Book of Modules 2009/2010

PGXXXX

Choose by Subject Category or Module Code:
PG6001 STEPS - Scientific Training for Enhanced Postgraduate Studies
PG6003 Teaching and Learning Module for Graduate Studies
PG6005 Biotechniques
PG6006 Commercialisation Skills for Research
PG6007 PATHS - Postgraduate Training for Arts, Humanities, Commerce and Social Sciences
PG6009 Graduate Information Literacy Skills
PG6014 Scientific Outreach and Communication
PG7001 The PhD: Getting Started and Generic Skills
PG7002 Professional Training of Research Postgraduates in the Humanities & Social Sciences
PG7003 The PhD II: From Development to Completion
PG7004 Master Class: Contemporary Theoretical Paradigms in the Humanities and Social Sciences
PG7005 Narratives
PG7006 Research Skills and Digital Research Management
PG7007 Professional Communication for Humanities and Social Science Students
PG7008 Editing Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences
PG7009 Digital Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences
PG7010 Theory and Philosophy for the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Summer School
PG7011 Theory and Philosophy for the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences Summer School
PG7012 International Political Anthropology Summer School
PG7013 International Political Anthropology Summer School
PG7014 Creativity and Innovation for Research Students
Back to Home page

Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

International visiting students should consult the International Education Office regarding selection of modules.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

PG6001 STEPS - Scientific Training for Enhanced Postgraduate Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 Lectures (Seminars and Workshops and student assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, Department of Graduate Studies office.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alan Kelly, Department of Graduate Studies office.

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students an introduction to principles and practice of scientific research, particularly through focussing on scientific writing and presentation skills. To use case studies from the recent history of science to illustrate principles discussed.

Module Content: Students completing the module should understand: Principles of writing and publishing papers, theses, research grant proposals and reports; Preparation of scientific presentations and posters; Ethical issuses in publishing research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Prepare a scientific manuscript for publication
· Write documents in a high standard of scientific writing
· Design a basic scientific presentation
· Explain basic principles of ethical aspects of publication.

Assessment: 1. In-class analysis and revision of a student's pre-written work as directed by the Module Coordinator; 2. Preparation of Powerpoint slides. Both assignments will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Assessments as prescribed by the Module Coordinator.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

PG6003 Teaching and Learning Module for Graduate Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2. (Suitable for all graduates with teaching responsibilities in all disciplinary areas and in all Colleges).

No. of Students: Max 50 (If oversubscribed by closing date, students will be chosen by random selection.).

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Methods: 18hr(s) Lectures (seminars and workshops. Additional learning will involve online discussion sessions and reflection on participants' own teaching).

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Grace Neville, Department of Vp Teaching and Learning.

Lecturer(s): Professor Grace Neville, Department of Vp Teaching and Learning, Members of the 4 Colleges and Guests.

Module Objective: To give graduates an introduction to the principles and practice of teaching and learning at third level, through a mix of practical advice and initiation into recent research on teaching and learning. Case Studies will be used.

Module Content: Sessions on small group/tutorial teaching, large group teaching, laboratory teaching, computer-assisted teaching and learning, course planning and delivery, the tutors role, setting examination questions, different types of assessment, some subject-specific sessions, keeping records, ethical issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Design, deliver and evaluate an event or activity to enable student learning
· Engage with various sources of evidence and scholarship to evaluate and improve their teaching practice
· Demonstrate critical reflection on personal teaching practice within their disciplinary contexts
· Devise appropriate strategies for further professional development of their teaching practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Literature Review 50 marks; Portfolio of Teaching 50 marks; Attendance at Module - Pass / Fail Judgement. A minimum of 80% attendance at lectures, seminars, workshops and other sessions will be required to achieve a Pass Judgement).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at lectures, seminars, workshops.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% In addition, students must achieve at least 50% in each element of Continuous Assessment and achieve a Pass Judgement for Attendance at this module. [A minimum of 80% attendance at lectures, seminars, workshops and other sessions will be required to achieve a Pass Judgement].

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

PG6005 Biotechniques (Last updated 21/10/2009)

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): Registration for a postgraduate programme employing cellular and molecular techniques in a relevant Life Sciences Department

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Resources and support will be provided on Blackboard).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Morrissey, Department of Microbiology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Microbiology; Staff, Department of Biochemistry; Staff, Department of Anatomy; Staff, Department of Physiology.

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students in the life sciences a broad overview of the range of techniques that are applied in cellular and molecular life science research.

Module Content: State of the art research methodologies that may include: PCR technology; Cell and Tissue Culture; Flow cytometry, laser scanning and cell separation techniques; Immunological techniques in protein analysis; Fluorescent and Confocal Microscopy; Bioinformatic resources for genome analysis; On-line resources for visualisation and analysis of protein structure; DNA chips, DNA arrays; Proteomic analysis; Transmission EM; Physiological techniques in whole animals; Specific models for the study of disease processes; Biochemical applications of Mass Spec; Manipulating the mouse genome.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the range of modern methodologies that are applied in life sciences research
· Describe how continually advancing methodologies facilitate new approaches to research questions
· Explain how some of these methodologies are applied to address specific research questions
· Explain how some of these methodologies could be applied in their own research projects.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (MCQ 1.5 hours end of module exam).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

PG6006 Commercialisation Skills for Research (Last updated 09/12/2009)

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (Seminars, workshops and guest speakers).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O'Flaherty, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems; Staff, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Management and Marketing; Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students an understanding of the relationship between research and commercial opportunity. Having completed the module, postgraduate students will have achieved a business perspective on the development of university start-ups and the commercial use made of research in established businesses, both nationally and internationally. Case studies will be used to illustrate principles discussed.

Module Content: Students will participate in seminars and workshops covering: Irish Research Policy, Innovation Structures and the Commercialisation agenda, The Business versus Research Mindset; Market Structure and Competitive Dynamics; Models of Innovation; Marketing and Selling Research Output; Principles of Intellectual Property and Legal Considerations of Research Output; and Financing & Evaluating Early Stage Ventures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the sources of commercial opportunity within research domains
· Discuss the roles of commercial team development
· Assess the market potential of alternative opportunities
· Develop a cohesive business plan for commercialisation
· Critique the value of intellectual property.

Assessment: Including a business plan and reflective learning log.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance at Lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

PG6007 PATHS - Postgraduate Training for Arts, Humanities, Commerce and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100 (open to postgraduate research students only).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (/seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew Cottey, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alan Kelly, Department of Graduate Studies office, and guests; Staff, Faculty of Arts; Staff, Faculty of Commerce; Staff, Faculty of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce postsgraduate students to core issues and methods in research in the Arts, Humanities, Commerce and Social Sciences and to provide them with practical advice on research in these areas.

Module Content: Research Planning; philosophies of research; research questions; qualitative and quantitative research; library and computing resources; case studies and comparative research; documentary analysis and archives; questionnaires, surveys and statistics; research interviews; writing skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the various approaches to conducting research;
· Distinguish and discriminate between different research techniques;
· Describe how data can be analysed;
· Plan a piece of research and defend the chosen methodology.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (Research Learning Journal) which will be assessed on a Pass/Fail Basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment (Research Learning Journal).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

PG6009 Graduate Information Literacy Skills (Last updated 14/01/2010)

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 26.

Pre-requisite(s): PhD/Masters (Research) Students (if places allow)

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Seminars and Workshops); Other ((Additional sessions will involve videos and discussion sessions). Resources and support will be provided by the College Liaison Librarians' Team. The module will be accessible online via Blackboard.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Margot Conrick, Library.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Library, (College Liaison Librarians, Information Services, Library).

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students an introduction to the principles and practice of Information Literacy, as applied to PhD research; to enable postgraduate students to audit and update their Information Literacy Skills by expanding and acquiring a portfolio of Information Literacy Skills; to develop those skills which will enhance the quality of their research and expand their career opportunities in our knowledge-based economy.

Module Content: Students completing the module should understand: The meaning of Information Literacy and its relevance to their research: The Components of Information Literacy Skills and the significance of acquiring these as part of the complete suite of Graduate Skills: The principles and applications of Graduate / Research Information Literacy Skills to the planning, managing and undertaking of research projects; The Shape of Research Literature; The Principles governing the Use of Information; Using appropriate software to Manage Information; Publishing & Disseminating Papers and Thesis preparation; Citation Analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Plan and undertake a comprehensive search and review of the literature;
· Develop effective strategies to locate and access relevant information;
· Analyse and critically evaluate research findings (yours & others);
· Demonstrate and apply a range of these skills as part of your wider research portfolio;
· Develop effective approaches to keep up to date with the latest research in your area;
· Manage your research information saving valuable time and effort;
· Identify the legal and ethical issues relating to the use of information;
· Publish and present information in an effective way;
· Justify the application of these information literacy skills to your specific research.

Assessment: Completion of a Short Report (1500 words) which will be marked on a pass/fail basis, to be completed at end of module describing how the concepts learnt will be applied in student's own thesis work.

Compulsory Elements: Completion of 1500 Word Report and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

PG6014 Scientific Outreach and Communication

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3. (The module may be registered for, and completed, at any time during registration for a postgraduate research degree.).

No. of Students: No limit.

Pre-requisite(s): Can be taken only by students registered for a Masters (by Research) or PhD Degree in the Colleges of Science, Engineering and Food Science or Medicine and Health.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (Involvement in outreach activities designed to build links between UCC and the community, which contribute to development of key generic and transferable skills by the students involved.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Patrick Fitzpatrick, Faculty office - Science.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Science.

Module Objective: To develop key skills for postgraduate students through discussing, explaining, and generating excitement about science in the broader community.

Module Content: Students must actively participate in 'Science for All' during which they will receive training in presentation skills and participate in a competition to present their research to a non-specialist audience. Furthermore, they must participate in a number of outreach activities including, but not limited to, visits to schools, presentation at open days, preparation of web-based materials designed to enhance public understanding of science, or publication of articles designed for broad audiences. Support sessions on specific topics (e.g., presentation to school audiences) will be provided by experienced staff members. Students will also present to fellow participants in the module on their experiences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Communicate scientific information to the public in an effective and transparent manner
· Promote public understanding of science through a diverse range of modes of communication (e.g., web, oral presentation, written pieces)
· Understand the important issues promoting the understanding and appreciation of science within the community
· Organise and lead a session that educates in an interesting and enjoyable way.

Assessment: Pass/Fail. Participants will prepare a short portfolio (1000-2000 words plus supporting appendices, if appropriate) of their experience, along with evidence of their outreach activities (e.g., articles, audio/visual recordings, success in Science for All) and a reflection on skills acquired. A judgement will be made based on the quality of the submitted material.

Compulsory Elements: Submission of final portfolio is required for a pass judgement to be recorded on a student's transcript.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Completion of satisfactory portfolio based on undertaking outreach activities.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

PG7001 The PhD: Getting Started and Generic Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Ryan, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To introduce PhD students to research formulation, management and the associated skills to complete the research process effectively.

Module Content: The module will guide new research students through a variety of management and organizational techniques including the introduction of Training Needs Analysis and Professional Development Planning. In addition it will provide sessions on the literature review, managing the supervision process, writing, information literacy, web based research, referencing tools and software and effective time management. It will provide an introduction to presentation skills for conference papers. The module will introduce students to research funding techniques.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Complete the Training Needs Analysis and Professional Development Plans
· Articulate their skills set and skills that they need to acquire
· Design and reflect on their literature review
· Use reference management tools and information management systems
· Identify the appropriate presentation skills for a variety of purposes.

Assessment: Reflective essay of not more than 3,000 words.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7002 Professional Training of Research Postgraduates in the Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To develop the advanced doctoral student's professional profile and his/her understanding of the job market and the interview process.

Module Content: This interdepartmental course (offered by the Department of Italian) will provide professional training for postgraduate students in the humanities (in their second year or higher) as they approach completion of their studies and prepare for the job market. Topics addressed include the following: importance of and strategies for completing the thesis; preparing job applications; the job market (e.g. Ireland, UK, and N. America); opportunities for PhD graduates outside the Academy; documenting evidence of good teaching practice; developing a publishing profile; conference participation and organization; investigating grant opportunities; among others.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify key areas in his/her curriculum vitae that need to be developed
· Present a professional dossier for job interviews
· Have an awareness of the job market, the interview process and what skills s/he needs to develop further.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Professional portfolio which includes the following elements: conference abstract; curriculum vitae; cover letter for job application; teaching dossier; plus participation in mock job interview.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7003 The PhD II: From Development to Completion

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Ryan, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To guide research students through the mid-stages of the PhD and to provide supplementary skills to assist with the completion of the project.

Module Content: The module guides students through mid-stage management techniques and introduces a variety of other practical sessions on networking and collaboration, web-design, writing and editing skills, poster design, research funding applications in Ireland and the EU, it provides introductions to additional software and examines issues relating to 'writing up and writer's block'. Finally, it provides guidance and training for the final stages of the PhD, including submission and preparation for the viva.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Present their research through a poster presentation or website
· Identify the variety of networking options within their field and discipline
· Identify the range of appropriate sources of research funding and complete funding applications
· Incorporate editorial skills into their research project
· Identify the key procedures associated with submission of the thesis and the viva.

Assessment: Poster Presentation on Research Topic.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7004 Master Class: Contemporary Theoretical Paradigms in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (seminars and workshops [teaching methods will vary from class to class]).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Ryan, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To enhance the doctoral education programme through a variety of classes designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to new frontiers of knowledge, by bringing prominent representatives of the 'state of the art' (supported by UCC staff) in contemporary interdisciplinary theoretical paradigms to UCC.

Module Content: The content will vary from class to class and year to year. The proposal is that we validate a framework through which the variety of Master Classes can be channelled. The College Graduate Studies Committee will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment is appropriate. The classes would reflect the inter-disciplinary nature of contemporary research in the arts, humanities and social sciences. The classes will transcend paradigms and perspectives from the disciplines in the College. Previously narrow disciplinary focus on substantive topics has been opened up to lively and intense debates on paradigms and epistemologies that transcend traditional areas of specialization, reinvigorating them and opening new horizons of research and thought.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Masterclass(es), outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
· Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
· Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
· Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Masterclass(es).
· Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories presented in Masterclass(es).
· Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms & theories presented in the Masterclass(es).

Assessment: Two reflective essays (not more that 2,000 words) on the themes of two of the master classes.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7005 Narratives

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Ryan, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To introduce PhD students to research formulation, management and the associated skills to complete the research process effectively.

Module Content: This module investigates central issues and methods of narrative practices. These principles inform approaches to postgraduate research in linguistic, visual, sociological and historical disciplines. Students are provided with an introduction to narratology, alongside its major theorists and texts. Through textual analysis, the course explores the language we use when defining narrative. It examines the techniques essential to narrative study and how they operate - often unseen - in a variety of media. The core ideas of narrative through case studies and comparative research, drawn from film, novels, graphic art and web narratives will be explored.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Confidently display knowledge of content, method and examples of narrative theory and practice.
· Demonstrate an ability to transfer abstract skills learned during the module into an assessment project.
· Demonstrate a readiness to participate in debate and to bring sources and examples to bear on the discussion.
· Contribute creatively to an overall understanding of narrative.
· Identify and explore the limit and structure of the subject area and its intersection with other general disciplines.
· Develop an individualised methodological profile and the ability to articulate and modify this.

Assessment: One reflective essay of not more than 3,000 words.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7006 Research Skills and Digital Research Management

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Seminars / Training).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Ryan, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To develop a range of generic research related skills and technical abilities with a specific focus on digital photography and creation of digital materials and archives.

Module Content: The module will provide an introduction to a range of intellectual abilities and digital skills commonly employed by historians and increasingly used in the arts and social sciences. It will introduce research students to skills associated with personal management and effectiveness, time, project and information management using software, intellectual skills and contextual knowledge including literature reviews and bibliographical skills: the use of digital archival finding aids, digital photography, the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) process, electronic reference organisation, digital and microfilm scanning, digital communication and networking techniques.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Use a range of software to facilitate the process of gathering, sifting and organising source material
· Use software for personal, project, time and information management
· Conduct digital photography
· Convert images through OCR into searchable PDF documents
· Use a variety of reference management tools and bibliographic software.

Assessment: Reflective essay on digitisation or demonstration of the digitisation of source material.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7007 Professional Communication for Humanities and Social Science Students

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Diarmuid Whelan, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of History; Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To assist students in the development of their professional communication skills.

Module Content: Development of skills associated with preparation of material for a range of audiences using the variety of media available. Preparation of a scholarly publication plan, papers, lectures and seminars. Preparation of abstracts, book proposals, conference posters, course outlines, syllabi, lesson plans and handouts. Presentation and dissemination of scholarly work to non-specialist audiences: radio and TV, podcasts, webcasts, blogs, webpages, newsletters, discussions groups; networking and participation in scholarly communities of practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Know about the range of communication outlets and audiences for scholarly activity
· Be able to prepare a publication plan appropriate to their research topic
· Be able to prepare conference submissions, abstracts, book proposals
· Be able to prepare plans for a range of presentations including posters, papers, lectures and seminars to various audiences.

Assessment: Learning portfolio including, inter alia, a publications plan, conference poster, webpage, contributions to scholarly newsletter, present a conference paper, article abstracts and paper submissions, book proposal, model funding application, course, teaching portfolio including lecture and seminar outlines, podcasts.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7008 Editing Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, Department of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To equip students with editorial skillsets necessary to create editions of humanities and social sciences material, as well as examining critical, theoretical frameworks and editorial theory.

Module Content: · This course will provide professional training for postgraduate students in the humanities (in their second year or higher) and Social Sciences as they approach completion of their studies and prepare for the job market. Using literature as a basis and reference, students will be trained in both conventional and new theories of textual editing as well as theorising copyright issues
· the role of the editor;
· the importance of interface;
· issues of copyright and fair dealing;
· the nature of information and divisions of knowledge;
· the importance of visuals, and of different media and online spaces;
· as well as in the technical skills (XML / TEI) required to publish online.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Create an edition of a text related to their course(not for publication)
· Understand key elements of editorial theory
· Participate in a joint edition of a class project: (eg) online pg essay collection.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Hardcopy edited text; Team project.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7009 Digital Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, Department of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To equip students with digital skillsets necessary to research, create, edit, categorise and publish digital humanities and social sciences material online.

Module Content: This course will provide professional training for postgraduate students in the humanities and social sciences. It will introduce students to a range of digital skills and key concepts for online publication of a range of texts / contexts / materials within the humanities. Skills include:
· Defining content
· Managing content
· HTML - Hyper Text Markup Language
· XML - Extensible Markup Language
· TEI - Text Encoding Initiative - the international standard for markup in the humanities
· Open source softwares for graphic / image manipulation and design
· Understanding IP and copyright issues
· FTP - File transfer protocol for transfer of files

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Create a hypertext of material from their research focus
· Mark up an essay relevant to their course for online publication according to best international standards
· Generate a website for their research portfolio.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Hypertext; Publication of marked up essay online; Website.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7010 Theory and Philosophy for the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Summer School

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3. (Summer School, one week duration).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 30hr(s) Lectures (Classroom content - lectures and seminars); 70hr(s) Other (Preparatory (assigned) reading; written assignment - learning journal of key concepts completed during the School).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Parkes, Department of Faculty office - Arts.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Philosophy, & Sociology.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to classical & contemporary theoretical and philosophical paradigms & epistemologies.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The School of Sociology and Philosophy will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment is appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in theoretical paradigms, interpretive frameworks, methodologies and epistemologies that underpin areas of substantive disciplinary specialization in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, integrating and consolidating the intellectual core of doctoral students' theses.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School,
outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.

· Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key
concepts and ideas.

· Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems,
issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

· Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate
them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School.

· Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in
terms of general theories presented in Summer School.

· Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of
paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Written assignments: learning journal.

Compulsory Elements: Participation and completion of assignment as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7011 Theory and Philosophy for the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences Summer School

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3. (Summer School, one week duration).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 30hr(s) Lectures (classroom content - lectures and seminars); 70hr(s) Other (preparatory [assigned] reading; written assignment - learning journal of key concepts completed during the school. In addition, students will write a major paper, representing 100 hours (self-directed) research & writing, to be submitted on conclusion of the Summer School).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Parkes, Department of Faculty office - Arts.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Philosophy; Staff, Department of Sociology; Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to classical & contemporary theoretical and philosophical paradigms & epistemologies.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The School of Sociology and Philosophy will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment is appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in theoretical paradigms, interpretive frameworks, methodologies and epistemologies that underpin areas of substantive disciplinary specialization in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, integrating and consolidating the intellectual core of doctoral students' theses.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School,
outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.

· Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key
concepts and ideas.

· Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems,
issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

· Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate
them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School.

· Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in
terms of general theories presented in Summer School.

· Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of
paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Written assignments (Learning journal; plus 5,000 word paper).

Compulsory Elements: Participation and completion of assignment(s) as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7012 International Political Anthropology Summer School

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3. (Summer School, one week duration).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 30hr(s) Lectures (classroom content - lectures & seminars); 70hr(s) Other (preparatory [assigned] reading; written assignment - learning journal of key concepts completed during the school.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Philosophy; Staff, Department of Sociology; Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to the field of International Political Anthropology.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The School of Sociology and Philosophy at UCC, in collaboration with colleagues internationally will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment is appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in International Political Anthropology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining
its historical development, scope and methodologies.

· Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key
concepts and ideas.

· Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems,
issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

· Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate
them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School.

· Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in
terms of general theories presented in Summer School.

· Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of
paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Written assignments (Learning Journal).

Compulsory Elements: Participation, and completion of assignments(s) as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7013 International Political Anthropology Summer School

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3. (Summer School, one week duration).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 30hr(s) Lectures (classroom content - lectures and seminars); 70hr(s) Other (preparatory [assigned] reading; written assignment - learning journal of key concepts completed during the school; In addition, students will write a major paper, representing 100 hours (self-directed) research & writing, to be submitted on conclusion of the Summer School).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Philosophy; Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to the field of International Political Anthropology.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The School of Sociology and Philosophy at UCC, in collaboration with colleagues internationally will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment is appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in International Political Anthropology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining
its historical development, scope and methodologies.

· Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key
concepts and ideas.

· Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems,
issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

· Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate
them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School.

· Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in
terms of general theories presented in Summer School.

· Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of
paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Written assignments (Learning Journal; plus 5,000 word paper).

Compulsory Elements: Participation, and completion of assignment(s) as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in Autumn.

[Top of page]

PG7014 Creativity and Innovation for Research Students

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): No pre-requisites, but the module is open to postgraduate research students in SEFS and M&H only.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Methods: 1 x 8hr(s) Workshops; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (tutorials); 1 x 4hr(s) Seminars; Other (plus self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Anita Maguire, School of Pharmacy.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Science, plus guest lecturers.

Module Objective: To introduce postgraduate students in any aspect of S&T to Creativity and Innovation and to provide them with practical advice on application to research.

Module Content: Introduction to practical tools relating to Creativity and Innovation, and implementation of these tools in a research programme ? 1 day workshop
Application of this approach to an element of the research programme with tutorial support ? 6-8 weeks
Presentation of the use of the Creativity and Innovation approach in their research at end of the module

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appreciate the potential for use of tools relating to creativity and innovation to research
· Apply this approach to development of an aspect of their research programme
· Present the results of this approach and the impact on the research to a group without expert knowledge of the research field.

Assessment: Pass/fail judgment based on presentation and participation in the module.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance and completion of module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/fail judgment based on presentation and participation in the module.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]