range of cooperative businesses, including agricultural, credit community, producer and worker co-operatives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Review co-operative principles and characteristics and differentiate between co-operative and conventional approaches to business;
?Identify lessons from the history of co-operative growth and development applicable to modern day co-operatives;
?Examine the relevance of co-operatives with particular reference to the agri-food business chain and the potential competitive advantages of co-operatives;
?Explore the implications of applying co-operative theory to practice;
?Evaluate the impact of co-operative businesses as effective vehicles for development in Ireland and overseas;
?Assess the relationship between different co-operatives and their members, especially in food processing and marketing co-operatives;
?Interpret the roles and functions of different stakeholders in a co-operative and assess their participation in management and decision-making.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1,500 word Individual Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE4012 Humanitarian Action in Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 3 Seminars (Led by development specialists); 2 x .5day(s) Workshops (Nutrition Responses).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael Fitzgibbon, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development, and visiting development specialists.

Module Objective: To understand the role and operation of humanitarian action in development.

Module Content: Human rights in emergencies, conflict and peacekeeping situations. The role of humanitarian relief in emergency situations. Basic logistics for emergencies. Provision of sanitation and emergency water supply. Emergency feeding responses and community based support mechanisms.
Civilian-military linkages in emergency responses linkages between civilian humanitarian organizations, bi- and multilateral organizations, target populations and military.
Maintaining personal security in conflict, post-conflict and other emergency situations. Understanding Stress management in emergencies.
The relief-development continuum and emergency prevention. Re-orienting development agencies to address prevention.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define and discuss the human rights context of conflict and other emergency situations;
?Differentiate between refugees and internally displaced people, and the application of human rights to each;
?Identify the key tasks necessary to coordinate logistics in emergency situations;
?Discuss the main international human rights legislations;
?Discuss the role of the military in emergencies, and the means of cooperation between civilian and military organs; and
?Define and discuss the relief-development continuum.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 Workshop Reports - 50 marks each (2,500 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

FE4015 Co-operative Enterprise (not on offer until 2019/20)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To make students more aware of the significance of co-operatives and other social enterprises and the roles they play in business and development and to explore the legal and regulatory environments for co-operatives and social enterprise.

Module Content: Principles and characteristics of co-operatives and social enterprises. Co-operative and social enterprise types and activity. Roles of co-operative and social enterprises in business and development. Potential competitive advantage of co-operative and social enterprise. Legal and policy environments.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the principles and characteristics of co-operative and social enterprise;
?Discuss the varied roles of co-operative and social enterprise;
?Appraise the possible competitive advantages of co-operatives and social enterprise;
?Illustrate a knowledge of the legal and policy environments pertaining to co-operatives and social enterprises.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Group Project including presentation/Essay (2000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

FE4205 Consumer Behaviour in Food Markets

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module provides an in-depth understanding of consumer behaviour in the food marketing process. Students will develop an appreciation of the determinants of food choice at the macro and micro levels.

Module Content: The module content focuses on the determinants of consumer behaviour in food markets. Environmental influences, individual differences, psychological and consumer decision processes are explored and the marketing strategy implications for food enterprises are considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the underlying influences on consumer behaviour;
?Critically analyse the impact of the human environment and individual difference on food choices;
?Critically analyse the influence of psychological and consumer decision processes on food consumption behaviour;
?Create models of consumer behaviour that inform our understanding of a particular food purchase.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (student assignment, 1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE4206 International Food Retail Marketing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 1day(s) Fieldwork (site visit).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To elucidate current marketing practices within the global food-retailing sector and to assess the strategic implications for food manufacturers.

Module Content: Overview of the global food retailing market; the food retail marketing mix; food retailers' marketing strategies and the impact on the supplier base; category managment; and efficient consumer response.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe current trends in the national and global food retailing markets;
?Describe the marketing strategies employed by the main grocery retailers;
?Explain how customers shop;
?Evaluate store layout, product merchandising and assortment using category management principles;
?Explain the determinants of retailers' brand position;
?Evaluate retailers brand and market positioning strategies, and assess retailers' supply chain (ECR) activities on their market position.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x category management exercise).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE4207 Global Food Supply Chain Management

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: The purpose of this module is to provide a holistic understanding of the dynamics of global food supply chains and introduce analytical frameworks and tools to continually improve strategic planning and operational performance.

Module Content: Supply Chain Management (SCM) encompasses all the activities associated with a given product, from the raw materials stage to the final consumer. Effective SCM requires a detailed understanding of business processes, and also of supply chain structures, supply and demand variability, information systems, purchasing, scheduling, inventory management, process design, logistics and customer services.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the main factors driving an increased interest in global supply chains;
?Consider the Supply Chain Management (SCM) challenges a food company may face in a global business environment;
?Identify trends in globalisation and international trade and assess the impact of these on the role of SCM in business today;
?Use various SCM analytical frameworks to assess and improve strategic development and operational performance of global food suppy chains;
?Identify key supply chain business processes and assess how these may be employed to reduce costs and/or add value in food supply chains;
?Describe and critically assess key competencies associated with supply chain professionals.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (student assignment, 1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business & Development).

[Top of page]

FE4405 Food Choice Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the factors influencing food choice and purchase and the implications for the new food product development process.

Module Content: This module provides an investigation of the various tools and methodologies employed to evaluate consumer attitudes, preferences and market acceptance factors that affect the changing demand for food, highlighting the implications for new product development strategies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse the role of market orientation in new product success;
?Apply new market research techniques to new marketing situations;
?Question the role of market-oriented techniques in designing new products;
?Challenge the role of ethics in the food supply chain and food marketing strategies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

[Top of page]

FE4412 Sustainable Development: Food, Natural Resources and Gender

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): Students who have previously taken FE3014 may not take this module,

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Project work conducted under the supervision of a member(s) of staff).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the role of food security, gender relations, natural resource management and climate change and their relationship to sustainable development.

Module Content: Concept and meaning of sustainable development; North-South issues in sustainable development; an analysis of the relationships between women and men in the broader framework of social, economic, cultural and political change; the impact of gender-poverty-environment linkages on sustainable livelihood and food security; community-based natural resource management; case studies from developed and developing countries.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the process and concept of sustainable development;
?Demonstrate a clear understanding of the main debates around climate and environmental change;
?Identify the linkages between gender, poverty, and the environment;
?Illustrate the causes of cultural, political and economic difference between men and women;
?Show the linkages between natural resource management and sustainable livelihood and food security; and
?Describe the differences between the North & South on issues of sustainable development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,000-word paper (50 marks), 1 x 6,000-word Research Report (150 marks) plus in-class Presentations.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE4414 Co-operative Banking

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Fieldwork (4hrs field visit).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To analyse the role of co-operative savings and credit institutions in development, particularly in an Irish context.

Module Content: Types of co-operative savings and credit institutions; Key role of credit unions; Importance of co-operative finance for local and international development; Structural and management issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define the variety of different types of co-operative savings and credit institutions.
?Examine the key role of credit unions in the market for co-operative savings and credit.
?Evaluate the importance of co-operative finance for local development and for meeting the financial needs of consumers, particularly low-income consumers.
?Identify and explore structural, management and performance measurement issues in co-operative financial institutions.
?Examine the reasons why some co-operative financial institutions demutualise.
?Illustrate the practice of co-operative banking through field observation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE4415 Research Project and Analytical Skills

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Project work conducted under the supervision of a member(s) of staff).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce the student to research methodology and design issues and to apply specific research tools and techniques.

Module Content: Various approaches to quantitative and qualitative research will be reviewed. A number of analytical tools and techniques will be applied, including: Questionnaire design; Data management; Case study analysis; Focus groups; Participatory appraisal. The project assignment may be conducted in any of the following areas: Food marketing; Food management; Food Retailing; Food Policy and Trade; Co-operative and Credit Union Businesses, International Development (including natural resource management, sustainability, gender, food security, health and poverty issues).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply research tools in conducting field survey;
?Demonstrate the application of analytical technique;
?Select and employ analytical tools in data analysis;
?Interpret and illustrate research results;
?Practice ethical issues during field work; and
?Draw conclusions and policy implications from data analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,000-word research proposal (50 marks) and 1 x 6,000-word research report (150 marks); plus in-class presentations).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Satisfactory attendance at lectures and participation in class seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE4416 Rural Development Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine and review contemporary policy and practice of rural development within a European context.

Module Content: Current Rural Development Policy and Practice (EU and Ireland); contemporary issues in rural development policy and practice to include: sustainable rural development strategies; recent developments in rural development policy; social capital and the rural social economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe some of the current issues facing European rural society;
?Discuss the theoretical and policy context of contemporary European rural development strategies;
?Critique contemporary European rural development strategies using empirical evidence from published case study material.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development. Students must contact the Department regarding arrangements for new assignment(s). New assignment(s) are to be submitted by the end of July.).

[Top of page]

FE4417 Contemporary Issues in Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of key contemporary issues in development studies

Module Content: The module analyses key contemporary development issues and debates. It provides an indepth survey of contemporary theoretical issues and developments and analysis of policy prescriptions. Issues such as GMO's, debt, impact of HIV/AIDS, role of civil society, impacts of globalisation, sustainable development could be addressed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the basic concepts of development in contemporary world of today
?Criticise issues such as GMO's, debt, and impact of HIV/AIDS development strategies.
?Assess the relevance of key strategies in efficient resource utilisation.
?Evaluate the key contributions of policy prescription in development.
?Summarise the mainstream issues that contributes to globalisation.
?Justify the impact of civil societies on participation, democracy and sustainable development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (One written paper, 2,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE4418 Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (written dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words, under the supervision of member(s) of staff).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development (and Dr Edward Lahiff, Joint Module Co-ordinators).

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Lahiff, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Nicholas Chisholm, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: Students are required to demonstrate their detailed understanding of the principles and practice of international development.

Module Content: Students are required to draw up a dissertation proposal for approval. They must complete and submit a 12,000 word dissertation related to a specific approved subject area of international development, demonstrating an advanced understanding of international development theory, principles and practice, drawing on material already studied in the programme and, where appropriate and as approved, utilising material and experience gained during the third-year work placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Draw up a dissertation proposal;
?Write a detailed dissertation;
?Demonstrate the ability to synthesize and present advanced literature in international development;
?Demonstrate through a written dissertation advanced understanding of a specific subject area in the field of international development.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x max. 12,000 word dissertation (250 marks); 1 x 1,500 word research proposal (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Submission of dissertation proposal for approval. Dissertation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails, or does not submit Continuous Assessment, he/she must submit revised assessment by the last working day in August, as prescribed by the Department.).

[Top of page]

FE4450 European Food Business

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Thia Hennessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding on aspects of the structure, strategies and competitiveness of the European Food and Beverage industry.

Module Content: Changing Food Paradigms. Structure and diversity of the European Food industry. Competitiveness and strategy in the European food industry. Food clusters. Case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the development of the contemporary food system;
?Explain the diversity and complexity of the EU food manufacturing industry;
?Discuss different models used in measuring competitiveness;
?Apply models of competitiveness to specific case studies;
?Discuss the role and importance of food clusters;
?Communicate the key strategic orientations used in the EU food industry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Project Report, in-class presentation).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE4475 Food Marketing and Entrepreneurship

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Business plan development project, under the supervision of member(s) of staff).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an in-depth practical understanding of the important elements (such as marketing, technical and financial) underpinning the development and marketing of successful new food products and business start-up.

Module Content: The development and marketing of an innovative food product by students working cooperatively (2 to 4 students per team) including drawing up a detailed marketing strategy, marketing plan, business plan, product development outline and financial projections.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Construct a business and marketing plan for a new food business;
?Design a marketing strategy for a new food product;
?Analyse the key factors underpinning new product success in competitive markets;
?Perform market research to evaluate the feasibility of a new product idea and design a launch strategy.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Team Project: business plan - 100 marks; secondary research - 20 marks; primary research - 20 marks; marketing strategy - 15 marks; finance - 15 marks; review paper - 20 marks; group work - 10 marks. The project submission date will be specified at the beginning of the academic year.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students may either revise and re-present their Project, or present a new project for the supplemental exam as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development. Assigments are to submitted by the end of July.).

[Top of page]

FE5201 Foundation in Lean Supply Chain Management

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Workshops (Distance Learning Mode: on-line tutorials and e-mentoring.); Directed Study (Distance Learning Mode: on-line assignment instructions, e-mentoring and feedback.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide a foundation in lean supply chain management and how lean tools, practises and value stream mapping can be applied to improve performance.

Module Content: Supply chain evolution and management implications, introduction to key concepts such as supply chain processes, value stream mapping and cellular flow manufacturing and lean tools such as JIT, Kanban and Kaizen events.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe key lean supply chain processes;
?Apply the main lean techniques and tools; and
?Identify and implement the main steps involved in Value Stream Mapping.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. End of module written assignment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Revise and resubmit assignment.

[Top of page]

FE6001 Advanced Food Consumer Behaviour

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop the participant's conceptual and theoretical understanding of consumer behaviour with regard to food purchase and consumption decisions.

Module Content: Consumer attitude and behaviour towards food products will be studied using selected models: the lifestyle model; means end chain model; purchase decision-making process and the attitude and belief model; perceived quality, and perceived risk and risk reduction strategies. The influence of food neophobia on the decision-making process will also be examined.
During the completion of this module the student should have:
1. Participated actively in class discussion; and
2. Presented a detailed account of one consumer behaviour theory.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe a number of consumer behaviour theories and research frameworks that have been applied in the field of food research.
?Illustrate the application of consumer behaviour theories to food marketing puzzles.
?Critically assess the contribution of such theories to understanding of food consumer behaviour.
?Explain how such theory could aid market strategy development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 40 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (presentation - 30 marks, written report - 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

[Top of page]

FE6002 Food Marketing Channel Theory

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module provides the student with conceptual frameworks appropriate to the understanding of market channel evolution and management in the food sector.

Module Content: Food marketing channel theories(transaction cost framework, resource dependence theory, resource-based approach); Food marketing channel organisation and management (power-dependence, conflict, co-operation and co-ordination); Food marketing channel strategies (relationship marketing, value-adding partnerships, networks).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess recent changes in organisational configuration and their impact on food marketing channel structure.
?Critically assess how various channel configurations might impact on the overall performance of food marketing channels.
?Explain various vertical coordination mechanisms relevant to food marketing channels.
?Appraise the contribution of relevant organisational theories to our understanding of food marketing channel structure and performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

[Top of page]

FE6004 Food Research Management and Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and computer lab sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module aims to:
Improve the student's research management skills;
Increase the students's qualitative and quantitative research skills;
Develop the students critical thinking, data analysis, and report writing skills; and
Develop teamwork in the context of research management, report preparation and presentation.

Module Content: Inductive and deductive research; desk research and literature reviews; research planning and design; in-depth interviewing and focus groups analysis; laddering techniques; conjoint analysis; construct measurement, reliability and validity; questionnaire design; data analysis, report writing and presentation skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Execute research projects;
?Utilise relevant sources of secondary information for the purpose of marketing research;
?Carryout in-depth interviews and focus group research;
?Apply hard laddering techniques;
?Design reliable and valid marketing construct measures;
?Design appropriate research instruments;
?Carryout primary quantitative market research and suitable analysis;
?Report conjoint and cluster analysis results; and
?Present market research findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Indepth interview and focus group report (group work) - 40 marks; Market analysis report (group work) - 50 marks; Questionnaire design and analysis (group work) - 50 marks; Special topic research report - 60 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

FE6005 Strategic Food Marketing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop the participant's understanding of strategic food marketing and to enable the formulation and evaluation of strategic marketing plans in the food sector. Topics covered will include: the marketing planning process, managing the marketing mix, objective setting, strategy formulation, implementation and evaluation. To provide an understanding of the factors influencing choice, the implications of this for the development of innovative products and an analysis of methods to develop more market-oriented products.

Module Content: An investigation of the various tools and methodologies utilised to conduct market research and the preparation of strategic marketing plans in food markets. Factors that influence NPD success will be identified and innovation case studies will highlight best practice for market-oriented approaches to new product design. Topics addressed will include: choice models, new product trends, the NPD process and activities, NPD success factors, new product design, innovation case studies and market-oriented NPD methodologies. The marketing of novel products such as health enhancing foods and functional foods will be analysed in class.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Design a marketing strategy for a novel product;
?Evaluate the role of strategic marketing in new product success;
?Apply new research techniques to new marketing situations;
?Differentiate between successful and unsuccessful marketing strategies;
?Analyse the different marketing strategies that firms utilise in competitive markets; and
?Evaluate the market entry and positioning strategies of firms in the functional foods market.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

[Top of page]

FE6006 Food Marketing Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Individual tuition and advice; presentaiton workshops (2); self directed study; research; reading, analysis and writing.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Enright, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module aims to
To apply the marketing skills and techniques that have been acquired during part 1 of the programme; and
To develop analytical, report writing, project management, time management and presentation skills.

Module Content: Project identification and project planning. Background literature search and synthesis. Devise and implement research methodology. Complete data analysis. Compile, write up and present results.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define a marketing research project;
?Devise an appropriate methodology based on a research question;
?Analyse primary and secondary food marketing data;
?Prepare an evidence based project report;
?Establish evidence based recommendations; and
?Present and defend findings and recommendations.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Work-in-progress presentation - 60 marks; Final presentation - 120 marks; project report (10,000 works) - 420 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

FE6008 Food Marketing Channel Analysis Part 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop the participant's ability to critique and evaluate the interaction among companies' marketing, supply chain and logistics practices and strategies.

Module Content: Routes to market and entry strategies; export marketing; value stream and business process management; product variety management; supplier and customer relationship management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Develop export market entry strategies
?Align logistics requirements with marketing strategies
?Assess the role of various business processes in value stream management
?Evaluate the key factors influencing supply chain efficiency and effectiveness
?Use various supplier/customer management frameworks to evaluate performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Team assignment with presentation 2,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department of Food Business and Development).

[Top of page]

FE6009 Food Marketing Channel Analysis Part 2

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 40hr(s) Lectures; 4hr(s) Other (computer sessions); 8hr(s) Other (site visits).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop the participant's ability to critique and evaluate marketing strategies developed and implemented at the retail and brand management stages of national and international food channels.

Module Content: Trends in national and international food retailing; Shopper Behaviour; Category Management, Brand Equity; Brand Management in the food sector; Customer and brand portfolio decision-making.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define categories from a consumer's and shopper's perspective
?Develop category management plans
?Present category management proposals
?Evaluate negotiation positions between retailers and suppliers
?Critically evaluate a product's brand equity and brand identity system
?Evaluate brand management strategies throughout the food marketing channel.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Category Management Plan - 40 marks, Brand Report - 30 marks, In-class test - 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6012 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (case study material and guest speakers).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding and knowledge of the principles, and practice, of social enterprise and social entrepreneurship.

Module Content: The phenomena of social entrepreneurship and social enterprises have captured the attention of policy makers, practitioners and academics across the globe. Increasingly associated with offering sustainable and effective solutions to contemporary social, economic and environmental problems this module provides students with an understanding of the emergence of social entrepreneurship as an innovative practice that integrates economic and social values.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of social enterprise and social entrepreneurship theories and concepts.
?Discuss the application of social entrepreneurship principles to address social problems and contribute to social change and social innovation.
?Describe different forms of social enterprise organisations.
?Compare social enterprise `ecosystems?.
?Discuss current opportunities and challenges for social entrepreneurship.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individual Project (3,000 words) 70 marks; Case Study (30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as directed by the department).

[Top of page]

FE6100 Dissertation in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development

Credit Weighting: 60

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 0, Max 0.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development (and Dr. Olive McCarthy).

Lecturer(s): Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To research and write a major research thesis.

Module Content: Researching and writing a major research thesis under academic supervision.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a research problem with associated research questions
?Review scientific and other literature
?Choose and implement a valid research design
?Conduct primary research in an organisational, developmental or community setting
?Collate and analyse data
?Write up a major research thesis
?Draw conclusions and make recommendations based in empirical research.

Assessment: Total Marks 1200: Continuous Assessment 1200 marks (Dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Dissertation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: None.

[Top of page]

FE6101 Food Business: Markets and Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the food business chain, evaluating the salient issues addressed by various stakeholders.

Module Content: An examination of the factors that influence the food business system from production to consumption. The module will also examine food supply chain issues including structure and organisation of the food industry, consumer behaviour, new product development, and the role of the agri-food sector in the Irish economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess the role of strategic marketing in NPD success.
?Evaluate the main policy measures and instruments used to influence food markets worldwide.
?Appreciate the need for a structured approach to NPD within the Food Industry.
?Evaluate the main methodologies used to examine consumer choice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Continuous Assessment (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE6104 Practical Training Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3. (Summer after Written Examination for the PGDipCOFMktgRD).

No. of Students: Min 13, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (Work Placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick Enright, Department of Food Business and Development; Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with practical experience relevant to the major topic areas and issues developed in the other core modules.

Module Content: The practical training placement will be undertaken on an approved aspect of Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing or Rural Development. Students will be placed for a minimum of 8 weeks in a relevant work environment and will be expected to make a significant contribution to a relevant project. Students are required to prepare a final food industry centred research project report on their placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Work in an organisational and/or development setting, arising from practical work placement;
?Conduct and report on organisational research; and
?Reflect analytically on organisational operations in co-operatives, social enterprises, food businesses and development agencies.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

[Top of page]

FE6109 Co-operative Organisation: Theory and Concepts

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Fieldtrips).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide in-depth understanding of theoretical and conceptual organisational and managerial issues involved in effective operation of a cooperative business.

Module Content: An overview of the history, special characteristics and range of activities of co-operatives, and an analysis of the specific sociological, organisational, economic, financial, legal and administrative issues involved in managing cooperative businesses.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Review co-operative activity in Ireland and abroad across the different co-operative sectors;
?Analyse co-operative principles and characteristics;
?Evaluate co-operatives in a historical context and explore lessons for today;
?Examine different theoretical and practical approaches to organising across the organisational spectrum, from conventional to co-operative;
?Assess the relationship between the co-operative and its members, especially in food processing and marketing co-operatives;
?Evaluate the relevance of co-operatives with particular reference to the agri-food business chain;
?Evaluate the potential competitive advantages of cooperatives;
?Research and report on different aspects of co-operative organisation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 175 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (Project proposal (1,500 words) (25 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development. Students must contact the Department regarding arrangements for new assignment(s). New assignment(s) are to be submitted by the end of July.).

[Top of page]

FE6110 Food Markets and Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the food business chain, evaluating the salient issues addressed by various stakeholders.

Module Content: An examination of the factors that influence the food business system from production to consumption. The module will also examine food supply chain issues including structure and organisation of the food industry, consumer behaviour, new product development, and the role of the agri-food sector in the Irish economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess the role of strategic marketing in NPD success;
?Evaluate the main policy measures and instruments used to influence food markets worldwide;
?Appreciate the need for a structured approach to NPD within the Food Industry; and
?Evaluate the main methodologies used to examine consumer choice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Essay - 1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.). Summer.

[Top of page]

FE6111 Co-Operative Organisation: Theoretical Application and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Fieldtrips).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development; Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To demonstrate the application and practice of the co-operative model in development in Ireland and internationally

Module Content: Application and practice of the co-operative model across a range of sectors, including employment, agriculture, food, community development, housing and financial services.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply co-operative theory to practice;
?Evaluate the practical application of the co-operative model in a wide range of settings including employment, agriculture, food, community development, housing and financial services;
?Evaluate co-operative performance in social and economic terms and as effective vehicles for development in Ireland and overseas;
?Explore co-operative governance, management and decision-making processes;
?Research and report on aspects of the application and practice of the co-operative model.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project (3,000 words) 60 marks, 2 x assignment (1,000 - 1,500 words each) 20 marks each,).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

[Top of page]

FE6112 Rural Development: Theory and Policy

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 13, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development (and Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of theories and practice of rural development strategies and approaches, and the role of local organisations in national and international rural development.

Module Content: Theories of rural development, rural research methodologies, trends in the rural economy, roles of local organisations including co-operatives and social enterprises in integrated rural development in Ireland and overseas, rural development policy at EU, national and local levels, the role of fairtrade social enterprises for sustainable rural development; and strategies for promoting sustainable and equitable rural development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define and explain development, poverty and food security in an international context;
?Explain sustainable rural development and the linkages between poverty and the environment;
?Explain the different approaches to rural development;
?Discuss the links between regional and rural development;
?Identify and explain the changing policy context for rural development in the EU and Ireland;
?Discuss the significance of the social economy for sustainable rural development;
?Explain the principles of research design for given rural development contexts;
?Write research proposals for given rural development contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 175 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (Rural Research proposal (1,500 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE6113 Rural Development: Application and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 13, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development (and Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop the students' socio-economic rural research capacity to review/critique contemporary rural development practice.

Module Content: Contemporary Irish rural development strategies and practice. Role and principles of research in rural development. Research approaches, problem/topic identification, literature review, development of research objectives with a specific rural theme. Sampling, qualitative research design, data collection, analysis and presentation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critique contemporary Irish rural development practice;
?Describe the role and principles of research in rural development;
?Differentiate the role of secondary and primary data in research;
?Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of research methods and techniques;
?Write research proposals and reports for given rural development contexts;
?Present research findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Rural research project (3,000 words) (60 marks); 2 x (1,000 - 1,500 word) assignment (20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development).).

[Top of page]

FE6114 Introduction to Food Marketing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the key marketing concepts and apply these to the food industry and the food consumer in national and global markets.

Module Content: This module provides an introduction to food marketing and addresses the following topics: marketing orientation and the marketing concept, market segmentation, marketing research, marketing strategy and target marketing, product innovation management, product choice, pricing, promotion and distribution.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define what food marketing is and demonstrate the key tasks underaken in food marketing;
?Illustrate how consumer markets can be broken down by segmentation techniques into smaller manageable groups;
?Conduct a piece of market research;
?Identify and consider the implications of trends on consumer food demands and choices;
?List the key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing the food sector;
?Prepare a marketing strategy for a new food product.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

[Top of page]

FE6115 Food Marketing and the Consumer

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the factors influencing food choice and the implications for the new food product development process.

Module Content: This module provides an investigation of the various tools and methodologies employed to evaluate consumer attitudes, preferences and market acceptance factors that affect the changing demand for food, highlighting the implications for new product development strategies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse the role of market orientation in new product success;
?Apply new market research techniques to new marketing situations;
?Question the role of market-oriented techniques in designing new products;
?Illustrate the role of ethics in the food supply chain and food maketing strategies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (Student essay assignment 1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE6116 Local Food Marketing: Application and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To demonstrate the application and practice of marketing concepts in the development of the local food economy.

Module Content: Application and practice of the marketing concepts and approaches to the development of local food economies and enterprises.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and explore the key issues in co-operative and enterprise start-up;
?Assess the different indirect and direct routes to market for local food producers and enterprises;
?Evaluate the practical application of approaches such as networking, value chains and solidarity economy for the development of local food economies and enterprises;
?Evaluate the application and relevance of tools such as social media in the development of local food economies and enterprises;
?Examine the role of social and ethical marketing in the promotion of local food economies and enterprises;
?Analyse the role of regional food branding in the development of local food economies and enterprises;
?Research and report on the application of marketing in a local food context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Food marketing research project (3,000 words) 60 marks; 2 x (1,000 - 1,500 word) assignments 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head, Department of Food Business and Development.).

[Top of page]

FE6117 Introduction to Food Marketing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Mr Ronan O'Farrell, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the key marketing concepts and apply these to the food industry and the food consumer in national and global markets.

Module Content: This module provides an introduction to food marketing and addresses the following topics: marketing orientation and the marketing concept, market segmentation, marketing research, marketing strategy and target marketing, product innovation management, product choice, pricing, promotion and distribution.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define what food maketing is and demonstrate the key tasks undertaken in food marketing
?Illustrate how consumer markets can be broken down by segmentation techniques into smaller more manageable groups
?Conduct a piece of market research
?Identify and consider the implications of trends on consumer food demands and choices
?List the key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing the food sector
?Prepare a marketing strategy for a new food market.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

[Top of page]

FE6118 Food Business Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop skills in the standard methods of social and business research in preparation for independent research.

Module Content: Elements of rsearch design and methodology. Quantitative methods, including descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative methods, including data collection and analysis. Ethical issues in social and business research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand standard research designs and distinguish their relative strengths and weaknesses
?Develop a research design pertinent to a set of research questions
?Carry out basic statistical analysis of quantitative data using computer software
?Analyse quantitative data using descriptive statistics
?Analyse quantitative data using appropriate statistical tests and models
?Understand the stages of a qualitative research design
?Understand methods for collecting qualitative data
?Carry out basic qualitative data analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-Class Examination 25 marks) and a 4,000 word project (75 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6120 Food Business Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide analytical skills necessary for developing an efficient and responsive food chain that understands and reconciles market changes with strategic and production decisions along the stages of the food business chain.

Module Content: This module will be run in a capstone seminar style drawing together both the compulsory and optional modules on this programme. It will link them together to examine the foremost issues affecting the evolving food chain such as the development of an innovative, efficient, consumer-oriented food chain, with high added value levels, emphasising safety and quality and taking into account new food trends and more competitive trading conditions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the changing influences on the dynamic food supply chain worldwide
?Analyse the role of market orientation in new product success
?Challenge the role of ethics in the food supply chain and food marketing strategies.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Methodological Literature Review - 7,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6121 Food Business Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Independent Research with Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with the necessary research skills and the latest research methodologies to facilitate the analysis of key issues in the evolving food supply chain.

Module Content: Detailed investigation of selected food marketing or food economics issues associated with a particular food product, process, firm or marketing channel as approved by the Programme Director.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse the research process and its key components
?Design a research process and identify a suitable research question
?Complete a literature review on a selected topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Literature Review - 10,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6122 Food Industry Centred Research Project

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 3. (Summer after (Part 1) Written Examination for the MSc (Food Business). The research report is to be submitted by end of November. See handbook for the exact date.).

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 x 4 months food industry centred research project).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To apply and utilise skills acquired in Part I of the programme to live issues encountered within a food business context.

Module Content: Following Part 1 summer examination, students will undertake a food industry centred research project to be undertaken jointly with a participating food business or other food related organisation. Normally this will require a placement period with the relevant food business or food related organisation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse their work experience and write up a corresponding project;
?Conduct comprehensive secondary and primary research; and
?Evaluate their personal and employment skills development as a result of their work experience.

Assessment: A research report (8,000 words) to be submitted before the end of November which will be assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Research report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6123 Dissertation in Food Business

Credit Weighting: 40

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Student-centred learning supported by academic supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: The development of theoretical understanding and methodological tools necessary to identify and address specific research questions.

Module Content: Students are required to submit a dissertation on a research area approved by the Head of the Department of Food Business and Development. Dissertations should be presented in the size range 80 to 150 (maximum) pages.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conduct an analytical review of relevant scientific literature in a national and international context;
?Develop specific research questions;
?Choose a suitable research methodology;
?Conduct comprehensive secondary and primary research;
?Complete detailed analysis of relevant data;
?Write up an analytical research dissertation;
?Draw research-based conclusions in the context of the relevant scientific literature.

Assessment: CA - Dissertation - 30,000 words.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6125 Economics of the Agri-food System

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of economic analysis of markets and food, evaluating the implications of agri-food in relation to small businesses.

Module Content: The module explores agricultural production theory (theory of the farm firm); applied production theory and risk and uncertainty; agricultural demand, prices and markets; and farm management economies applied to business.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse traditional problems relating to agricultural markets and food, evaluating the implications of agri-food and commercial policies
?Manage the liberalization processes and rules of free competition also within an international context
?Analyse the behaviour of final consumers with respect to food products
?Understand the different sectors of the agri-food system, the vertical relations and the coordination of the various phases of the system (e.g. agriculture, food processing and food retailing).

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

[Top of page]

FE6201 Globalisation Issues - Food and Bioprocess Supply Chains

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Workshops (12 hours lectures, seminars and groupwork; Distance Learning - online materials and e-mentoring.); Directed Study (in-classroom assignment instructions and on-line assignment instructions and feedback).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: Globalisation presents many challenges and opportunities. This module uses food/bioprocess cases to identify key factors influencing global supply chains and evaluates various global supply chain strategies.

Module Content: Cases are used to illustrate the impact of globalisation on supply chain strategy and configuration. The impact of various factors on planning and implementation of supply chain strategies are explored, including planning levels and horizons, location, product range, innovation and risk management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key globalisation factors influencing supply chain strategy and configuration;
?Review recent economic, political, social, environmental and technological changes and consider their impact on supply chain processes and the opportunities for improvement;
?Critically assess the usefulness of various analytical frameworks that may help manage the complexities inherent in global supply chains;
?Reflect on, evaluate and apply learning in work/practice contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3,000 words written assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. End of module written assignment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmit written assignment.

[Top of page]

FE6202 Dissertation in Supply Chain Management

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Seminars (Blended Learning Mode: seminars, on-line tutorials. Distance Learning Mode: on-line tutorials, e-mentoring); Other (electronic journals).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To apply the knowledge and techniques acquired in the taught Postgraduate Diploma in Supply Chain Management to a chosen supply chain setting.

Module Content: To successfully achieve the Masters Degree in Supply Chain Management (MComm) Postgraduate Diploma students are required to complete and submit a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation related to supply chain management, utilising principles and analytical techniques learned during the Postgraduate Diploma in Supply Chain Management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critique, synthesise and interpret literature relevant to the chosen research field.
?Resolve complexities inherent in supply chain research and development.
?Recommend courses of action based on research undertaken.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation 12,000-15,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Dissertation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

FE6501 Business Processes Across the Supply Chain

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 4hr(s) Other (Block Release).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Seamus O'Reilly, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To familiarise the student with key business processes across the dairy supply chain.

Module Content: Supply chain processes in the dairy chain; Innovation and NPD in dairy; Category Management; and Team Building.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key NPD success factors across the dairy sector;
?Critically analyse the different commercialisation strategies that food firms utilise in competitive markets;
?Identify key supply chain business processes and assess how these may be employed to reduce costs and/or add value in dairy supply chains;
?Evaluate product merchandising and assortment using category management principles;
?Describe and explain the key components of the category management process;
?Display a knowledge of how to construct effective teams.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks (Open Book); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Category Management Project Report).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Open Book) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Open Book) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head of Department).

[Top of page]

FE6502 Trends and Dynamics Across Dairy Markets

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 4hr(s) Other (Block Release).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick Enright, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Alan Collins, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Mary McCarthy, Department of Management and Marketing.

Module Objective: To familiarise the student with the key trends shaping the evolution of the dairy industry.

Module Content: The structure of and factors influencing the competiveness of the dairy industry; Consumer trends; Retail trends; and Communication skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the factors influencing the evolution and competitiveness of the Irish dairy sector;
?Analyse consumer trends and assess the implications for the dairy processing sector;
?Analyse the changing retail market and evaluate the implications for the dairy processing sector;
?Apply the key principles of effective communication in the business environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks (Open Book); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1,500 Word Report).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Open Book) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Open Book) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Head of Department).

[Top of page]

FE6503 Food Business Elective

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1. (Part 2, Year 1, MBA).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development (and Prof Thia Hennessy).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to examine food industry strategy in the context of policy and regulatory influences that impact on the Food Sector, in particular to examine the strategies and performance of Ireland's leading food companies, and to examine the structure and varied applications of the co-operative model in business. The module will also explore the sustainability agenda and its implications for food business in Ireland.

Module Content: Development, rationale and mechanisms of food policy, the global food policy context, other relevant policies such as international trade and climate change policy, the strategic development of the Irish and European food industry in the context of changes in policy and global food demand. Co-operative activity in food and development, competitive advantages of co-operative organisation, management and capitalisation dilemmas in co-operative business. Food business executives will be invited to deliver guest lectures outlining the experiences of their companies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and evaluate contemporary food and agricultural policies in selected developed market economies;
?Understand the impact of international trade and climate change policies on business in general in Ireland and in particular on food businesses;
?Describe the sustainability agenda and its impact on Irish food business;
?Identify appropriate food industry strategies in the context of changing demand and food industry policy;
?Critically evaluate co-operative activity in food and development;
?Identify and deliberate on possible competitive advantages, management dilemmas and capitalisation issues that can arise in co-operative business;
?Research and report on aspects of co-operative organisation and food policy;
?Debate professional opinion on the functioning of food businesses.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individual Essay 50 marks - 1,500-2,000 words and Group Project 50 marks - 1,500-2,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6600 An Introduction to the National and Global Food Sector

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (lectures, seminars, guest presentations, discussions).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the food business chain, evaluating the salient issues addressed by various stakeholders

Module Content: Dimensions of the food sector in Ireland, the European Union and internationally, forces influencing supply and demand for food, decision-making issues facing firms at various stages in the food business chain, application of marketing concepts and techniques to the food industries of Ireland and the European Union. This will include an indepth analysis of consumer behaviour, projections in the food sector until 2016, new product development, category management in the retail sector, cooperatives and entrepreneurship in the food sector and strategic marketing of food and nutrition.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key components of a marketing strategy for a new food firm
?Differentiate between successful and unsuccessful marketing strategies
?Identify the supply and demand factors influencing the supply of food on world markets
?Interpret consumer behaviour issues
?Critically analyse the different marketing strategies that firms utilise in competitive markets
?Evaluate the market entry and positioning strategies of firms in the functional foods market
?Appreciate the role of strategic marketing in new product success.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (which will consist of an essay on an element of the Food Sector - to be submitted by a set date after completion of the module).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. and attendance at module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

FE6601 Co-operatives and the Third Sector

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development (Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business & Development).

Lecturer(s): Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module examines the structure and varied applications of the co-operative model in the third sector.

Module Content: Co-operative characteristics and principles; Evaluation of co-operative activity in the third sector by co-operative type; Initiating and setting up co-operatives in Ireland; The special features of co-operative management - openness, democratic control, governance, profit distribution, member-centred decision-making; Competitive advantages of co-operative organisation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain co-operative characteristics and principles;
?Evaluate co-operative activity in the third sector by co-operative type;
?Illustrate why co-operatives are established and how they are set up in Ireland;
?Analyse the particular features of co-operative management, such as openness, democratic control, profit distribution, member-centred decision-making;
?Assess the special nature of governance and business processes in co-operatives;
?Analyse the potential competitive advantages of co-operative organisations.
?Explore how co-operative businesses can be re-invented and re-invigorated to continue to meet members' needs;
?Engage in critical dialogue and debate on co-operative issues with their colleagues.
?Research and report on aspects of co-operative organisation within the third sector.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x learning journal - 40 marks; 1 x case study - 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department of Food Business and Development).

[Top of page]

FE6602 Social Enterprises and Local Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To demonstrate and discuss the role of social enterprises in local development

Module Content: This module provides an introduction to the social economy with a particular focus on social enterprises and their role in local development. This module will entail the specific use of case study material to demonstrate and discuss the role of work integration social enterprises as a means of local community service delivery.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand and explain the concept of the social economy.
?Discuss the influence of statutory policy initiatives on the social economy in general and social enterprises in particular.
?Explain the role of the social economy as a strategy for local social and economic development.
?Discuss, evaluate and illustrate the impact of social economy initiatives through specific case study material.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay 40 marks; 1 x case study 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department of Food Business and Development).

[Top of page]

FE6701 Co-operative and Social Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Case studies); Other (On-line discussion; Case Study Analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To explore how Co-operative and Social Enterprise concepts are applied across a wide range of service and industrial sectors, and to identify specific practices which can provide useful and innovative lessons across sectors.

Module Content: Students are challenged to re-examine their own co-operative and social enterprise experience in a cross-sector and international context. The main sectors to be explored include food, finance, housing, social services (including child and elder care), job creation and community development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess the scope and functioning of co-operatives around the world.
?Analyse the co-operative sector by co-operative type.
?Explore how everyday services offered in conventional ways can be offered through more co-operative structures.
?Explore how existing co-operatives can be re-invented and re-invigorated to continue to meet members' needs.
?Examine what different types of co-operative across the co-operative sector might learn from one another.
?Research and report on different types of co-operative.
?Discuss and debate professional opinion on the functioning and roles of co-operatives with their colleagues.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (On-line discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6702 Social and Co-operative Entrepreneurship

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To identify the know-how and skills necessary for collective entrepreneurship in co-operative and social enterprise settings.

Module Content: The nature of collective vs individual entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurial dilemmas and tensions in a co-operative setting. Entrepreneurial creativity and competitive advantages arising from co-operative and social enterprise. Mutual aid and design for use as entrepreneurial catalysts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the meaning and nature of entrepreneurship and assess how it varies according to organisational setting.
?Distinguish collective from individual entrepreneurship and how each can be applied to enhance the performance of co-operatives and social enterprises.
?Assess the dilemmas and tensions encountered in entrepreneurial co-operatives and social enterprises.
?Analyse effective strategies for facilitating and managing entrepreneurial creativity in a co-operative setting.
?Identify and apply specific techniques for enhancing their own entrepreneurial creativity and for supporting and complementing the entrepreneurial creativity of colleagues.
?Apply theoretical concepts to their own practice
?Research and report on aspects of social and co-operative entrepreneurship.
?Discuss and debate the concepts of social and co-operative entrepreneurship with their colleagues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (On-line discussion forum (20 marks); Essay - 2,000-2,500 words (80 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6703 Co-operative and Social Enterprise Governance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aisling Moroney, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine how user-owned businesses balance corporate success with user control and responsiveness to users' needs.

Module Content: Issues to be explored in Co-operative and social enterprise contexts include: appropriate management and leadership roles and approaches; appropriate member participation; roles and responsibilities of boards of directors (management committees); relationships between members, board and management; unitary and composite boards; participative decision-making; monitoring performance including the use of social auditing; preparation of a relevant governance manual.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain in detail what is meant by the term governance.
?Discuss how co-operatives and social enterprises are typically governed.
?Discuss and debate the key governance issues and dilemmas facing co-operatives and social enterprises in general and their own in particular.
?Outline the importance of member participation and member control and explain how this can be further nurtured and developed.
?Describe how democracy in co-operatives and social enterprises can be revitalised and how boards can be made more effective and dynamic.
?Debate the role of management in the governance of co-operatives and social enterprises.
?Describe the kind of systems of control and monitoring which underpin the efforts of the key players to govern effectively.
?Assess and critique the governance of a chosen co-operative or social enterprise.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (On-line discussion forum (20 marks); Essay - 2,000 to 2,500 words (80 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6704 Education and Marketing for Co-operatives and Social Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aisling Moroney, Department of Food Business and Development; Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To explore strategies for identifying and responding to user needs through processes of education and communication.

Module Content: Identifying needs through user dialogue and debate. Appropriate organisation responses via co-operative communication. The competitive advantages of the co-operative as a marketing concept.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain and analyse the dilemmas and issues that can arise in the marketing of co-operatives and social enterprises.
?Assess the competitive advantage of the co-operative as a marketing concept.
?Describe the linkages between education and marketing in co-operative and mutual enterprises (CMEs).
?Identify the approaches to education which help to create responsive, learning organisations.
?Analyse how CMEs can, in both conventional and more innovative ways, tap into the ideas, perspectives and needs of their members/users.
?Assess how CMEs can most effectively communicate to members and the wider public the benefits of the co-operative approach and the services available to them.
?Research and report on aspects of education and marketing in a co-operative or other social enterprise.
?Discuss and debate the concepts of education and marketing in co-operatives and social enterprises with their colleagues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (On-line discussion forum (20 marks); Essay - 2,000 to 2,500 words (80 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6705 Innovation and Enterprise in Financial Co-ops and Mutuals

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (The module may be offered in either Semester 1 or Semester 2, depending on timetabling).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carol Power, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: From an examination of a wide range of user-owned financial institutions, identify innovative and enterprising practices and the skills required to implement them.

Module Content: How a wide range of user-owned financial institutions (co-operative banks, credit unions, LETS schemes, etc.) innovate to promote enterprise and local development and to give users greater leverage over their financial affairs. Concepts such as backward and forward integration will be examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain and discuss the nature of innovation and how it differs from other closely related concepts such as invention and creativity.
?Recommend how innovation can be nurtured in the financial co-operative/mutual.
?Assess how internal and external factors impact on innovation in a financial co-operative/mutual.
?Discuss how the co-operative can cope with competition, with particular focus on the carving out of a market space and the development of collaborative structures.
?Ascertain how strategic orientation impacts on innovation in the financial co-operative/mutual.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (On-line discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6706 Community Co-operatives and Social Enterprises

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (The module may be offered in either Semester 1 or Semester 2, depending on timetabling).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To explore co-operative approaches to meeting needs not addressed adequately by conventional businesses or by governments, (including the provision of public services which are being phased out or down-graded by governments) in both urban and rural communities.

Module Content: Co-operative strategies for meeting neglected needs such as different ways of organising child-care, services for people with disabilities, and rural transport systems, and different ways of addressing community and environmental concerns, such as housing, tourism, and leisure activities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appraise critically the effectiveness of responses by the State, private and community/voluntary sectors to human needs.
?Describe and assess critically the co-operative approach to meeting human needs.
?Define social enterprises and the factors that account for their emergence.
?Appraise the community development role of social enterprises.
?Define community co-ops and explain the factors that account for their emergence.
?Assess critically the role of community co-operatives and explain the factors that account for their success.
?Research and report on aspects of a community co-operative or other social enterprise.
?Discuss and debate the concepts of community co-operatives and social enterprises with their colleagues.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (On-line discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6707 Worker Co-operative Strategies

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (The module may be offered in either Semester 1 or Semester 2, depending on timetabling).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development (and Dr Olive McCarthy).

Lecturer(s): Ms Bridget Carroll, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine the unique characteristics, scope, performance and roles of worker co-operatives and ways in which successful worker co-operatives reconcile dilemmas arising from inadequate financing, collective entrepreneurship and self-management.

Module Content: An examination (with the help of case studies from Ireland and abroad) of the special characteristics, scope, performance and roles of worker co-operatives; the special management and entrepreneurial issues arising in worker-owned enterprises and how these issues are addressed in successful co-operatives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the main characteristics of a worker co-operative and how it differs from other co-operatives;
?Critically assess the scope and performance of worker co-operatives;
?Explain the application of the worker co-operative model in a range of co-operative and social enterprise contexts;
?Identify and suggest solutions for common problems/challenges faced by worker co-operatives;
?Critically analyse a range of factors associated with the development of the worker co-operative sector.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (On-line discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6708 Co-operative Food Processing and Supply

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (The module may be offered in either Semester 1 or Semester 2, depending on timetabling).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To explore how co-operative structures can help farmer producers maintain control over food production in highly competitive global markets, while ensuring that consumers can also meet their needs effectively.

Module Content: Understanding co-operatives. Innovative business strategies in food and agribusiness, enabling both farmers and consumers to exert effective control in the food business chain. These strategies include farmers and consumers working together in integrated food co-ops; co-operative strategies for backward and forward integration along the food chain.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and analyse the challenges and opportunities posed in the processing and supply of food.
?Analyse the conflicting paradigms of food supply
?Assess the co-operative response to the challenges, opportunities and paradigms of food processing and supply.
?Describe and analyse innovative co-operative business strategies in food and agri-business, such as backward and forward integration, fair trade, new generation co-operatives and community-supported agriculture.
?Explore co-operative strategies in accessing global markets, with particular reference to the dairy industry.
?Research and report on aspects of co-operative food processing and supply.
?Discuss and debate professional opinion on the concepts of co-operative food processing and supply with their colleagues.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (On-line discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6709 Social Enterprises and the Developing World

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (The module may be offered in either Semester 1 or Semester 2, depending on timetabling).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (On-line discussion; Case study analysis).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary O'Shaughnessy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To identify co-operative and social enterprise strategies and skills for meeting the needs of producers, consumers and communities in the developing world.

Module Content: User-owned and controlled organisations addressing issues such as: food security; management of resources; health; gender balance; local development; employment creation and enterprise development; environmental protection and fair trade.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the different meanings and dimensions associated with the term development
?Distinguish between the different concepts and approaches in measuring development
?Outline the linkages between poverty reduction, economic growth and income distribution
?Appraise the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as a framework for development
?Analyse the contribution of social enterprises to development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (On-line discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6710 Dissertation in Co-operative and Social Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To apply the knowledge and techniques acquired in the taught element to a chosen
co-operative/social enterprise setting.

Module Content: Audit/analysis of a specific co-operative/social enterprise setting.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a research problem in a co-operative or social enterprise setting;
?Identify and conduct an analytical review of relevant scientific literature in a national and international context;
?Develop specific research questions;
?Choose an appropriate research methodology;
?Conduct comprehensive secondary and primary research;
?Collate and conduct a detailed analysis of relevant data;
?Write up an analytical research dissertation; and
?Draw research-based conclusions in the context of the relevant scientific literature.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation - 15,000 to 30,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6711 Research Methodology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To equip the students with the knowledge and tools they will need to conduct research in a co-operative and social enterprise setup.

Module Content: The design of a research proposal; quantitative and qualitative research methods; sampling and statistical techniques; the use of case studies; action research; and ethical considerations in the design, conduct and reporting of research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain theoretical approaches to research
?Distinguish between different research techniques
?Design a research question
?Conduct a literature review
?Write a research proposal and defend the chosen methodology
?Describe how primary data can be collected and analysed
?Identify ethical dilemmas in the research process and propose ways in which they can be overcome.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Online discussion forum 20 marks; 2 x essay 1,500 words each 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6712 Leadership and Change Management in Co-operative and Social Enterprises

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (The module may be offered in either Semester 1 or Semester 2, depending on timetabling).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Olive McCarthy, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: This module will explore the experiences of business leaders in co-operative and social enterprises and current leadership and change theory and practice. It will assess the relationship between leadership skills and abilities, and the challenges organisations face as they deal with internal and external pressures for change.

Module Content: Leadership studies, including leadership versus management, leader traits and skills, leader behaviour and activities, leader power and influence, situational determinants of leadership for organisational effectiveness, leadership as an attributional phenomenon. The role of leadership in creating effective change strategies and processes. Leadership and followership behaviours that support change. Techniques, strategies and processes necessary for implementing change.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Exhibit the skills necessary as leaders of co-operative and social enterprises to assess, plan and implement organisational change under conditions of uncertainty and complexity
?Evaluate the context for change and indicate how this influences the strategy formation process
?Identify possible interventions for a variety of change scenarios
?Interpret , and recommend approaches to minimise, the difficulties associated with implementation efforts in co-operative and social enterprises.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Online discussion forum (40 marks); Essay - 3,000 to 5,000 words (160 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6902 Global Food Policy Issues

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 90.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Enright, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To analyse both the development and the impact of food policy in Europe, the USA and other selected countries.

Module Content: The impact of food policy and of regulatory framework on price, production, trade flows, incomes, rural communities, the environment, agriculture, food processing and retailing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the different approaches to policy analysis;

?Employ different theoretical approaches to the study of food policy;
?Describe contemporary food and agricultural policies in selected developed market economies;
?Assess the impact of contemporary food and agricultural policies in selected developed market economies;
?Assess the implications of current policy developments for the Irish agricultural and food sectors; and
?Assess the influence of contemporary food and agricultural policies on the food supply chain.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Literature Review - 5,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6903 Food Security and Sustainable Livelihoods in the Developing World

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Stephen Onakuse, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To explore the impact of changing patterns of world food trade, structural adjustment and other intervention programmes on rural livelihoods and survival strategies in the developing world.

Module Content: The economic and environmental sustainability of livelihood portfolios and the impact on food security of structural adjustment programmes, trade liberalisation, bilateral and multilateral donors and changing governmental policies and roles.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess the impact of institutional policy on developing countries e.g. SAP, PRSP etc;
?Debate issues on the millennium development goals, including its contribution to longer-term developmental goals (economic development, empowerment and good governance);
?Evaluate the sustainable livelihood framework using livelihood portfolios;
?Debate the roles of bilateral and multi-lateral agencies in developing countries;
?Predict the forces and nature of sustainable livelihoods in a complex world; and
?Explain the current challenges to food and nutrition security.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay (5,000 words) - 70 marks, and in-class presentation - 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. The assessment of this module inlcudes a cross-disciplinary and project-oriented essay. The in-class presentation will be integrated with the final essay submitted.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6904 Co-operative Business and Food Supply

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development (and Noreen Byrne).

Lecturer(s): Ms Noreen Byrne, Department of Food Business and Development; Prof Michael Ward, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To examine and evaluate the role of cooperative businesses in the development of the rural economy.

Module Content: This module will evaluate the impact of cooperative businesses as effective vehicles for rural development in Ireland and overseas. Case studies will be used to examine the role and effectiveness of a wide range of cooperative businesses, including agricultural, credit community, producer and worker co-operatives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Review and analyse co-operative principles and characteristics and differentiate between co-operative and conventional approaches to business;
?Identify and apply lessons from the history of co-operative growth and development applicable to modern day co-operatives;
?Examine the relevance of co-operatives with particular reference to the agri-food business chain and the potential competitive advantages of co-operatives;
?Assess the co-operative response to the challenges, opportunities and paradigms of food processing and supply;
?Describe and analyse innovative co-operative business strategies in food and agri-business, such as backward and forward integration, fair trade, new generation co-operatives and community-supported agriculture;
?Assess the relationship between the co-operative and its members, especially in food processing and marketing co-operatives;
?Interpret the roles and functions of different stakeholders in a co-operative and assess their participation in management and decision-making.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Literature Review - 5,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

FE6905 Food Choice and Innovation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the factors influencing food choice and purchase and the implications for the new food product development process.

Module Content: This module provides an investigation of the various tools and methodologies employed to evaluate consumer attitudes, preferences and market acceptance factors that affect the changing demand for food, highlighting the implications for new product development strategies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse the role of market orientation in new product success;
?Apply new market research techniques to new marketing situations;
?Question the role of market-oriented techniques in designing new products;
?Challenge the role of ethics in the food supply chain and food marketing strategies;
?Evaluate the changing influences on the dynamic food supply chain worldwide; and
?Complete a literature review on a selected food choice and innovation topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Literature Review - 5,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]