Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

AP1105 Experimental Design and Statistical Application
AP1108 Research Methods in Psychology
AP1110 Psychology as Science
AP1123 Introduction to Biological and Cognitive Perspectives on Psychology
AP1149 Introduction to Developmental and Social Psychology
AP1223 Introduction to Biological and Cognitive Perspectives on Psychology
AP1249 Introduction to Developmental and Social Psychology
AP1349 Introduction to Developmental and Social Psychology
AP1504 Research Methods in Education and Psychology
AP2025 Developmental Psychology
AP2102 Biological Bases of Behaviour
AP2103 Introduction to Neuroscience, Perception and Attention
AP2104 Developmental Psychology
AP2105 Experimental Design and Statistical Applications 2
AP2106 History and Philosophy of Psychology
AP2107 Individual Differences
AP2109 Social Psychology
AP2111 Psychology and Everyday Life
AP2204 The Psychology of Aging
AP2209 Research Methods in Psychology II
AP2504 Early Years and Childhood Health & Wellbeing Project
AP3015 Forensic Psychology
AP3020 Applying Psychology in Community Settings
AP3022 Applied Developmental Psychology II: The Psychology of Ageing
AP3030 Special Educational Needs: Aetiology, Assessment and Intervention
AP3033 Positive Psychology
AP3037 Work Psychology
AP3039 Evolutionary Psychology
AP3101 Abnormal Psychology
AP3102 Applied Biological Psychology
AP3104 Applied Developmental Psychology
AP3108 Practical Project Work
AP3110 Psychological Therapies
AP3111 Personal and Career Development
AP3113 Applied Developmental Psychology
AP3114 Cognition and Real Life Applications
AP3115 Health Psychology: Models and Applications
AP3299 People and Technology
AP3399 Psychological Measurement
AP3501 Applying Psychological Theory and Reflective Practice to Placement Context
AP3504 Child and Family Health Psychology
AP3514 Psychological Perspectives on Special Educational Needs
AP6016 Research Methods and Data Analysis
AP6023 Psychological Assessment
AP6112 Critical Issues in Applying Psychology
AP6116 Coaching and Positive Psychology
AP6117 Wellness Coaching
AP6128 Introduction to Psychotherapeutic Skills
AP6129 Health Psychology
AP6137 Dissertation in Applied Psychology
AP6142 People and Technology
AP6144 Applied Clinical Issues (Adult Mental Health)
AP6153 Placement
AP6154 Conflict and Co-operation
AP6155 Applied Clincial Issues (Child and Adolescent Mental Health)
AP6156 Psychology and Intellectual Disabilities
AP6159 Positive Organisational Psychology
AP6160 Private Practice
AP6161 Coaching Skills
AP6164 Positive Psychology in Group Settings
AP6166 Personnel Selection and Assessment
AP6168 Designing in Work and Workplaces
AP6169 Learning, Well-Being and Participation at Work
AP6170 Professional Skills
AP6171 Research Dissertation in Work, Organisational and Coaching Psychology
AP6173 Service Design and Evaluation
AP6174 Clinical presentations (Child, Adolescent, Adult, and ID)
AP6176 Cognitive Enhancement
AP6178 Psychological Principles and Skills in Working with Children and Families
AP6179 Participatory Research
AP6180 Mental Health and Disability Placement
AP6181 Practice of Evidence Based Coaching
AP6182 Positive Psychology and Human Flourishing
AP6183 Positive Psychology Coaching Practice
AP6205 Psychological Principles of Human Development
AP6206 Psychological Perspectives on Counselling Theories
AP6211 Theories of Career Development
AP6215 Professional Issues in Guidance Counselling
AP6220 Career Skills
AP6221 Career Information Management Skills
AP6222 Counselling Skills for Guidance Counsellors
AP6223 Psychological Intervention Skills for Guidance Counsellors
AP6224 Group Work Skills and Theory 1
AP6225 Group Work Skills and Theory 2
AP6226 Theory of Psychological Testing
AP6227 Practice of Psychological Testing
AP6228 Guidance Counselling Field Practice
AP7000 Introduction to Doctoral Research in Applied Psychology
AP7002 Clinical Psychology Applied to Adults
AP7003 Clinical Psychology Applied to Intellectual Disability and Autism 1
AP7004 Clinical Psychology Applied to Intellectual Disability and Autism 2
AP7005 Clinical Psychology Applied to Child and Adolescent
AP7006 Elective Topic in Clinical Psychology
AP7007 Advanced Placement in Clinical Psychology
AP7008 Clinical Research Methods and Data Analysis 1
AP7009 Clinical Research Methods and Data Analysis 2

AP1105 Experimental Design and Statistical Application

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 Other (course work exercises).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Chan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jason Chan, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of experimental design and quantitative evaluation of outcomes; to gain practice with conducting and reporting statistical analyses.

Module Content: Exploratory data analysis methods, summary statistics, correlation study methods. Hypothesis testing and the scientific method. Design and analysis of studies involving two or more experimental conditions. Introduction to cluster and factor analysis. introduction to computer packages for statistical analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe data distributions;
?Compute descriptive statistics on numerical data;
?Apply the statistical argument to the outcome of a quantitative investigation;
?Carry out commonly used bivariate tests of difference;
?Explain and conduct a correlation analysis;
?Explain the basic form of the general linear model;
?Explain the process of conducting an analysis of variance;
?Report the results of statistical tests in an appropriate manner;
?Use the SPSS statistical package to explore and plot data and conduct simple statistical tests.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Weekly coursework exercises which must be submitted one term week after the exercise has been set 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% and submission of all weekly coursework exercises. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a "Fail Special Requirement" will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP1108 Research Methods in Psychology

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1.5hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce standard approaches to psychological reesarch.

Module Content: Introduction to scientific method; introduce research designs which seek to describe variables, establish relationships between variables and/or differences between groups.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define commonly used terms in experimental design;
?Recognise the difference between qualitative and quantitative approaches to data gathering;
?Apply suitable standards of reporting to the results of psychological investigations;
?Explain the difference between dependent, independent and uncontrolled variables;
?Interpret a psychological question as a research hypothesis;
?Relate to participants in an ethical and humane manner;
?Write up laboratory reports using APA guidelines.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (8 Practical Reports. Note: Practical report(s) for which the student has not attended the requisite classes will be assigned a mark of zero unless the absence is excused and the attendance requirement waived by the School Teaching and Learning Committee).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at practicals is compulsory and recorded by class register. Practical reports for which the student has not attended the requisite classes will be assigned a mark of zero unless absence is excused and the attendance requirement waived by the School Teach & Learning Comm. Students who are absent from more than 2 lectures or practical sessions over the year will meet with the Mod Coordinator. In order to pass the module all practicals must be submitted and passed.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must submit and pass at least 6 practicals to pass this module. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a "Fail Special Requirement" will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP1110 Psychology as Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 540.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Online content); 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Online self-paced learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To place psychology in a conceptual, historical, scientific and applied context.

Module Content: Psychology as a scientific discipline. Introduction to the scientific method in Psychology; historical perspectives on Psychology; branches of modern Psychology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define commonly used terms in psychology;
?Understand the role of the scientific method in Psychology;
?Show understanding of the historical development of the discipline;
?Illustrate with examples the broad thematic branches within modern psychology.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Multiple Choice Written Examination).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 90 min(s) mcq to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 90 min(s) mcq to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP1123 Introduction to Biological and Cognitive Perspectives on Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 392.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce key concepts in biological and cognitive psychology

Module Content: The brain as the organ of the mind. Biological bases of behaviour. An introduction to cognitive psychology which includes memory, perception, reasoning and language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define commonly used terms in cognitive psychology and biopsychology;
?Illustrate the scientific nature of contemporary psychology with examples;
?Describe at least five experiments or demonstrations in cognitive and biopsychology;

?Describe and contrast at least two theories in cognitive and biopsychology;

?Comprehend the scientific approach to understanding human nature.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP1149 Introduction to Developmental and Social Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 392.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Anna O'Reilly-Trace, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: In this module you will learn about the findings and theories of developmental sciences and social psychology

Module Content: An introduction to theories and research in social psychology focusing on the areas of social influence (e.g. inter-group behaviour and conformity), social relations (e.g. group identity and prosocial behaviour) and social thinking (e.g. attitudes and attribution). An introduction to theories and research in developmental psychology, covering selected aspects of perceptual, motor, cognitive, social and emotional development in childhood, adolescence and adulthood.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key stages of human development across the lifespan: when they occur and what their characteristics are.
?Identify the main forces (biological and social) that shape the course of human development. Demonstrate some understanding of how those forces interact with each other.
?Describe controversies regarding the relative importance of different forces shaping the course of development (e.g. How important is parental upbringing, compared to genes, compared to peer influence)
?Describe key theories that try to explain developmental changes
?Evaluate those theories in the light of available evidence
?Describe some key features of human social cognition (especially the fundamental attribution error and cognitive dissonance)
?Describe Fiske's four social modes of cognition.
?Critically evaluate explanations of human aggression and altruism that are commonly offered.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP1223 Introduction to Biological and Cognitive Perspectives on Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce key concepts in biological and cognitive psychology

Module Content: The brain as the organ of the mind. Biological bases of behaviour. An introduction to cognitive psychology which includes memory, perception, reasoning and language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define commonly used terms in cognitive psychology and biopsychology;
?Illustrate the scientific nature of contemporary psychology with examples;
?Describe at least five experiments or demonstrations in cognitive and biopsychology;
?Describe and contrast at least two theories in cognitive and biopsychology;
?Comprehend the scientific approach to understanding human nature.
?Present a coherent, well-structured essay which complies with stated word limits and displays good standards of theoretical understanding and academic writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP1249 Introduction to Developmental and Social Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: In this module you will learn about the findings and theories of developmental sciences and social psychology

Module Content: An introduction to theories and research in social psychology focusing on the areas of social influence (e.g. inter-group behaviour and conformity), social relations (e.g. group identity and prosocial behaviour) and social thinking (e.g. attitudes and attribution). An introduction to theories and research in developmental psychology, covering selected aspects of perceptual, motor, cognitive, social and emotional development in childhood, adolescence and adulthood.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key stages of human development across the lifespan: when they occur and what their characteristics are.
?Identify the main forces (biological and social) that shape the course of human development. Demonstrate some understanding of how those forces interact with each other.
?Describe controversies regarding the relative importance of different forces shaping the course of development (e.g. How important is parental upbringing, compared to genes, compared to peer influence)
?Describe key theories that try to explain developmental changes
?Evaluate those theories in the light of available evidence
?Describe some key features of human social cognition (especially the fundamental attribution error and cognitive dissonance)
?Describe Fiske's four social modes of cognition.
?Critically evaluate explanations of human aggression and altruism that are commonly offered.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP1349 Introduction to Developmental and Social Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Anna O'Reilly-Trace, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: In this module you will learn about the findings and theories of developmental sciences and social psychology

Module Content: An introduction to theories and research in social psychology focusing on the areas of social influence (e.g. inter-group behaviour and conformity), social relations (e.g. group identity and prosocial behaviour) and social thinking (e.g. attitudes and attribution). An introduction to theories and research in developmental psychology, covering selected aspects of perceptual, motor, cognitive, social and emotional development in childhood, adolescence and adulthood.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key stages of human development across the lifespan: when they occur and what their characteristics are.
?Identify the main forces (biological and social) that shape the course of human development. Demonstrate some understanding of how those forces interact with each other.
?Describe controversies regarding the relative importance of different forces shaping the course of development (e.g. How important is parental upbringing, compared to genes, compared to peer influence)
?Describe key theories that try to explain developmental changes
?Evaluate those theories in the light of available evidence
?Describe some key features of human social cognition (especially the fundamental attribution error and cognitive dissonance)
?Describe Fiske's four social modes of cognition.
?Critically evaluate explanations of human aggression and altruism that are commonly offered.
?Summarise and evaluate relevant theories and evidence in a scholarly essay.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 1500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP1504 Research Methods in Education and Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: The module is an introduction to the research methodology of the social sciences. It should teach you how social scientists (especially those working in the field education and psychology) go about studying human behaviour and human mind. It should also teach you about the value, indeed, indispensability of scientific research as a tool for solving practical problems concerning childcare, teaching, healthcare, and other aspects of human wellbeing.

We hope that this module will help you develop into savvy consumers of research: people who appreciate the value of research evidence, know where to find that evidence, can understand it, are able to appraise it critically, and can use it to improve their own professional practice (e.g. in teaching or childcare).

Module Content: The scientific method. Psychological and educational measurement. Basic principles and skills of data analysis (quantitative and qualitative). Evidence-based practice. Ethical principles of human research. Academic writing and publishing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand key terms used to describe the process of scientific research;
?Know the key elements of scientific research and use this knowledge to distinguish between good and poor science, as well as between science and pseudoscience;
?Begin to develop the skills of critical evaluation of scientific news presented in the media;
?Understand ethical issues in researching people;
?Use the tools and concepts of descriptive statistics to interpret numerical data;
?Know about the basics of academic publishing: the types of scholarly publication, the peer-review process, and the structure of a typical peer-reviewed research paper;
?Develop academic writing skills, especially the skills of presenting scientific evidence in a format and style accessible to a layperson;
?Know why scientific research is indispensable in finding answers to theoretical and practical problems of human development, including childcare and education;
?Understand the concept and the process of evidence-based practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x very brief reports).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP2025 Developmental Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To critically look at key theoretical positions in developmental literature. To examine thoeries and processes of individual development and change through the life-span.

Module Content: Theoretical perspectives that examine development throughout the lifespan including the biological basis of development and developmental neuroscience, intersubjectivity, theoretical approaches to development, adulthood and ageing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the biological base of development and developmental neuroscience, with particular reference to infancy;
?Explain inter-subjectivity and theories of mind during childhood;
?Critically discuss the research literature related to the development of general representational abilities, especially language, drawing and number;
?Compare and contrast constructivist, sociocultural and informational processing concepts of cognitive development and the impact of schooling;
?Analyse psychological perspectives on development in adulthood and ageing;
?Apply ecological and systems perspectives to child and adult development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP2102 Biological Bases of Behaviour

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): AP1123 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To review methods, theories and approaches to describing and explaining biological bases of behaviour.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to key concepts of psychobiology and the biology of human behaviour. The module will review the key neurological and endocrine structures most commonly associated with behaviour, and examine the research methods used to examine the biology behind human behaviours. The influence of genes on behaviour will be also described, including a review of epigenetics, and the interaction of genes and environment in influencing behaviours. The module will describe the biological basis of depression, anxiety and aggression. The changes in biology at different life stages (e.g. puberty, menopause, older age) associated with behavioural change will also be described.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe in detail the structure and physiology of the human nervous system that governs behaviour.
?Describe the bidirectional associations of the neural and endocrine systems.
?Describe the research methods in current use in biological psychology, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method.
?Describe how genes may influence behaviour; describe epigenetics and the how the interaction of genes and environment may influence behaviour.
?Describe the main mechanisms by which behaviour may be programmed in utero.
?Describe the neuroendocrine changes that occur at adolescence, indicating how these may influence behaviour and distinguishing between direct and indirect effects.
?Describe the physical and cognitive changes that occur in middle adulthood.
?Describe the physical and cognitive changes that occur in older adulthood.
?Describe the biology of Alzheimers Disease, including how changes relate to behaviour.
Demonstrate critical thinking about how psychobiological processes relate to behaviour.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP2103 Introduction to Neuroscience, Perception and Attention

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Chan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jason Chan, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To review methods, theories and approaches to describing and explaining the neuroscience of brain function, perception and basic attention.

Module Content: Evaluate empirical and theoretical foundations, understand general brain development and function, and understand the theories and empirical models of perception and attention.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe how neurons work in relation to cognitive processes.
?Have a general understanding about how neuroimaging is conducted and some of the pitfalls.
?Understand how the brain develops across the lifespan;
?Explain how brain damage or abnormal brain function can lead to abnormal behaviour;
?Describe visual perception and object recognition models drawn from neuropsychological and experimental studies;
?Understand auditory perception and how speech signals are decoded;
?Demonstrate knowledge of attention theories and empirical findings;
?Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of dual tasking on cognitive performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP2104 Developmental Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 392.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To critically look at key theoretical positions in developmental literature. To examine theories and processes of individual development and change through the life-span.

Module Content: Theoretical perspectives that examine development throughout the lifespan including the biological basis of development and developmental neuroscience, intersubjectivity, theoretical approaches to development, adulthood and ageing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the biological base of development and developmental neuroscience, with particular reference to infancy.
?Explain inter-subjectivity and theories of mind during childhood
?Critically discuss the research literature related to the development of general representational abilities, especially language, drawing and number
?Compare and contrast constructivist, sociocultural and informational processing concepts of cognitive development and the impact of schooling
?Analysis psychological perspectives on development in adulthood and ageing
?Apply ecological and systems perspectives to child and adult development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP2105 Experimental Design and Statistical Applications 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): AP1105 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To teach experimental design strategies found in contemporary psychological literature, along with computer-based data analysis and methods of evaluating outcomes.

Module Content: Parametric and non-parametric data models. Test selection, univariate and multivariate analysis, use of computer packages for statistical analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify types of data, and in conjunction with the research question, recommend appropriate statistical analyses.
?Using SPSS, be able to carry out tests of relationships and differences up to and including types of multiple regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA).
?Report the results of these analyses appropriately, within the context of a research report.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 practical report 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP2106 History and Philosophy of Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To place psychology within the scientific tradition in Western thought.

Module Content: To examine modern conceptions of science, and to evaluate the history of science from these perspectives with particular emphasis on the process of discovery and the formulation and testing of theories. To examine the rationale for presenting psychology as a science, and to review developments within psychology from the start of the 20th century until today with emphasis on key philosophical issues within that tradition.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the key problems in the philosopy of science such as the distinction between induction and deduction;
?Be able to describe the wider issues pertaining to psychologists in their roles as members of a scientific community for example distinguishing science from pseudo-science
?Be able to show understanding of the conceptual issues underlying persistent problems in human self understanding;
?Demonstrate an ability to defend chosen positions on substantive philosophical debates in the field using effective evidence and logical argument;
?To be able to describe historical and contemporary instances of how such conceptual issues have been manifest. For example to appreciate the practical importance of what, if anything, constitutes human nature or what role neuroscience has to play in law enforcement.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 Word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 3,000 word essay).

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AP2107 Individual Differences

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the area of individual differences in human behaviour, personality and intelligence.

Module Content: The history of intelligence and personality assessment. Models of personality and intelligence and the measurement thereof. Application of individual differences in social, work and personal life.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the major areas of psychological investigation typically studied within an individual differences research paradigm;
?Question the appropriate methodologies used in individual differences research;
?Highlight and summarise the current trends within the intelligence and personality literature as it pertains to individual differences research;
?Contrast and compare the various approaches towards the study of personality;
?Critically evaluate the science of intelligence and heredity;
?Design studies in applied individual differences research;
?Apply theoretical knowledge in varied applied fields including interpersonal relationships;
?Understand fundamentals of measurement accuracy including validity and reliability.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP2109 Social Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To review methods, theories and approaches to social psychology.

Module Content: This module reviews theory and research in social psychology with a view to developing research-informed appreciation of connections between the field of social and everyday life. Social Psychology is concerned with people in relationship, understanding of which is central to many concerns in everyday life, e.g. participation in community, happiness, social justice, sustainable development, making sense of economic crises and recessions, working out ways of living together. This module will explore how social psychological research (e.g. social relations and representation, social identity theory, influence and persuasion, people in groups) can inform and be informed by understanding these everyday experiences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain various research methods and theories in social psychology;
?Appreciate how different approaches to social psychology suggest different understandings of `person';
?Evaluate key studies in social psychology as ethical enquiry into social life and relationship;
?Explore connections between social psychological research and everyday life.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP2111 Psychology and Everyday Life

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): AP1108

Co-requisite(s): AP2209

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 5hr(s) Fieldwork (ethnographic fieldwork with online support).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John C McCarthy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to theoretical, methodological, and empirical ideas about an approach to studying experience, practices, dilemmas, and potential of people's everyday lives.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the critical potential of 'everyday lived experience' as a radically different approach to psychological research and practice that provides a link between psychology and social theory. Introduction to psychology of everyday lived experience; concepts such as lived experience, voice, values, subject position, participation; ethnography of lived experience as researching with the other; case studies such as children living in a debt economy, the everyday experience of being a migrant, digital technology and the transformation of everyday living, everyday caring, etc. (case studies will vary from year to year).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply concepts such as voice, subjectivity and society, lived experience, dialogue in analysis of examples of everyday lived experience;
?Examine research evidence in light of social theory;
?Appreciate the critical potential of a focus on `everyday lived experience? in psychology;
?Carry out a short ethnography of a specific aspect of everyday lived experience.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Ethnographically-informed report that focuses on everyday experience, challenges, practices, and potential in the situation studied (1 x 3,000 word report)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP2204 The Psychology of Aging

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To examine psychological issues in middle and older adulthood and related research findings

Module Content: Life stages, transitions, and role differentiation in middle and older adulthood; age-related changes in cognitive functions, personality, and interpersonal relationships; relationship between perception, cognition and physical health; aspects of dementia and dementia care; the impact on psychological wellbeing of support services and the physical environment; experience-centred design of services, support and supportive technologies; caring relationships; the community context; dying, bereavement, grieving.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Articulate the lifespan developmental approach as it relates to middle and older adulthood;
?Evaluate research age-related changes in functioning and wellbeing.
?Evaluate research on the relationship between perception, cognition and physical health.
?Discuss dementia in the context of age-related changes in cognitive functions, personality, and interpersonal relationships.
?Apply knowledge of the experience of aging to the design of supportive environment, communities, and services.
?Discuss psychological issues related to dying, bereavement, and grieving.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay or applied project).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP2209 Research Methods in Psychology II

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): AP1108 and AP1105

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 15 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 3 x 2hr(s) Other (proposal writing).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to carry out and critically evaluate research in psychology

Module Content: Lectures, small group tutorials and supervised practical work on research design, methodology, and practice, pertaining to individual differences, developmental, biological, social, cognitive and abnormal psychology. Topics including: factorial and repeated measures experimental design; psychological measurement; qualitative approaches to ethnographic fieldwork and textual analysis; coding and analysis; theoretical and epistemological foundations of qualitative methods; varieties of data collection analysis and interpretation; ethical issues in psychological research; report writing and oral presentation of work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the literature in a research area based on a clear understanding of theoretical representations and research interventions.
?Formulate original research questions.
?Design and carry out quantitative and qualitative research study using appropriate methodology.
?Analyse and interpret data using appropriate methods.
?Appreciate ethical issues and make ethical judgments.
?Communicate research in written presentations as well as presenting in an oral presentation.
?Evaluate methodologies used in psychological research.
?Defend and challenge the research approaches used in psychology.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (4 reports of empirical research practicals (2,500 - 3,500 words each); 1 project proposal (2,500 - 3,000 words); an oral presentation of one of the above to be specified in the handbook. Six assessment elements in total 50 marks each. All components must be submitted and passed.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at practicals is compulsory and recorded by a class register. Practical report(s) for which the student has not attended the requisite classes will be assigned a mark of zero unless the absence is excused and the attendance requirement waived by the School. In order to pass the module, all practicals must be submitted and passed.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% To pass the module, all practicals must be submitted and passed. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a "Fail Special Requirement" will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School). In order to pass the module all practicals must be submitted and passed.

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AP2504 Early Years and Childhood Health & Wellbeing Project

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 130.

Pre-requisite(s): AP1504 (Research Methods in Education and Psychology), AP1149 (Social and Developmental Psychology) or their equivalents

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Research methodology in developmental and educational psychology); 12 x 1hr(s) Workshops (Information literacy); 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Online tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: The module builds on knowledge and skills developed in the context of AP1505 Research Methods in Education and Psychology, which you took in year 1. The aim of the module is to help you become evidence-informed practitioners: people who appreciate the value of research evidence, know where to find that evidence, understand it, synthesise it, are able to appraise it critically, and can use it to improve their own professional practice - to promote well-being of children.

Module Content: Evidence-informed practice. Review of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies used frequently in the context of early years and childhood studies research. Research designs and data analysis. Formulating a clear research question relevant to early years and childhood practice. Methods of literature search. Evaluation of the quality of evidence. Evidence synthesis. Conventions of academic writing-style and referencing. Writing for non-academic audience. Technical skills of preparing a manuscript (with tables and figures) and Power Point presentation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognize main research methods and designs employed in psychological research on children (both quantitative and qualitative), appreciate their strengths as well as limitations.
?Identify psychological and educational problems of childhood that can be resolved by research, and formulate research questions with a potential to improve early years and childhood practice.
?Use bibliographic databases, digital libraries and other relevant sources to access scientific literature on developmental and educational psychology, child health and wellbeing.
?Apply technical conventions and terminology (e.g. the structure of a research paper, descriptive and inferential statistics terminology) in order to read research literature with understanding.
?Identify, evaluate and synthesise scientific literature relevant to your research question, demonstrating critical evaluation skills.
?Document the process and results of your research - adhere to proper standards of academic referencing.
?Appreciate ethical issues associated with early years and childhood research.
?Write about research to a professional standard, for academic and non-academic audiences.
?Deliver effective oral presentations.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 X Portfolio record of achievement - evidence of learning practical skills of searching for, reading and evaluating literature and presenting the results of your findings (90 marks); 1 X Final Report - systematic literature review (4000 words) (210 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3015 Forensic Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 2hr(s) Other (Court Visit).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To discuss the theory and practice of contemporary forensic psychology and to explore the role of psychology in the study of crime and the coperation of the criminal justice system.

Module Content: This module explores the application of psychological theory and research to areas such as investigative psychology, confessions and offender profiling; sexual and violent crimes (including homicide and serial killers) as well as the role that mental illness, psychopathy, social learning and cognitive processes play in explaining criminality. In addition students are given an opportunity to see the administration of summary justice in a court setting.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the interface between the fields of law and psychology and in so doing justify a definition of forensic psychology.
?Examine how knowledge of forensic psychology can impact on the criminal justice system and specifically evaluate:
?a. the impact on the investigative processes
?b. the impact on the court process.
?Compare and contrast major theories that seek to explain criminal behaviour and specifically:
?a. discuss the nature of violent crimes
?b. discuss the nature of sexual crimes.
?Attend a sitting of the District Court, observe examples of the administration of justice and be able to discuss how forensic psychological approaches could be applied to a particular case.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3020 Applying Psychology in Community Settings

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (60 hours of volunteering in agreed voluntary settings).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To recognise students' commitment to serving in voluntary settings as a means of furthering their understanding of the importance of psychology in community settings.

Module Content: Students will identify opportunities to serve in voluntary settings which will extend practical experience of the contribution psychology can make in community settings, and with a relevant member of academic staff, put in place a learning contract with the service concerned. Students will maintain a log of time contributed and, in conjunction with a staff member in the service setting, will document learning experiences in their organisation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate their ability to identify and secure opportunities to serve the community
?Demonstrate evidence of committing the appropriate time to the community, and formative experienced gained and training undertaken in a Reflective Learning Log
?Apply their understanding of theory and data from the BAAP/HDip programme in order to meet the demands of the service setting
?Reflect on learning and demonstrate personal development throughout the process
?Demonstrate an ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with colleagues
?Develop a critical appreciation of the need for psychological contributions to community settings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1x 3000 word essay and Reflective Learning Log).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 3,000 word essay will be reset by the module co-ordinator for Autumn submission).

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AP3022 Applied Developmental Psychology II: The Psychology of Ageing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mike Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To examine psychological issues in middle and older adulthood and related research findings

Module Content: Life stages, transitions, and role differentiation in middle and older adulthood; age-related changes in cognitive functions, personality, and interpersonal relationships; relationship between perception, cognition and physical health; aspects of dementia and dementia care; the impact on psychological wellbeing of support services and the physical environment; experience-centred design of services, support and supportive technologies; caring relationships; the community context; dying, bereavement, grieving.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Articulate the lifespan developmental approach as it relates to middle and older adulthood;
?Evaluate research age-related changes in functioning and wellbeing.
?Evaluate research on the relationship between perception, cognition and physical health.
?Discuss dementia in the context of age-related changes in cognitive functions, personality, and interpersonal relationships.
?Apply knowledge of the experience of aging to the design of supportive environment, communities, and services.
?Discuss psychological issues related to dying, bereavement, and grieving.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay or applied project).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3030 Special Educational Needs: Aetiology, Assessment and Intervention

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To teach the basic facts about the nature and origins of special educational needs from a psychological perspective.

Module Content: Definitions of special needs;
- Biological, cognitive, social and environmental determinants of special needs in education;
- Epidemiology of special needs; Causes of special needs; - Effects on family;
- Importance of social relationships and social networks;
- Models of assessment;
- Methods of intervention and current educational approach

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline disability legislation and policy with particular reference to the Irish context.
?Evaluate the principle of inclusive education.
?Identify the implications of developmental psychological theories in understanding disability and children with special education needs.
?Describe the function of psychological assessment, factors informing an assessment, assessment procedure and the role of assessment in identifying a child with special needs.
?Examine how knowledge of brain function informs behaviour.
?Evaluate psychological theory relating to the clinical presentations of various specialist client groups across the lifespan which underpins clinical and educational practice.
?Describe the nature and origin of special education needs from a psychological perspective.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP3033 Positive Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To critically evaluate the concepts and the research that underpins positive psychology, and their application to coaching.

Module Content: This course will examine the theory and practice of positive psychology, its application to coaching and the paradigm shift from pathology to strength based psychology, as well as exploring the nature of human strengths and virtues which contribute towards individuals and communities thriving. In addition students will be given opportunities to apply positive psychology practices to their lives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Justify a definition for positive and coaching psychology;
?Discuss the nature of happiness and well-being;
?Identify the determinants that shape happiness, and well-being
?Evaluate wellbeing and happiness measures;
?Critically evaluate the contribution of resources, interventions and techniques in coaching psychology;
?Practice positive psychology interventions;
?Know how to apply positive psychology practices to themselves.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3037 Work Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures (including in class participation and discussion, use of case studies, and vignettes (through various media), to encourage students to reflect on how concepts discussed actually apply in work settings); 4 x 2hr(s) Other (structured online lectures and activities).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carol Linehan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carol Linehan, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: The core objective of this module is to understand human behavior and experience at work. We will draw on theories of human ability, motivation, and adaptability to explore dimensions of human performance in organisations. Two core themes will run through our exploration of work psychology: the relationship between the self and the social, and the diverse, and sometimes competing, interests in the employment relationship.

Module Content: Meaning of paid work in the self concept; introducing a framework for understanding performance at work; dimensions of human ability at work, selection methods and tools; applying motivational theories to understand employee performance, engagement and implications for reward strategies; applying learning theories to adaptability and flexibility at work; the impact of work and organizational design on behaviour at work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the relationship between work and an individual's identity;
?Define parameters of ability at work;
?Describe and evaluate contemporary personnel selection methods;
?Apply the psychology of motivation to employee performance and engagement;
?Describe and evaluate different reward strategies;
?Apply learning theories to workplace learning and change;
?Outline choices in work and organisational design and discuss the likely impacts of such choices on human behaviour and experience at work.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (An applied project based on a course theme (3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3039 Evolutionary Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 80 x 1hr(s) Other (self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To discuss the theory and practice of evolution and genetics as they pertain to human behavior.

Module Content: This module explores the application of biological theory to human behavior. This will involve some knowledge of genetics, mechanisms of selection, various heritability issues, and the adaptationist program. The focus will be on particular psychological issues including sexual behavior, life history theory, applications to mental health, and anti-social behavior.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the interface between the fields of biology and psychology.
?Justify the role of evolutionary theory as an over-arching explanatory paradigm unifying the field, an appreciation of psychology as a life science.
?Examine how knowledge of genetics and selection can shed light on otherwise puzzling human behaviors, especially: Psychopathologies; Mate selection; Risk-taking; Social behaviors,
?Explain the nature of heritability: Including being able to perform some basic estimates of heritability, and discuss the importance of heritability in a broader context - e.g. gene-environment interactions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay (excluding references)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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AP3101 Abnormal Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean Hammond, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sean Hammond, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To examine the concept of abnormality from a biopsychosocial perspective and determine its place in the study of mental health.

Module Content: This module examines the prevailing models of psychopathology and attempts to expose the strengths and weaknesses of a variety approaches to the aetiology, assessment and treatment of psychological disorder. This is illustrated by looking at commonly used diagnostic categories and critically examining the evidence base behind each.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the emergence of current perspectives of abnormal psychology
?Identify the most salient signs and symptoms associated with a variety of psychological disorders.
?Critically evaluate the research into the aetiology, prognosis and treatment strategies of a variety of psychological disorders.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay/critical review).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3102 Applied Biological Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): AP2102 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the how biological approaches to psychology have informed understanding of everyday behaviour

Module Content: The module contains several components of unequal size. (1) The biological bases of human sexuality, and sexual pathology (2) Sleep, its disorders and everyday functioningIssues in sexual pathology. (3) Pharmacological effects on thought and behaviour.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the physiological and biological factors underlying the repertoire of human sexual behaviour.
?Discourse freely and without embarrassment on all matters of a sexual nature using appropriate terminology.
?Perceive the link between functional and dysfunctional sexual behaviours and be aware of the wide range of 'normal' sexual functions.
?Understand the aetiology of sleep disorders and their treatment.? Understand the effect of sleep loss and sleep hygene contribution to everyday behaviour. Understand the used effects of widely used legal and illegal substances on everyday functioning, and treatment for dependence.
?Plan and follow healthy options in their own sexual lives.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3 x 1000 word reports).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3104 Applied Developmental Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): AP2104 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop skills and knowledge in applying models of child, adolescent and emerging adult biopsychosocial and cultural development to support health and wellbeing and to develop resilience. It aims to develop a knowledge and understanding of a range of psychosocial interventions with children, adolescents and emerging adults. It will enable students to critically appraise evidence-based psychological interventions.

Module Content: This module provides an overview of critical issues in health and wellbeing in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood (e.g. health behaviours, anxiety, persistence and achievement, culture and diversity).
It reflects on how bridges are being developed between research-based developmental models (e.g. attachment theory, mentalisation, culture-cound adulthood) and person-oriented psychological interventions.
It analyses the implementation and impact of early preschool intervention aiming at increasing school readiness of children growing in poverty (interventions such as Head Start).
It introduces student to theory and research in resilience studies (the psychobiology of resilience, family and community influences).
It examines the theory and practice of psychosocial prevention and interventions with children and adolescents ranging from psychotherapeutic modalities to educational and community-oriented psychological interventions, including interventions to manage learning disorders.
It critically assesses the evidence base underpinning different child-oriented psychosocial interventions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Provide a comprehensive understanding of the multiple influences on the child, adolescent and early adulthood development.
?Critically consider how psychobiological processes can be influenced by life experiences, and how these psychobiological processes can then, in turn, influence life experiences and influence health and wellbeing.
?Apply this knowledge to explain/address factors that promote or compromise child, adolescent and early adulthood wellbeing.
?Be able to evaluate the effectiveness (or otherwise) of a given approach empirically, by reviewing relevant literature.ive to applied research areas such as gender, immigration, disability etc.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3 x 1,000 word short essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. All 3 essays must be submitted.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students failing this module must submit one 3,000 word essay.

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AP3108 Practical Project Work

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): AP2208, AP2105 or equivalents

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other (Individual supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide practical experience of the conceptualisation, running, and reporting of a piece of empirically based research in psychology.

Module Content: This module will cover the skills of setting up an empirical research programme yielding quantifiable or qualitative results, analysing those results, and presenting the results in a manner consistent with current psychological research practice. The subject matter will be chosen by discussion with the tutor involved.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a research question in conjunction with a supervisor that can be studied empirically by utilising a range of library resources (databases, books, journals), discussion with experts, etc
?Complete a project proposal and document a research plan
?Develop the skill of summarising a large body of literature and critically evaluate the theory and research done in that area
?Know about ethical guidelines and apply ethical standards in research
?Organise themselves to design, plan, and carry out the study in a scientific, professional manner
?Collect primary data
?Analyse those data, utilising the qualitative or quantitative analysis methods they have learned in first and second year, and more specialist techniques as necessary
?Gain experience in doing an oral presentation of their research in a conference-like setting.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (1 x Practical report 8,000 - 10,000 words (400 marks) presentation (pass/fail judgement)). In exceptional cases, students may be called to a viva voce examination.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. and presentation. Viva Voce Examination, if required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% mark for the practical report and pass judgement in the presentation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by Department).

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AP3110 Psychological Therapies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and group discussions); 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop a basic understanding of the main theories underlying a range of psychological therapies and consider the application of these theories in individual social situations.

Module Content: This module will look at the origins of the therapeutic approach, an overview of the main
perspectives that informs practice and will consider a number of specific approaches to counselling psychology and psychotherapy including multi-cultural counselling.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe factors relevant to the emergence of the field of counselling and psychotherapy.
?Recognise and discuss key factors and values pertinent to therapeutic work.
?Reflect on the differences between the main approaches to counselling psychology and psychotherapy.
?Critically evaluate the contributions and limitations of at least one specific approach to counselling and psychotherapy.
?Summarise the development of personal understanding of counselling and psychotherapy during the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP3111 Personal and Career Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Group Work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nadia Pantidi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carol Linehan, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce key issues and skills for professional psychologists.

Module Content: Training in literature searching, cv preparation, psychology as a profession, presentation skills, interviewing and professional ethics will be covered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Be able to carry out a detailed literature search:
?Prepare a cv appropriate to a variety of potential applications;
?Make a presentation using appropriate electronic media;
?Articulate key issues relevant to the nature of psychology as a discipline and a profession;
?Demonstrate an understanding of PSI code of ethics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay 70 marks; group presentation on psychology as a profession 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. including in-class group presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP3113 Applied Developmental Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): AP2104 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop skills and knowledge in applying models of child development to support education, health and wellbeing and to develop resilience. It aims to develop a knowledge and understanding of a range of psychosocial interventions with children. It will enable students to critically appraise evidence-based psychological interventions.

Module Content: This module provides an overview of critical issues in health and wellbeing in childhood and adolescence (e.g. health behaviours, depression and anxiety, persistence and achievement, cultural and diversity).
It reflects on how bridges are being developed between research-based developmental models (e.g. attachment theory, mentalisation) and child-oriented psychological interventions.
It analyses the implementation and impact of early preschool intervention aiming at increasing school readiness of children growing in poverty (interventions such as Head Start).
It introduces student to theory and research in resilience studies (the psychobiology of resilience, family and community influences,).
It examines the theory and practice of psychosocial prevention and interventions with children and adolescents ranging from psychotherapeutic modalities to educational and community-oriented psychological interventions, including interventions to manage learning disorders.
It critically assesses the evidence base underpinning different child-oriented psychosocial interventions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Provide a comprehensive understanding of the multiple influences on the child and adolescent development.
?Critically consider how psychobiological processes can be influenced by life experiences, and how these psychobiological processes can then, in turn, influence life experiences and influence health and wellbeing.
?Apply this knowledge to explain/address factors that promote or compromise child and adolescent wellbeing in education, clinical and community settings.
?Evaluate the effectiveness (or otherwise) of a given approach empirically, by critically reviewing the relevant research literature.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP3114 Cognition and Real Life Applications

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To review theories, methods of investigation and empirical findings on cognitive processes such as memory, thinking, reasoning, speaking and understanding language and how they affect performance in real life situations (e.g. choosing what to eat; driving, etc.) To promote knowledge of how cognition is studied empirically and critical thinking around these topics. To be aware of cultural differences in approaching cognition empirically and how these differences may affect theory.

Module Content: Evaluate empirical and theoretical foundations, neurological basis and applications of research in memory, thought, language, decision making and learning; Provide example of cognition in real life setting and how it is studied to elucidate some of the theories presented.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse theories and empirical work on memory systems;
?Consider theories and empirical work on language acquisition and production;
?Analyse theories and empirical work on reasoning;
?Evaluate theories and empirical work on judgment and decision making;
?Examine theories and empirical work on problem solving;
?Identify the main cognitive processes involved in real life scenarios such as driving, spatial navigation, etc. ;
?Describe and critically analyse the links between research in laboratory and in real life settings on these topics and how they inform each other.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP3115 Health Psychology: Models and Applications

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Other (laboratory class); 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (online group tutorial sessions (moderated by lecturer)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the core models used in health psychology and how these models are applied in practice to understand and modify health behaviours.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the core psychological theories and models that explain health and health outcomes. Individual health behaviours (e.g. sleep, exercise, smoking, dietary habits) will be used to examine how behaviours are learnt, established and may be modified. Health behaviours will be examined using the learning theories, the Social Cognitive Theory, Theories of Reasoned Action and Planned Behaviour, the Transtheoretical Model and the Health Action Process Approach. The module will support students to gain experience in developing behaviour modification programmes using the 'capability', 'opportunity', 'motivation' and 'behaviour' (COM-B) model of health behaviour. Students will be introduced to the Behaviour Change Wheel as a method to develop and assess behaviour change programmes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the biopsychosocial model of health and disease.
?Describe models and theories of health behaviour, including the learning theories, the Social Cognitive Theory, Theories of Reasoned Action and Planned Behaviour, the Transtheoretical Model and the Health Action Process Approach.
?Demonstrate an understanding of methods and measures to assess individual health behaviours.
?Develop a behaviour change programme, describing the behaviour in terms of `capability', 'opportunity', 'motivation' and 'behaviour'.
?Use the Behaviour Change Wheel to describe the influences on a health behaviour and to assess a behaviour change programme.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x online tests via Blackboard (2 x 15 marks each);1 x critique of public health campaign 750 words (20 marks); 1 x behaviour modification programme and reflection 1750 words in 3 parts (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3299 People and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 2 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 8 x 2hr(s) Other (structured online lectures); 100 x 1hr(s) Other (online activities eg blogs, forums, discussion groups, design activity).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Conor Linehan, School of Applied Psychology (School of Applied Psychology).

Lecturer(s): Dr Nadia Pantidi, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Conor Linehan, School of Applied Psychology; Prof John C McCarthy, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with a critical understanding of the factors (psychological, social, and organizational) involved in the user-centred design and evaluation of computer-mediated environments and experiences. This will include evaluating different approaches to human-computer interaction (HCI), understanding people's experience of interacting with computers, and practicing relevant HCI methods and skills.

Module Content: Introduction to HCI; Usability and user experience; Usability evaluation; user-centered and participatory design for a variety of people and situations (e.g. to design and evaluate assistive technologies for older people); Social life and work online.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate HCI theories, models and methods in terms of their value to the user-centered/participatory-centered/ experience-centered design and evaluation.
?Carry out a usability evaluation.
?Discuss psychological research on life online.
?Appreciate the ethical implications of researching life and work online.
?Evaluate the evidence of appropriation and experience of technologies in a variety of settings (e.g. work, home, health, education).

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Participation in structured online activities eg. peer tutoring, creating online resource of value to teaching others interested in an area of HCI (50 marks); Individual essay 1,500 - 2,000 works (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3399 Psychological Measurement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): AP2107 and AP2208 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean Hammond, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sean Hammond, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the principles and methods of Psychological Measurement.

Module Content: A critical appraisal of Classical Test Theory, psychophysical origins of psychometrics, paired comparisons, models for scaling, Item Response Theory, Unfolding, Idiographic measurement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the limitations of Classical Test Theory and its use and misuse in the psychological research literature.
?Understand the principles of building measurement models.
?Utilise appropriate models for a range of assessment problems
?Plan and carry out optimal assessment protocols in a variety of settings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1500 word reports).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3501 Applying Psychological Theory and Reflective Practice to Placement Context

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 125.

Pre-requisite(s): AP1149, AP2104; AP1504, AP2504 or their equivalents

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (On Line); 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Reconnection Days).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To document critical reflection on the relationship between psychological theory and practice in placement settings.

Module Content: Linked to Placement, students would compile a reflective portfolio based on psychological theory linked to practice in their placement experiences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Show an ability to reflect on your learning process, your capabilities, developmental needs and professional relationships in your placement setting as an Early Years and Childhood Studies student practitioner (using your placement diaries as a source of your observations);
?Demonstrate an ability to make connections between psychological theory and practice and between psychological theory, practice and knowledge acquired through your Early Years & Childhood Studies course;
?Write evidence-based reports demonstrating how you have supported children?s learning during this placement;
?Demonstrate a capacity for reflection and self-challenge concerning the development of your own professional identity;
?Demonstrate that you value ethnically informed practice;
?Present a coherent, well-structured report which complies with stated word limits and displays good standards of theoretical understanding and academic writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay on using psychological theory and research evidence to support children's learning during placement, accompanied by five reflective entries (3 x 250 words = 750 words in total) presenting your placement experience of linking science and practice).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment, Placement, Reconnection days.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP3504 Child and Family Health Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 392.

Pre-requisite(s): AP2504 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Audrey Dunn Galvin, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: This module will engage students with the main themes and theories of health psychology. The students will gain an understanding of the importance of psychological processes in the experience and perception of health and illness of children and families, the development of coping strategies, and explore the role of behaviour and emotion in current trends of mortality and morbidity from a developmental pathway perspective. They will also become aware of the crucial role health psychology has to play in the applied aspects of health psychology, such as evaluating and monitoring health related quality of life, and health promotion interventions.

Module Content: - Health psychology as a field of enquiry
- Health psychology and child and family in society
- Biopsychosocial models of health and illness
- Theories of stress, coping, and the role of social support
- Personality and emotional correlates of health and illness
- Communication in medical settings
- Models of health behaviours
- Health compromising behaviours (e.g. Smoking, obesity, eating disorders)
- Living and coping with chronic conditions: the examples of food allergy, diabetes, asthma
- Patient related outcome measures (e.g. Health related quality of life, patient satisfaction)

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate understanding of the biopsychosocial causes and consequences of health and disease from a developmental pathway perspective.
?Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the role of psychological processes in health and illness, including health perception, health beliefs, and coping strategies.
?Demonstrate familiarity with patient related outcome measures and their value in applied settings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP3514 Psychological Perspectives on Special Educational Needs

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 392.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To teach the basic facts about the nature and origins of special educational needs from a psychological perspective.

Module Content: Definitions of special needs; Biological, cognitive, social and environmental determinants of special needs in education; Epidemiology of special needs; Causes of special needs; Effects on family; Importance of social relationships and social networks; Models of assessment; Methods of intervention and current educational approach

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline disability legislation and policy with particular reference to the Irish context.
?Evaluate the principle of inclusive education.
?Identify the implications of developmental psychological theories in understanding disability and children with special education needs.
?Describe the function of psychological assessment, factors informing an assessment, assessment procedure and the role of assessment in identifying a child with special needs.
?Examine how knowledge of brain function informs behaviour.
?Evaluate psychological theory relating to the clinical presentations of various specialist client groups across the lifespan which underpins clinical and educational practice.
?Describe the nature and origin of special education needs from a psychological perspective.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP6016 Research Methods and Data Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures (This module will be offered as a blended learning module. Some lectures will be available as integrated and interactive online lectures and other lectures will be delivered face-to-face in class.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of qualitative and quantitative methodological strategies; consider ethical issues in research design and procedures for data collection and analysis; work with students on the skills required to carry out an effective research project and practice data analysis.

Module Content: - Theory, method, and research design in psychology
- Practical, methodological and ethical issues in planning research
- Reflexivity in research
- Issues in qualitative date collection and analysis (eg ethnography, thematic analysis, grounded theory, case study method, discourse analysis)
-Issues in quantitative date collection and anslsis (eg univariate, non-parametric and parametric frequentist approaches, multivariate statistical analysis and model testing).
- Using SPSS applications for data analysis
- Disseminating research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Formulate and appropriately conceptualise original research questions;
?Plan and design a research project taking account of ethics, methodology, feasibility, likelihood of answering the research question, and analysis;
?Evaluate research designs theoretically, methodologically, ethically and practically;
?Select and use appropriate data collection methods;
?Select and use appropriate methods for analysing data;
?Evaluate methods of analysis including univariate and multivariate statistical analysis, as well as qualitative analysis
?Write research reports.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 - 5,000 word statistical analysis 100 marks; prepare an online resource (to be specified by the lecturers) as part of an online pack to be developed by the class for teaching qualitative research 3,000 - 5,000 words 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6023 Psychological Assessment

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (This module will be offered as a blended learning module. Some lectures will be available as integrated and interactive online lectures and other lectures will be delivered face-to-face in class); 80 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: This module is designed to provide students with generalisable skills that can be used with a wide variety of instruments in various professional contexts.

Module Content: This course explores the use of assessment batteries in the areas of personality, intelligence, clinical pathology and neuropsychology. A theoretical background to classical test theory and item response theory is given as an underpinning for understanding a broad range of assessment batteries currently used in industry and psychological practice. The course is structured into theory and practice giving students hands-on experience and exposure to various assessment batteries.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Administer an assessment protocol, score and interpret the results and write up the report;
?Recognise the nature of assessment in broader context within clinical and non-clinical samples;
?Comprehend and apply classical test theory and item response theory when devising a test battery;
?Know the historical and theoretical underpinnings of intelligence, personality, pathology and neuropsychological assessment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word assessment report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6112 Critical Issues in Applying Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and Seminars); 80 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop a critical sense of what successful application of psychological knowledge involves and requires in specific through considering examples of successful and unsuccessful application across domains of applied psychology.

Module Content: Each seminar will consider the ethical, practical, professional, political, organisational and theoretical challenges that applying psychology involves in a variety of domains of applied psychology/work settings (e.g. Clinical, Educational, Counselling, Occupational, Forensic, Cognitive, Health). Each seminar will be led by a member of staff with substantial experience of working as an applied psychologist or psychologist practitioner in a given setting. Where seminars are led by an applied psychologist from outside the School, these will be introduced and chaired by members of the School.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically reflect on the practice of applying psychology;
?Demonstrate advanced knowledge of the ethical issues involved in applying psychology;
?Demonstrate advanced knowledge of professional standards and requirements;
?Explain the critical issues related to applying psychology in a number of specialist areas;
?Appreciate the lived experience of organisational politics in applying psychology.
?Demonstrate successful application of psychological knowledge;
?Appreciate value-related criteria in applying psychology.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x blogs approx. 1000 words excluding references (66 marks) and 2 blog responses x 500 words excluding references (34 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the co-ordinator).

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AP6116 Coaching and Positive Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 7 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and training sessions); 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study; 4 x 1hr(s) Other (Practical Work); 1 x 6hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To learn to apply the concepts and the research that underpins positive psychology in a coaching context.

Module Content: This skills course will examine the application of positive psychology in coaching. We will explore how positive psychology interventions can contribute towards engagement, performances and wellbeing. Students will be given the opportunity to apply positive psychology practices to their lives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Justify a definition for positive psychology
?Examine how coaching can influence resilience, well-being, engagement, performance and flourishing
?Apply positive psychology interventions in a variety of coaching situations
?Use relevant measures, in a coaching context
?Critically evaluate the contribution of resources, interventions and techniques that increase wellbeing and performance
?Practice positive psychology interventions.
?Write a case study based on the application of positive psychology in coaching.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word case study; 1 x Reflective log (3000 words pass/fail basis).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6117 Wellness Coaching

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 9 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 6hr(s) Workshops; 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Anna O'Reilly-Trace, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: Wellness coaching is the practice of health education, health promotion, health psychology and positive psychology within a coaching context, to enhance the wellbeing of individuals and to facilitate the achievement of health-related goals. The aim of this module is to introduce students to health and wellness coaching theory, research and practice.

Module Content: Theoretical, research and practical issues in health and wellness coaching, including evidence based techniques to promote health behaviour change, reduce stress, manage chronic illness and enhance wellbeing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the role of psychology in health and wellness;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the theories and research evidence base in wellness coaching;
?Analyse and critique evidence based wellness coaching interventions;
?Explore the role of health coaching in managing stress and chronic illness;
?Practice skills such as goal setting, motivational interviewing, stress management and mindfulness.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Assessment of motivational interviewing skills demonstrated by the student - 30 mins video recording of a wellness coaching session.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6128 Introduction to Psychotherapeutic Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 24.

Pre-requisite(s): AP3110 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures ( and Discussion and Video Work); 80 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop theoretical and practical understanding of basic skills underlying psychotherapeutic intervention.

Module Content: In this module attending, active listening, empathy, probing/questioning, feedback, challenging, non verbal communication and professional issues linked with psychotherapeutic intervention will be considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Reflect on the development of their communication skills;
?Implement basic psychotherapeutic intervention skills;
?Offer constructive feedback to other group members;
?Identify and analyse basic psychotherapeutic intervention skills;
?Recognise non verbal communication in relation to psychotherapeutic skills;
?Advance understanding of the application of psychology to personal and social situations
?Discuss professional issues in relation to psychotherapeutic intervention.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (A 20-minute taped counselling session with 8-minute transcript, analysis and written overall assessment of the twenty minute session).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment/Attendance and participation in role play as client and/or counsellor.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the co-ordinator).

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AP6129 Health Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 9 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and training sessions); 80 x 1hr(s) Other (self-directed learning); 1day(s) Workshops (6 hrs skills training).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to health psychology theory, research and practice.

Module Content: Theoretical, research and practical issues in health psychology including evidence based techniques to promote health behaviour change, reduce stress and enhance wellbeing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the role of psychology in health and wellness
?Demonstrate an understanding of the theories and research issues in health psychology
?Analyse and critique evidence based interventions aimed at health promotion and stress management.
?Critically evaluate tests and assessments relevant to health psychology
?Practice health psychology skills such as stress managaement, breathing exercises and mindfulness.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x practice focused project - 3000 word report based on the principles of health coaching).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6137 Dissertation in Applied Psychology

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (600 hours of study time including 24 hours made up of supervised seminar / tutorial work.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To teach by self-directed learning how to prepare and present a professional Applied Psychology report to contemporary standards.

Module Content: A problem in an area of Applied Psychology will be chosen by the student under guidance from the module co-ordinator. An applied problem will be investigated and presented to current professional standards both as a written report and as a verbal presentation. Students will be coached on appropriate methods of presentation, both written and verbal.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify an appropriate problem in an area of contemporary applied psychology relevant to the programme of study;
?Apply suitable research methods to answer the problem identified;
?Document the process of investigation to prevailing standards in the area;
?Interpret the solution obtained;
?Present the problem, the process, and the solution in a 20-minute verbal briefing.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (A fully documented 20 minute presentation to peers and experts (pass/fail judgement); Either a 15,000 word report to professional standards, not including technical appendices if any (600 marks) or a 6,000 word grant application (250 marks) and an article for publication in a peer-reviewed journal 9,000 words (350 marks) as directed by the supervisor.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. - comprising both written work and presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% mark for the written work and pass judgement in the presentation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AP6142 People and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 2 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 8 x 2hr(s) Other (structured online lectures); 100 x 1hr(s) Other (online activities eg blogs, forums, discussion groups, design activity).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Conor Linehan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nadia Pantidi, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Conor Linehan, School of Applied Psychology; Prof John C McCarthy, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with a critical understanding of the factors (psychological, social, and organizational) involved in the user-centred design and evaluation of computer-mediated environments and experiences. This will include evaluating different approaches to human-computer interaction (HCI), understanding people's experience of interacting with computers, and practicing relevant HCI methods and skills.

Module Content: Introduction to HCI; Usability and user experience; Usability evaluation; user-centered and participatory design for a variety of people and situations (e.g. to design and evaluate assistive technologies for older people); Social life and work online

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate HCI theories, models and methods in terms of their value to the user-centered/participatory-centered/ experience-centered design and evaluation.
?Carry out a usability evaluation.
?Discuss psychological research on life online.
?Appreciate the ethical implications of researching life and work online.
?Evaluate the evidence of appropriation and experience of technologies in a variety of settings (e.g. work, home, health, education).

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Participation in structured online activities e.g. peer tutoring, creating an online resource of value to teaching others interested in an area of HCI (30 marks); Individual essay 2,500 (70 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6144 Applied Clinical Issues (Adult Mental Health)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Lectures, workshops & guest speakers); 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology, and invited speakers.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding and critical awareness of the primary issues involved in clinical interventions within Adult mental health settings.

Module Content: The module will cover common psychological presentations in clinical psychology services in the over 18's population. This will include, presentation, aetiology, assessment, treatment and prognosis. Aspects of clinical practice, formulation and governance will be covered in relation to particular disorders

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the emergence of current perspectives in clinical settings.
?Explain the contribution of empirical research to our understanding of psychological dysfunction.
?Critically evaluate a variety of clinical interventions and describe how they may be tailored to particular client needs.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay excluding references).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 3000 word essay excluding references).

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AP6153 Placement

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (Maximum number of students is dependent on the number of placements available, and ability to secure placement through interview process.).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Placements (Supervised placement practice in Work Setting Relevant To Programme Of Study, two days a week for 6 months (approx.340 hours); 12 x 1 hr lectures; Other (self-directed learning).).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with learning opportunities in relevant work settings in which they are expected to develop skills in applying psychology and to demonstrate critical integration of theory and practice.

Module Content: Students are provided with learning opportunities in work settings relevant to the programme of study, and assessed on the basis of a reflective portfolio maintained by the students in conjunction with the placement provider and their academic supervisor. By the end of the placement, students are required to demonstrate a basic level of competence in applying psychology and in working in relevant settings. They are also expected to be able to reflect on their experience and demonstrate personal development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate their ability to take part in the work of placement provider in an area relevant to the programme of study.
?Demonstrate evidence of learning activities and experiences in a Reflective Learning Log.
?Apply theory from the programme of study to complete work placement tasks/activities.
?Utilise the principles of applied psychological practice, in the placement settings.
?Reflect on learning and demonstrate personal development throughout the process.
?Demonstrate an ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with colleagues.
?Develop an adequate level of competence with working practices utilised in the placement organisation.
?Possess the attributes considered necessary in an individual to work in the relevant organisation.
?Have the capacity to perform key skills and tasks within the organisation.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Reflective Portfolio (300 marks); Placement Practice Report (Pass Judgement)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Fully complete a relevant supervised placement, Submit a Reflective Portfolio, and receive a satisfactory Placement Practice Report from the placement supervisor and course director.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% in Continuous Assessment and a Pass Judgement in the Placement Practice Report (completed by the Placement Provider Supervisor). Students who fail to satisfy a Pass Judgement in the Placement Practice Report will fail the module overall. If students do not complete the required number of placement hours due to illness etc it is expected that any time off must be made up by extending the placement (in consultation with the placement provider).

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students cannot repeat unless conditions are met (Students failing the Reflective Portfolio can resubmit only having received a Pass Judgement in the Placement. Students failing the Placement may be permitted to repeat the Placement only once in a repeat year).

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AP6154 Conflict and Co-operation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 80 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To discuss the theory and practice of evolution and genetics as they pertain to human behavior.

Module Content: This module explores the application of biological theory to human behavior. This will involve knowledge of genetics, the various mechanisms of selection, various heritability issues, and the adaptationist programme. The focus will on particular psychological issues including sexual behaviour, life history theory, social behaviour, aggression, altruism and learning as a set of biological processes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the interface between the fields of biology and psychology and be able to justify the role of evolutionary theory as an over-arching explanatory paradigm unifying the field;
?Examine how knowledge of genetics and selection can shed light on otherwise puzzling human behaviours, especially: Mate selection; Risk-taking; Social behaviours
?Understand the nature of heritability: Including being able to perform some basic estimates of heritability, and discuss the importance of heritability in a broader context - e.g. gene-environment interactions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 - 4,000 word essay (excluding references)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the co-ordinator).

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AP6155 Applied Clincial Issues (Child and Adolescent Mental Health)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Lectures, workshops & guest speakers); 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology, and invited speakers.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding and critical awareness of the primary issues involved in clinical interventions within child and adolescent mental health settings.

Module Content: The module will cover the most common psychological dysfunctions that are presented to clinical psychology services for an under 18 years of age population. This will include presentation, aetiology, assessment, treatment and prognosis. Aspects of clinical practice, formulation and governance will be covered in relation to particular disorders.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand the role of clinical psychology in a child and adolescent mental health settings;
?Discuss the emergence of current perspectives in clinical settings;
?Explain the contribution of empirical research to our understanding of psychological dysfunction;
?Describe the commonly presented disorders in a child and adolescent mental health setting;
?Identify appropriate psychological interventions and models of practice for various disorders;
?Evaluate a variety of clinical interventions and describe how they may be tailored to particular patient needs;
?Critically evaluate intervention outcomes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must submit both essays.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. Students failing this module must resubmit 2 x 1,500 word essays.

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AP6156 Psychology and Intellectual Disabilities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Lectures, workshops & guest speakers); 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology, and invited speakers.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding, appreciation and critical awareness of the nature of intellectual disabilities and their implications for individuals and families.

Module Content: The module will consider the presentation, aetiology, assessment, treatment and prognosis of common intellectual disabilities presented to psychology services for child and adult populations. Models and theories of intellectual disability will be considered, particularly in regard to the assessment of functional adaptive behaviour, together with the ethics, values and impact of intellectual disability. The module will present the historical development of services for people with an intellectual disability and consider models of disability and the philosophy of service provision.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the most commonly presented intellectual disabilities (IDs) in child, adolescent and adult populations;
?Demonstrate knowledge of the role of psychology in the assessment of intellectual disability;
?Explain the contribution of empirical research to understanding intellectual disability;
?Evaluate the models and theories of Intellectual disabilities;
?Evaluate appropriate psychological interventions and models of practice for various IDs;
?Critically reflect on the ethics and values surrounding intellectual disability.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay (excluding references)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the co-ordinator).

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AP6159 Positive Organisational Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 150 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To critically evaluate the evidence base of leadership and management from the perspective of positive psychology and organisational scholarship, and to consider how positive interventions can enhance individual, group and organisational development.

Module Content: The core objective of this module is to understand human behaviour and experience in organisational settings. Based on a critical understanding of evidence based positive psychology and positive organisational scholarship, approaches to enhance engagement, leadership, performance and well-being in the workplace will be explored.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically assess the evidence base of positive psychology and positive organisational scholarship within the context of organisational settings;
?Critically evaluate the role of positive relationships and performance;
?Critically analyse the evidence base of positive interventions, such as authentic leadership development, individual and team engagement, virtuous organisations, appreciative inquiry, strengths and psychological capital.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 Word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School.).

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AP6160 Private Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and training sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop and to be aware of the business issues involved in coaching psychology.

Module Content: Lectures and skill sessions with demonstrations and role play. The role of coaches in business both nationally and internationally and the nature of private practice for coaching.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss how to set up own private practice, including legal, financial, marketing and management issues;
?Develop a brand for a business in coaching and present their product with confidence and understand effective marketing communication.
?Apply the principles of persuasive communication in a commercial situation;
?Be able to demonstrate their mission, vision and values;
?Locate themselves within one of the various niches in coaching private practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Business Plan 2,000 words 70 Marks; Class Presentation 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School.).

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AP6161 Coaching Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and skills training); 6 x 1hr(s) Other (coached by peer); 6 x 1hr(s) Other (coaching sessions); 50 x 1hr(s) Other (self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop and have an opportunity to practice a range of coaching skills.

Module Content: Lectures and skill sessions with demonstrations and role play. The development of professional skills in coaching.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate core coaching competencies;
?Demonstrate listening, questioning, constructive challenging; goal-setting and trust-building skills
?Test the complexity of the coaching conversation and relationship;
?Show an ability to coach from current state to a desired state.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment Portfolio 100 marks (Portfolio consists of: Analysis of a coaching session (2,000 words) and a video recording of a coaching session - 80 marks; Learning journal - 20 marks, Coaching log detailing 6 hours of practice - pass/fail judgement)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% and a Pass/Fail judgement in the Coaching Log.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6164 Positive Psychology in Group Settings

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 24.

Pre-requisite(s): AP6159

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Fieldwork; 150 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (directed reading, personal study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sharon Lambert, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: This module develops students' skills delivering evidence based positive psychology interventions to groups.

Module Content: Theoretical underpinnings of Positive Psychology interventions, evaluation of research base, assessment of group development needs,rules that govern groups, impact and power of groups, individual and group approaches to problem solving, group think/group polarization, key components of communication and its importance in group dynamics, resilience as a positive psychology tool in groups, the selection of appropriate interventions, delivery of intervention and assessment of outcomes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Synthesise the empirical basis of Positive Psychology Interventions
?Assess group developmental needs
?Understand factors that contribute to highly effective teams/groups.
?Design an appropriate positive psychology intervention
?Deliver a positive psychology intervention in a group context
?Assess the outcome of such an intervention.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word Portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6166 Personnel Selection and Assessment

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 24 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (on-line learning consisting of online lectures, online self-assessment, directed activities and participation in dicussion boards).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carol Linehan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carol Linehan, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: This module is about recognising and assessing human potential and performance at work, from a consideration of dimensions of psychological difference, to dynamic assessment, to means of measurement and a critical evaluation of different tools used in selection and appraisal contexts in work. To define the assessment needs of the client and decide when psychological tests should or should not be used as part of an assessment process. To allow students to gain skills in administering appropriate psychometric tests and to develop their ability to write appropriate reports. To consider the psychological dimensions of performance, reward and motivation at work.

Module Content: Overview of organizational context for recruitment, selection and performance management processes; Theoretical approaches to identifying psychological differences (intelligence, personality) and dynamic assessment of these; Critically evaluating means of measurement, applying to recruitment and selection decisions, reliability and validity of selection tools; Professional aspects of test use including legal context of employment; Job analysis; Assessing job performance; Performance management context and appraisal methods, bias in the assessment and appraisal context; Reward and motivation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the organisational context for recruitment, selection and appraisal practices and decisions.
?Utilise the historical and theoretical underpinnings of intelligence and personality assessment.
?Comprehend the theoretical underpinnings in selecting, administering, scoring and interpreting a range of tests of interests and aptitudes/abilities.
?Define the assessment needs of the client and decide when psychological tests should or should not be used as part of an assessment process.
?Administer an assessment protocol, score and interpret the results and write up the report
?Know the organisational context for performance management, reward and motivation of staff.
?Apply psychological research to guide recommendations for performance management, reward and motivation decisions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word report).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP6168 Designing in Work and Workplaces

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 16 x 2hr(s) Other (structured online lectures); 100 x 1hr(s) Other (online activities eg blogs, forums, discussion groupss, design activity).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Conor Linehan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Conor Linehan, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with a critical understanding of the factors (psychological, social, and organisational) involved in the user-centred design and evaluation of work environments, particularly computer mediated work and experiences. This will include evaluating different approaches to ergonomic design, human-computer interaction (HCI), understanding people's experience of interacting with computers, and practicing relevant HCI methods and skills.

Module Content: Introduction to Ergonomics; Principles of physiological and psychological work and environmental design, safety and health at work; HCI; Experience-centred design; Usability and user experience; Usability evaluation; HCI design for a variety of people and situations; Issues in ICT mediated working such as IT and the organisation of work, home working, culture of busyness with email, and computer supported cooperative work. Participatory projects in HCI.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate Ergonomic and HCI theories, models and methods in terms of their value to the experience-centred design and evaluation at work.
?Carry out a conceptual design using a participatory approach
?Carry out a usability evaluation
?Evaluate the evidence around appropriation, experience and impacts of technologies in a work setting.
?Appreciate the ethics of human factors reseach and intervention.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Participation in structured online activities eg. peer tutoring, conceptual design and usability projects online, creating online resource of value to teaching others interested in an area of work design decisions (100 marks); an applied HCI research project (approx 3000 words)(100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6169 Learning, Well-Being and Participation at Work

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 24 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (online learning consisting of online lectures, online self-assessment, directed activities, and participation in discussion boards).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carol Linehan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carol Linehan, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: This module consists of two themes addressing development and participation at work. The first looks at learning and development at work from the perspective of identifying, addressing and evaluating training and learning needs drawing on relevant psychological theories. The second strand deals with individual wellbeing and participation at work in the context of contemporary work trends and employment relations.

Module Content: Approaches to understanding learning at work. Theories of how people learn at work; Learning at individual, group and organizational levels; Learning and training; Identifying Learning & Development (L & D) needs; Designing L & D interventions; Evaluating L & D.
Well-being at work; Work life integration issues; Emotion at work and emotional labour; Diversity at work (diversity in organisations; gender and careers; aging; minority stress); Bullying and aggression at work.
Contemporary work trends and impacts on worker experiences including workplace flexibilities; psychological contracts; employee relations and opportunities for employee voice and participation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the application of contemporary psychological theories of learning in a work domain.
?Assess, design responses to, and evaluate training and learning needs in organisations.
?Critically evaluate models of and responses to diversity at work.

?Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary trends in work and employment relations and their impacts on worker experiences.
?Examine the factors that influence well-being and development at work
?Appreciate the diversity of stakeholder interests and expectations in the employment relationship.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio including - group presentation (10 marks), discussion board contribution (20 marks), two individual short reports of max 1,200 (35 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6170 Professional Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (group work and directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carol Linehan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce key issues and skills for professional psychologists.

Module Content: Exploring work and organizational psychology as a profession; Developing skills in making presentations, interviewing, negotiation, and consulting; CV preparation; Understanding and using social networks/capital; Professional ethics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Prepare a cv appropriate to a variety of potential applications.
?Make a presentation using appropriate electronic media.
?Articulate key issues relevant to the nature of psychology as a discipline and a profession in the domain of work and organisations.
?Demonstrate an understanding of PSI code of ethics.
?Apply ethical guides and principles to generating recommendations for ethical practice as a professional.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1500 word essay 60 marks; CV relevant to chosen career path 15 marks; group presentation 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. including in-class group presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6171 Research Dissertation in Work, Organisational and Coaching Psychology

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; Other (600 hours of study time including 24 hours made up of supervised seminar / tutorial work.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Debora Jeske, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To teach by self-directed learning how to prepare and present a professional Applied Psychology report to contemporary standards.

Module Content: A research question in an area of Work, Organisational or Coaching Psychology will be chosen by the student under guidance from the module co-ordinator. An applied issue will be investigated and presented to current professional standards both as a written report and as a verbal presentation. Students will be coached on appropriate methods of presentation, both written and verbal.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify an appropriate research question in a chosen area of contemporary work, organisational or coaching psychology
?Conduct a comprehensive literature review
?Develop suitable research design and use appropriate methods to gather data and address the research question identified
?Document the process of investigation to prevailing standards in the area
?Critically evaluate relevant theory in work psychology and make informed recommendations based on the project findings
?Present the research question, the process, and the solution in a verbal briefing
?Demonstrate skills in written and verbal communication, project management and professional ethics.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (A fully documented 20 minute presentation to peers and experts (pass/fail judgement); Either a 15,000 word report to professional standards, not including technical appendices if any (600 marks) or a 6,000 word grant application (250 marks) and an article for publication in a peer-reviewed journal 9,000 words (350 marks) as directed by the supervisor.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. - comprising both written work and presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% mark for the written work and pass judgement in the presentation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AP6173 Service Design and Evaluation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 40 x 1hr(s) Lectures (,Seminars and Workshops); 160 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Nadia Pantidi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Nadia Pantidi, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To enable students to experience and develop a critical understanding of the roles that applied psychologists can play in the design and evaluation of services, e.g. community, healthcare, social care , communications, entertainment, creativity, and public services

Module Content: This is a project-centred module in which small teams work on real-world design and evaluation projects to learn about: Service design as a user-centred approach to creating, developing, implementing , and evaluating services; Experience-centred approach (e.g. to patient services); User participation(patients, community activists, staff, etc.) in design and evaluation; Empathy in design and evaluation; Design and evaluation as research inquiry; Issues such as sustainability and conviviality; ICT and services; The lived experience of organisational processes and politics in services

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Contribute to the work of a group carrying out a service design and evaluation project.
?Appreciate the values entailed in different approaches to service design and evaluation.
?Apply knowledge of service design approaches (e.g. empathic, experience-centred, participative, survey, etc. ) to the design and evaluation of effective, sustainable services.
?Demonstrate knowledge of a variety of service design and evaluation methods.
?Demonstrate advanced knowledge of professional standards and requirements.
?Reflect on organisational processes and politics in project work.
?Demonstrate successful application of psychological knowledge.
?Appreciate value-related criteria in applying psychology.
?Write a professional project report.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Professional project report 3,000 words (100 marks); Reflective projects workbook 2,000 words (50 Marks); Professional project presentation (50 Marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6174 Clinical presentations (Child, Adolescent, Adult, and ID)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 5hr(s) Workshops; 6 x 3hr(s) Lectures (and guest speakers); 80 x 1hr(s) Other (self-directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology, and invited speakers.

Module Objective: To facilitate in students an understanding and critical awareness of the primary issues involved in clinical presentations in children, adolescent and adult populations and to advance an appreciation of the nature and implications of intellectual disabilities across the lifespan.

Module Content: The module will cover a number of clinical psychology presentations across the life span. This will include, presentation, aetiology, assessment, treatment and prognosis. Aspects of clinical practice, formulation, governance, philosophy of service provision, ethics and values will also be considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the emergence of current perspectives in clinical settings.
?Explain the contribution of empirical research to our understanding of psychological dysfunction.
?Describe a range of clinical presentations in children, adolescent and adult populations;
?Describe commonly presented intellectual disabilities (IDs) in child, adolescent and adult populations;
?Critically evaluate psychological interventions and models of practice for various clinical presentations.
?Consider how psychological interventions may be tailored to particular client needs.
?Critically reflect on practice issues relating to psychological intervention e.g. ethics, values.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 3000 word essay excluding references).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (2 x 3000 word essay excluding references).

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AP6176 Cognitive Enhancement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 9 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Other (Practical experience in cognitive testing); 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Annalisa Setti, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with examples of the impact of efficient/inefficient cognition (e.g. attention, memory, decision making) on human performance and give an overview of the most recent scientifically based cognitive enhancing methods; To provide students with analytical skills to be able to evaluate studies aiming at optimising cognition for the purpose of optimal performance (e.g. visualization in sports and in decision making).To give students an appreciation of the impact of motivation and mental toughness on cognition and performance. To enable students to create links between their background (e.g. coaching) and Cognitive Psychology through the reflection on how cognition influences performance and goal achievement.

Module Content: This course will examine scientific approaches to enhance our cognitive performance (e.g. memory, attention, decision making) such as exercise, visualization and imagery, environmental factors, motivation, psychological factors such as mental toughness. We will explore the link between optimal cognitive performance and goal achievement (e.g. expertise). These examples will also include 'choking under pressure', decision making and the 'hot hand' etc. The students will critically analyse the idea of a 'cognitive edge' and how this can be achieved and measured with reference to the most recent literature. Ethical considerations on cognitive enhancement will be also discussed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define the main models utilised to understand how perception, attention, memory, learning and decision making are studied and assessed, in the context of applied settings;
?Demonstrate an understanding of scientifically based ways to enhance cognition for optimal performance;
?Apply knowledge of cognitive processes to improve performance and coaching experience in different coaching situations (or alternative applied situations depending on their background);
?Compare and contrast different coaching situations (or alternative applied situations depending on their background) in terms of cognitive performance and identify how to optimise cognition for the client benefit;
?Integrate knowledge from the other modules on the course to be able to utilise knowledge of cognition to support client goal achievement.
?.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay (50 marks); 1 x 1,000 word report on practical exercises (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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AP6178 Psychological Principles and Skills in Working with Children and Families

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sharon Lambert, School of Applied Psychology, and invited speakers; Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To learn principles, theory and practice of psychological skills in working with children and families.

Module Content: Lectures and skill development sessions. The development of theoretical knowledge and professional skills in psychological practice with children and families including listening and communication skills, working with play and the arts. Contemporary debates in the field of child and family psychological practice and critical engagement with dominant paradigms of child mental health and emotional wellbeing

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe parent-infant interaction research and interventions;
?Demonstrate an understanding of principles in child and family psychological practice, ethics and child protection;
?Apply child and adolescent psychoanalytic theory and family systems theory to developing children?s social and emotional wellbeing;
?Explain the processes and issues related to working with family systems and other systems, e.g. social services and health services;
?Critically engage with contemporary debates in the field of child and family psychological practice and with dominant paradigms of child mental health and emotional wellbeing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Portfolio Record of Achievement [100 marks]).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6179 Participatory Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (interactive workshops, directed practice); skills training sessions (e.g. organizing workshops, interviewing, analysis, dissemination)); 5 x 1hr(s) Other (structured e-learning peer-supported activities.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Angela Veale, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: This module is designed for students who are interested in carrying out participatory research or gaining participatory research skills and insights. The objective is to introduce students to participatory research ideas and practice through interactive workshops and seminars, and e-learning activities.

Module Content: Personal, critical, and theoretical groundings.
Survey of participatory practices and approaches (e.g. participatory action research, cooperative enquiry, participatory design).
Introduction to areas in which participatory research is used and purposes of it in those settings (e.g. service, support, and technology design, development studies, health and wellbeing).
Practicing skills such as organizing workshops, negotiating access, managing relationships, interviewing, reflective practice, fieldwork and field data, analysis, communicating research outcomes, implementing follow-up actions, reflecting on projects.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate examples of participatory research.
?Design and organize a participatory research study.
?Contribute to a group participatory project
?Justify participatory methodologies
?Apply analytical skills in participatory research
?Practice participatory research skills
?Reflect on action outcomes and their implementation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Practicum Portfolio 3,000 words ((excluding references) documenting the participatory research process and outcome).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6180 Mental Health and Disability Placement

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6 (Maximum number of students is dependent on the number of placements available, and ability to secure placement through interview process).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Placements (Supervised placement practice in an appropriate setting, two days a week for at least 6 months (340 hrs minimum)); 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Workshops; Other (self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology (School of Applied Psychology).

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Dempsey, School of Applied Psychology, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with learning opportunities in an appropriate work setting in which they are expected to develop a critical perspective on mental health and / or disability, transferable skills in applying psychology, an ability to demonstrate critical integration of theory and practice and advancement of IT skills in reporting their work.

Module Content: Students are provided with learning opportunities in a mental health and / or a disability work settings, and assessed on the basis of a reflective e-portfolio developed by the students while on placement. By the end of the placement, students are required to demonstrate a basic level of competence in applying psychology, engaging in placement supervision, and in working in relevant settings. They are also expected to be able to reflect on their experience and demonstrate personal and professional development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evidence ability to complete keys tasks and engage in a supervisory process within their placement setting.
?Demonstrate ability to integrate theory and practice within context of placement.

?Utilise the principles of applied psychological practice, in the placement
?Demonstrate awareness of critical issues in mental health and / or disability policy, and service provision.
?Demonstrate ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with colleagues.
?Develop an adequate level of competence in placement working practices.
?Demonstrate the attributes considered necessary in an individual to work in the field of mental health and / or disability.
?Reflect on placement experience by demonstrating personal, professional and academic learning from placement in a reflective e-portfolio.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Reflective e-portfolio (400 marks); Placement Practice Report (Pass Judgement)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Fully complete a mental health and / or disability based placement supervised by a clinical, counselling, or educational psychologist; submit a reflective e-portfolio, and receive a satisfactory placement practice report from the placement supervisor and course director.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% in Continuous Assessment and a Pass Judgement in the Placement Practice Report (completed by the Placement Provider Supervisor). Students who fail to satisfy a Pass Judgement in the Placement Practice Report will fail the module overall. If students do not complete the required number of placement hours due to illness etc it is expected that any time off must be made up by extending the placement (in consultation with the placement provider).

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students cannot repeat unless conditions are met (Students failing the reflective e-portfolio can resubmit only having received a Pass Judgement in the Placement. Students failing the Placement may be permitted to repeat the Placement only once in a repeat year).

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AP6181 Practice of Evidence Based Coaching

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 3hr(s) Seminars (and skills training workshops); 2 x 6hr(s) Fieldwork; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Coaching sessions); 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Coached by a peer); 100 x 1hr(s) Other (Self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop and have an opportunity to practice a range of coaching skills and demonstrate the ability to coach from a range of coaching models.

Module Content: Lectures and skill sessions with demonstrations and role play. The development of professional skills in coaching.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate core coaching competences;
?Demonstrate listening, questioning, constructive challenging; goal-setting and trust-building skills;
?Test the complexity of the coaching conversation and relationship;
?Show an ability to coach from current state to a desired state;
?Demonstrate competence in a range of coaching approaches and models;
?Apply coaching skills from a cognitive behavioural, solution focused, appreciative inquiry and strengths coaching, and clean language perspectives;
?Integrate a number of positive psychological coaching models and approaches as they apply to different coaching contexts;
?Test the complexity of the coaching conversation and relationship;
?Understand the readiness to change process.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio, 200 marks (Portfolio consists of: Analysis of a coaching session, 3000 words - 100 marks, 2000 word case study - 75 marks, Learning journal - 25 marks, Coaching log detailing 12 hours of practice - pass/fail judgement)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: All element(s) of portfolio must be repeated (as prescribed by school). Mark(s) in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are not carried forward.

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AP6182 Positive Psychology and Human Flourishing

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 24.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): AP6181 Practice of Evidence Based Coaching

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 3hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Fieldwork; 100 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (self directed reading, personal study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To critically evaluate the theories, approaches, models and evidence based research that underpins Positive Psychology.
To design Positive Psychology interventions that are evidence based and tailored to individual needs.
Formulate evaluation strategies for Positive Psychology interventions

Module Content: This module will explore the area of positive psychology coaching in terms of theory and practice.
We will explore the nature of human strengths and virtues that contribute towards flourishing individuals.
A focus on inquiry on what is working in people's lives, the growth mindset, positive emotions, leveraging psychological strengths, role of relationships, meaning and values to support optimal well-being, and the pursuit of achievement and performance through a solution focused orientation.
Students will develop the ability to design and evaluate positive psychology interventions in a coaching context.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess existing empirical research evidence in the area of positive and coaching psychology.
?Evaluate Positive Psychology Interventions.
?Assess individual developmental needs
?Examine the factors that influence happiness and well-being
?Evaluate wellbeing measures, in a positive psychology coaching context
?Critically evaluate the contribution of resources, interventions and techniques that increase happiness and wellbeing
?Design positive psychology coaching interventions.
?Formulate evaluation strategies
?Communicate the case for Positive Psychology to a general audience.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio, 200 marks (Portfolio consists of: Applied project, 2000 words - 75 marks, Case study on a four week self administered positive psychology intervention 2000 words - 75 marks, Online resource of value to those interested in positive psychology, 800 words - 50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. All elements have to be passed.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marke in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are not carried forward. As the portfolio is an integrated body of work, all elements, including those passed, must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6183 Positive Psychology Coaching Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20 (Maximum number of students is dependent on their ability to secure an appropriate placement).

Pre-requisite(s): Achieved a pass mark in AP6181 Practice of Evidence Based Coaching

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (In-class supervision); 18 x 1hr(s) Other (Coaching sessions); 160 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Zelda Di Blasi, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with learning opportunities in which they are expected to integrate awareness of the ethical and professional issues involved in applying positive and coaching psychology in the context professional practice in a fieldwork setting that does not include children or vulnerable adults.

Module Content: The development of ethical and professional skills in coaching through the supervisory process.
In order to take this module students have to secure an appropriate placement such that:
It is appropriate to their skill levels
It should not involve children or vulnerable adults
It is approved by the School of Applied Psychology.
Supervision and skill sessions with demonstrations and role play.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a coaching niche and develop an appropriate coaching service for this niche;
?Distinguish between ethical and unethical forms of coaching practice;
?Identify boundaries and professional competence;
?Design requirements for supervision of coaching practice;
?Integrate insights from the supervision process into practice;
?Manage the referral process appropriately;
?Demonstrate an ability to reflect on learning and demonstrate personal development throughout the process;
?Demonstrate an ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with stake holders of their chosen coaching niche.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Reflective learning journal (3,000 words) - 100 marks, Presentation - 50 marks, Supervisor report - 50 marks, Coaching log - pass/fail judgement).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6205 Psychological Principles of Human Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Marcin Szczerbinski, School of Applied Psychology; Dr Samantha Dockray, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: In this module you will explore some theories and findings of developmental psychology from the perspective of guidance counselling. Material presented in this module should enable you to:
- Consider how developmental psychology may inform guidance counselling practice;
- Become aware of your own assumptions regarding development and how they impact on practice;
- Draw on an understanding of the developmental literature in order to make sense of their own personal and professional journey.
- Learn about some common developmental difficulties may encounter in guidance counselling practice.

Module Content: 1. Wellbeing and distress interactionist perspective
2. Risk and resilience
3. Life transitions, development and well-being
4. Effects of social, biological and family factors on human functioning and flourishing
5. Nature/nurture debate: implications for practitioners
6. Developmental disorders
7. Illiteracy
8. Development in adulthood
9. The life course of guidance counsellor career: phases, processes, challenges

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Adopt a critical stance towards the concept of development and explore how the perspectives presented might guide their guidance practice;
?Bring a developmental perspective to intervention with clients;
?Integrate the developmental literature into their understanding of their own personal and professional journey.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Portfolio Record of Achievement [100 marks]).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP6206 Psychological Perspectives on Counselling Theories

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David O'Sullivan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Inge Nieuwstraten, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: Material presented in this module enables students to:
1. Support guidance counselling practice through an understanding of counselling theory;
2. Be aware of values and assumptions underpinning the theories presented;
3. Explore the use of theory in a contextual manner.

Module Content: Introduction to counselling theory and the origins of the counselling movement; the social constructionist perspective on counselling theory; the evidence-based practice debate; the contribution of humanistic, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioural approaches and interpersonal therapy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Use the language and key concepts associated with a number of theoretical approaches to counselling;
?Express a critical stance in discussing counselling theories;
?Apply the perspectives presented in the lectures to their practice work with clients.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word Essay (100 Marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students may be required to submit alternative continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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AP6211 Theories of Career Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Other (seminars/presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Nicola Barry, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary McCarthy, Department of Careers Service; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to models of career development.

Module Content: Career Theory: models of career development; notions about work; the different career guidance needs of particular populations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the different models of career counselling and career development;
?Distinguish between the different needs of different client groups;
?Organise and disseminate career information;
?Make effective career presentations;
?Access relevant contacts and referral services.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In Class Group Presentations - Content (80 marks). Presentation (20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6215 Professional Issues in Guidance Counselling

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Nicola Barry, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To apply knowledge of ethical and professional issues to the role of the guidance counsellor.

Module Content: The nature of guidance counselling; the nature of professional issues; the intersection of the personal and the professional; shared gatekeeping responsibilities; supervision; dual relationships; informed consent; confidentiality; record keeping; risk; referral; ethical codes and ethical decision-making.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the nature of professional issues;
?Resolve ethical dilemmas in a systematic way, taking account of the legal context where relevant;
?Value ethical practice;
?Access relevant contacts and referral services;
?Know how to manage and make appropriate referrals for personal difficulties which are outside the competence of a guidance counsellor.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( 1 x 3000 word essay .).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by School).

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AP6220 Career Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Group practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Nicola Barry, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Alexandra Kingston, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide students with the practical skills so as to equip them to conduct vocational guidance.

Module Content: To consolidate the theoretical underpinnings of career vocational skills; role play with group feedback.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Perform the routine tasks of the guidance practitioner;
?Conduct an appropriately structured vocational guidance interview;
?Demonstrate key guidance skills;
?Provide appropriate feedback.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Guidance Interview with a peer, with a write up of 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as precribed by the School.).

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AP6221 Career Information Management Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Nicola Barry, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary McCarthy, Department of Careers Service; Ms Alexandra Kingston, School of Applied Psychology; Ms Mai Smiddy Kerins, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To teach students to source information about careers, important work areas and referral services which interface with guidance counselling. To consolidate the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of a guidance counsellor by managing these sources of information about careers and important work areas.

Module Content: Career Information: the importance of career information; how it can be acquired, organised, presented and disseminated; the use of various media and sources of information, effective dissemination of information to different client groups. Management Skills: Develop career information management skills; role play with group feedback and provide the appropriate career information.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate the role of career information and labour market trends in the vocational guidance interview process;
?Acquire, Organise, Present and Disseminate career information and labour market information;
?Utilise various media and sources of information;
?Effectively disseminate information to different client groups;
?Make effective career presentation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Prepare an appropriate information resource pack (50 marks); Presentation (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6222 Counselling Skills for Guidance Counsellors

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 9 x 2hr(s) Other (Skills Training); 1 x 6hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Anna O'Reilly-Trace, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Inge Nieuwstraten, School of Applied Psychology; Ms Anna O'Reilly-Trace, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To equip students with basic counselling skills relevant to the guidance counselling role.

Module Content: Skills sessions with role play.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an awareness of basic counselling skills relevant to guidance counselling;
?Apply these skills appropriately in role play;
?Employ these skills to establish effective relationships with clients in future work settings;
?Transcribe a video-recorded session of themselves using basic counselling skills (attending, listening, probing, reflection) to demonstrate the core values of empathy, congruence and unconditional positive regard
?To provide a commentary, interpretation, and critical analysis of interventions employed.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Reflective report 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6223 Psychological Intervention Skills for Guidance Counsellors

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): AP6222

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 9 x 2hr(s) Other (Skills Training); 1 x 6hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Anna O'Reilly-Trace, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Inge Nieuwstraten, School of Applied Psychology; Ms Anna O'Reilly-Trace, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To equip students with basic counselling skills and psychological treatments relevant to the guidance counselling role.

Module Content: Skills sessions with role play.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an awareness of basic counselling skills and psychological approaches relevant to guidance counselling;
?Apply these skills appropriately in both role play and actual client contact format;
?Distinguish between problem focused and emotion focused coping;
?Employ these skills to establish effective relationships with clients in future work settings;
?Transcribe a video-recorded session of themselves using intervention skills (listening, open questions, reflection, goal setting and decision making, perception checking and challenge with another individual)
?Provide a commentary, interpretation, and critical analysis of interventions employed.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Video-Recording and 3,000 word transcript and commentary).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Students may be required to submit alternative continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School).).

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AP6224 Group Work Skills and Theory 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Nicola Barry, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Inge Nieuwstraten, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop students' ability to work sensitively on personal material as a participant in small group settings, using relevant theoretical notions and empirical findings.

Module Content: This module concentrates on group work skills required of a client (where students explore their own personal issues / engage in "personal growth"). This requires ground rules which allow students to feel safe in their exploration.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and value their own needs, feelings and reactions;
?Communicate to others in authentic ways about their needs, feelings and reactions;
?Demonstrate sensitivity and respect towards the needs, feelings and reactions of others;
?Value collaboration with and support from others;
?Apply theoretical notions and empirical findings about experiential groups to their own experience;
?Show evidence for the above outcomes in a Learning Journal.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Learning Journal 3000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6225 Group Work Skills and Theory 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): AP6224

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Nicola Barry, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Inge Nieuwstraten, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop students' ability to facilitate group members to work sensitively on personal material in small group settings, using relevant theoretical notions and empirical findings.

Module Content: This module focuses on the facilitation skills required to help others in a group setting explore issues and engage in 'personal growth'. It builds on the necessary experience of being a participant in such a group.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Facilitate others to identify and value their own needs, feelings and reactions;
?Facilitate others to communicate to others in authentic ways about their needs, feelings and reactions;
?Facilitate others to demonstrate sensitivity and respect towards the needs, feelings and reactions of others;
?Facilitate others to value collaboration with and support from others;
?Apply theoretical notions and empirical findings about experiential groups to their own group work;
?Facilitate a group, managing such factors as boundaries, safety, and the balance between support and challenge, both for themselves and for those in the client role;
?Write a commentary demonstrating their ability to transcribe, analyse and reflect upon a video-recording of their own facilitation, while incorporating relevant theoretical notions and empirical findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Video Recording and 3000 word written commentary).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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AP6226 Theory of Psychological Testing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (lecture /discussion); 100 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Mr Peadar Crowley, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To understand the ethical and appropriate use of psychological tests in the context of guidance counselling; including test selection, administration, scoring, interpretation and feedback.

Module Content: Theory of test use.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define the assessment needs of the client and decide when psychological tests should or should not be used as part of an assessment process
?Interpret and use basic statistics such as measures of central tendency, correlation, standard deviation, and standard error of measurement.
?Demonstrate understanding of basic principles of measurement theory, types of tests, types of scores, reliability, validity and standardisation/norms.
?Understand the theoretical underpinnings in selecting, administering, scoring and interpreting a range of tests of interests and aptitudes/abilities.
?Implement relevant requirements of the Code of Ethics of the Institute of Guidance Counsellors, particularly with reference to issues of consent and confidentiality.
?Implement the provisions of the PSI Policy on the use of Psychometric Tests in Ireland (ITC)
?Understand the provisions of relevant Irish legislation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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AP6227 Practice of Psychological Testing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): AP6226

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other ( lecture/discussion; supervised administration of tests); 100 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Raegan Murphy, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Mr Frank Mulvihill, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To allow students to gain skills in administrating appropriate psychometric tests and to develop their ability to write appropriate reports.

Module Content: Development of assessment and report writing skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Select, administer, score and interpret a range of tests of interests and aptitudes/abilities;
?Write professional assessment reports;
?Feed back results of psychometric assessment to clients in the context of the guidance counselling function;
?Understand the professional requirements involved in providing psychometric assessments as a guidance counsellor.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word Psychometric Report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School.).

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AP6228 Guidance Counselling Field Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x .5day(s) Placements (Guidance Counselling); 6 x 2hr(s) Other (in-class supervisory support for the vocational guidance dimension of the placement. Also 6-8 counselling sessions with a client supported by 11 x 2 hour sessions of counselling supervision in groups of six).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Nicola Barry, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Nicola Barry, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop students' professional practice in a placement setting. To gain supervised experience of counselling a client.

Module Content: This module provides students with opportunities to integrate theory and skills in a work environment. Counsel a client with supervisory support.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Make clear links between theory, skills and practice in a work environment;
?Demonstrate an ability to view themselves within the context of the profession of guidance counselling;
?Incorporate feedback from supervision into guidance counselling practice;
?Demonstrate a capacity for reflection and self-challenge regarding their counselling practice;
?Establish a warm counselling relationship and explore the client's experience;
?Present the case at, and engage with, supervision;
?Incorporate feedback from supervision into counselling practice;
?Engage in referral where appropriate.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3000 word Case Study 80 marks; Supervisor's report 20 marks; 3000 word written report on vocational guidance interview and psychometric assessment 50 Marks; In Vivo Assessment 50 Marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School.).

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AP7000 Introduction to Doctoral Research in Applied Psychology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 100hr(s) Directed Study; 6 x 4hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Conor Linehan, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Conor Linehan, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To provide an advanced introduction to the professional working practices of researchers in Applied Psychology. A series of seminars across the first semester will provide hands-on experience with a number of practices and processes necessary for effective working as a professional researcher. Students participate in expert workshops on project management, writing for scientific publications, communication of scientific work to wider audiences, making oral presentations, collaborative and group working, and writing funding proposals. This module will make clear the standards and working practices expected of PhD students, will emphasise both the importance and the attainability of academic publications, and funding submissions.

Module Content: Skills for science communication (writing papers, grant applications, and making oral presentations); Project management techniques; Social, legal, ethical and professional issues in psychological research; Collaboration and cooperative working in a research environment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Analyse complex research projects and break them down into focused and achievable components, through application of established project management techniques;
?Evaluate the current state of the art in their fields of study, and analyse current national, and EU funding priorities in order to produce a funding application;
?Communicate research at a professional standard, both written and verbally;
?Apply best practices in collaborative working;
?Work collaboratively and productively with other researchers.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (funding application (70 Marks); Presentation (30 Marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. There are two compulsory elements; 1) Produce a draft funding application based on the topic of your PhD project (5,000-8,000 words); 2) Make a 20 minute group presentation to the school of Applied Psychology on the topic of your PhD research.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AP7002 Clinical Psychology Applied to Adults

Credit Weighting: 25

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 25weeks(s) Placements (supervised in adult clinical psychology setting).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Christopher Gerard McCusker, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Medicine.

Module Objective: To teach trainees the knowledge, understanding and skills required for the application of practice in clinical psychology and the determinants of health, biophychosocial and integrated sciences models and to the diverse clinical psychology in adult mental health

Module Content: The first five weeks of this module is a taught component when students will be introduced to the diverse challenges and responsibilities of the Clinical Psychologist in adult mental health settings including ethical and legal matters. The core competencies required in the professional practice will be outlined as well as the knowledge and skills for everyday clinical practice. For the remaining 25 weeks students will undertake a supervised clinical placement in both acute inpatient and community outpatient settings.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Respond to explicit and implicit communications in a therapeutic setting
?Synthesise formulation and share it verbally with patients and MDT
?Gather information for a psychological assessment, scoring and interpreting tests and distilling information
?Demonstrate intervention skills
?Conduct a clinical interview with good rapport eliciting appropriate information
?Record a thorough, sensitive and detailed assessment using appropriate techniques and equipment
?Select and use a broad range of psychological methods, appropriate to the patient environment and the type of intervension likely to be required
?Use formal selection procedures (standard psychometric instruments), systemic interviewing techniques and other structured methods of assessment
?Apply practice of mental health law to clinical practice.

Assessment: 1 x 5,000 word critical literature review; 1 x 5,000 word case study; 1 x adult clinical psychology placement.

Compulsory Elements: Critical literature review, case study, and placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement. In order to pass the module students must acheive a pass in each element of assessment A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator. Students failing the Placement may, with the approval of the programme team, be permitted to either extend or repeat the Placement. Students may repeat the placement only once in a repeat year. Students failing or not completing the placement because of a serious ethical breach will not be permitted to repeat the placement.).

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AP7003 Clinical Psychology Applied to Intellectual Disability and Autism 1

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 10weeks(s) Placements (supervised in intellectual disability clinical psychology setting).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Christopher Gerard McCusker, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Medicine.

Module Objective: To teach trainees the theory, practice and skills for the application of practice in clinical psychology in intellectual disability and autism.

Module Content: The first five weeks of this module is a taught component where students will be introduced to ithe historical and cultural contest of the development of concepts of ID and ASD. Topics covered will be marginalisation, stigmatisation, institutionalisation, rights, independence, choice, inclusion and formulation assessment and interventions. Students will undertake the first part of their 25 week supervised clinical placement in the area of intellectual disability and autism.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the implications of marginalisation, stigmatisation and institutionalisation of people with intellectual disabilities
?Respond to the need for effective communication throughout the care of the service user.
?Evaluate risks and their implications
?Communicate effectively with people with a wide range of cognitive abilities including clients who are non-verbal
?Respond to the impact of intellectual disability across the lifespan on clients and families
?Demonstrate an awareness of the range of possible causes of intellectual disabilities and the common physical and mental problems associated with particular syndromes.
?Explain the dynamics present in therapeutic and other relationships.

Assessment: 1 x 5,000 word reflective practice assignment; 1 x intellectual disability and autism placement report.

Compulsory Elements: Reflective practice assignment, and placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement. In order to pass the module students must achieve a pass each element of assessment. A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator. Students failing the Placement may, with the approval of the programme team, be permitted to either extend or repeat the Placement. Students may repeat the placement only once in a repeat year. Students failing or not completing the placement because of a serious ethical breach will not be permitted to repeat the placement.).

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AP7004 Clinical Psychology Applied to Intellectual Disability and Autism 2

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): AP7003

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 15weeks(s) Placements (supervised in intellectual disability clinical psychology setting).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Christopher Gerard McCusker, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Medicine.

Module Objective: Further development of theoretical knowledge in parallel with clincal teaching and practice in the subject area of intellectual disability and autism

Module Content: Students complete the remainder of the 25 week supervised clinical placement in the area of intellectual disability and autism

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the dynamics present in therapeutic and other relationships
?Discern the need for effective communication throughout the care of the service user
?Critically evaluate risks and their implications
?Demonstrate assessment, formulation and diagnostic skills
?Apply knowledge of expected codes of conduct, governance and ethics obtained in AP7003 to the practice of clinical psychology in intellectual disability and autism.

Assessment: 1 x 5,000 word case study; 1 x intellectual disability and autism placement report.

Compulsory Elements: Case study, and placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement. In order to pass the module students must achieve a pass in each element of assessment. A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator. Students failing the Placement may, with the approval of the programme team, be permitted to either extend or repeat the Placement. Students may repeat the placement only once in a repeat year. Students failing or not completing the placement because of a serious ethical breach will not be permitted to repeat the placement.).

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AP7005 Clinical Psychology Applied to Child and Adolescent

Credit Weighting: 25

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 25weeks(s) Placements (supervised in child and adolescent clinical psychology setting).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Christopher Gerard McCusker, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Medicine.

Module Objective: To develop knowledge, skills and attitudes including clinical skill, clinical decision making and professionalism in the practice of child and adolescent mental health

Module Content: The first five weeks of this modules is a taught component when students will be in introduced to a range of psychological problems faced by children and adolescents. For the remaining 25 weeks students will undertake a supervised clinical placement working with children and adolescents from a range of age groups and with a range of developmental, emotional and behavioural difficulties or mental health conditions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply research on growth and development in childhood and adolescence
?Apply psychological knowledge and theory to create an individual formulation of the presenting problem taking into account a variety of factors
?Demonstrate intervention skills, create intervention plans based on individual formulations and reflecting clients' priorities
?Understand statistical validity and appropriateness of a number of standard and non-standardised measures used for clinical outcome evaluation
?Approach, communicate and assess children and adolescents, their parents and carers in an effective and age-appropriate manner.
?Apply knowledge of expected codes of conduct governance and ethics to the practice of child and adolescent mental health at a pre-registration level.

Assessment: 1 x 5,000 word reflective practice assignment; 1 x 5,000 word case study; 1 x child and adolescent clinical psychology placement report.

Compulsory Elements: Reflective practice assignment, case study, and placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement. In order to pass the module students must achieve a pass in each element of assessment. A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator. Students failing the Placement may, with the approval of the programme team, be permitted to either extend or repeat the Placement. Students may repeat the placement only once in a repeat year. Students failing or not completing the placement because of a serious ethical breach will not be permitted to repeat the placement.).

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AP7006 Elective Topic in Clinical Psychology

Credit Weighting: 25

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 25weeks(s) Placements (supervised in a clinical psychology setting).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Christopher Gerard McCusker, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Medicine.

Module Objective: To provide students with an opportunity to work within a new, specialist area of practice in which they have not previously worked.

Module Content: The first five weeks of this module is a taught component where students will be introduced to the role of the Clinical Psychologist in the elective area of their choosing. The core competencies in the professional practice will be outlined as well as the knowledge and skills required for everyday clinical practice in the area. For the remaining 25 weeks, students will undertake a supervised clinical placement in the elective area of their choosing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Gather information for a psychological assessment, scoring and interpreting tests and distilling information
?Demonstrate test skill selection appropriate to the the specialist population.
?Synthesise formulation and share it verbally with patients, families, MDTs and health systems
?Demonstrate effective intervention and consultation skills
?Select and modify approaches to meet the needs of an individual, groups or communities
?Integrate knowledge of the impact of lifespan issues into formulation and assessment.

Assessment: 1 x 5,000 word case study; 1 x elective clinical psychology placement report.

Compulsory Elements: Case study, and placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement. In order to pass the module students must achieve a pass in each element of assessment. A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator. Students failing the Placement may, with the approval of the programme team, be permitted to either extend or repeat the Placement. Students may repeat the placement only once in a repeat year. Students failing or not completing the placement because of a serious ethical breach will not be permitted to repeat the placement.).

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AP7007 Advanced Placement in Clinical Psychology

Credit Weighting: 25

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18weeks(s) Placements (supervised in a clinical psychology setting).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Christopher Gerard McCusker, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, School of Medicine.

Module Objective: To provide students with an opportunity to work within a new, specialist area of practice in which they have not previously worked or provide students with an opportunity to extend their elective placement.

Module Content: Students will continue for a further 18 weeks in the chosen elective supervised placement to gain a deeper understanding of their chosen area. Alternatively students can opt to select another elective supervised placement to expand their knowledge of clincal psychology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate clinical interviewing and assessment skills
?Show clinical judgement and clinical decision making skills
?Determine test skill selection appropriate to the specialist population.
?Establish ability to synthesise formulation and share it verbally with client and MTD
?Demonstrate intervention skills.

Assessment: 1 x 5,000 word case study; 1 x advanced clinical psychology placement report.

Compulsory Elements: Case study, and placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement. In order to pass the module students must achieve a pass in each element of assessment. A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator. Students failing the Placement may, with the approval of the programme team, be permitted to either extend or repeat the Placement. Students may repeat the placement only once in a repeat year. Students failing or not completing the placement because of a serious ethical breach will not be permitted to repeat the placement.).

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AP7008 Clinical Research Methods and Data Analysis 1

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30hr(s) Lectures (Seminars/Workshops (This module will be offered as a blended learning module. Some lectures will be available as integrated and interactive online lectures and other lectures will be delivered face-to-face in class)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean Hammond, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of methodological strategies in clinical research and impart the skills required to plan an effective and ethical research project in a variety of clinical contexts.

Module Content: Posing research questions and identifying appropriate methodological approaches to take.
- Practical, methodological and ethical issues in planning research
- Introduction to a variety of strategies for research.
- Relating data analysis strategies to the research question and the data collected.
- Disseminating research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Formulate and appropriately conceptualise original research questions;
?Plan and design a research project taking account of ethics, methodology, feasibility, likelihood of answering the research question, and analysis;
?Evaluate research designs theoretically, methodologically, ethically and practically;
?Select and use appropriate data collection methods;
?Select and use appropriate methods for analysing data;
?Write a viable research proposal.
?Conduct and disseminate a small research project related to service evaluation or development.

Assessment: 1 x 5,000 word service related research project and report.

Compulsory Elements: Service related research project.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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AP7009 Clinical Research Methods and Data Analysis 2

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30hr(s) Lectures (/Seminars/Workshops (This module will make considerable use of secondary data sources and may be offered as a blended learning module. Some lectures will be available as integrated and interactive online lectures and other lectures will be delivered face-to-face in class)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean Hammond, School of Applied Psychology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To allow students to develop practical skills in a variety of data collection and analysis techniques. Enable students to carry out a short, effective and ethical research project.

Module Content: - Managing data
- Computer based methods for data collection, storage and analysis.
- Introduction to NVivo, SPSS, R.
- Reporting and disseminating from a variety of data analysis techniques.
- Mixing methods for optimal research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Generate a meaningful research question and carry out an effective analysis using secondary data sources;
?Select and use appropriate data collection methods;
?Select and use appropriate methods for analysing data;
?Write research reports.
?Conduct a systematic literature review
?Develop an empirical research proposal.

Assessment: 1 x 5,000 word systematic review; 1 x 5,000 word research proposal.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the module co-ordinator).

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