Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

RG1001 Religions in the Contemporary World: An Introduction to the Study of Religions
RG2300 Islam: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives
RG2301 Buddhism in Practice
RG2302 Christianities in a Global Age
RG2304 Religions of East Asia
RG2305 Authority and Community in Contemporary Christianities
RG2307 Indigenous Religions
RG2308 Hinduism and Indian Religions
RG2309 Contemporary Religions in Ireland
RG2310 Western Esotericism and New Religious Movements
RG2313 Religions, Gender and Sexuality
RG3000 Dissertation in the Study of Religions
RG6010 Contemporary Approaches in The Study of Religion
RG6020 Contemporary Islam
RG6050 Deities, Devotion and Disciplines in Indian Religions
RG6061 Indigenous Worldviews and Minority Religions
RG6075 Extended Essay in Contemporary Religions
RG6095 Religions and Memory
RG6600 Dissertation in Contemporary Religions
RG7000 Postgraduate Research Seminar

RG1001 Religions in the Contemporary World: An Introduction to the Study of Religions

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 150.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 24hr(s) Directed Study (presentations, learning journal).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jenny Butler, Department of Study of Religions; Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions; Dr Amanullah De Sondy, Department of Study of Religions; Dr Tatsuma Padoan, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce theories, concepts, methods and problems associated with the academic study of religions and to introduce a range of contemporary religions worldwide.

Module Content: The course will offer an introductory overview of a range of religions, linked to an introductory exploration of key theories, approaches and methodological issues in the study of religions such as the 'insider/outsider' problem, the meaning of 'religion', the sociology, psychology, anthropology and phenomenology of religion and topics such as religion and: modernity/postmodernity, power, globalisation, gender and secular wordviews.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?show an introductory understanding of important issues and debates arisng in the academic study of religions.
?demonstrate an introductory knowledge and understanding of a range of religious traditions in their contemporary contexts.
?demonstrate competencies in writing, critical thinking, argument, reflection, oral communication and ability to work independently and in groups.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 1,500 word (max) essay: 45 marks; 1 x 2,500 word (max) essay: 120 marks; 1 weekly learning journal: 75 marks; 1 x team presentation: 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Two essays and learning journal may be resubmitted by a date set by the Department. Marks for the team presentation are carried forward (whether passed or failed). The module co-ordinator will use discretion where a student fails the presentation for good cause such as illness.).

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RG2300 Islam: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Amanullah De Sondy, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr Amanullah De Sondy, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce students to Islam in the context of the academic Study of Religions

Module Content: This course assumes little or no previous knowledge of Islam in its various historical and contemporary contexts. It will cover the life and career of the Prophet Muhammad, and the Qur'an and Sunna as the main sources of Islamic teachings, as well as some Islamic institutions, selected issues of Islamic law, ethics and current issues in Muslim society. The course will illustrate the internal diversity of Islam and the various expressions of Muslim religiosity with particular reference to contemporary issues. Problems and debates in the academic study of Islam will also be introduced.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Islam, its history, practices, doctrines and contemporary situation.
?demonstrate foundation-level understanding of important issues and debates arising in the academic study of Islam.
?demonstrate undergraduate skills in writing, critical thinking and argument, necessary for the study of Islam in the context of the academic Study of Religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 1,500 word (max) essay (50 marks); 1 x 2,500 word (max) essay (100 marks); 1 x Learning Journal (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG2301 Buddhism in Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 75.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce students to Buddhism in the context of the academic Study of Religions.

Module Content: This course covers some of the main historical, doctrinal, literary, artistic and social features of Buddhism and assumes little or no previous knowledge of Buddhism in its broad historical development. . Following an overview of the history and geographical spread of Buddhism and the development of Buddhist teachings and practices, the module will focus on aspects of Buddhism in the modern period (19th-21st centuries) including the globalisation of Buddhism.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of Buddhism, its history, practices, doctrines and contemporary situation.
?demonstrate understanding of issues and debates arising in the academic study of Buddhism.
?demonstrate undergraduate skills in writing, critical thinking and argument, necessary for the study of religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 1,500 word (max) essay (50 marks); 1 x 2,500 word (max) essay (100 marks); 1 x Learning Journal (50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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RG2302 Christianities in a Global Age

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 75.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jenny Butler, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jenny Butler, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the study of Christianity in the context of the academic Study of Religions.

Module Content: This is a survey course for students who are presumed to have some knowledge of at least one form of Christianity but little knowledge of the great variety of forms and interpretations of Christianity, past and present. The course will explore diverse Christianities with particular reference to contemporary issues. Problems and debates in the academic study of Christianity will also be introduced.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate knowledge of a range of influential forms of Christianity, including their history, practices, doctrines and the contemporary context.
?demonstrate understanding of important issues and debates within and about different forms of Christianity, especially in the contemporary world.
?demonstrate undergraduate skills in writing, critical thinking and argument, necessary for the study of Christianity in the context of the academic Study of Religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 2,000 word (max) essay (80 marks each); 1 x in-class test (40 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG2304 Religions of East Asia

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 75.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tatsuma Padoan, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr Tatsuma Padoan, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To explore selected themes and topics in East Asian religions, focusing on thereligions of one or more of Japan, Korean or China, with an emphasis on the modern period (19th-21st centuries).

Module Content: The course assumes no detailed previous knowledge of East Asian religions. The course will begin with an overview of the field; thereafter approach will be selective in order to achieve depth of coverage.. Topics to be covered may include e.g. religion, ancestors and the family; pilgrimage; new and minority religious movements; religion, politics and the state; religion and modernisation; and the contemporary globalisation of East Asian religions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key features of East Asian religions.
?demonstrate in-depth knowledge and understanding of selected topics in East Asian religions.
?demonstrate undergraduate skills in writing, critical thinking and argument, necessary for the academic Study of Religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 1,500 word (max) essay (50 marks); 1 x 2,500 word (max) essay (100 marks); Learning Journal (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG2305 Authority and Community in Contemporary Christianities

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 25, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To examine in depth the relationship between 'official' forms of religious authority, including the bible, doctrine and theology, ecclesiology and clerical authority, and popular religious agency in the context of contemporary (19th-21st century) Christianities.

Module Content: The module examines the dynamics of the relationship between church and laity with regard to a variety of Christian traditions within the contemporary world. The case studies will have a regional focus exploring Christianity in context including Ireland, Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, and South America.

The module offers students the opportunity to engage in in-depth contextual studies of Christianity that will encompass key debates including church-state relations, secularization and globalization, sexuality and gender and Christian responses to modernity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a sound knowledge of issues of authority and community in different forms of Christianity active in the contemporary world.
?Demonstrate an in-depth knowledege and understanding of theorietical debates in the sociological and anthropological study of Christianity.
?Demonstrate undergraduate skills in writing and critical thinking for the academic study of religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,000 (max) word essay (80 marks); 1 x 3,000 (max) word essay (100 marks) 1 x in class test (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (August 2015).

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RG2307 Indigenous Religions

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 75.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to indigenous religions in the context of the academic Study of Religions

Module Content: This is a module about indigenous religions and local worldviews. No previous knowledge of indigenous religions is required. The course introduces the history of anthropology of religions and key issues. It offers an introductory overview of indigenous societies and their worldviews based on diverse ethnographies and critically analyses historical and contemporary academic categories such as fetishism, animism, magic, shamanism, taboo, witchcraft and possession. It aims to approach pre-industrial, ethnic or minority categories and worldviews from their particular culture-specific perspectives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?empathic understanding of a range of culturally specific indigenous religious worldviews.
?knowledge and understanding of key themes and topics in the study of indigenous religions.
?understanding of important issues and debates arising in the academic study of indigenous religions.
?undergraduate skills in writing, critical thinking and argument, necessary for the study of indigenous religions in the context of the academic Study of Religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 2,000 word (max) essay (70 marks each); 2 x in-class tests (25 marks); attendance (10 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG2308 Hinduism and Indian Religions

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 75.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to Hinduism and Indian religions in the context of the academic Study of Religions.

Module Content: This course introduces students to Hinduism and other Indian religions in contemporary South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka). On the basis of an anthropological perspective, it investigates 1) the dominant historic and contemporary narratives of Hinduism and 2) highlights the diversity of religious traditions in South Asia. It seeks to give an overview of dominant and minority religious traditions with its various types of vernacular religious practices. The module approaches Hinduism from a perspective of diversity, focusing on facets of popular Hinduism, popular asceticism, goddess worship, indigenous (Adivasi) Indian religions as well as South Asian Islam and Christianity.


Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate an enhanced awareness of the history of the study of Hinduism; its academic ?discovery? and its construction and reconstruction by scholars, religious reformers and contemporary religious specialists.
?demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key issues, themes and topics in the study of Hinduism and Indian religions
?understand diversity as a crucial feature of Hinduism and Indian religions
?demonstrate improved undergraduate skills in writing, critical thinking and argument, necessary for the study of Hinduism and Indian religions in South Asia in the context of the academic Study of Religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,000 word (max) essay 80 marks; 1 x in-class test 10 marks; Seminar attendance 10 marks; 1 x 3,000 word essay 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ( Seminar attendance cannot be repeated and mark is carried forward.).

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RG2309 Contemporary Religions in Ireland

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a selection of the variety of contemporary religions that exist in Ireland in the context of the academic study of religions.

Module Content: This course provides an overview of the contemporary religious landscape in Ireland. It will cover several religious groups, communities and traditions in the contemporary context of Irish society. It will span a range of topics, including current issues and debates in contemporary Catholicism, the main beliefs and practices of members of the Pentecostal Church and other migrant religions, the evolution of the Irish Muslim community, Orthodox Christianity in Ireland, and new religious movements. The course is introductory-level and assumes little or no previous knowledge of the selected religious groups. The course will illustrate the diversity of religions to be found in present-day Ireland and introduce methods of investigating religious worldviews and practices.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
? reveal knowledge and understanding of the contemporary Irish religious landscape and the range of religious expressions to be found in multicultural contemporary settings.
? display foundation-level understanding of the main methodologies and approaches employed in the academic study of religions.
?demonstrate undergraduate skills in writing, critical thinking and argument, necessary for the study of diverse religious groups in the context of the academic study of religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 1,500 word (max) essay (50 marks); 1 x 2,500 word (max) essay (100) marks; 1 x Learning Journal (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (In August 2017).

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RG2310 Western Esotericism and New Religious Movements

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jenny Butler, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jenny Butler, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the study of Western esotericism and new religious movements in the context of the academic study of religions.

Module Content: This module is an introduction to the study of Western esotericism and new religious movements (NRMs) from the perspective of study of religions. The course explores discourses on Western esotericism, the New Age and New Religious Movements. As institutionalised religion declines in the 21st century and people seek spiritual outlets elsewhere, new forms and expressions of religion are on the rise. This course investigates the multiplicity of these new religious forms, with a focus on how they manifest in Ireland, and spans a variety of topics including angelology, Celtic spirituality, faith healing, neo-Shamanism, holistic health practices and religion, Wicca, neo-Druidry, spiritual mediumship, and Goddess worship. The course examines historical and contemporary esoteric groups and organisations in the Irish and British milieu, including the Golden Dawn, the Theosophical Society and the Fellowship of Isis. While exploring those aspects of Irish religious life carried out outside the frameworks of mainstream religious institutions, the course also examines the relationship between new religious expressions and folk or vernacular belief systems. As an introductory-level course, it assumes little or no previous knowledge of the specific religious currents under discussion.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
? identify and document different examples of esoteric religious currents, new forms of religiosity and new outlets for spiritual expression.
? develop knowledge and understanding of the discourses on Western esotericism, the New Age Movement and new religious movements.
?demonstrate undergraduate skills in writing, critical thinking and argument, necessary for the study of religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 1,500 word (max) essay (50 marks); 1 x 2,500 word (max) essay (90 marks); 1 x Learning journal (60 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG2313 Religions, Gender and Sexuality

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Amanullah De Sondy, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr Amanullah De Sondy, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the connection between gender and sexuality studies and the critical study of religions.

Module Content: This course will develop an understanding of religions using the methodology of gender analysis through textual, philosophical, sociological, anthropological and ethnographic inquiry as students look at several traditions, geographical areas and historical periods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate a foundational level understanding of gender analysis and how it relates to understanding religions
?demonstrate an understanding of the feminist challenge to the study of religions
?demonstrate an understanding of the connection between feminist critique of religions and masculinities studies
?demonstrate an understanding of the relationship and tension between text, gender and sexuality
?demonstrate a critique of popular media?s representation of gender and religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,500 word (max.) essay (100 marks); 1 x 1,500 word (max.) comparative book review (50 marks);1 x class presentation (50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG3000 Dissertation in the Study of Religions

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 75.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (After an introductory seminar, the module will be taught through individual consultation with the relevant Supervisor).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jenny Butler, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jenny Butler, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To develop students' research, critical analysis and presentational skills by undertaking a substantial project that draws upon different aspects of the Religions programme.

Module Content: Students will be required to agree a research topic for their directed study which falls within the scope of the Religions and Global Diversity programme. The project must be sufficiently distinct from other assessment tasks they have undertaken. While the project will be assessed against standard academic criteria and should mainly comprise written material, the project may include audio-visual elements where appropriate.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate a substantial knowledge and understanding of a specified topic in the study of religions
?apply theories, methods and concepts appropriately to the topic under discussion
?demonstrate effectiveness in formulating, researching and presenting the project.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 8000 word (max) essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 8000 word (max) essay to be submitted by a deadline prescribed by the Department).

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RG6010 Contemporary Approaches in The Study of Religion

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures (plus seminar presentations, directed and self-directed study, review and final examination).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To offer students the opportunity to examine the ethics and politics of knowledge within the context of the study of religions as an academic field.

Module Content: The course deals with three main bodies of critical theory (poststructuralist, postcolonial, and gender theory), plotting the intersections and points of departure between them and tracing the implications that their insights offer both to the academic study of religions and to the politics of location within the western academy.
Historically, the study of religions has tried to provide a means of sympathetically exploring and understanding the diverse cultures, beliefs and practices of the world using a variety of methodological approaches and orientations. Contemporary critiques have problematised these approaches from a variety of critical and theoretical perspectives. In spite of claims within the Study of Religions to apparent neutrality, scholarly methods and assumptions play a central role in producing and maintaining cultural hegemony that has increasingly ethical implications that we need to take seriously.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?evaluate the history of the study of religions in the western academy and the interface between critical theory and the field of the study of religions.
?develop and communicate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the relationships between a variety of critical theories.
?recognise the variety of methodologies that these approaches offer the student of religion and identify the relevance of these approaches to their areas of interest.
?evaluate critically a variety of books, journals and other sources of information relevant to the topics studied on the course.
?produce detailed written work on a number of approved topics relevant to the course.
?record and reflect on their experience of the subject matter of the course, particularly with regard to its application in the study of religions.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 3500 word essay: 150 marks; 1 x 2000 word essay: 75 marks; 1 seminar presentation: 75 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (August 2015).

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RG6020 Contemporary Islam

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures (plus seminar presentations, directed and self-directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Amanullah De Sondy, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr Amanullah De Sondy, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce students to advanced level study of modern and contemporary Islam (19th-21st centuries)

Module Content: This module traces the development of various trends in modern and contemporary Islam through movements and individuals, from pre-modernist reform movements such as the Wahhabiyya, the recent Islamic 'resurgence' up to contemporary forms of globalised Islam. The evolution of modern and contemporary Muslim political thought and attempts to establish Islamic states, as in Iran, Pakistan or Afghanistan, will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on social and intellectual challenges faced by Muslims, such as the question of Islam and gender, the situation of Muslims living in the West and the relationship between Islam and democracy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of salient developments in the Muslim world from the 19th century up to the present
?demonstrate critical awareness of important issues and debates arising in the study of modern and contemporary Islam
?demonstrate advanced postgraduate skills necessary to carry out research in the academic study of religions in general and modern and contemporary Islam in particular.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 3,500 word (max) essay: 200 marks; 1 x 1,500 word seminar presentation: 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (August 2015).

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RG6050 Deities, Devotion and Disciplines in Indian Religions

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures (plus seminar presentations, directed and self-directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the advanced level of the study of contemporary Indian religions (19th-21st centuries).

Module Content: This module analyses various modern and contemporary religious traditions of India, such as Neo-Hinduism, Popular Hinduism, ascetic and reformist traditions. The course introduces the regional multitude of deities, forms of devotion and disciplines within the wider social, cultural and political context of South Asia.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of religious developments in India from the 19th century up to the present.

?demonstrate critical awareness of important issues and debates arising in the study of modern and contemporary Hinduism and Indian religions.

?demonstrate advanced postgraduate skills necessary to carry out research in the academic study of religions in general and modern and contemporary Hinduism and Indian religions in particular.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 3,500 word (max) essay: 200 marks; 1 x 1,500 word seminar presentation and written submission of the presentation, 100 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG6061 Indigenous Worldviews and Minority Religions

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS; Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To introduce students to advanced-level study of indigenous worldviews and minority religions in the contemporary world. This course focuses on the political, environmental and social challenges faced by indigenous peoples, cultural and religious minorities in a globalized post-colonial world and the role of indigenous knowledge and knowledge-holders in solving global challenges.

Module Content: This module examines the contemporary dynamics of the relationship between globalisation, neo-liberalism and indigenous and minority populations. We approach this complex relationship through the lens of indigenous worldviews, knowledge systems and religious revival movements. Topics explored include sacred ecologies and non-dualistic ontologies; intangible cultural heritage; marginalised knowledge systems (orality, music, performance); decolonisation, re-traditionalisation and resistance; and international institutions and frameworks of human, minority and indigenous rights. Case studies will be drawn from across the globe with particular focus on India, Eurasia (Eastern Europe, Russia, Siberia) and Brazil.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a range of indigenous and minority cultural and/or religious revitalisation, re-traditionalisation and resistance movements.
?Demonstrate critical reflection on contemporary approaches to marginalization, the politics of indigeneity, indigenous and minority agency and human rights.
?Demonstrate advanced postgraduate research skills in the study of contemporary indigenous and minority worldviews, indigenous knowledge systems and indigenous and minority revitalisation movements.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,000 word max essay 60 marks, 1 x 3,000 word essay 80 marks, 1 x 1,500 word seminar presentation 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG6075 Extended Essay in Contemporary Religions

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): Undergraduate or Language modules from among those approved in the MA Contemporary Religions

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to conduct research and to present their findings in the form of an extended essay.

Module Content: An essay of a max 3,500 words on an approved topic in the study of contemporary religions, written under the direction of a relevant member of staff.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of a specified topic in contemporary religions.
?demonstrate advanced critical awareness of theories, methods and concepts relevant to the topic of study
?demonstrate effectiveness in researching,formulating and communicating this knowledge, understanding and critical awareness in the form of an extended essay.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Essay, 3,500 words (max)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x Essay, 3,500 words (max) to be submitted by a deadline prescribed by the Department prior to the Autumn Supplemental Examination).

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RG6095 Religions and Memory

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tatsuma Padoan, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To develop an in-depth semiotic and anthropological understanding of memory as a theoretical issue across different societies and religious contexts: this will provide students with a better understanding of dynamics of cultural diversity, conflict, and identity, where politics of remembering and forgetting play nowadays a crucial role.

Module Content: This course intends to explore the relationship between religion and memory from a semiotic and anthropological viewpoint. Although only few courses are currently offered in Europe on this subject, memory has become a central topic in present debates concerning migration, cultural heritage, and transnational tourism, to the extent that many observers are talking about a real "memory boom." Such considerations are even more amplified when discussion of memory pertains to religious sites of contested histories and difficult heritage, or where people suffered from violent trauma and persecution for political, religious, cultural or ethnic reasons. This course will thus also address important themes currently discussed inside and outside the academia and connected to memory, such as: the value of shared and contested narratives, objects and sacred space; ritual, discourse and forms of textuality; religious heritage; migration and identity; religious diversity and conflict. In the first part, we will focus on strategies of religious transmission, by analysing the production, learning and transformation of knowledge through ritual across different societies, and exploring the deep relation between memory and materiality, by addressing recent works on religious materiality, on the ritual agency of artefacts, and on the tactics of remembering and forgetting associated with their use. In the second part, we will investigate instead how such strategies would be connected to larger politics of identity, by studying the relationship between landscape and memory through the analysis of religious and cultural heritage, agency and moral value attributed to places, and extending these notions to the examination of contested religious memories, especially when involving trauma, conflicting identities and forgetting.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate critically the cultural and social issues and debates related to memory, identity, ritual, landscape and materiality in religious discourse.
?Record and reflect on their experience of the subject matter of the course, particularly with regard to its application in the study of religions.
?Apply methodologies and theories relevant to fieldwork and archival research in the study of religions and memory.
?Design and execute an individual or collaborative fieldwork/archival research project in the area of contemporary religions.
?Communicate a critical and reflexive understanding of a contemporary religious group/community or equivalent topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 fieldwork/archival project report (3000 words max): 100 marks; Seminar presentation: 100 marks; 1 essay (3,500 words max): 100 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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RG6600 Dissertation in Contemporary Religions

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions.

Lecturer(s): Dr James Alexander Kapalo, Department of Study of Religions.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to conduct extended research and to present their findings in the form of a Dissertation.

Module Content: A Dissertation of a max 10,000 words on an approved topic in the study of contemporary religions, written under the direction of a relevant member of the Study of Religions Department.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of a specified topic in contemporary religions
?demonstrate advanced critical awareness of theories, methods and concepts relevant to the topic of study
?demonstrate effectiveness in researching, formulating and communicating this knowledge, understanding and critical awareness in the form of a Dissertation.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (1 x Dissertation 10,000 words (max) submitted for Winter Examination Board: 600 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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RG7000 Postgraduate Research Seminar

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Lidia Julianna Guzy, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to present work-in progress research in an intellectually stimulating environment, where postgraduate student train in a culture of debate and academic work and writing.

Module Content: Presentations of ongoing research projects, research papers, work in progress research reports

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate advanced skills in a culture of debate in social sciences.
?demonstrate awareness of academic work as a dialogic process, where discussion, constructive criticism and self-reflection represent important tool for critical and analytical thinking.
?demonstrate effectiveness in researching, formulating and communicating their research and their research process.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (One oral presentation (100 marks) also submitted in written form (1,500-2000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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