Irish Law Updates

Friday, February 02, 2007

Launch of Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, UCC, Cork

Announcing the launch of the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights,

Faculty of Law, University College Cork

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights was established by the Faculty of Law, U.C.C. in 2006, building on the Faculty's expanding research and teaching programs in these fields. The Centre will be formally launched on Tuesday February 27th, 2007 with the first in a series of Annual Distinguished Lectures in Criminal Justice and Human Rights. Addressing one of the key questions for criminal justice and human rights today, Professor Conor Gearty, Rausing Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, L.S.E, will speak on the topic:

'Criminal Justice and Human Rights: Rising to the Challenge of Counter-Terrorism'.

Venue: Aula Maxima, U.C.C.
Time: 6pm (registration from 5.30pm)
Date: Feb. 27th
RSVP: Feb. 20th ccjhr@ucc.ie

Professor Conor Gearty

Conor Gearty was born in Ireland and graduated in law from University College Dublin before moving to Wolfson College, Cambridge in 1980 to study for a Master's Degree and then for a PhD. He became a fellow of Emmanuel College Cambridge in 1983 and in 1990 he moved to the school of law at King's College London where he was first a senior lecturer, then a reader and finally (from 1995) a professor. On 1 October 2002, he took up a new appointment as Rausing Director of the Centre for the Study of Human Rights and professor of human rights law at LSE.
Conor Gearty has published widely on terrorism, civil liberties and human rights. His books include Terror (Faber, 1990) and two books with K D Ewing, Freedom under Thatcher (1989) and The Struggle for Civil Liberties (2000). One of his more recent books, Principles of Human Rights Adjudication, is a study of the place of the Human Rights Act in Britain's constitutional order. It locates the measure in its political and historical context and analyses the case law from the perspective not only of principle but also of practical experience. In his latest book, Can Human Rights Survive? <http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521685524> , Conor analyses the problems facing human rights today and the challenges that need to be overcome if the subject is to continue to thrive. The book is based on the Hamlyn lectures that Conor gave in 2005.

Conor Gearty is also a barrister and was a founder member of Matrix chambers from where he continues to practice. He has been a frequent adviser to judges, practitioners and public authorities on the implications of the UK Human Rights Act, and has frequently lectured at home and abroad on the topic of human rights. He has appeared in human rights cases in the House of Lords, the Court of Appeal and the High Court.

About the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights

The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights was established by the Faculty of Law, U.C.C. in 2006. The study of crime, justice and human rights raises complex and often challenging questions for lawyers and policy makers. The Centre seeks to contribute to national and international debates on these questions, through the promotion of critical legal research, innovative programmes of legal education and training, and key partnerships with Government, statutory bodies and civil society organisations. The Centre builds on the success of the LLM Criminal Justice (Clinical) programme and the Faculty's growing international reputation for excellence in the fields of crime, justice and human rights.

For further information contact:
Dr Siobhan Mullally, Co-Director, Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, s.mullally@ucc.ie <mailto:s.mullally@ucc.ie>

http://www.ucc.ie/en/lawsite/centres/CJHR/

0 Comments:

Post a Comment



<$I18N$LinksToThisPost>:

Create a Link

<< Home