Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

DH1001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities I
DH1002 Digital Tools and Methodologies 1
DH1003 Introduction to Student Learning in the Digital Age
DH2001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities II
DH2002 Digital Tools and Methodologies II
DH2003 Concepts and Collaboration I
DH2005 Research, Analysis and Knowledge Creation in the Digital Age
DH2006 Digital Curation
DH3001 Concepts and Collaboration II
DH3002 Tools and Methodologies II
DH3003 Work Placement
DH4001 Research Seminar
DH4002 Research Methods
DH4003 Research Project
DH6001 Communities of Practice in Digital Scholarship
DH6003 Digital Humanities Institute
DH6004 Conceptual Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities
DH6005 History and Theory of Digital Arts
DH6006 Teaching and Learning in Digital Humanities
DH6007 Models, Simulations and Games
DH6010 Humanities and New Technologies: Tools and Methodologies
DH6012 Editing Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences
DH6013 Getting Started with Graduate Research and Generic Skills
DH6014 Digital Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Science
DH6016 Digital Humanities Institute
DH6018 History and Theory of Digital Arts
DH6022 Communities of Practice in Digital Scholarship
DH6023 Conceptual Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities
DH6024 Humanities and New Technologies: Tools and Methodologies
DH6026 Principles of Game Design
DH6028 Narrative and System Design
DH6029 Digital Cultures Dissertation
DH6031 Game User Research
DH6032 Communities of Practice in Digital Scholarship
DH6033 Conceptual Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities
DH6034 Humanities and New Technologies: Tools and Methodologies
DH6035 Digital Arts and Humanities Dissertation
DH6103 Digital Humanities Institute
DH6104 Conceptual Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities
DH6105 History and Theory of Digital Arts
DH6106 Teaching and Learning in Digital Humanities
DH6107 Models, Simulations and Games
DH6110 Humanities and New Technologies: Tools and Methodologies
DH7009 Digital Humanities Institute
DH7010 Research Colloquium
DH7011 Digital Humanities Institute
DH7012 Industrial/Research Institute Placement
DH7013 Digital Humanities Institute
DH7014 Research Colloquium

DH1001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Module Objective: Introduce basic core concepts in Digital Humanities and lay foundations for collaboration in DH work and further digital scholarship.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital humanities history and theory. It will lay the foundations for subsequent modules by introducing students to a variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital humanities practice. Students will explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the changing nature of scholarship, on communities of practice, peer review, collaboration and "critical friends". The changing nature of academic debate and the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work and topics such as digital rights management, licensing and copyright will be introduced. Students will engage with local, national and international networks, and begin to explore the creation of a digital "presence".

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create a personal portfolio of critical digital writing comprising a range of media, including text, video and mixed media
?Collaborate to create a team web artifact (website, journal, video, map, or other tool as agreed with teaching team)
?Recognise the broad extent of conceptual issues in the field
?Explain the rationale behind practices like blogging, open access publishing, distant reading and visualization
?Explore issues in knowledge representation
?Focus on the creation of new knowledge environments
?Demonstrate knowledge of some of the major debates in digital humanities
?Participate in the collaborative nature of digital humanities
?Participate in active discussion on issues in DH within the class and in the broader DH community.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individual portfolio of reflective digital critical writing (30 marks); team digital artifact creation (30 marks); Presentation on new knowledge environments (15 marks); Active creation and participation in virtual and social networks (15 marks); participation, engagement and contribution in all media, and face to face (10 marks). Equivalent to about 4,000 words in total).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Continuous Assessment.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH1002 Digital Tools and Methodologies 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: Introduction to key tools and methods in Digital Humanities.

Module Content: Students will be introduced to some of the key tools and practices which support the creation of digital artefacts and collaborative scholarly work in the Digital Humanities. Students will explore the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work, focusing on Data Capture, Data Structuring and Enhancement, Data Analysis, Data Visualisation, Data Publishing and Dissemination using a variety of standards. A range of other tools will be introduced and explored in lecture and in hands-on seminars.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create a digital text
?Create a website
?Create a database
?Model a digital artifact as part of a team
?Demonstrate awareness of the range of tools and methods in contemporary DAH
?Show awareness of how technology choices affect research
?Demonstrate ability to capture sources in core standard formats
?Demonstrate basic ability to analyze and query digital data collections.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work to include an element of group work, individual work and creation of digital outputs: Creation of a digital text within a website (20 marks), creation of a database (20 marks), modelling a digital artifact as part of a team (30 marks), presentation on a key concept for DAH tools and methods (10 marks), active creation and participation in virtual and social networks (10 marks), participation, engagement and contribution in all media, and face to face (10 marks) (equivalent to about 4,000 words.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Continuous Assessment.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH1003 Introduction to Student Learning in the Digital Age

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: Introduce new modes of student-centred, active, research based learning.

Module Content: Introduce students to the idea of student centred, constructivist, research-led learning by surveying reading and examples of practice in the area, based on writers from John Dewey through Schon, Shulman and Bandura to D.R. Garrison, John Seely Brown, Graham Atwell and contemporary work on self-regulated and self-directed learning, exploring student learning goals and needs and engaging in active research and reflection on their own learning process to developing learning journals, reflective learning portfolios and, personal learning plans.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate awareness of some currents trends in online learning;
?Demonstrate familiarity with contemporary tools for digital research and learning;
?Reflect critically on online learning and their role in it;
?Relate their own views and learning needs to the emerging practices in online learning;
?Create a personal skills inventory and develop a personal learning plan to maintain currency and develop new skills and abilities;
?Apply contemporary digital tools to managing their own learning individually and in collaborative work.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work demonstrating active participation in virtual and social networks (10 Marks), ability to locate and evaluate information (10 marks), ability to analyse sources (10 marks) ability to map the extent of discussions and debates (10 Marks), ability to synthesise knowledge (20 marks) ability to plan delivery of knowledge across a range of media (10 marks), ability to produce material which deliver knowledge using both traditional and digital tools (20 marks), create personal learning and research plans(10 marks) equivalent to about 4,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH2001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Module Objective: Developing from the first year module; addressing more advanced conceptual issues. Critical Theories of Digital Humanities, Openess, Access and Privacy

Module Content: This module will further develop students' understanding of a range of theoretical and conceptual views on a variety of issues of concern in contemporary Digital Humanities practice. Students will further explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the contested nature of scholarship, the changing nature of academic debate and the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a high level of digital literacy
?Write digitally literate responses to key conceptual issues for digital research
?Show a sophisticated understanding of social media practice in research and scholarship
?Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary critical debates in the field based on critical readings and discussion of recent writings by leading figures
?Create, lead and participate in new knowledge networks.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (-Digital literacy artifact (single or multimodal, a practical response to a key issue) (20 marks) -Website focusing on a key concept (single or multimodal) (20 marks) -Online literature review of social media (20 marks) -Presentation on a key concept in DAH and a contested view (20 marks) -Active creation and participation in virtual and social networks (10 marks) -Participation, engagement and contribution in all media, and face to face (10 marks) Assessment in total equivalent to about 5,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH2002 Digital Tools and Methodologies II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: Develop wider knowledge of a range of digital tools and methods.

Module Content: This module will develop student knowledge of core standards and tools used in the Digital Humanities, and explore a range of additional tools for data capture, enhancement, analysis, visualisation and presentation across a range of media. Methodologies for managing digital projects, and issues of sustainability will be introduced and addressed

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create a range of digital objects in a variety of media
?Hack traditional methods creating new forms of engagement
?Fix given problems in teams
?Demonstrate ability to capture more complex sources using advanced techniques in standard formats.
?Present digital data in an appropriate range of formats - text corpus, ebooks, database, visualizations and others for public access
?Articulate how technology choices affect research
?Demonstrate ability to analyze and query digital data collections using standard tools and methods.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Create a digital object from within their research area (30 marks) Create a well formed document (20 marks) Create a well formed database (20 marks) Presentation on data visualization for research (10 marks) Active creation and participation in virtual and social networks (10 marks) Participation, engagement and contribution in all media, and face to face (10 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH2003 Concepts and Collaboration I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Murphy, School of English; Staff, College of Accss.

Module Objective: Introduce basic core concepts in digital arts and humanities, lay foundations for collaboration in digital arts and humanities work

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital arts and humanities history, and theory. It will lay the foundations for subsequent modules by introducing students to a variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital arts and humanities practice. Students will explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the changing nature of scholarship, on communities of practice, peer review, collaboration and "critical friends". Foundational texts and projects such as the Digital Humanities Manifesto, the Day of Digital Humanities, and surveys such the Debates in Digital Humanities and the Companion to Digital Humanities will provide a foundation for exploring the range of contemporary perspectives on Digital Humanities as a collaborative academic project. The changing nature of academic debate and the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work and topics such as digital rights management, licensing and copyright will be introduced. Students will engage with local, national and international networks, and begin to explore the creation of a a digital "presence"

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create a personal portfolio of critical digital writing comprising a range of media, including text, video and mixed media
?Collaborate to create a team web artifact (website, journal, video, map, or other tool as agreed with teaching team)
?Recognise the broad extent of conceptual issues in the field
?Explain the rationale behind practices like blogging, open access publishing, distant reading and visualization
?Explore issues in knowledge representation,
?Focus on the creation of new knowledge environments,
?Demonstrate awareness of some of the major debates in digital humanities
?Demonstrate awareness of the collaborative nature of digital humanities
?Participate in active discussion on issues in DH within the class and in the broader DH community.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individual portfolio of digital critical writing (30 marks);team digital artifact creation (30 marks); Presentation on new knowledge environments (15 marks); Active creation and participation in virtual and social networks (15 marks);Participation, engagement and contribution in all media, and face to face (10 marks). Equivalent to about 5,000 words in total).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. .

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH2005 Research, Analysis and Knowledge Creation in the Digital Age

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: This module will look at the main developments and debates in digital learning, research and knowledge management, and how digital tools affect, modify and develop those debates and practices

Module Content: The Humanities develop a set of research, analysis and communications skills geared towards understanding complex real world, human problems on the basis of often incomplete information and differing theoretical lenses. This module offers undergraduates an opportunity to explore how to apply the skills of the humanist to everyday problems and to demonstrate this in a portfolio which will enhance their organisational, leadership and lifelong learning, analytical and problem-solving skills. Students will engage with a range of readings on contemporary knowledge management, information analysis and student leadership and personal development topics from writers like Nonaka, Von Krogh, Jarche, MacGregor Burns, Komives, and others, and develop personal and team research and learning action plans and engage in activity which carries the theoretical perspectives into action.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a knowledge of a range of readings on digital research, learning, knowledge management and leadership
?Demonstrate an ability to gather and analyse information on real world problems or challenges.
?Demonstrate the ability to organise their work so that they can perform research, analysis and communication work effectively both independently and in teams
?Select a variety of digital and blended learning tools to manage research, analysis and sharing of knowledge
?Facilitate knowledge sharing, learning and collaboration in organisations by being able to use digital tools to gather, organise and share knowledge, adding value to it
?Demonstrate that they can bring critical thinking, analytic and presentation skills to bear in their assessed work in this module.
?Reflect on the outcomes of that activity, with particular reference to their learning and self-development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work including elements of individual work and group work, active participation in virtual and social networks, demonstrating ability to seek enhance and share information in a range of digital formats and develop personal learning and research plans equivalent to about 4,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH2006 Digital Curation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: Introduce students to critical understanding and synthesis of concepts of creation, repesentation, transformation and translation of knowledge for research, business and cultural engagement.

Module Content: Participants will be encouraged to question, deconstruct and form their own articulation of knowledge in the digital age. This will involve: production, acquisition, storage, sharing and dissemination and reception with a broad variety of stakeholders and the general public. Students will also be encouraged to participate in the development of international formats, standards and policies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Adopt a critical perspective on practice in their own and in the field more broadly
?Assess and critique tools and methodologies employed in digital practice
?Identify current understanding of machine - human learning and intelligence.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individual critique (40 marks), group report (50 marks), active contribution and participation in virtual and social networks (10 marks). Equivalent to approx 4,000 words in total.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH3001 Concepts and Collaboration II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Murphy, School of English; Staff, College of Accss.

Module Objective: Develop deeper and wider engagement with concepts in the field, addressing more advanced conceptual issues

Module Content: This module will develop students' understanding of a range of theoretical and conceptual views on a variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital arts and humanities practice. Students will further explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the changing nature of scholarship, social networks and network analysis, the changing nature of academic debate and the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work through engagement with the writings of leading figures in the field such as Liu, Svennson, McGann, McCarthy, Fitzpatrick, Terras, Deleuze , Latour and Manovich.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a high level of digital literacy
?Write digitally literate responses to key conceptual issues for digital research
?Show a sophisticated understanding of social media practice in research and scholarship
?Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary debates in the field based on critical readings and discussion of recent writings by leading figures
?Create, lead and participate in new knowledge networks.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Digital literacy artifact (single or multimodal, a practical response to a key issue) (20 marks) Website focusing on a key concept (single or multimodal) (20 marks) Online literature review of social media (20 marks) Presentation on a key concept in DAH (10 marks) Active creation and participation in virtual and social networks (10 marks) Participation, engagement and contribution in all media, and face to face (10 marks) equivalent to about 5,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. .

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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DH3002 Tools and Methodologies II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: Develop wider knowledge of a range of digital arts and humanities tools and methods.

Module Content: This module will develop student knowledge of core standards and tools used in the Digital Humanities, and explore a range of additional tools for data capture, enhancement, analysis and presentation across a range of media. Methodololgies for managing digital projects, and issues of sustainability will be introduced and addressed. Tools, methods and standards such as HTML 5, XML, XPATH, XQUERY, QGIS, TEI, Network analysis and data visualization will be explored and compared.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create a range of digital objects in a variety of media
?Hack traditional methods creating new forms of engagement
?Fix given problems in teams
?Demonstrate ability to capture more complex sources using advanced techniques in standard formats (TEI/XML, SQL)
?Present digital data in an appropriate range of formats - text corpus, ebooks, database, visualizations and others for public access
?Show awareness of how technology choices affect research
?Demonstrate ability to analyze and query digital data collections using standard tools and methods (eg) SQL, XPATH and XQUERY.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work which demonstrates use of the tools and methods covered in the course to include an element of group, and individual work, presentations and the creation of digital artifacts equivalent to about 5,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Create a digital object from within their research area (30 marks) Create a well formed TEI/XML document (20 marks) Create a well formed database (20 marks) Presentation on data visualization for research (10 marks) Active creation and participation in virtual and social networks (10 marks) Participation, engagement and contribution in all media, and face to face (10 marks).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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DH3003 Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 60

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (Placements 9 months in workplace)).

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (9 months in workplace).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Careers Service.

Module Objective: Students should gain experience of the workplace

Module Content: Each student will take a placement on an agreed work programme. The placement period will normally be 9 months. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a Digital Humanities Programme staff member and an employee of the placement organisation. Students may be placed in an industrial, cultural heritage, or other organisation as deemed suitable by the Board of Studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define different roles and their relationships in the workplace
?Use the internal protocols and technologies of an industrial setting
?Analyse the specifications and define the goals of an workplace project and manage it to success
?Report results
?Work as a member of a team.

Assessment: No specific mark will be given. Assessment is based on Student Report and the Assessment Forms from Supervisor(s). Students who fail to apply for Work Placements or who fail to accept a Placement when offered will fail DH3003.

Compulsory Elements: Submission of Student Report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Board of Studies (an alternative placement or a long-form project report defined by the Board of Studies, equivalent to 15,000 words in extent)).

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DH4001 Research Seminar

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: Draw together the conceptual elements of the programme

Module Content: This Seminar will draw together the theoretical and conceptual strand of the Digital Humanities programme.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the broad range of theoretical issues in Digital Humanities
?Present complex theoretical issues to a public audience, and in an extended paper
?Foster and encourage debate on issues in Digital Humanities.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (active seminar participation and reflective essay ( c. 4,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH4002 Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and Group Discussion); 7 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online collaboration, group work and self-directed learning to fulfill the assessment component).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: Draw together the research methods elements of programme.

Module Content: This module will draw together the methods strand of the Digital Humanities programme.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define a research issue in Digital Humanities in way suitable for a capstone research project;
?Plan a major research project
?Determine which digital tools should be used for a particular research project.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Research proposal and research plan for a Digital Humanities research project ( c. 4,000 words).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH4003 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Independent co-supervised project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: Students will conduct a major practical research project as a capstone for the programme.

Module Content: In this module students will undertake a significant research project, creating a digital artefact with critical and methodological commentary to demonstrate mastery at appropriate level of the concepts, tools and methodologies explored in the programme.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Formulate research questions at an appropriate level
?Select appropriate tools to execute a research project
?Deliver an extended research project, including creation of a digital artefact
?Present supporting discussion of theory and methods to frame the project.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Continuous Assessment 300 marks (research project including a digital artefact and supporting critical documentation equivalent to 15,000 words detailing the technical delivery and theoretical and analytic conclusions arising from the research).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6001 Communities of Practice in Digital Scholarship

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to current practice in scholarly collaboration using digital tools

Module Content: In this module, students will be introduced to the range of tools and practices which support current collaborative scholarly work in the Digital Humanities. Students will explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the changing nature of scholarship, on communities of practice, peer review, collaboration and "critical friends". The changing nature of academic debate and the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work and topics such as digital rights management, licensing and copyright will be studied. Students will engage with local, national and international networks, and begin to develop a professional digital "presence".

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Use digital tools to support collaboration
?Engage in a range of online collaborations in their field
?Know the literature and debates on digital collaboration and on Communities of Practice
?Demonstrate an awareness of the impact of new forms of scholarly collaboration on the practice of research in their field
?Show ability to use digital tools to build and participate in online scholarly communities
?Create an online professional presence.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, to include an element of group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6003 Digital Humanities Institute

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. ([e.g. a Summer School]).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Seminars (Workshops); Directed Study (assigned reading, independent research); Other (written exercise held over 2 - 3 days in hosting institution).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Accss.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students in the Digital Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics in Digital Humanities.
The content will vary depending on the topic/school offered in any given year.

Module Content: Varies from year to year to accommodate key trends and new critical theories and methods in DAH disciplines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and demonstrate understanding of the special topic studied in the Institute, outlining its development, scope and methodologies

?Identify major paradigms or theories employed and define key concepts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the Institute

?Apply theories and concepts addressed in the Institute and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research

?Articulate phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories, paradigms or concepts presented in the Institute

?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Institute.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work to include an element of group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 4,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (To be taken in Autumn).

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DH6004 Conceptual Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To understand the conceptual bases of digital research in the Arts and Humanities, including emerging new fields and the positioning of digital culture in current discourse.

Module Content: To understand the conceptual bases of digital research in the Arts and Humanities, including emerging new fields and the positioning of digital culture in current discourse. This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital arts and humanities history, theory, and methodologies. It will lay the foundations for subsequent modules by introducing students to a wide variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital arts and humanities practice. The trajectory of the course will move from historical and cultural concerns to present-day practice to cutting-edge research questions

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise of the history and current trends in conceptual debates about the nature and role of digital arts and humanities
?Identify the central questions and problems associated with identity and subjectivity in digital culture
?Describe the major data types in the field and issues associated with their preservation and curation
?Recognise how digital art and artefacts are positioned within the wider socio-economiccultural sphere
?Evaluate the current models of digital aesthetics
?Outline the development of computational technologies in art practice
?Apply data modelling according to the practices of the field
?Apply the major standards in the field, both historically and contemporaneous
?Differentiate the field's various sub disciplines.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, to include an element of group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6005 History and Theory of Digital Arts

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To study the history and theory of artistic expression using digital resources.

Module Content: Discussion and analysis of problems in the history and theory of digital art.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Know the use of digital resources in artistic productivity
?Understand the development of digital arts technology
?Know the role of digital arts technology in contemporary society, and relevant debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work to include an element of group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 4,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as perscribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6006 Teaching and Learning in Digital Humanities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Critical reading and study and reflective, collaborative online discussion of key texts and artefacts.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the tools, pedagogies and debates relating to teaching in the humanities in the digital era

Module Content: This module will look at the main developments and debates in teaching and learning in higher education, and look at how digital tools affect, modify and develop those debates; and at pedagogical uses of digital tools. A range of theoretical approaches will be reviewed in readings; students will apply these theories and methods to developing a design for teaching using digital tools.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe some of the main debates on the scholarship of teaching and learning in the humanities disciplines
?Recognise the relationship of those debates to the digital humanities
?Apply appropriate strategies and pedagogies to design effective teaching in their humanities area
teaching in their humanities area.
?Select a variety digital and blended learning tools to create, deliver and evaluate teaching & learning in their humanities area

?Co-operate on and share research on teaching and learning.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work to include an element of group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 4,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6007 Models, Simulations and Games

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Critical reading and study and reflective, collaborative online discussion of key texts and artefacts).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the history, theory and practice of using models, simulations and games in history, military history, international relations and other disciplines.

Module Content: Since the adoption of Von Reisswitz' Kreigspeil by the Prussian army, the use of models, simulations and games for education, training and planning in war and peace has expanded, and this has accelerated in developments in digital gaming and simulations. This module surveys the history of these developments, and looks at the theoretical debates about the use and abuse of these tools. Students will study and produce conceptual designs for simulations or games.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Know the main developments in the use of models, simulations and games in the modern era
?Read a range of theoretical literature on MSG in research, planning and teaching
?Use a range of MSG and evaluated them
?Design learning simulations in the disciplinary area.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work to include an element of group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 4,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6010 Humanities and New Technologies: Tools and Methodologies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 2hr(s) Seminars (seminar and discussion, face-to-face and online).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS, module is shared between TCD, NUIM, NUIG, UCC, RIA.

Module Objective: To study tools and methods of Digital Humanities from a practical and theoretical standpoint

Module Content: Study of selected topics in Communication and collaboration, Data Capture, Data Structuring and Enhancement, Data Analysis, Data Publishing and Dissemination, Strategy and Project Management

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?To gain an understanding of the technological bases of digital humanities.
?To gain an understanding of the development of digital technology in the humanities.
?To gain an understanding of the role of digital humanities in contemporary society, and relevant debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (6,000 word essay or equivalent, analysing the potential of new technologies for the student's dissertation research project).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6012 Editing Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Critical reading and study and reflective, collaborative online discussion of key texts and artefacts.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To equip students with editorial skillsets necessary to create editions of humanities and social sciences material, as well as examining critical, theoretical frameworks and editorial theory.

Module Content: Using literature as a basis and reference, students will be trained in both conventional and new theories of textual editing and the scholarly digital edition
-the role of the editor
-the importance of interface
-issues of copyright in the context of Creative Commons licensing;
-the nature of information and divisions of knowledge
-the importance of visuals, and of different media and online spaces
as well as in the technical skills (XML / TEI) required to publish online.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create an edition of a text related to their course(not for publication)
?Understand key elements of editorial theory
?Participate in a joint edition of a class project: (eg) online postgraduate essay collection
?Use a standard academic submission, review and publication software.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work to include an element of group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 4,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

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DH6013 Getting Started with Graduate Research and Generic Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to research formulation, philosophy, ethics, management and the associated skills to complete the research process effectively.

Module Content: The module will guide students through a variety of management and organizational techniques including the introduction of Training Needs Analysis and Professional Development Planning. In addition it will provide sessions on the literature review, managing the supervision process, writing, information literacy, web based research, referencing tools and software and effective time management. It will provide an introduction to presentation skills for conference papers. The module will introduce students to research ethics and the philosophy of research and research funding techniques.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Complete the Training Needs Analysis and Professional Development Plans
?Articulate their skills set and skills that they need to acquire
?Design and reflect on their literature review
?Use reference management tools and information management systems
?Identify the appropriate presentation skills for a variety of purposes
?Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the philosophy of research and research ethics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6014 Digital Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To equip students with digital skillsets necessary to research, create, edit, categorise and publish digital humanities and social sciences material online.

Module Content: It will introduce students to a range of digital skills and key concepts for online publication of a range of texts / contexts / materials within the humanities. Skills include:
Defining content
Managing content
HTML - Hyper Text Markup Language
XML - Extensible Markup Language
TEI - Text Encoding Initiative - the international standard for markup in the humanities
Open source softwares for graphic / image manipulation and design
Understanding IP and copyright issues
FTP - File transfer protocol for transfer of files

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create a hypertext of material from their research focus
?Mark up an essay relevant to their course for online publication according to best international standards
?Generate a website for their research portfolio.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work to include an element of group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 4,000 words in extent.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

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DH6016 Digital Humanities Institute

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2day(s) Seminars (Workshops); Directed Study (assigned reading, independent research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students in the Digital Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics in Digital Humanities.
The content will vary depending on the topic/school offered in any given year.

Module Content: The workshops in this module will provide opportunities for student induction, team building, familiarisation with the online tools used for learning in the course, practical hands on sessions to support the tools and methods covered in the online modules, and individual and group presentations of work in a live setting.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Know how to use the main features of the university Learning Management System.

?Know how to use common collaboration and social media tools to support learning and research.

?Demonstrate ability to use contemporary presentation tools to present work to an audience of colleagues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (participation in seminar, discussion and engagement with topics, presentations: 40 marks; critical reflection in a learning portfolio: 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (To be taken in Autumn).

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DH6018 History and Theory of Digital Arts

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Critical reading and study and reflective, collaborative online discussion of key texts and artefacts).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To study the history and theory of artistic expression using digital resources

Module Content: Discussion and analysis of problems in the history and theory of digital art. This module will review a wide range of readings on the theory of art in the digital era. For practical work students will explore digital tools which can be used to create 'art' and will produce an artifact which demonstrates an exploration of the use of digital tools to produce creative work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the use of digital resources in artistic productivity.
?Demonstrate an understanding of the development of digital arts technology.
?Demonstrate an understanding of the role of digital arts technology in contemporary society, and relevant debates.
?Recognise how digital art and artefacts are positioned within the wider socio-economic cultural sphere.
?Evaluate the current models of digital aesthetics.
?Outline the development of computational technologies in art practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work, to a discussion of readings in the field, and an artefact which explores some use of digital tools for creative or artistic work, equivalent in effort to about 4,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as perscribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6022 Communities of Practice in Digital Scholarship

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30 x 1hr(s) Other (Online Moderated Activities); 100 x 1hr(s) Other (Online Self Directed Study); 70 x 1hr(s) Other (Written Assignment Reflection and Development).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to current practice in scholarly collaboration using digital tools.

Module Content: In this module, students will be introduced to the range of theories, tools and practices which support current collaborative scholarly work in the Digital Humanities. Students will explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the changing nature of scholarship, on communities of practice, peer review, collaboration and 'critical friends'. The changing nature of academic work and topics such as digital rights management, licensing and copyright will be studied. Students will engage with local, national and international networks, and begin to develop a professional digital 'presence'.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Use digital tools to support collaboration
?Engage in a range of online collaborations in their field
?Demonstrate an understanding of the literature and debates on digital collaboration and on Communities of Practice
?Demonstrate an awareness of the impact of new forms of scholarly collaboration on the practice of research in their field
?Show ability to use digital tools to build and participate in online scholarly communities
?Create an online professional presence.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio of work to include evidence of active participation in online communities in a range of forms, and collaborative work equivalent to about 8,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-odinator).

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DH6023 Conceptual Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To understand the conceptual bases of digital research in the Arts and Humanities, including emerging new fields and the positioning of digital culture in current discourse.

Module Content: To understand the conceptual bases of digital research in the Arts and Humanities, including emerging new fields and the positioning of digital culture in current discourse. This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital arts and humanities history, theory, and methodologies. It will lay the foundations for subsequent modules by introducing students to a wide variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital arts and humanities practice. The trajectory of the course will move from historical and cultural concerns to present-day practice to cutting-edge research questions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise the history and current trends in conceptual debates about the nature and role of digital arts and humanities
?Identify the central questions and problems associated with identity and subjectivity in digital culture
?Define key trends in digital scholarship internationally
?Interrogate the state of the art in digital identity and representatiaon
?Recognise the major standards in the field
?Differentiate the fields's various sub-disciplines.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, to include evidence of contribution to group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6024 Humanities and New Technologies: Tools and Methodologies

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Critical reading and study and reflective, collaborative online discussion of key texts and artefacts).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To study tools and methods of Digital Humanities from a practical and theoretical standpoint

Module Content: Study of selected topics in Data Capture, Data Structuring and Enhancement, Data Analysis, Data Publishing and Dissemination, Strategy and Project Management. Students will survey a range of methodologies and approaches to how digital tools are used in research, and conduct practical explorations of digital tool use.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the technological bases of digital humanities
?Demonstrate knowledge of the development of digital technology in the humanities
?Demonstrate an understanding of the role of digital humanities in contemporary society, and relevent debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (8,000 word essay or equivalent (3 x 2,000 word reports), analysing the potential of new technologies for the student's dissertation research project).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6026 Principles of Game Design

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 15 x 1hr(s) Other (Online Moderated Activities); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (Online Self Directed Study); 35 x 1hr(s) Other (Written Assignment Reflection and Development).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the fudnamental theoretical underpinnings of contemporary game design practice.

Module Content: This module will make use of material drawn from both academia and industry to introduce students to the key models, theories and practices used in contemporary game design. Students will study developments in MDA theory, positive psychology and user focused design. Course material with emphasise the development of practical skills through workshop exercises and project work aiming to prepare students to develop their own game projects in future modules.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of several branches of contemporary game design theory
?Be able to produce and manage high level game design documentation
?Demonstrate an understanding of the key principles of user focused design
?Outline the main elements of game design practices.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, to include evidence of contribution to group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6028 Narrative and System Design

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 15 x 1hr(s) Other (Online Moderated Activities); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (Online Self Directed Study); 35 x 1hr(s) Other (Written Assignment Reflection and Development).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To develop practical game design experience through a supervised and assessed game design project.

Module Content: This module will focus on the development of practical game design skills through supervised project work. Students will develop an original game from concept to prototype stage with a narrative or systems design emphasis.The module will emphasise transferable principles over tools driven development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline a game design concept
?Demonstrate a working knowledge of the principles of iterative design
?Show a strong understanding of the principles of either Narrative or Systems design
?Show practical experience in product and prototype development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, to include evidence of contribution to group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by module co-ordinator).

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DH6029 Digital Cultures Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To train students in research in Digital Cultures.

Module Content: A minor dissertation on an approved topic in the field of Digital Cultures, written under the direction of a relevant member of staff.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a valid research topic
?Propose a line of study that will facilitate this research
?Engage in systematic study of primary and secondary source material
?Articulate a thesis based on a synthesis of the research material
?Deliver a dissertation that reflects the student's mature consideration of the research topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words plus a digital artefact).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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DH6031 Game User Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 15 x 1hr(s) Other (Online Moderated Activities); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (Online Self Directed Study); 35 x 1hr(s) Other (Written Assignment Reflection and Development).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to essential user research methodologies for game development and to introduce key concepts in game usability and HCI.

Module Content: This module will provide knowledge of user research practices used in the games industry with an emphasis on developing practical skills for use in student's own project work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Show a working knowledge of transferable user research practices such as questionaires, speak aloud protocol and interviewing
?Demonstrate an ability to analyse game user research data for actionable insights
?Demonstrate an understanding of key principles of usability design, user experience and HCI
?Demonstrate an understanding of key ethics issues in user research.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, to include evidence of contribution to group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6032 Communities of Practice in Digital Scholarship

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to current practice in scholarly collaboration using digital tools

Module Content: In this module, students will be introduced to the range of tools and practices which support current collaborative scholarly work in the Digital Humanities. Students will explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the changing nature of scholarship, on communities of practice, peer review, collaboration and "critical friends". The changing nature of academic debate and the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work and topics such as digital rights management, licensing and copyright will be studied. Students will engage with local, national and international networks, and begin to develop a professional digital "presence".

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Use digital tools to support collaboration
?Engage in a range of online collaborations in their field
?Demonstrate an understanding of the literature and debates on digital collaboration and on Communities of Practice
?Demonstrate an awareness of the impact of new forms of scholarly collaboration on the practice of research in their field
?Show ability to use digital tools to build and participate in online scholarly communities
?Create an online professional presence.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, to include evidence of contribution to group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6033 Conceptual Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To understand the conceptual bases of digital research in the Arts and Humanities, including emerging new fields and the positioning of digital culture in current discourse.

Module Content: To understand the conceptual bases of digital research in the Arts and Humanities, including emerging new fields and the positioning of digital culture in current discourse. This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital arts and humanities history, theory, and methodologies. It will lay the foundations for subsequent modules by introducing students to a wide variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital arts and humanities practice. The trajectory of the course will move from historical and cultural concerns to present-day practice to cutting-edge research questions

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise of the history and current trends in conceptual debates about the nature and role of digital arts and humanities
?Identify the central questions and problems associated with identity and subjectivity in digital culture
?Describe the major data types in the field and issues associated with their preservation and curation
?Recognise how digital art and artefacts are positioned within the wider socio-economiccultural sphere
?Evaluate the current models of digital aesthetics
?Outline the development of computational technologies in art practice
?Apply data modelling according to the practices of the field
?Apply the major standards in the field, both historically and contemporaneous
?Differentiate the field's various sub disciplines.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio of work of up to 6-12 items, to include evidence of contribution to group work, individual work and a presentation equivalent to about 6,000 words in extent).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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DH6034 Humanities and New Technologies: Tools and Methodologies

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (seminar and discussion, face-to-face and online).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To study tools and methods of Digital Humanities from a practical and theoretical standpoint

Module Content: Study of selected topics in Communication and collaboration, Data Capture, Data Structuring and Enhancement, Data Analysis, Data Publishing and Dissemination, Strategy and Project Management

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the technological bases of digital humanities
?Demonstrate knowledge of the development of digital technology in the humanities
?Demonstrate an understanding of the role of digital humanities in contemporary society, and relevant debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (8,000 word essay or equivalent (3 x 2,000 word reports), analysing the potential of new technologies for the student's dissertation research project).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6035 Digital Arts and Humanities Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To train students in research in Digital Arts & Humanities.

Module Content: A minor dissertation on an approved topic in the field of Digital Arts & Humanities, written under the direction of a relevant member of staff

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a valid research topic.
?Propose a line of study that will facilitate this research.
?Engage in systematic study of primary and secondary source material.
?Articulate a thesis based on a synthesis of the research material.
?Deliver a dissertation and digital artefact that reflects the student's mature consideration of the research topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (dissertation of12,000-15,000 words, which may include appropriate digital artefacts (which embodies primary materials, analysis and/or conclusions in digital form), submitted for Winter Examination Board).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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DH6103 Digital Humanities Institute

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1. ([e.g. Summer School] of one week's duration).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (/Conference participation); Other (Written exercise held over 2-3 days); Directed Study (Assigned reading, independent research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Accss.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students in the Digital Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics in Digital Humanities. The content will vary, depending on the topic/school offered in any given year.

Module Content: Varies from year to year to accommodate key trends and new critical theories and methods in DAH disciplines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and demonstrate understanding of the special topic studied in the Institute, outlining its development, scope and methodologies.
?Identify major paradigms or theories employed and define key concepts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the Institute.
?Apply theories and concepts addressed in the Institute and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
?Articulate phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories, paradigms or concepts presented in the Institute.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Institute.

Assessment: Reflective essay on the Institute, presented in a public blog post(s), 4,000 words in extent.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6104 Conceptual Introduction to Digital Arts and Humanities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and discussion, face-to-face and online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Module Objective: To understand the conceptual bases of digital research in the Arts and Humanities, including emerging new fields and the positioning of digital culture in current discourse.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital arts and humanities history, theory, and
methodologies. It will lay the foundations for subsequent modules by introducing students to a wide
variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital arts and humanities practice. The trajectory of the
course will move from historical and cultural concerns to present-day practice to cutting-edge research
questions

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss both the history and current trends in digital arts and humanities.
?Understand the central questions and problems associated with identity and subjectivity in digital culture.
?Know the major data types in the field and issues associated with their preservation and curation.
?Understand how digital art and artefacts are positioned within the wider socio-economiccultural sphere.
?Understand the current models of digital aesthetics.
?Understand the development of computational technologies in art practice.
?Understand how data modelling is used within the discipline.
?Know the major standards in the field, both historically and contemporaneous.
?Differentiate the field's various sub disciplines.

Assessment: based on a portfolio which may include literature review and/or research paper, up to equivalent of 5,000 words.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Sessions are mandatory.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6105 History and Theory of Digital Arts

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 2hr(s) Seminars (seminar and discussion, face-to-face and online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: To study the history and theory of artistic expression using digital resources

Module Content: Discussion and analysis of problems in the history and theory of digital art

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Have a fundamental understanding of the use of digital resources in artistic productivity.
?Have an understanding of the development of digital arts technology.
?Have an understanding of the role of digital arts technology in contemporary society, and relevant debates.

Assessment: 6,000 word essay or equivalent, analysing the potential of new technologies for the student's doctoral research project.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment: Sessions are mandatory.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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DH6106 Teaching and Learning in Digital Humanities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar and discussion, face-to-face and online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: Introduce students to the tools, pedagogies and debates relating to teaching in
the humanities in the digital era

Module Content: Module will look at the main developments and debates in teaching and learning
in higher education, and look at how digital tools affect, modify and develop those debates; and at
pedagogical uses of digital tools

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Read some of the debates on the scholarship of teaching and learning in the humanities.
disciplines
?Demonstrate an ability to apply those debates to the digital humanities.
?Demonstrate an ability to use appropriate strategies and pedagogies to design effective
teaching in their humanities area.
?Demonstrate an ability to use a variety digital and blended learning tools to create, deliver
and evaluate teaching & learning in their humanities area.
?Demonstrate an ability to collaborate on and share research on teaching and learning.

Assessment: Assessment is based on a portfolio which will include literature reviews, papers, presentations, examples of data applications in the humanities and digital artefacts, to the equivalent of 5000 words.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6107 Models, Simulations and Games

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Seminar/Discussion).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Module Objective: Introduce students to the history, theory and practice of using models,
simulations and games in history, military history, international relations and other humanities
disciplines.

Module Content: Since the adoption of Von Reisswitz' Kreigspeil by the Prussian army, the use of
models, simulations and games for education, training and planning in war and peace has expanded,
and this has accelerated in developments in digital gaming and simulations. This module surveys
the history of these developments, and looks at the theoretical debates about the use and abuse of
these tools. Students will study and design simulations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Know the main developments in the use of models, simulations and games in the modern era.
?Read a range of theoretical literature on MSG in research, planning and teaching.
?Use a range of MSG and evaluated them.
?Design learning simulations in the disciplinary area.

Assessment: Assessment is based on a portfolio which will include literature reviews, papers, presentations, examples of data applications in the humanities and digital artefacts, to the equivalent of 5000 words.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH6110 Humanities and New Technologies: Tools and Methodologies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 2hr(s) Seminars (seminar and discussion, face-to-face and online).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Mr Shawn Day, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To study tools and methods of Digital Humanities from a practical and theoretical standpoint

Module Content: Study of selected topics in Communication and collaboration, Data Capture, Data Structuring and Enhancement, Data Analysis, Data Publishing and Dissemination, Strategy and Project Management

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?To gain an understanding of the technological bases of digital humanities.
?To gain an understanding of the development of digital technology in the humanities.
?To gain an understanding of the role of digital humanities in contemporary society, and relevant debates.

Assessment: 6,000 word essay or equivalent, analysing the potential of new technologies for the student's doctoral research project.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Sessions are mandatory.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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DH7009 Digital Humanities Institute

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. ([e.g. Summer School]).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (/Conference participation); Directed Study (assigned reading, independent research); Other (written exercise held over 2-3 days).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students in the Digital Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics in Digital Humanities. The content will vary depending on the topic/school offered in any given year.

Module Content: Varies from year to year to accommodate key trends and new critical theories and methods in DAH disciplines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and demonstrate understanding of the special topic studied in the Institute, outlining its development, scope and methodologies.

?Identify major paradigms or theories employed and define key concepts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the Institute.

?Apply theories and concepts addressed in the Institute and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

?Articulate phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories, paradigms or concepts presented in the Institute.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Institute.

Assessment: Reflective essay on the Institute, presented in a public blog post(s), 4,000 words in extent.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (To be taken in Autumn).

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DH7010 Research Colloquium

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 20hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students in the Digital Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigationon special topics in Digital Humanities. The content will vary depending on the topic/school offered in any given year.

Module Content: Varies from year to year to accommodate key trends and new critical theories and methods in DAH disciplines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and demonstrate understanding of the special topic studied in the Institute, outlining its development, scope and methodologies.
?Indentify major paradigms or theories employed and define key conecpts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the Institute
?Apply theories and concepts addressed in the Institute and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
?Articulate phenomena and formulate particular research problems in term sof general theories, paradigms or concepts presented in the Institute.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Institute.

Assessment: Research portfolio, presentation, participation.

Compulsory Elements: Participation, presentation and submission of portfolio.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Research portfolio may be resubmitted. [Note: candidates may not submit their PhD thesis until this module has been passed].

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DH7011 Digital Humanities Institute

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. ([e.g. Summer School]).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (/Conference participation); Directed Study (assigned reading, independent research); Other (written exercise helod over 2-3 days).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Accss.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students in the Digital Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics in Digital Humanities. The content will vary depending on the topic/school offered in any given year.

Module Content: Varies from year to year to accommodate key trends and new critical theories and methods in DAH disciplines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and demonstrate understanding of the special topic studied in the Institute, outlining its development, scope and methodologies.

?Identify major paradigms or theories employed and define key concepts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the Institute.

?Apply theories and concepts addressed in the Institute and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

?Articulate phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories, paradigms or concepts presented in the Institute.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Institute.

Assessment: Reflective essay on the Institute, presented in a public blog post(s), 4,000 words in extent.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (To be taken in Autumn).

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DH7012 Industrial/Research Institute Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12weeks(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS, relevant off-site supervisors.

Module Objective: To provide an opportunity for students to develop career-relevant transferable skills through work experience in a cultural or commercial environment.

Module Content: Students will be placed in a relevant work environment for 12 weeks to increase their employability and prepare their entry into the knowledge economy. They will be expected to develop their skill set and broaden their education under the supervision of work-place and UCC personnel. Students are obliged to actively participate in the Work Placement Programme. Students are required to prepare a final report on their placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Work in a collaborative environment
?Deploy principles of project and time management
?Demonstrate an awareness of transferable skills and their applicability to non-academic settings
?Initiate and sustain networks and relationships that may foster employment opportunities
?Comprehend intellectual property and knowledge exchange issues
?Gain awareness of the role of entrepreneurship in the cultural field
?Reflect critically on work experience and act positively on it.

Assessment: 1 x 5000 word report and participation.

Compulsory Elements: Participation and Report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Work Placement Report may be resubmitted. [Note: candidates may not submit their PhD thesis until this module has been passed].

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DH7013 Digital Humanities Institute

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3. ([e.g. Summer School]).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (/Conference participation); Directed Study (assigned reading, independent research); Other (written exercise heldo over 2-3 days).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Accss.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students in the Digital Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics in Digital Humanities. The content will vary depending on the topic/school offered in any given year.

Module Content: Varies from year to year to accommodate key trends and new critical theories and methods in DAH disciplines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and demonstrate understanding of the special topic studied in the Institute, outlining its development, scope and methodologies.

?Identify major paradigms or theories employed and define key concepts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the Institute.

?Apply theories and concepts addressed in the Institute and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

?Articulate phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories, paradigms or concepts presented in the Institute.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Institute.

Assessment: Reflective essay on the Institute, presented in a public blog post(s), 4,000 words in extent.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (To be taken in Autumn).

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DH7014 Research Colloquium

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (taken over Years 2 & 3 of the programme).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 20hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students in the Digital Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics in Digital Humanities.
The content will vary depending on the topic/school offered in any given year

Module Content: Varies from year to year to accommodate key trends and new critical theories and methods in DAH disciplines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and demonstrate understanding of the special topic studied in the Institute, outlining its development, scope and methodologies.
?Identify major paradigms or theories employed and define key concepts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the Institute.
?Apply theories and concepts addressed in the Institute and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
?Articulate phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories, paradigms or concepts presented in the Institute.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Institute.

Assessment: Research portfolio, presentation, participation.

Compulsory Elements: Participation, presentation and submission of portfolio.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Research portfolio may be resubmitted. [Note: candidates may not submit their PhD thesis until this module has been passed].

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