Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

GE0003 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 1
GE0004 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 2
GE0005 German Language ( CEFR-Level A2.1)
GE0008 German Language (CEFR-Level A2.2)
GE0100 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 1
GE0103 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 2
GE0104 German Language (Intermediate Level B1), Pt 1
GE0105 German Language (Intermediate Level B1), Pt 2
GE1101 Integrated Written and Oral Language Course for German
GE1102 Introduction to Literature
GE1103 Integrated Written and Oral German Language Course for Beginners
GE1104 Introduction to German Culture and Literature for Beginners
GE2100 German Love Poetry
GE2101 Integrated German Language Course
GE2101S Integrated German Language Course
GE2102 Linguistics 1
GE2106 Cultural and Intercultural Learning for the Year Abroad - Theory and Practice
GE2113 Novelle und Kurzprosa
GE2126 German Literature from 18th to 21st Century
GE2130 Constructing and Deconstructing German National Identity: Key Texts in the Development, Expression and Modification of an Idea
GE2131 German Business and Culture Today: Theory and Practice
GE2150 Memory and Identity in Contemporary Generational Narratives
GE2801 Integrated German Language Course for BComm Students
GE2902 Political and Social Culture since 1945
GE3101 Advanced Integrated German Language Course
GE3103 Linguistik II
GE3108 Teaching German as a Foreign Language
GE3126 German Film in Focus: A Thematic Approach
GE3137 Interpreting Heinrich von Kleist's Prose Fiction
GE3139 Historical Connections: German-Irish Relations from the Past to the Present
GE3142 Nietzsche fur Alle und Keinen: The Philosopher as Artist.
GE3145 Performative Approaches to German Literature
GE3150 Living Rooms, Houses, Woods, Rivers, Villages and Cities: Fiction and Topographies
GE3151 Loneliness with a Trilling 'R': Migration, Multilingualism and Literature
GE3309 German Work Placement
GE3310 German Work Placement Oral Presentation
GE3801 Advanced Integrated German Language Course for BComm Students
GE3807 Commercial Language: German
GE3901 Advanced Integrated Language Course
GE3902 Language and Interpretation
GE3904 The Double Face of Germany: Representing the Holocaust
GE4002 Introduction to Translation Theory and Industry
GE5013 Translation Project (German)
GE6001 Dissertation in Comparative Aesthetics and the Arts
GE6003 Ut pictura poiesis: Literature and the Visual Arts
GE6005 Translation Project (German)
GE6009 Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice
GE6014 German-English-German Translation: Methods and Practice
GE6015 Dissertation in Languages and Cultures (German)
GE6020 Questions of Adaptation and Adoption: Re-Writings/Re-Viewings/Re-Readings

GE0003 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE0004

Teaching Method(s): Other (36 x 1 hr small group language classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To improve a student's skill in German by one level on the language ability scale.

Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered
?reproduce grammatical forms accurately
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at the lower end of level A1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
?apply principles of basic German grammar and employ simple vocabulary to communicate in the German language, both orally and in written form, at the lower end of level A1
?interact in a simple way with fellow students and native speakers, using familiar everyday expressions and basic phrases
?examine aspects of German culture and society in comparison to their own culture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 in-class test 60 marks, attendance and participation 20 marks); Oral Assessment 20 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must take a 1 x 1.5hr test in lieu of failed Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department. The Oral must be retaken if failed.).

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GE0004 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE0003

Teaching Method(s): Other (36 x 1 hr small group language classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To improve a student's skill in German by one level on the language ability scale.

Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered
?reproduce grammatical forms accurately
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at the level A1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
?apply principles of basic German grammar and employ simple vocabulary to communicate in the German language, both orally and in written form, at level A1
?interact in a simple way with fellow students and native speakers, using familiar everyday expressions and basic phrases
?examine aspects of German culture and society in comparison to their own culture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (attendance and participation 10 marks); Oral Assessment 20 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must take a 1 x 1hr test in lieu of failed Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department. The Oral must be retaken if failed.).

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GE0005 German Language ( CEFR-Level A2.1)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE0008

Teaching Method(s): Other (36 x 1 hr small group language classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: This module should bring students to the upper end of CEFR-Level A2.1 for German.

Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered
?accurately reproduce grammatical forms dealt with
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at level A2.1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
?participate successfully in class discussions (in German) with fellow students by expressing and defending their own views and demonstrating an understanding of their fellow students' views
?produce grammatically correct written texts by applying German language at CEFR-Level A2.1
?examine aspects of German culture and society and reflect on them.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1x1hr in-class test 50 marks; project with presentation 30 marks; vocab tests, attendance and participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must take a 1 x 1hr test in lieu of failed Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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GE0008 German Language (CEFR-Level A2.2)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE0005

Teaching Method(s): Other (36 x 1 hr small group language classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: This module should bring students to the upper end of CEFR-Level A2.2 for German.

Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered
?accurately reproduce grammatical forms dealt with
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at level A2.2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
?participate successfully in class discussions (in German) with fellow students by expressing and defending their own views and demonstrating an understanding of their fellow students' views
?produce grammatically correct written texts by applying German language at level A2.2
?examine aspects of German culture and society and reflect on them.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (vocab tests 10 marks, homework assignment(s) 10 marks, attendance and participation 5 marks); Oral Assessment 25 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (Students must take a 1 x 1hr test in lieu of failed Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department. The Oral Examination must be retaken, if failed.).

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GE0100 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE0103

Teaching Method(s): Other (3 contact hours per week).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To improve a student's skill in German by one level on the language ability scale.

Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered
?reproduce grammatical forms accurately
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at the lower end of level A1 of the common European Framework of reference for Languages
?apply principles of basic German grammar and employ basic vocabulary to communicate in the German language, both orally and in written form, at the lower end of level A1
?interact in a simple way with fellow students and native speakers, using familiar everyday expressions and basic phrases
?examine aspects of German culture and society in comparison to their own culture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 in-class test 60 marks, attendance and participation 20 marks); Oral Assessment 20 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must take a 1 x 1.5hr department test in lieu of failed Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department. The Oral Examination must be retaken, if failed.).

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GE0103 German Language (Beginner Level A1) Part 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE0100

Teaching Method(s): Other (3 contact hours per week).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To improve a student's skill in German by one level on the language ability scale.

Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered
?reproduce grammatical forms accurately
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at the level A1 of the common European Framework of reference for Languages
?apply principles of basic German grammar and employ basic vocabulary to communicate in the German language, both orally and in written form, at level A1
?interact in a simple way with fellow students and native speakers, using familiar everyday expressions and basic phrases
?examine aspects of German culture and society in comparison to their own culture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (attendance and participation 10 marks); Oral Assessment 20 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must take a 1 x 1hr department test in lieu of failed Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department. The Oral Examination must be retaken, if failed.).

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GE0104 German Language (Intermediate Level B1), Pt 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE0105

Teaching Method(s): Other (3 contact hours per week).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To improve a student's skill in German by one level on the language ability scale.

Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered
?accurately reproduce grammatical forms dealt with
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at the lower end of level B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
?participate successfully in class discussions with fellow students by expressing and defending their own views and demonstrating an understanding of their fellow students' views
?produce grammatically correct written texts by applying German language at the lower end of level B1
?examine aspects of German culture and society and reflect on them.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 in-class test 50 marks; project with presentation 30 marks; vocab tests, attendance and participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students failing Continuous Assessment must undertake a 1 x 1.5 hr test as prescribed by the Department.

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GE0105 German Language (Intermediate Level B1), Pt 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 18.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE0104

Teaching Method(s): Other (3 contact hours per week).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To improve a student's skill in German by one level on the language ability scale.

Module Content: A four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) language course with a generally communicative approach.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered
?accurately reproduce grammatical forms dealt with
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at level B1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
?participate successfully in class discussions with fellow students by expressing and defending their own views and demonstrating an understanding of their fellow students' views
?produce grammatically correct written texts by applying German language at level B1
?examine aspects of German culture and society and reflect on them.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (vocab tests, attendance and participation 10 marks); Oral Assessment 30 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (The Oral examination must be retaken if failed. Students failing Continuous Assessment must undertake a 1 x 1hr test as prescribed by the Department).

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GE1101 Integrated Written and Oral Language Course for German

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (75 contact hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Module Objective: To further independent learning and both productive and receptive language skills (writing/speaking, listening/reading) and complete CEFR level A2.

Module Content: Students are taught in small groups (optimum 15 per group). The emphasis is on the competent use of language structures in integrated language performance. Students are expected to spend a minimum of six hours a week on autonomous learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered and reproduce grammatical forms accurately.
?Discuss topics, orally and in written form, using German language at the CEFR level A2 of the Common European framework of reference for languages.
?Identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at CEFR level A2.
?Participate successfully in class discussions (in German) with fellow students by expressing their own views and demonstrating an understanding of their fellow students' views.
?Understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of relevance.
?Communicate in simple tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar matters.
?Describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 language test 30 marks; In-class tests & quizzes 20 marks; Homework assignments 20 marks; contribution and participation 10 marks); Oral Assessment 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Please Note: Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (The Oral Examination must be retaken if failed. Students failing Continuous Assessment must sit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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GE1102 Introduction to Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Small Group Teaching).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nikolai Preuschoff, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German; Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German; Dr Nikolai Preuschoff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To raise students' interest, encourage active responses and provide the terminology and strategies needed for a critical assessment of selected texts.

Module Content: The lectures will introduce students to German literature and culture as well as to German media and elements of popular culture. The complementary small group course is intended to facilitate the students' reading and the analysis of literary texts in the target language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Interpret examples of German literature and culture.
?Recall the essential terminology for literature and media studies.
?Identify aspects of cultural life of the German speaking countries within literary texts and films.
?Discuss, critically, Gemran literary texts and films in English.
?Develop strategies to interpret German texts using the skills of literary analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x in-class test, 20 marks; small-group student presentation, 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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GE1103 Integrated Written and Oral German Language Course for Beginners

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 96 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Period 1: 60; Period 2: 36); 24 x 1hr(s) Practicals (Period 1: 12; Period 2: 12).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the German language and to help them develop both productive and receptive language skills (writing/speaking, listening/reading). The overall objective is to bring students, therefore, to the same level of language competence as the existing German programme by second year.

Module Content: Within a small group approach, students are introduced to German phonology and to the basic structures of grammar; they develop communicative skills, learn to read, write and understand texts. Students are expected to spend a minimum of four hours a week on autonomous learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall vocabulary relevant to topics covered and reproduce grammatical forms accurately
?identify the key points of printed texts and audio-texts at level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages
?apply principles of basic German grammar and employ simple vocabulary to communicate in the German language, both orally and in written form, at level A2
?examine aspects of German culture and society in comparison to their own culture
?interact with fellow students and native speakers in everyday situations
?engage in independent learning, demonstrating the capacity for critical self-evaluation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (Test 1: 20 marks; Test 2: 30 marks; short end-of-chapter tests: 20 marks; written homework: 10 marks)); Oral Assessment 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department. A failed oral examination must be retaken.).

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GE1104 Introduction to German Culture and Literature for Beginners

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (24 hours in total).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Mr Dragan Miladinovic, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: -To raise students' interest, encourage active responses and provide the terminology and strategies needed for a critical assessment of selected texts.
-To explore and discuss aspects of cultural life of the German speaking countries.
- To improve language skills (reading and writing).

Module Content: Introduction to literary texts reflecting aspects of contemporary German culture and representing the major literary genres (poetry, prose, drama) and to concepts of German culture-related discourse.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise the key points in short literary texts
?Recall the essential terminology for literature studies
?Paraphrase contents of literary texts
?Identify aspects of cultural life of the German speaking countries within literary texts
?Critically discuss (in English) German literary texts
?Develop strategies to interpret German texts using the skills of literary analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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GE2100 German Love Poetry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (Supervision of Continuous Assessment project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Module Objective: To develop different aspects of the experience of love, friendship, eroticism, compassion, religious devotion, through the interpretation of their poetic reflection.

Module Content: The module will analyse and interpret various examples from the history of German Liebeslyrik, beginning with the medieval Minnesang (Walther von der Vogelweide), Brautmystik (Mechthild von Magdeburg), putting emphasis on Goethezeit, romanticism (cult of friendship and romantic love, e.g. Novalis), 20th and 21st century poems (e.g. Erich Fried).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate the various historical and topical forms of love poetry.
?Analyse selected lyrical texts by representative authors from various historical periods with regards to their cultural, philosophical and religious contexts.
?Analyse the complexity of the love-topos as a significant cultural phenomenon in German and European cultural history.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individually supervised seminar project work or essay (3000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GE2101 Integrated German Language Course

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (96 contact hours (small group teaching)).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: Development of communicative competence, acquisition of techniques for text production; extension of vocabulary; practical application of grammatical structures and acquisition of translation techniques.

Module Content: Students will discuss and produce texts in German, with additional oral practice. A selection of texts will be translated into German and English. All the materials for this module are designed to foster awareness of social and political issues in the German-speaking countries. Grammar classes will reinforce and deepen students' awareness of German linguistic structures. Students are expected to spend time on autonomous learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise and reproduce, orally and in writing, a range of vocabulary relating to topics studied during the year.
?Discuss topics, orally and in written form, using German language at the level B1/ B2 of the Common European Framework of reference for Languages.
?Produce a coherent and structured written text in German which shows appropriate grammatical accuracy for the students' level (B1/B2).
?Produce translations from German into English and English into German, recognising and applying grammatical structures studied during the year.
?Identify the key points of printed texts and audio texts at level B1/B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
?Construct and deliver a short presentation in German.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 1hr English-German translation 20 marks; 2 x 1hr grammar assessment 10 marks each; project with presentation 20 marks; written portfolio of 2 x 300 word home assignments plus homeworks 10 marks; contribution and participation 10 marks); Oral Assessment 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination; Attendance at lectures, which will be monitored by a formal class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (The Oral Examination must be retaken if failed. Students failing the portfolio and home assignment element of the Continuous Assessment must sit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department. Marks for attendance and participation are carried forward whether passed or failed.).

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GE2101S Integrated German Language Course

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48hr(s) Other (small group teaching).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: Development of communicative competence, acquisition of techniques for text production; extension of vocabulary; practical application of grammatical structures and acquisition of translation techniques

Module Content: Students will discuss and produce texts in German, with additional oral practice. A selection of texts will be translated into German and English. All the materials for this module are designed to foster awareness of social and political issues in the German speaking countries. Grammar classes will reinforce and deepen students' awareness of German linguistic structures. Students are expected to spend time on autonomous learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise and reproduce, orally and in writing, a range of vocabulary relating to topics studied during the year.
?Discuss topics , orally and in written form, using German language at CEFR level B1.2 / B2.1.
?Produce a coherent and structured written text in German which shows appropriate grammatical accuracy for CEFR level B1.2/B2.1.
?Produce translations from German into English and English into German, recognising and applying grammatical structures studied during the semester.
?Identify the key points of printed texts and audio texts at level B1.2/B2.1.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 40 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 1 hr English-German translation 20 marks; 1 x 1 hr grammar assessment 20 marks); Oral Assessment 20 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (The oral examination must be retaken if failed. Students failing any section of the Continuous Assessment must sit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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GE2102 Linguistics 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Module Objective: To instruct students in the process of analyzing and decoding meaning.

Module Content: An introduction to the some of the disciplines of modern linguistics with special reference to the German language. These disciplines include morphology, syntax, lexicology, phonetics, phonology, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, first and second language acquisition, and history of the language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recall and describe the basic terminology of linguistics;
?Explain the history of linguistics, the origin of language and its function;
?Identify linguistic fields;
?Apply the key concepts of morphology, syntax, semantics and phonology;
?Describe the main phonetic features of sounds;
?Explain sociolinguistic differences between Modern High German, various dialects and varieties;
?Compare various theories about how first and second languages are learned.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 in-class test worth 50 marks, and one 1000 word essay worth 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of continuous assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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GE2106 Cultural and Intercultural Learning for the Year Abroad - Theory and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Module Objective: The aim of this module is to prepare students for the Year Abroad culturally and interculturally, and help them identify their own learning goals in academic, linguistic, professional and personal terms. Students will receive input on concepts such as intercultural learning and intercultural competence, concepts on living and working abroad and engage closely with a cross-section of scholarly papers on the Year Abroad and ask how these publications are relevant to ttheir own learning. Students will have the opportunity to carry out a small-scale research project with other students on learning experiences on the Year Abroad.

Module Content: Living and working abroad from the perspective of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Year Abroad Studies, culture shock, strategies for reaching one's goals from educational psychology; Research methondology and interviews.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand the scholarly work on the Year Abroad and how it applies to students' own learning
?Identify Year Abroad Goals and have strategies prepared for reaching one's goals
?Learn how to carry out a small-scale research study (design; goals; implementation).
?Understand concepts such as Intercultural Learning and Intercultural Competence and their relevance to the Year Abroad.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Participation and engagement in class (20 marks); Written work 2,500-3,000 words (80 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) modified essay examination (in lieu of Continuous Assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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GE2113 Novelle und Kurzprosa

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nikolai Preuschoff, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nikolai Preuschoff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To explore and compare Novelle and Kurzgeschichte as typical forms of a dramatically-shaped kind of German narrative prose

Module Content: Students will be acquainted with the historical background (esp. Boccaccio's Decamerone) to the German novella tradition from the early 19th century inwards (e.g. Kleist's Die Marquise van O.) and be familiarised with the structural characteristics of these exciting texts, that typically centred (like dramas) around scandalous, provocative, eccentric, or disastrous examples of human fate. In the final part of the course we shall compare these with some examples of the 20th century Kurzgeschichte, which often show very similar aesthetic features, focusing their narration on unexpected and confounding, but always unsettling meaningful incidents

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Read and study German literary prose texts from different periods independently.
?Place the texts studied and discussed in class within the larger framework of German literary history.
?Recognise and describe the main features of the novella and short story.
?Apply basic narratological concepts to literary texts.
?Analyse the structure, characterisation and use of motifs and symbols in different examples of German short fiction.
?Discuss literary texts with peers using adequate literary terms.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (one seminar presentation (30) plus one essay (70)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently to pass the module. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GE2126 German Literature from 18th to 21st Century

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German; Prof Manfred Schewe, Department of German.

Module Objective: To provide a survey of the history of German literature from the 18th to the 21st Century.

Module Content: The most important periods of German literature will be investigated together with their historical and cultural background.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Distinguish the major periods of German history of literature from the 18th to the 21st Century.
?Discuss some of the most significant thoughts in German and European history of ideas since enlightenment.
?Analyse texts from selected authors representing these periods.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Written Homework).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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GE2130 Constructing and Deconstructing German National Identity: Key Texts in the Development, Expression and Modification of an Idea

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German.

Module Objective: To acquaint students with key theoretical texts on the phenomenon of Nationalism, and teach students to apply these theories to and think critically about those German texts (texts understood here in the broad sense) that contributed to a specifically German sense of national identity.

Module Content: Nationalism, it has been argued, is one of only a handful of major discourses that determine the ideological matrix in which modern human existence is embedded. This course will examine the phenomenon of nationalism in the context of Germany, a country with a perhaps uniquely troubled relationship with the concept of identity as determined by nationalist ideology, the troubled relationship serving to magnify tensions that are, of course, inherent in all.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the main contemporary theories of nationalism (primordialism, modernism, ethno-symbolism)
?Distinguish and evaluate different definitions of nation, nationalism, ethnicity, and other related concepts.
?Talk about key issues and difficulties in the field of nationalism studies.
?Discuss key stages in the genesis of a German sense of national identity.
?Apply theories of nationalism and relevant critical terminology to key texts involved in the development, dissemination, modification and criticism of ideas of German national identity.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay (excluding bibliography 50 marks; 1 x in-class presentation 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit essay, as prescribed by the department. Students failing the in-class presentation must take a ten-minute oral examination on their presentation topic).

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GE2131 German Business and Culture Today: Theory and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Module Objective: The primary aim of this module is to examine developments in the contemporary business environment within Germany. Students will gain knowledge of aspects of business practice and business approach in Germany and their ability to converse in German on business topics will be addressed. Time will be set aside for preparation of CVs for work placement applications in Germany or Austria.

Module Content: This module will integrate a number of different business themes to fulfil its objective including an analysis of selected companies as portrayed in German journals and the German media, and the theory and practice of negotiations. We will reflect on culturally appropriate behaviours and learn about negotiations from an Irish-German perspective. Moreover, students will carry out role-plays in German to simulate negotiations with German business partners, and these negotiations will be filmed. Peer-review and individual error-correction will play a role in the analysis of the negotiations. Media publications, academic literature, and languages for specific purposes will serve a a basis for knowledge.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?- Describe contemporary phenomena pertaining to German business practice and approach.
?- Converse in German on selected business topics, and in particular regarding negotiations.
?- Understand culturally appropriate behaviours in Irish-German business settings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks (1.5 hour Paper to be completed in the Winter Exams); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Attendance and Participation).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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GE2150 Memory and Identity in Contemporary Generational Narratives

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Barbara Siller, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Barbara Siller, Department of German.

Module Objective: To familiarise students with the concepts of memory and identity and to discuss how these concepts are applied to contemporary generational prose texts.

Module Content: Memory and identity are key issues in many contemporary German novels. They play a crucial role in the process of re-writing and configuring contents of collective memory through forms of "communicative memory", a term introduced by Jan Assmann in order to define autobiographical types of remembering. This individual form of remembering enables people to tell their personal history from their own perspective, to construct their identity accordingly, and to pass on their stories to the next generation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain key concepts of memory and identity.
?Critically analyse the representation of memory and identity in literary texts.
?Outline the characteristics of the genre `generational narrative? and evaluate its relevance in contemporary writing.
?Discuss how literary representations have an impact on memory and how they advance the 'collective memory'.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay (excluding bibliography) 50 marks; 1 x in-class presentation 40 marks, in-class participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit essay, as prescribed by the department. Students failing the in-class presentation must take a ten-minute oral examination on their presentation topic).

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GE2801 Integrated German Language Course for BComm Students

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (96 hrs small group teaching).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: Development of communicative competence; acquisition of techniques for text production; extension of vocabulary, including commercial/business terminology; acquisition of translation techniques.

Module Content: Students discuss and produce texts in German with additional oral practice. A selection of texts will be translated into German and into English. Students are instructed in the development of written and oral skills for commercial language and, in preparation for their year abroad, are expected to process information and make presentations. All the materials for this module are designed to foster awareness of social, political, and commercial issues in the German speaking countries. Grammar classes will reinforce and deepen students' awareness of German linguistic structures. Students are expected to spend time on autonomous learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise and reproduce, orally and in writing, a range of vocabulary (including commercial vocabulary) relating to topics studied during the year.
?Discuss topics, orally and in written form, using German language at level B1/ B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
?Produce a coherent and structured written text in German which shows appropriate grammatical accuracy for the students' level (B1/B2)
?Produce translations from German into English and English into German, recognising and applying grammatical structures studied during the year.
?Identify the key points of printed texts and audio texts at level B1/B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for languages.
?Construct and deliver a short presentation in German on a commercial topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 1hr English-German translation 20 marks; 2 x 1hr grammar assessment 10 marks each; project with presentation 20 marks; written portfolio of 2 x 300 word home assignments plus homeworks 10 marks; attendance & participation 10 mark); Oral Assessment 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination. Attendance at lectures, which will be monitored by a formal class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (including the Oral Examination which must be retaken if failed. Students failing the portfolio and home assignment element of the Continuous Assessment must sit an alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department. Marks for attendance and participation are carried forward, whether passed or failed.).

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GE2902 Political and Social Culture since 1945

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Hanna Bingel Jones, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Hanna Bingel Jones, Department of German.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of 20th Century history, culture and society in Germany.

Module Content: The aim of the seminar is to give students an overview of German history, culture and society after the Second World War, based on discussion of various literary and theoretical texts, media and film. The seminar will focus on aspects of life in divided Germany and the effects unification had on the lives of the people. The seminar is also designed to prepare students for their year abroad, not only by dealing with practical questions, but also by discussing cultural issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Reflect critically on the history of divided Germany after WW2.
?Explain the global context of Germany's political division in the period of "Cold War".
?Discuss the aspects of the political ideology of socialism in the GDR.
?Reflect and discuss the effects of the unification on Germany and the German culture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x in class assignment 40 marks, 1 x 1500-2000 word essay 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit an essay, as prescribed by the Department. Students failing the in-class presentation must take a ten minute oral examination on their presentation topic.).

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GE3101 Advanced Integrated German Language Course

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (96 contact hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: Advancement of communicative competence and translation skills through confrontation with more challenging texts; mastery of more complex aspects of German grammar.

Module Content: Oral and written treatment of more demanding texts. Students will develop their ability to express their ideas and arguments competently in both written and oral German. Students learn to produce idiomatic German translations of English texts and v.v. Students acquire proficiency in the more difficult grammatical structures of German.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Participate successfully and with reasonable fluency in conversations and discussions, in a native speaker environment, using a range of vocabulary relating to topics such as literature, current affairs, social issues, as well as everyday life.
?Discuss topics, orally and in written form (coherent texts and essays), using German language at level B2/C1 of the common European Framework of Reference for Languages, demonstrating grammatical accuracy at an appropriate level.
?Produce short translations from German into English and English into German, thereby demonstrating recognition of and an ability to apply grammatical structures studied during the year.
?Understand and apply advanced German Grammar rules in all areas of the Language Module and master theses.
?Construct and give a short presentation, demonstrating the ability to talk relatively freely and confidently and to answer questions afterwards.
?Describe and discuss items related to general culture, social, historical and current issues of German speaking countries, with a particular emphasis on Germany itself.
?Identify the key points of printed texts and audio texts at level B2/C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 1hr English-German translation 20 marks; 2 x 1hr Grammar assessment 10 marks each; project with presentation 20 marks; homework assignments 10 marks; attendance & participation 10 marks.); Oral Assessment 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination; Attendance at lectures, which will be monitored by a formal class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (The oral examination must be repeated if failed. Students failing the graded homework element of Continuous Assessment must sit alternative assessment as prescribed by the Department. Marks for Attendance and participation are carried forward whether passed or failed.).

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GE3103 Linguistik II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): GE2102

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Ditte Bellettre, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German; Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German; Ms Ditte Bellettre, Department of German.

Module Objective: The module offers an introduction to the theory and application of German syntax and text formation.

Module Content: Introduction to basic models of grammar theory. The analysis of German sentences (basic sentence patterns) and texts from the point of view of grammatical functions. The analysis of German sentences (basic German sentence patterns) from the point of view of syntactic functions. The realisation of syntactic functions through words, phrases, clauses.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Distinguish between basic models of grammar theory.
?Understand the concept of the 'valency' of the verb.
?Differentiate between the various complements and adverbials ('Satzglieder') in a German sentence.
?Identify whether these 'Satzglieder' are obligatory, optional-obligatory or free in the context of a given sentence, applying the 'valency' concept.
?Identify and name the syntactic functions of 'Satzglieder' in sentences and texts.
?Identify the various types of 'Adverbialsaetze' in the German language.
?Analyse structural patterns of text construction and rhetoric.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x in-class test).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed continuous assessment must be repeated.

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GE3108 Teaching German as a Foreign Language

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German (and Siobhan Mortell, Department of German).

Lecturer(s): Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German; Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Module Objective: To introduce students opting for a language teaching career to the main concepts of Teaching German as a Foreign Language (DaF); lay foundations for starting out in language teaching.

Module Content: Initially the students will reflect on foreign language learning experiences during their three years of university study as well as previous school study. Students will then be introduced to core aspects of the theory and practice of Teaching German as a Foreign Language (DaF) and will analyse and apply different concepts / methods of teaching and learning in the areas of language, literature and culture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the main issues involved in core areas of teaching German as a foreign language;
?Identify and discuss different didactic concepts of foreign language teaching;
?Demonstrate awareness of how languages are learned and how this influences the practice of teaching;
?Analyse textbooks and teaching materials used for teaching German as a foreign language;
?Develop a coherent and practicable class plan for a given topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x c. 2,500 word essay 40 marks; 1 x Seminar Presentation [c. 15 minutes] 40 marks; attendance and participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department). (Marks for attendance and participation are carried forward, whether passed or failed.).

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GE3126 German Film in Focus: A Thematic Approach

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Films shown separately).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German; Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German; Dr Nikolai Preuschoff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To investigate the history of German Film.

Module Content: This module is designed to explore the major currents in German film as reflected in its themes and aesthetics. It gives an introduction to film theory and will focus on selected exemplary films. The seminar will center around analysis and discussion; the films will be shown separately.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Place selected German films within their film-historical and socio-historical contexts.
?Identify basic aspects of film style, film genre and film narrative.
?Analyse, orally and in written form, the theories advanced in selected writings on film.
?Discuss, orally and in written form, film and film-related texts using appropriate literary and film-related terminology and theoretical concepts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay (excluding bibliography) 50 marks; 1 x in class presentation 50 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit an essay, as prescribed by the Department. Students failing the in-class presentation must take a ten minute oral examination on their presentation topic.).

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GE3137 Interpreting Heinrich von Kleist's Prose Fiction

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German.

Module Objective: To develop the students' ability to situate their reading of a literary text in the broader field of literary interpretation.

Module Content: Heinrich von Kleist (1777-1811), although writing in the so-called Romantic period, produced a body of work that is curiously modern (if not post-modern) in its approach to meaning. In this seminar we will be examining through the close reading of some of Kleist's shorter prose texts (key essays and short stories), how his works generate so many different meanings and, at the same time, disrupt the interpretation process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the main prose works of Heinrich von Kleist in terms of their structure, and reflect on the implications of any structural peculiarities for the hermeneutic process.
?Identify the main"schools" of Kleist interpretation, and how they have approached Kleist's works.
?Explain why Kleist's texts have been interpreted in such radically different ways.
?Identify and evaluate the epistemological implications of texts that are so interpretatively open, and suggest what such texts achieve aesthetically and philosophically.
?Argue the merits of the thesis that Kleist's texts are deliberately designed as "reading generators", conceived to elicit different and potentially mutually contradictory positions in the reader, a literary version of Reader Response Theory.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay (excluding bibliography (50 marks); 1 x in-class presentation 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit essay, as prescribed by the Department. Students failing the in-class presentation must take a ten minute oral examination on their presentation topic).

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GE3139 Historical Connections: German-Irish Relations from the Past to the Present

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20 ((Please note the maximum numbers)).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Module Objective: To increase knowledge in the area of German-Irish Relations from a number of disciplinary perspectives and angles

Module Content: German-Irish relations will include the discussion of long-term historical connections, identify individuals who were instrumental in forming meaningful associations and examine links and relations in contemporary socio-political contexts. An array of texts crossing history, literature, the media and including travel reports and selected films / film excerpts will be used to discuss German-Irish relations in the past.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?- Relate key events and developments shaping contemporary German-Irish Relations
?- Discuss historical events and key persona
?- Reflect on their own mobility and experiences in Germany.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay [60 marks] (2,500-3,000 words); Bibliography and Commentary on Sources [20 Marks] (350-500 words); Attendance and active Participation in Class [20 Marks]).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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GE3142 Nietzsche fur Alle und Keinen: The Philosopher as Artist.

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Module Objective: To investigate and discuss Nietzsche's writings. To examine critically some of his key ideas and understand their impact on current art and literature.

Module Content: Nietzsche dedicated his magnum opus Also sprach Zarathustra to "all and none". His expectation was that everybody would be reached by Zarathustra's "halcyonian" (calm) tone, but only very few, or none, would also be able to respond to it in a congenial way.
As a philosopher Nietzsche was simultaneously writer and performance artist. He presented his philosophy as a public and theatre-like "arts of transfiguration", but also as a radically exclusive "art for artists, only for artists". Our seminar will try to make Nietzsche accessible to all - at least to all those who are willing to practice their thought as if it would be an artistic performance - through the close reading of some of his key texts, such as Die Geburt der Tragodie, Also sprach Zarathustra, and Ecce Homo.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Develop ideas of Nietzschean provenance.
?Reflect critically on Nietzsche's influence on 20th century's intellectual discourse.
?Discuss, analyse and interpret selected texts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmit Continuous Assessment (whether passed or failed).

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GE3145 Performative Approaches to German Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Manfred Schewe, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Prof Manfred Schewe, Department of German.

Module Objective: This workshop-based module aims to explore a range of active and interactive approaches to the teaching and learning of literature.

Module Content: Students will experience how holistic learning methodologies, in particular that of drama in education, can be applied to the study of literary texts from different genres and epochs, including 21st century material. The work will culminate in a small scale performance project involving the participants in the careful planning and rehearsing of a collage of scenes selected from the literary texts studied in more detail as part of this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Read and understand German literary texts from different epochs and genres.
?Discuss these texts with peers using adequate genre specific terminology.
?Identify aesthetic characteristics of selected literary texts and make informed choices in relation to a text's suitability for performance.
?Perform texts by making appropriate use of vocal and facial expression, gesture and movement.
?Critically evaluate their own experiences with performative approaches to literary texts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Course Record Assignment 30 marks; one practical assignment 50 marks; participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: A student failing the Course Record Assignment must sit a 1hr supplemental paper. A student failing the Practical Assignment must sit a 1.5 hr supplemental paper.

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GE3150 Living Rooms, Houses, Woods, Rivers, Villages and Cities: Fiction and Topographies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Barbara Siller, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Barbara Siller, Department of German.

Module Objective: To acquaint students with literary topographies and their relevance for the interpretation of texts.

Module Content: Since the 1980s space has played a crucial role in many disciplines, such as politics, sociology, psychology, cultural studies and arts. The perception of space as an abstract concept has been replaced by the proposition of space as a concrete and transformative term. Thus, space does change in line with historical, political or sociological events and should be seen in relation to collective memories, to human actions and human awareness. Literature offers an outstanding medium where space can be described, narrated, remembered, altered, or (re)created. Using literary examples we will examine the representation of spaces in order to expand our understanding of narrative texts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the key concepts of spatial studies within the discipline of cultural and literary studies.
?Critically analyse the representation, the function and the symbolic character of spaces in literature.
?Outline the relation between space and characters, space and time, space and discourse.
?Discuss the possibilities of space representation in German fiction.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay (excluding bibliography) 50 marks; 1 x in-class presentation 40 marks, in-class participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit essay, as prescribed by the department. Students failing the in-class presentation must take a ten minute oral examination on their presentation topic.).

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GE3151 Loneliness with a Trilling 'R': Migration, Multilingualism and Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Barbara Siller, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Barbara Siller, Department of German.

Module Objective: To acquaint students with selected prose and poetry texts portraying experiences of migration with a particular focus on the phenomenon of heteroglossia.

Module Content: Migration and multilingualism is not a new theme within contemporary German literature (we could think of historical examples such as Heinrich Heine, Paul Celan or Elias Canetti), but it is a phenomenon which grows significantly more important within the postmodern globalized world. Students of this module will study how German literature offers many outstanding examples of transcultural texts written by authors who are biographically rooted in multiple languages and who reflect on topics such as territorial displacement, multilingualism, identities and alterities, longing and belonging. Creative productivity of selected authors often derives from living outside the sphere of their mother tongue, while their displaced existence enriches their writing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline core concepts in the context of migration and multilingualism.
?Analyse the complex formal structures and modes of narrating and identify typical motifs of transcultural texts.
?Critically discuss the impact of multilingualism and topographical displacement on contemporary literary writing in German.
?Demonstrate skills of reading theoretical and literary texts within their context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment 100 marks: 1 x 2,500 word essay (excluding bibliography) 50 marks; 1 x in-class presentation 40 marks, in-class participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit essay, as prescribed by the department. Students failing the in-class presentation must take a ten minute oral examination on their presentation topic.).

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GE3309 German Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2. (Placement course work is to be submitted before the end of July).

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 4.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE3310

Teaching Method(s): Other (Min 20 week(s) work placement in a business workplace in Germany or Austria).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German, and Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to business work environments in Germany.

Module Content: Each student will be required to undertake a minimum 20 weeks work placement. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a work placement supervisor in the external organisation. Students will be expected to keep a bi-weekly learning journal and complete a self-assessment essay. Please note that a letter from the workplace mentor must be submitted with the Work Placement report denoting the period and length of the placement and detailing the duties carried out by the student.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Administer their own work and carry out essential organisational responsibilities.
?Interact, in German, in the workplace using appropriate linguistic registers - at both oral and written levels.
?Apply interpersonal skills effectively in their work through the target language.
?Link theory and practice by providing practical experience of work to reinforce and complement the academic components of the BComm International (German).
?Develop and exercise thinking in a practical, hands-on setting.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Students must complete a Learning Journal with ten journal entries [200 marks] and a Work Placement Report [200 marks] (minimum 3,000 words, maximum 4,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. A 20 weeks minimum work placement and satisfactory attendance. A minimum of 30 hours per week, ideally on site at the place of work.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed aspects of continuous assessment must be re-submitted.

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GE3310 German Work Placement Oral Presentation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2. (Assessment for TP1 in December or January. Assessment for TP2 in June or July).

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 4.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GE3309 (German Work Placement)

Teaching Method(s): Other (min of 20 weeks workplacement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German, and Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Module Objective: To enable students to present a reflected and personal appraisal of their work experience in Germany.

Module Content: An oral presentation in the presence of academic mentor(s) in UCC, to take place following the work placement in the German organisation (GE3309).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Communicate the work placement experience in an oral presentation in German.
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement.
?Assess their host company and report on the activities of this company in German.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Oral Assessment 200 marks (Oral Assessment 200 marks with 1 x 20 minute presentation and discussion).

Compulsory Elements: Oral Examination. An award of zero will be recorded if no presentation is made.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed aspects of continuous assessment must be re-submitted.

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GE3801 Advanced Integrated German Language Course for BComm Students

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 96 x 1hr(s) Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: Building on their year abroad, students further develop linguistic skills with increased emphasis on Business German language.

Module Content: Oral and written treatment of more demanding texts. Students will develop their ability to express their ideas and arguments competently in both written and oral German. Students learn to produce idiomatic English translations of German texts and v.v. Students acquire proficiency in the more difficult grammatical structures of German.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Participate successfully and with reasonable fluency in conversations and discussions, in a native speaker environment, using a range of vocabulary relating to topics such as literature, current affairs, social issues, as well as everyday life.
?Discuss topics, orally and in written form (coherent texts and essays), using German language at level B2/C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, demonstrating grammatical accuracy at an appropriate level.
?Produce short translations from German into English and English into German, demonstrating recognition of and an ability to apply grammatical structures studied during the year.
?Identify the key points of printed and audio texts at level B2/C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
?Construct and give a short presentation, demonstrating an ability to speak relatively freely and confidently and answer questions afterwards.
?Describe and discuss items related to general culture, social, historical and current issues of German speaking countries.
?Apply advanced German grammar rules in all areas of the language module and master these.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (Project with presentation 20 marks; 2 x 1hr grammar assessments 20 marks; 1 x 1hr translation English-German; Homework assignments 10 marks, attendance & participation 10 marks); Oral Assessment 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination. Attendance at lectures, which will be monitored by a formal class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students who are absent from more than 20% of classes may be excluded from examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (The oral examination must be repeated if failed. Students failing the graded homework element of Continuous Assessment must sit alternative assessment as prescribed by the Department. Marks for Attendance and participation are carried forward whether passed or failed.).

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GE3807 Commercial Language: German

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Siobhan Mortell, Department of German.

Module Objective: Building on their year abroad, students further develop linguistic skills with emphasis on business German.

Module Content: Oral and written treatment of more demanding texts on commercial topics. Students will develop their ability to express their ideas and arguments competently in both written and oral German. Students improve their business/commerce related vocabulary by reading and discussing more complex business texts in German.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Participate successfully and with reasonable fluency in conversations and discussions of a business nature and in a native speaker environment, using a range of vocabulary relating to commercial topics.
?Discuss commercial topics, orally and in written form, using German language at level B2/C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
?Identify the key points of printed texts from a business source at level B2/C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
?Construct and conduct short presentations on commercial topics.
?Develop an application dossier (including a CV, letter of application and possible questions and answers) for a specific job advertisement of their choice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (in class test 30 marks, presentation 40 marks, portfolio 20 marks, attendance & participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GE3901 Advanced Integrated Language Course

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: For all Final Year BCL German Students.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 96 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Ms Christine Bremer, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: Building on their year abroad, students further develop linguistic skills with increased emphasis on legal German.

Module Content: Oral and written treatment of more demanding texts (including more advanced legal texts). Students will develop their ability to express their ideas and arguments competently in both written and oral German. Students learn to produce idiomatic English translations of German texts, and are introduced to legal translations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Participate successfully and with resonable fluency in coversations and discussions, ina a native speaker environment, using a range of vocabulary relating to topics on subject areas such as literature, current affairs, social issues as well as legal topics.
?Discuss topics, orally and in written form, using German language at the lower end of level C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for languages.
?Produce a coherent, structured and grammatically accurate essay in German.
?Produce translations of ca. 250-300 words from German into English and English into German (without the help of a dictionary and within a set time frame), thereby demonstrating recognition of and an ability to apply grammatical structures studied during the year.
?Identify the key points of printed texts (including texts on legal topics) and audio texts att he lower end of level C1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.
?Construct short presentations, demonstrating an understanding of different aspects of the cultures of the German speaking countries.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 1hr German-English translation 20 marks; 1 x 1hr Legal Language Assessment 20 marks; 1 x 1hr Essay 20 marks; project with presentation 20); Oral Assessment 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing Continuous Assessment must sit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department. The Oral Examination must be retaken, if failed).

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GE3902 Language and Interpretation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German; Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To integrate the understanding gained from the language and the law streams of this degree programme.

Module Content: Students work on the theory of interpretation, or the study of acts of mediation, exposition or elucidation of meaning. More particularly, students engage with a range of contemporary treatments of the disjunction between truthfulness and meaning, as it bears on legal discourse, among other uses of language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the problems of language and interpretation under the theoretical viewpoint of hermeneutics.
?Explain Hans-Georg Gadamer's theoretical concept of the "hermeneutic circle", as a structural tool of the process of linguistic interpretation.
?Understand the basic ideas of the de-constructive approach to language, law, and literature.
?Develop critical ideas about the relationship of law and literature.
?Draw and conceive a critical image of the lawyer as an 'intellectual' and his/her responsibility for the legal and ethical culture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (One 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmit Continuous Assessment (whether passed or failed).

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GE3904 The Double Face of Germany: Representing the Holocaust

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the discourse on the problems of Holocaust representations in Germany and on the international stage.

Module Content: We shall study core texts of the post-war Holocaust debate and examine particular examples of German (and international) literature and film representing the Shoah and discussing German ways of confronting it.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the historical facts of the Holocaust in the context of national-socialist politics and ideology.
?Discuss critically historical and philosophical attempts to conceive the Holocaust.
?Analyse critically filmic and literary representations of the Holocaust.
?Assess the meaning of the ongoing Holocaust discussion for contemporary societies in Germany and elsewhere.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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GE4002 Introduction to Translation Theory and Industry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 17.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Marina Durnin, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to translation theories and to the technologies employed within the translation industry. The translation aids used in the industry will be applied in the course.

Module Content: Students will be given an overview of the main theories of translation and their development, focusing mainly on linguistic and functional approaches to translation, the cultural turn in Translation Studies, and translation in the digital age which includes crowdsourcing, machine translation and localization. Students will also learn about relevant technologies with a particular focus on translation memory systems. The practical application of the technology will allow students to reflect on the advantages and limitations of computer-assisted translation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?recall and define the core theories and concepts of translation;
?compare different approaches to translation;
?critically discuss the pros and cons of typical translation aids used in the translation process;
?utilise a translation aid.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,700 word practical assignment 50 marks; 1 x 2,000-2,500 word essay (excluding bibliography) 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GE5013 Translation Project (German)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LL6018

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Tutorials); 6 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Manfred Schewe, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To develop advanced translation skills between German and English, focusing on translation into the L1.

Module Content: The module will prepare students to translate a 1,500-word text of their choice from German to English or English to German, drawing on appropriate theories, methodologies and approaches to the translation of different text-type and genres, encouraging them to reflect on issues such as target audience and function and to use a range of translation resources. Students will be expected to agree a project with their tutor, for which they will translate a text from German to English or English to German and provide commentary on the text, in the form of annotations, where appropriate, and in a separate analytical essay in English.* Periodical tutorial and/or seminar support will be provided.

*Students will normally be expected to translate into their first language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the main areas of debate in the analysis and practice of translation
?Understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to the analysis and practice of translation
?Show awareness of key differences between the two linguistic systems
?Produce a critical translation from German into English or English to German (see above)
?Present written translations in a professional manner.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Translation Project (1500 words translation + 1500 words commentary)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GE6001 Dissertation in Comparative Aesthetics and the Arts

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Individual Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To analyse and critically discuss an approved topic in detail.

Module Content: A dissertation written under the supervision of a staff member on an approved topic.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Engage in original research;
?Develop individual research strategies and produce critical bibliographies;
?Identify and utilise major interpretive and argumentative strategies;
?Analyse and criticise relevant positions and approaches on an academic level appropriate to postgraduate research;
?Demonstrate ability to write critically, logically and systematically, using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research;
?Argue for an original position on an advanced level of critical reflection.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (3 copies of typed dissertation (max 15,000 words) to be submitted by the first Friday in October).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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GE6003 Ut pictura poiesis: Literature and the Visual Arts

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus self-directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gert Hofmann, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To explore the history and theory of the artistic, aesthetic, and rhetoric dialogue between literature and the visual arts in a series of paradigmatic case studies.

Module Content: The encounter of visual image and language catalyses literary as well as artistic imagination; it yields hybrid aesthetic structures of textual gesture, performance and theatre. It further engenders philosophical reflections on status and importance of specific literary and visual art forms within the hierarchies of their interrelationship. Such reflections give evidence of the all encompassing reach of the aesthetic world view at various stages of our cultural history. Our studies comprise authors and artists such as: Ovidius' "Pygmalion" and "Narcissus"; his influence on Goethe's "Roman Elegies"; Lessing's "Laokoon" and Winckelmann's descriptions of classical Greek works of art; paintings and sculptures in Wilhelm Heinse's infamous erotic novel "Ardinghello"; Raphaels Transfiguration: the literary history of a painting (from Visari to Nietzsche); visual art and aesthetics of despair in Dostoevsky's "The Idiot"; Rilke's perception of Rodin and Cezanne; Sigmund Freud, "Moses of Michelangelo"; Walter Benjamin on the problem of art criticism; Gilles Deleuze, "Francis Bacon. Logic of Sensation".

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Reproduce core ideas of major aesthetic theories.
?Reflect critically on the relationship of textual and visual art.
?Discuss selected works of art which integrate both textual and visual elements.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (One in-class presentation 80 marks; one essay 3,000 words, 120 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Regular attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (The mark for the in-class presentation will be carried forward.), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ( Essay must be revised and resubmitted as prescribed by the Module coordinator.).

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GE6005 Translation Project (German)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LL6018

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Tutorials); 6 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Manfred Schewe, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To develop advanced translation skills between German and English, focusing on translation into the L1.

Module Content: The module will prepare students to translate a 1,500-word text of their choice from German to English or English to German, drawing on appropriate theories, methodologies and approaches to the translation of different text-type and genres, encouraging them to reflect on issues such as target audience and function and to use a range of translation resources. Students will be expected to agree a project with their tutor, for which they will translate a text from German to English or English to German and provide commentary on the text, in the form of annotations, where appropriate, and in a separate analytical essay in English.* Periodical tutorial and/or seminar support will be provided.

*Students will normally be expected to translate into their first language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the main areas of debate in the analysis and practice of translation
?Understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to the analysis and practice of translation
?Analyse and describe the different parameters which constitute a text's translatability
?Show competence in the use of a variety of translation resources
?Show awareness of key differences between the two linguistic systems
?Produce a critical translation from German into English or English to German (see above)
?Present written translations in a professional manner.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Translation Project (1500 words translation + 2500 words commentary)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GE6009 Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (and self-directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire O'Reilly, Department of German.

Module Objective: This course will examine key theoretical concepts underpinning the academic study of Intercultural Communication. Knowledge is rooted predominantly within German(-language) academic discourse. Students will apply this knowledge to a research project examining aspects of Intercultural Communication in an applied setting.

Module Content: Theories of Intercultural Communication and the processes associated with gaining intercultural understanding and intercultural competence will be examined from an interdisciplinary perspective; possibilities for the examination of these issues in qualitative research projects are encouraged.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?assess selected theories and concepts of ICC within a German academic discourse/context;
?criticise contemporary societal developments in light of selected concepts and theories;
?apply these concepts within a research project related to the study of Intercultural Communication or,
?apply these concepts via the theoretical exploration of a related subject in the field of Intercultural Communication.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 100 marks; (Presentation/case study/small empirical study) 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by module coordinator).

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GE6014 German-English-German Translation: Methods and Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 16 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Directed Study).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Ditte Bellettre, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of German.

Module Objective: To develop and improve advanced practical translation skills in both translation into English from German source texts and translation into German from English source texts. To apply translation key concepts in finding informed solutions and comment on these.

Module Content: This is a team-taught module which will prepare students to translate different text types and genres from source into target language (German ? English; English ? German) and comment in detail on translation choices while employing translation theory and concepts studied in different modules of LL6018. The development of translation skills into English, the students' first language, will be based on the reading of selected chapters from Hervey, Loughridge, Higgins: Thinking German translation. For the translation into German which is not the students' first language linguistic key issues will be revised in order to support translation skill acquisition. All text materials correspond to an advanced postgraduate level.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a variety of text genres and show awareness of the translation strategies specific to the genre.
?Show awareness of key differences between the two linguistic systems
?Produce draft translations into the two target languages and comment on translation choices; discuss and correct submitted translation drafts and re-submit a final corrected version of same.
?Make use of a variety of translation resources.
?Gain confidence and a certain routine in approaching a given text and employing translation strategies with a view to producing a professional translation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Submission of 6 commented translation drafts (each worth 33.3%) and corrected and revised versions at the end of module; 2 German-English;4 English-German.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Long term illness (medically certified) preventing attendance of a minimum of 80%. Repeat of all elements of the assessment i.e. 6 parts.).

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GE6015 Dissertation in Languages and Cultures (German)

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Manfred Schewe, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To carry out a sustained research project on an original topic in the field; to develop research skills, critical thinking, and the identification of appropriate methodologies and presentation of findings in the form of a dissertation.

Module Content: Under the academic guidance of staff, students will independently explore a specialised area from among the areas of applied linguistics, visual art, media, theatre, film, cultural history or pedagogies of language teaching within German Studies, apply the appropriate research methodologies and present the results in a minor dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate an ability to conduct guided individual research at an appropriate level;
?Conceptualize and execute a sustained, specialized research project;
?Develop individual research strategies and produce critical bibliographies;
?Explain major interpretive strategies of the texts in question;
?Display an independent approach to critical analysis and evaluation;
?Write critically using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research;
?Identify an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework consistent with their area of study;
?Present their work in a minor dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Research Dissertation 15,000 - 20,000 words).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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GE6020 Questions of Adaptation and Adoption: Re-Writings/Re-Viewings/Re-Readings

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars ( 24 hrs independent reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German.

Lecturer(s): Dr Rachel Magshamhrain, Department of German; Staff, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the burgeoning field of adaptation studies (also known as comparative adaptation theory) as a sub-discipline of comparative literature, and to apply existing scholarship in this field and its critical apparatus to a selection of literary, film and graphic texts. Students will gain a critical understanding of the "transmigration of ideas" across time, cultural, social, political and geographical boundaries, as well as back and forth across media. Relatedly, students will also be able to identify and apply the main principles of intertextual criticism.

Module Content: In this module, students will analyse a selection of primary literary, graphic and film texts, tracing their di- and con-verging approaches to 7 broad and often overlapping core storylines, plots or ideas: the creation plot; the family plot; the (unrequited) love story; the revenge plot; the tale of the outsider/upstart; the crime plot; the righting of wrongs / (social) crusader / saviour plot. Students will reflect on whether and how the specificities of different cultures and the media chosen alter how these core storylines are presented, and also, diachronically, examine whether and to what extent concerns of different periods cause changes in these seemingly perennial concerns.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify core critical positions, concerns and issues in the field of adaptation theory, applying this to new texts and 'throughlines' not dealt with in class
?Engage in original and independent research in the field of adaptation theory, including compiling bibliographies
?Produce independently-researched academic texts on the subject that are critical, innovative, and adhere to the accepted standards for academic thought and writing at postgraduate level.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ( 3,000 -4,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment (Project).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated and resubmitted as prescribed by the Module coordinator.).

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