Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

LL2003 Aspects of the Classical Tradition
LL2108 Crossing Borders: Cultures and Societies
LL3002 Travel Writing
LL3102 European Cultural Identities 2: Cultural Capitals
LL3901 International Work Placement
LL3902 Year Abroad Language Programme
LL4001 Contemporary Translation Theory and Practice
LL5001 ICT of the Localisation Industry
LL5002 Translation and Professional Communication Skills
LL5003 Mobility, Plurilingualism and Intercultural Communication in a Globalized World
LL6006 Dissertation in Languages and Cultures
LL6007 Research Journal and Presentation Skills
LL6008 Mobility, Plurilingualism and Intercultural Communication in a Globalized World
LL6012 Research Project
LL6013 ICT of the Localisation Industry
LL6014 Translation and Professional Communication Skills
LL6016 Mediterranean Cultures: Encounters
LL6017 Work Placement and Portfolio
LL6018 Contemporary Translation Theory and Practice
LL6023 What Gets Lost: Poetry and Translation
LL6024 Conflict, memory and nation building in the Francophone world
LL6025 Introduction to Audio-Visual Translation Studies
LL6026 Introduction to Translation Technologies
LL6027 Genres in Translation
LL6028 Translation in the European Union
LL6029 Introduction to Community, Liaison and Public Service Interpreting
LL6030 Translation Project (General)
LL6031 Extended Translation Project
LL6032 Dissertation in Translation Studies
LL6033 Using Corpora in Translation Studies
LL6037 Migration and Culture
LL6901 Research Methods
LL7001 Presenting Critical Theory
LL7002 Research Skills in Non-Native Languages I

LL2003 Aspects of the Classical Tradition

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (24 1hr Lectures/Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Daragh O'Connell, Department of Italian.

Lecturer(s): Dr Daragh O'Connell, Department of Italian; Staff, Department of Classics; Staff, School of English; Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: The appreciation of aspects of the classical tradition in European culture.

Module Content: This module will examine the influence of the ancient work on European art, literature and architecture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the nature and content of Greek and Roman education
?Assess the influence of this education through the Mediaeval and Early Modern Periods
?Identify themes and imagery from the Classical heritage in later literature and art up until the present, by study of selected authors and artists
?Evaluate the usefulness of these Classical motifs in enabling artists of later periods to express their own imaginative world.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,500 word essays 50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not submitted the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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LL2108 Crossing Borders: Cultures and Societies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100 (Module taken by all 2nd Year students registered on the BA International).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.

Lecturer(s): Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian; Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies; Dr Patrick Crowley, Department of French; Dr Martin Howard, Department of Hispanic Studies; Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German; Dr Jeremiah D Scully, School of History.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop awareness and understanding of key themes and concepts underlying the societal and cultural impact of internationalisation and globalisation in world perspective.

Module Content: The module will explore and analyse the societal and cultural issues and challenges arising out of human and cultural mobility through both a historical and contemporary prism, looking at examples from various world regions, such as Quebec and Canada, US-Mexico Border, Algeria as well as the historic European centres. A comparative and thematic analysis will be applied through a focus on such issues in relation to the specific themes of migration and mobility, the relation between borders and intercultural relations, cultural and personal identity in a global context, and intercultural awareness. The module will also include a preparatory focus on the student's year abroad.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?discuss a range of meta-themes underlying the phenomena of internationalisation and globalisation.
?analyse relevant texts relating to internationalisation and globalisation.
?discuss the treatment of the issues and challenges arising out of internationalisation and globalisation in relation to various geographical regions of the world.
?evidence understanding, through appropriate use, of relevant terminology and concepts relating to internationalisation and globalisation.
?engage in reflection on issues which may condition their personal study abroad experience.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500-2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (students must submit alternative assessment work by a specified date in August).

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LL3002 Travel Writing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 Lectures (Other: Independent Reading of Designated Texts).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.

Lecturer(s): Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.

Module Objective: This course examines the theory and practice of travel writing

Module Content: This module examines the theory and practice of travel writing. Students will read a set of texts (in English and in English translation) that range from literature of the nineteenth century to contemporary writing. We will be looking at writers who have travelled to such places as Italy, Spain, North Africa and the Middle East, among others. We will consider issues such as the nature of the genre, the relationship between writing and travelling, and the conceptualization of foreign cultures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?identify prescribed texts, and their cultural and historical context;
?discuss key ideas of prescribed texts;
?analyse stylistic features of prescribed texts;
?analyse the relationship of prescribed texts to each other and to their cultural and historical
?context;
?evaluate prescribed texts;
?communicate the above appropriately in written and oral presentations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((100 marks): One in class assessment (50 marks) and one essay of between 1,500 and 2000 words (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment work by a specified date in August).

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LL3102 European Cultural Identities 2: Cultural Capitals

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To explore the role of cities that have been major contributors to European cultural production, and the cultural artefacts produced in them.

Module Content: Europe has often had a notional capital - a dominant cultural centre. At the same time, there have always been important, diverse roles for a range of cities across the continent. This course aims to look at the idea of a cultural capital, from Rome to the annual EU award of the title, and to explore in more detail the cultural productions and contexts around a particular city at a given point in history.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate an awareness of the form of European cultural identity and identities within it
?use critical concepts to analyse and understand cultural production (art, literature, popular and general culture); write a critical commentary based on those skills.
?demonstrate an awareness of how geographical and historical context and culture inform each other.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (The required essay must have been submitted), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students may submit another essay on a topic provided by the lecturer, not later than the first working day in September, as prescribed by the Department). A student who has not submitted the required essay will not normally be granted permission to take the Autumn Supplemental Examination in this module.

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LL3901 International Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (Placement course work is to be submitted before the end of September).

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12weeks(s) Placements (Min 10- Max 14 weeks placement in business workplace in a French-speaking, German-speaking or Spanish-speaking country, or in Italy.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mark Chu, Department of Italian.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in international business environments and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Each student will be required to undertake a 10-14-week work placement. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a work placement supervisor in the external organisation. Students will be expected to keep a weekly learning journal and complete a self-assessment essay/presentation on their return to UCC.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Administer their own work and carry out essential organisational responsibilities
?Interact in the relevant language in the workplace using appropriate linguistic registers ? at both oral and written levels
?Communicate their work placement experience in an oral presentation in the relevant language
?Apply interpersonal skills effectively in their work through the target language
?Examine ways of reconciling personal goals with professional demands and organisational realities
?Develop and exercise thinking in a practical setting
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Students must complete a Learning Journal/Blog (100 marks), a Self Assessment Essay (100 marks) and Presentation (100 marks). In addition, the work placement supervisor in the external organization will submit an Appraisal (100 marks) of the student's performance, based on the student's performance according to a set of criteria (including Initiative, Teamwork, Accuracy) and targets established in advance with the academic mentor).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. A 10-14 week work placement. Continuous Assessment (Learning Journal/Blog (100 marks) and Self-Assessment Essay (100 marks); Oral presentation in the relevant language (100 marks).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL3902 Year Abroad Language Programme

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2.

No. of Students: No min or max.

Pre-requisite(s): FR2101, GE2101 or IT2101 as appropriate to the language context in which the Work Placement is being undertaken

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 72 x 1hr(s) Other (Online language study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mark Chu, Department of Italian.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To consolidate knowledge of oral, aural and written skills in relevant language

Module Content: This module will involve regular practice in the four main language skills with particular focus on reading and listening as well as free expression (oral and written) in the relevant language. This course is wholly online and is monitored and implemented by UCC staff via the TellMeMore online learning programme or such alternative as determined by the Board of Studies

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Converse and produce written French, German or Italian as appropriate, at a level equal to B2 (Reference Level Descriptors/Council of Europe) with fluency and accuracy
?Identify and employ learning strategies appropriate to self-motivated learning in the four language skills of listening, speaking, writing and reading
?Recognise various styles and registers of the relevant language (e.g. journalistic, conversational, literary, formal and informal).

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (A minimum of 2 tests carried out over the course of the placement 200 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL4001 Contemporary Translation Theory and Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 24.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Tutorials, guided learning and language laboratory sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German; Staff, Department of Italian; Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to some of the main theories, methodologies and tools available to the contemporary translator.

Module Content: The weekly seminars will be dedicated to exploring a range of linguistic, cultural and ideological issues that arise when translating a text into another language and culture. The process and product of translation will be considered in relation to social and cultural contexts. Theoretical concepts will be explained using examples taken from different languages in back-translation into English. The module will also provide an introduction to translation technologies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand and describe what is involved in the process of translation
?Identify translation strategies that are appropriate to the function of the target text
?Discuss linguistic choices and translation strategies
?Analyse translations using some of the conceptual tools provided
?Show familiarity with a range of translation tools.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ((Comprising one 3,000-word translation studies essay (100) and one 1.5 hour class test (100).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL5001 ICT of the Localisation Industry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Manfred Schewe, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to the practice of localisation. The course gives a profile of the industry and of the core activities involved in translating the User Interface and User Assistance. The translation aids used in the industry will be applied in the course.

Module Content: Students will be given an overview of the international industry sector of (software) localisation including the main customers, suppliers and support organisations. Students will be introduced to the concept of localisation, including translation of software, help, websites and documentation. Students will also learn about the various topics and roles which are currently important to the localisation industry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?describe the characteristics of the localisation industry and process
?recall and define the core terms and concepts of the localisation industry
?critically discuss the pros and cons of typical translation aids used in the localisation process
?utilise a translation aid to localise a software product successfully
?document coherently the localisation process, its translation challenges and solutions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated and resubmitted as prescribed by the Module coordinator.

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LL5002 Translation and Professional Communication Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: This module is designed to develop and maintain the translation and communication skills necessary to underpin work as a translator, researcher, professional linguist or equivalent. It will show students how to keep their language skills up-to-date and familiarise them with appropriate technical presentation skills and resources to prepare for translation, research and professional assignments. It will provide a guide to a range of information sources and research relevant to translation and professional communication, focusing specifically on institutional, financial and commercial text-types and discourses.

Module Content: Students will be encouraged to analyse both terminological problems and differences in information structures, and will learn to produce a range of text-types, using techniques of translation, transposition, adaptation, summary and textual editing. At every stage they will be encouraged to reflect critically on their work, learning the different criteria for evaluating different communication events. They will learn basic techniques to research general and domain-specific terminology and familiarise themselves with general and specialist information to assist with assignments, such as internet, glossaries and subject-specific journals and publications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principal features of different professional text-types at sentence and above sentence level
?Show familiarity with a range of information sources and research relevant to translation and communication in professional settings
?Show competence in the production of specific text types and communication events
?Produce professionally-presented texts in one or more languages
?Evaluate the effectiveness of their work, using a range of criteria.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 assessed pieces (50 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated and resubmitted as prescribed by the Module coordinator.

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LL5003 Mobility, Plurilingualism and Intercultural Communication in a Globalized World

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops (plus self-directed study and group meetings (x 24 hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To offer an overview of current research and thinking in the areas of languages, intercultural communication and the negotiation of knowledges in contemporary societies.

Module Content: Students will cover a range of topics integral to the core concept of the Masters programme involving topics in three key areas:
? intercultural communication including translation and cultural transfer
? borders, migration and mobilities including plurilingualism, intermediality and transnational aesthetics
? identities and cultural practices including ideas around cultural geographies, multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?outline recent developments in theoretical thinking in the key areas covered by the course;
?apply different methodologies to the study of language, literature and culture;
?use appropriate conceptual and theoretical frameworks in their approaches to texts, contexts and languages;
?demonstrate an ability to work and learn with others through completion of a group project.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay 150 marks (2,500 words); Group presentation and accompanying written documentation (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by module coordinator).

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LL6006 Dissertation in Languages and Cultures

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To carry out a sustained research project on an original topic in the field; to develop research skills, critical thinking, and the identification of appropriate methodologies and presentation of findings in the form of a dissertation.

Module Content: Under the academic guidance of staff, students will independently explore a specialised area within the areas of applied linguistics, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese or Latin American studies, visual art, media, theatre, film, cultural history or pedagogies of language teaching, apply the appropriate research methodologies and present the results in a minor dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate an ability to conduct guided individual research at an appropriate level;
?Conceptualize and execute a sustained, specialized research project;
?Develop individual research strategies and produce critical bibliographies;
?Explain major interpretive strategies of the texts in question;
?Display an independent approach to critical analysis and evaluation;
?Write critically using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research;
?Identify an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework consistent with their area of study;
?Present their work in a minor dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Research Dissertation 12,000 - 15,000 words).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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LL6007 Research Journal and Presentation Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Other (Consultation, Presentation and Attendance at Departmental/School Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: This module provides the opportunity for students on the programme to engage with the research conducted in their own and related fields. It will help students self-direct their research and, in consultation with their supervisor(s), prepare a thesis proposal and work schedule for their major research project.

Module Content: Working with a designated supervisor/mentor, students design a work schedule which will include: the writing of a research journal in either traditional or digital forms (e.g. blogs) to include; an element of reflective practice and/or experiential learning; an annotated bibliography and review of research seminars; attendance at a minimum of four research seminars in their School/Department with a review of a least two seminars; delivery of a presentation on their chosen research topic.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conceive and articulate a viable research topic.
?Critically appraise the bibliography on their chosen topic.
?Engage constructively with the research of others.
?Prepare and present verbal presentations of their research topic.
?Participate in discussions about their own and others' research.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Research Journal, including annotated bibliography and review of Research Seminars (2,000 words 50 marks); and Research Presentation and accompanying documentation (50 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Research presentation must be repeated as prescribed by the relevant Department/School.).

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LL6008 Mobility, Plurilingualism and Intercultural Communication in a Globalized World

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops (plus self-directed study and group meetings (x 24 hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To offer an overview of current research and thinking in the areas of languages, intercultural communication and the negotiation of knowledges in contemporary societies.

Module Content: Students will cover a range of topics integral to the core concept of the Masters programme involving topics in three key areas:
? intercultural communication including translation and cultural transfer
? borders, migration and mobilities including plurilingualism, intermediality and transnational aesthetics
? identities and cultural practices including ideas around cultural geographies, multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?outline recent developments in theoretical thinking in the key areas covered by the course;
?apply different methodologies to the study of language, literature and culture;
?use appropriate conceptual and theoretical frameworks in their approaches to texts, contexts and languages;
?demonstrate an ability to work and learn with others through completion of a group project.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay 150 marks (4,000 words); Group presentation and accompanying written documentation (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by module coordinator).

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LL6012 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Direction and supervision by one or more members of the programme team).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To facilitate individual research on a particular topic of interest to students that is not covered by either their Research Dissertation or the optional modules available within the programme. It will involve familiarisation with appropriate primary and secondary source materials, and identification of appropriate methodological and theoretical approaches.

Module Content: Under the academic guidance of a staff member, students will independently explore a specialised area within the areas of literature, visual art, media, applied linguistics, theatre, film, or cultural history, and apply the appropriate research methodologies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set topic and related texts.
?Demonstrate ability to write clearly.
?Develop a written argument to an appropriate level of sophistication (both content and language).
?Display an independent approach to critical analysis and evaluation.
?Apply an appropriate bibliographical system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 5,000 Word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at consultation sessions and submission of drafts as required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed Continuous Assessment may be re-submitted (as prescribed by the Department).).

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LL6013 ICT of the Localisation Industry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Manfred Schewe, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to the practice of localisation. The course gives a profile of the industry and of the core activities involved in translating the User Interface and User Assistance. The translation aids used in the industry will be applied in the course.

Module Content: Students will be given an overview of the international industry sector of (software) localisation including the main customers, suppliers and support organisations. Students will be introduced to the concept of localisation, including translation of software, help, websites and documentation. Students will also learn about the various topics and roles which are currently important to the localisation industry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?describe the characteristics of the localisation industry and process
?recall and define the core terms and concepts of the localisation industry
?critically discuss the pros and cons of typical translation aids used in the localisation process
?utilise a translation aid to localise a software product successfully
?document coherently the localisation process, its translation challenges and solutions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project x 4,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated and resubmitted as prescribed by the Module coordinator.

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LL6014 Translation and Professional Communication Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: This module is designed to develop and maintain the translation and communication skills necessary to underpin work as a translator, researcher, professional linguist or equivalent. It will show students how to keep their language skills up-to-date and familiarise them with appropriate technical presentation skills and resources to prepare for translation, research and professional assignments. It will provide a guide to a range of information sources and research relevant to translation and professional communication, focusing specifically on institutional, financial and commercial text-types and discourses.

Module Content: Students will be encouraged to analyse both terminological problems and differences in information structures, and will learn to produce a range of text-types, using techniques of translation, transposition, adaptation, summary and textual editing. At every stage they will be encouraged to reflect critically on their work, learning the different criteria for evaluating different communication events. They will learn basic techniques to research general and domain-specific terminology and familiarise themselves with general and specialist information to assist with assignments, such as internet, glossaries and subject-specific journals and publications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principal features of different professional text-types at sentence and above sentence level
?Demonstrate deep knowledge of a range of information sources and research relevant to translation and communication in professional settings
?Display competence in the production of specific text types and communication events
?Produce professionally-presented texts in one or more languages
?Evaluate the effectiveness of their work, using a range of criteria.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 assessed pieces (50 marks each) x 2,000 words each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated and resubmitted as prescribed by the Module coordinator.

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LL6016 Mediterranean Cultures: Encounters

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Supplemented by extensive reading set by staff. In addition, students are expected to organise and run supplementary research seminars (1x1.5hrs per term) based on research projects designed by students in consultation with staff. This is designed to promote autonomous research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Daragh O'Connell, Department of Italian.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: As a region of the world in which explorations and formations of identity and alterity take place, the Mediterranean is compelling in its diversity. It is where the continents of Europe, Africa and Asia meet and where successive cultural forms have taken shape, and eventually mutated, as a result of encounters alsong the Mediterranean shores. It is a region that ahs always invited comparisons as aresult of conflict, exchange and movement. The objective of this module is to analyse and assess representations of the cultural and social significance of transcultural encounters and transnational movements across the mediterranean.

Module Content: The content of this module will comprise of cultural texts (i.e. literature, films, philosophy, performances, popular culture, theory) that have as their focus the mediterranean as a site of cultural encounter - within and between nations, regions and cities; between North and South; between East and WEst. Such encounters have had a variety of outcomes: cultural hybridity and transformation, social dislocation and control, as well as the cultural construction, performance and interrogation of mediterranean spaces. The course may include canonical writers such as Homer, Dante, Cervantes and Holderlin, along with contemporary writers and film makers such as Fatih Akin, Merzak Allouche, Vincenzo Consolo, Eugene Fromentin, Robert Guediguian, Ryszard Kapuscinski, Eric Newby, Predrag Matvejevic, Guido Piovene, and Andre Techine as well as the work of Comediants and Fura dels Baus.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the Mediterranean as figured within a variety of cultural texts and performances.
?Reflect critically on the ways in which the Mediterranean has been constructed for cultural, political and social ends.
?Discuss, analyse and interpret a range of selected texts and performances drawn from literature, travel narratives, film and theory relating to the Mediterranean.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (One 5000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6017 Work Placement and Portfolio

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3month(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To provide students with experience of working in an arts organization and to enable them to apply intercultural, linguistic and other kinds of knowledges in an arts-related work context.

Module Content: Each student will be required to undertake work placement of at least 12 weeks (approximately 360 hours) duration. UCC, the work placement provider and the student will work together in developing a structured plan for the students work in order to ensure that it is relevant to their programme of study as part of the MA in Languages and Cultures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an ability to work in a policy-oriented, publicly funded arts environment.
?Administer their own work and carry out essential organisational responsibilities.
?Apply interpersonal skills effectively in their work
?Produce a research paper relating to their work placement. This could include audience research; art curation or film/music programming; translation of material for specific purposes (e.g. brochure copy).

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ((i) Work Placement Portfolio (4,000 words, 200 marks). To include the research paper (3,000 words) and a reflection on the work placement (1,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at Placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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LL6018 Contemporary Translation Theory and Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 24.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 12 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German; Staff, Department of Italian; Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the most significant theories, methodologies and concepts available to enable understanding of the process of translation. To provide students with an understanding of the knowledge, skills and competences required of a professional translator.

Module Content: The weekly seminars will be dedicated to exploring the various linguistic, cultural and ideological issues that arise when translating a text into another language and culture. The process and product of translation will be considered in relation to social and cultural contexts. Theoretical concepts will be explained using examples taken from different languages. The module will also provide an introduction to the translation profession, covering the basic knowledge, skills and competences required of a professional translator.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand and describe what is involved in the process of translation
?Identify and assess similarities and differences between source and target language systems and contexts
?Develop translation strategies that are appropriate to the function of the target text
?Discuss and justify linguistic choices and translation strategies
?Analyse translations critically using the conceptual tools provided
?Show familiarity with the full range of national and international occupational standards in the translation profession
?Demonstrate full understanding of the basic knowledge, skills and competences required of a professional translator.
?Understand and negotiate the ethical issues that arise in the course of translation, interpretation and intercultural mediation in different contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ((Comprising one 3,000-word translation studies essay (100 marks) and one 2,000-2,500-word professional translation portfolio comprising CV, testimonial, training needs evaluation, speed translation exercises and learning journal (100 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6023 What Gets Lost: Poetry and Translation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): Advanced language skills in English and at least one other language

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 24 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary P. Noonan, Department of French.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To develop understanding of the challenges facing the translator of poetry, and to develop techniques for the successful translation of poetry

Module Content: Students will examine a range of discursive and theoretical texts analysing the process of translating poetry, and will engage in extensive practice of translation of poetry from a source language to a target language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Engage in critical reflection on the challenges facing the translator of poetry.
?Employ a range of contemporary theoretical sources to analyse the process of poetry translation.
?Assess and critique a broad range of translations of poetry from their chosen source language.
?Produce successful translations of poetry from their chosen source language.
?Analyse and critique their own translation practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x poetry translation project (150 marks); 1 x poetry translation presentation (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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LL6024 Conflict, memory and nation building in the Francophone world

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study (Associated Reading)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kate Hodgson, Department of French.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of French.

Module Objective: To consider how conflict, memory and processes of nation building have shaped the Francophone world.

Module Content: This module will focus on three moments of extreme conflict that have shaped the modern Francophone world: the Haitian revolution, the Algerian war of independence and the Rwandan genocide. Students will consider how the nations that emerged out of these conflicts have chosen to commemorate the foundational violence that brought them into being. Problems related to collective memory, the politics of violence and national identity will be central to class discussions. Students will examine how Haiti, Algeria and Rwanda are today still dealing with the aftermath of extreme violence, including continued internal conflict and colonial/neo-colonial influence. Each country's approach to post-conflict nation building will be considered in turn, as we engage in debates about the controversies that national reconstruction inevitably entails.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and analyse the causes and consequences of conflict in each of the three cases studied.
?Critically evaluate the role played by different actors in the conflicts and subsequent processes of reconstruction
?Demonstrate awareness of the wider historical and political context on a national and international level.
?Analyse selected political, historical and theoretical texts
?Reflect critically on a range of source materials in producing coursework for assessment.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6025 Introduction to Audio-Visual Translation Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 3hr(s) Workshops; 12hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to a range of different aspects of the field of Audio-Visual Translation Studies.

Module Content: This course will provide an overview of developments in the field of Audio-Visual Translation Studies, covering key debates, models and approaches, as well as current practice in interlingual, bilingual and intralingual subtitling, dubbing, voice-over, surtitling and audio description.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and explain developments in the field of AVT over the past 25 years
?Show advanced understanding of one or more aspects of the field of AVT
?Apply appropriate theories and approaches to the analysis of AVT practice
?Apply appropriate models and approaches to the process and production of AVT translation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word project (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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LL6026 Introduction to Translation Technologies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops (Language laboratories).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: This module provides an introduction to contemporary translation technologies, including machine translation, translation memory software and the use of corpora and specialist terminologies.

Module Content: Students will be provided with a hands-on experience of a range of technologies applied to the study and practice of translation. They will learn how to use the tools most commonly required by employers and critically assess the technological requirements for different translation projects. They will also learn to analyse how translation tools work and their impact on translation in disciplinary and professional contexts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and evaluate developments in translation technology in the 20th and 21st centuries
?Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of translation memory technology
?Show competence in the use of at least one commercial translation memory tool
?Demonstrate awareness of the principles of contemporary machine translation
?Optimize texts for machine translation or for human translation completed using a translation memory tool.
?Post-edit texts produced by machine translation or a translation memory tool.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project x 4,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated and resubmitted as prescribed by the Module coordinator.

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LL6027 Genres in Translation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elisa Maria Serra Porteiro, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Italian; Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: This module aims to enable students to analyse, evaluate and apply appropriate translation theories to different genres of texts.

Module Content: The module will equip students with key theoreteical approaches and practical strategies for the translation of a wide variety of texts including different literary genres, advertising texts, newspapers, commercial, technical and institutional texts, children's literature, tourism and legal writing. The module will also provide guidance on information sources and research relevant to semi-specialised translation in a range of different language pairs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand the relevance of the distinction between different genres of texts in translation
?Identify the characteristics of different genres in translation
?Demonstrate awareness of a range of theories and strategies to the translation of different genres of texts
?Apply a range of theories and strategies to the translation of different genres.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 genre translation portfolio comprising 4 pieces (4000 words in total)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6028 Translation in the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 3hr(s) Workshops; 1 x 72hr(s) Other (Field trip).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: This module will provide a working knowledge of the role and function of translation in the EU.

Module Content: This module will provide an introduction to the foundation role of multilingualism in the EU and how it is implemented through translation and interpreting in the different EU institutions. The module will include a study visit to the European Commission, European Parliament and Directorate General of Translation in Brussels.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the function of the EU Institutions
?Evaluate the EU policy of foundational multilingualism
?Demonstrate awareness of the different ways in which foundational multilingualism is implemented in practice
?Critically evaluate the translation and interpreting practices of the EU Institutions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay (50 marks); 1 x 2000 word field trip journal (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6029 Introduction to Community, Liaison and Public Service Interpreting

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 3hr(s) Workshops; 12 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to the principles of community and liaison interpreting in different contexts.

Module Content: The module will provide an introduction to the theory and practice of community and liaison interpreting in different contexts, with a special focus on community and public service interpreting needs in the Irish context. Students will undertake interpreting practice on a range of topics and will develop a range of skills: public speaking, memory retention, note-taking, professionalism and ethics/codes of conduct, cultural mediation, rapport management, and role managament.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate understanding of the theory and practice of community and liaison interpreting in different contexts
?Show basic competence in community interpreting in liaison, consecutive and whispered simultaneous modes
?Prepare appropriately for interpreting assignments
?Draw on a range of memory training techniques as appropriate to consecutive and simultaneous interpreting
?Take appropriate notes in a variety of interpreting scenarios
?Show awareness of ethical issues in community interpreting scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (4 x interpreting tasks (25 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6030 Translation Project (General)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Tutorials); 24 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin Cawley, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies; Ms Ching Keane, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies; Dr Till Weingartner, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.

Module Objective: To develop advanced translation skills, focusing on translation into the student's first language.

Module Content: The module will prepare students to translate a 3000-word text of their choice, drawing on appropriate theories, methodologies and approaches to the translation of different text-types and genres, encouraging them to reflect on issues such as target audience and function and to use a range of translation resources. Students will be expected to agree a project with their tutor, for which they will translate a text and provide commentary, in the form of annotations, where appropriate, and in a separate analytical essay in English.* Periodical tutorial and/or seminar support will be provided.

*Students will normally be expected to translate into their first language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the main areas of debate in the analysis and practice of translation
?Understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to the analysis and practice of translation
?Analyse and describe the different parameters which constitute a text's translatability
?Show competence in the use of a variety of translation resources
?Show awareness of key differences between the two linguistic systems
?Produce a critical translation into the student's first language (see above)
?Present written translations in a professional manner.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Translation Project (3000 words translation + 3500 words commentary)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6031 Extended Translation Project

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Independent study with guidance by appropriate supervisor(s)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Martin Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies; Dr Angela Ryan, Department of French; Dr Kevin Cawley, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies; Ms Ching Keane, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies; Dr Daragh O'Connell, Department of Italian; Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German; Dr Till Weingartner, UCC Centre for Chinese Studies.

Module Objective: To apply the advanced translation skills acquired during the MA to the production of an extended translation (6,000-8,000 words) from a foreign language into English, or vice versa, and provide an extended commentary (8,000 words) on this translation.

Module Content: The module will support students in the management and production of an extended translation of a text in a genre of their choice, drawing on appropriate theories, methodologies and approaches to the translation of different text-types and genres, encouraging them to reflect on issues such as target audience and function and to use a range of translation resources. Students will be expected to agree a project with their supervisor, for which they will translate a text and provide commentary, in the form of annotations, where appropriate, and in a separate analytical commentary in English.* .

*Students will normally be expected to translate into their first language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate advanced knowledge of the main areas of debate in the analysis and practice of translation
?Show advanced understanding and the ability to apply a variety of theoretical approaches to the analysis and practice of translation
?Analyse and describe the different parameters which constitute a text's translatability
?Show advanced competence in translation project management and in the use of a variety of translation resources
?Show advanced awareness of key differences between the two linguistic systems
?Show an advanced understanding of the cultural differences and the role of cultural factors in translation and more generally in international communication
?Demonstrate the ability to produce high-level idiomatic and functionally adequate target texts, composed in a target language that is grammatically correct, fluent, adhering to the appropriate register, and in compliance with the features of the appropriate genre and text-type.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Translation Project (6,000-8,000 words translation + 8,000 words commentary)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6032 Dissertation in Translation Studies

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4month(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To carry out a sustained research project on an original topic in Translation Studies; to develop research skills, critical thinking, and the ability to identify and apply appropriate methodologies for research in translation and present findings in the form of a scholarly dissertation.

Module Content: Under the academic guidance of staff, students will independently explore a specialised area within the area of Translation Studies, select and apply the appropriate research methodologies drawn from modules in the taught element of the programme, and present the results in the form of a research dissertation, in line with scholarly best practice in Translation Studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate an ability to conduct guided individual research at an appropriate level;
?Conceptualize and execute a sustained, specialized research project;
?Develop individual research strategies and produce critical bibliographies;
?Explain major interpretive strategies of the theories, approaches, concepts and texts in question;
?Display an independent approach to critical analysis and evaluation;
?Write critically using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research;
?Identify an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework consistent with their area of study;
?Present their work in a minor dissertation of 12,000-16,000 words.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Research Dissertation 12,000 - 16,000 words).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met.

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LL6033 Using Corpora in Translation Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 3hr(s) Workshops; 12hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Laura Linares Fernandez, Language Centre; Craig Neville, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to recent developments in Corpus-based Translation Studies and a range of uses of corpora for both research and practice in translation, as well as to familiarise them with the most popular tools for corpus analysis.

Module Content: This course will provide an overview of developments in Corpus-based Translation Studies, covering key debates, models and approaches; types of corpora and their uses; quantitative and qualitative approaches to research using corpora; tools used for corpus analysis; applications of corpora to the practice of translation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and explain developments in the field of corpus-based translation studies over the past 25 years
?Show advanced understanding of one or more aspects of the field of corpus-based translation studies
?Apply appropriate theories and approaches to the analysis of translations
?Show advanced understanding of the tools and techniques used for corpus analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word project (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL6037 Migration and Culture

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 24hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Crowley, Department of French.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of French.

Module Objective: To explore the relationship between migration and cultural production and, in doing so, examine the implications for integration, identity formations and intercultural exchange from a local, national and transnational perspective.

Module Content: Over the course of this module students will work with a range of theoretical works and primary, empirical sources that prompt us to think about migration as mediated by cultural objects and public discourse. Through three case studies that consider French, Italian and Galician contexts (of migration, colonisation and diaspora from a trans-Mediterranean, trans-Atlantic and nation-state perspective), we will examine identity formations and socio-cultural formations resulting from migration.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate understanding and independent critical reflection on the relationship between migration and culture
?Describe and analyse cultural artefacts in terms of their relationship to migration and intercultural exchange
?Show critical understanding of the various historical, social and political contexts that have shaped patterns of migration into and from Europe
?Critically engage with a range of primary and secondary materials in order to produce assigned coursework for assessment.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3000 word essay (140 marks); In-class assessment (Journal) (60 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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LL6901 Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Seminars/ workshops/ online forum tasks).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To explore research methods in the range of disciplines represented in the School

Module Content: The teaching will focus on the range of research questions and research methods characteristic of the different relevant disciplines. Topics for discussion will include: defining research problems; the justification of research claims; sources for research; using libraries; using information technology; online research strategies; style and presentation; subject-specific research issues and sources. The teaching will take the form of research workshops and seminar discussion of work carried out by members of the group

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?formulate a research question informed by current theoretical or scholarly models;
?plan and manage a research project with a view to formulating specific research arguments;
?justify claims resulting from the investigation or evaluation of research questions;
?locate sources or data which give the research question its proper scope and document how the use of these sources helps to justify the claims made;
?display due rigour in academic writing informed by prevailing scholarly conventions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project proposal 25 Marks; Literature search and review 75 Marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the relevant Programme Director).

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LL7001 Presenting Critical Theory

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 24 x 1hr(s) Other (self-directed reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: to enable doctoral students of the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures to gain familiarity with major critical theories and to give a seminar presentation on a theory (or theorist) related to their research.

Module Content: the course will run as a seminar in which staff and doctoral students present critical theories (or theorists) to the group, situating them also within the context of their own research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
? identify major critical theories
? demonstrate an understanding of contemporary critical debates
? give a seminar presentation on a theory/theorist relevant to their research, using technical support where appropriate
? demonstrate awareness of the ways in which critical theory can be used as an interpretive strategy when analyzing a range of texts.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (seminar presentation and position paper of 2,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LL7002 Research Skills in Non-Native Languages I

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): Common European Framework of Reference for Languages A1 or A2 in the language concerned

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 25 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Patrick O'Donovan, Department of French.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To develop reading and research skills in non-native languages for research purposes

Module Content: This module will allow students to develop the capacity to work directly on original sources. Teaching and learning will focus on the knowledge and skills required to read primary sources in non-native languages and also on using relevant databases and research tools. Teaching will be offered in one or more languages on a cyclical basis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?identify sources in non-native languages relevant to specific research projects
?devise and implement reading strategies appropriate to these sources
?apply knowledge of grammatical and communicative systems in non-native languages to the reading of these sources for research purposes
?contextualize these sources
?identify and use relevant databases to analyse these sources.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Class assignments (80) and end of module class test (120)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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