Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

SE6002 Biomedical Materials (BMED H5001 - Athlone Institute of Technology)
SE6003 Polymer Materials (PLAS H5001 - Athlone Institute of Technology)
SE6004 Microsystems Engineering (INTR8012 - Cork Institute of Technology)
SE6005 Photonic Devices (EE506 - Dublin City University)
SE6006 Scientific Programming Concepts (PH502 - NUI Galway)
SE6007 Electronic Structure Theory
SE6008 Statistical Mechanics
SE6009 High Performance Computing and Parallel Programming (PH504 - NUI Galway)
SE6010 Optical Design and Image Formation (PHY506 - NUI Galway)
SE6011 Nanobiomaterials (CH508 - NUI Galway)
SE6012 Biomaterials (MT8001 - University of Limerick)
SE6013 Advanced Characterisation Techniques (PH5093 - University of Limerick)
SE6016 Special Topics in Nanoscience

SE6002 Biomedical Materials (BMED H5001 - Athlone Institute of Technology)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12hr(s) Lectures; 30hr(s) Directed Study (assignments); 6hr(s) Practicals (laboratory practicals (on-line lectures and on-site lab workshop in AIT)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Clement Higginbotham, Athlone Institute of Technology.

Module Objective: The study of biomedical materials is essential for ICGEE students who are undertaking a PhD in any aspect of nanomedicine or nanotechnology as applied to biomedical systems. This assignment-based module introduces students to biomaterial surfaces, biomaterial-cell interaction, biocompatibility, biomaterial characterisation, biomaterials for biosensors and diagnostic devices, biomaterials for drug delivery and biomaterials for tissue engineering. Emphasis will be placed on biomaterials at the nano-scale as the application of materials to biological systems shows interesting characteristics at this level.

Module Content: · Introduction to biomaterials,
· Biomaterials surfaces,
· Protein-surface interactions,
· Cell-surface interactions,
· Surface modification,
· Surface characterisation,
· Biomaterials for biosensors and diagnostic devices,
· Biomaterials for drug delivery,
· Biomaterials for organ replacement,
· Biomaterials for tissue engineering,
· Nano-biomaterials.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Interpret and evaluate the underlying concepts and principles of material selection for biomedical applications.
· Know how a material performs in a certain biological environment.
· Use acquired analytical and characterisation skills at an advanced level to undertake research activities on biomedical materials.
· Select the appropriate surface modification method for a particular biomedical material application.
· Solve technically complex problems relevant to the evaluation of biomedical materials.
· Communicate information and observations using appropriate terminology through the preparation of written scientific reports.
· Demonstrate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of new biomedical materials and their applications.
· Know general relationships between structures, properties and their relationships.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (based on assignment submissions).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on the module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

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SE6003 Polymer Materials (PLAS H5001 - Athlone Institute of Technology)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12hr(s) Lectures; 30hr(s) Directed Study (assignments); 6hr(s) Practicals (laboratory practical (on-line lectures and on-site laboratory workshop in AIT)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Clement Higginbotham, Athlone Institute of Technology.

Module Objective: "Polymer materials" is a core subject area for a PhD student researching any aspect of polymer science and technology, including at the micro- and nano- scale. This assignment-based module introduces students to polymer materials and focuses on structure/property relationships. It also deals with more specialized advanced polymer systems. The practical element will teach the students to synthesize and characterize a range of polymers using various analytical tools.

Module Content: · Introduction to polymer materials,
· Review of polymerisation methods,
· Molecular weight determination,
· Property modification and the use of additives,
· Developments in commodity polymers,
· Composites,
· Speciality polymers,
· Specialised applications,
· Diffusion control, Environmental aspects of polymers,
· New trends and developments in speciality polymers,
· Nanomaterials

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have an enhanced knowledge and understanding of polymeric materials.
· Know general relationships between structure, properties and applications.
· Interpret and evaluate the underlying concepts and principles of material selection for advanced polymer applications.
· Use acquired analytical and characterisation skills at an advanced level to undertake research activities on speciality polymers.
· Solve technically complex problems relevant to the evaluation of material properties.
· Communicate information and observations using appropriate terminology through the preparation of written scientific reports.
· Demonstrate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of new materials and their applications.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (based on assignment submissions).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on the module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

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SE6004 Microsystems Engineering (INTR8012 - Cork Institute of Technology)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 2day(s) Workshops (in CIT/Tyndall for experimental element plus lectures to be delivered on-line. Total 13 weeks).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Martin Hill, Cork Institute of Technology.

Module Objective: This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary skills required to design and apply microsystems, will examine some current commercial microsystems application and will consider future possibilities for the technology. It can be taken by students from different technical backgrounds and introduces a technology which is predicted to find applications in many technical domains.

Module Content: · Introduction to Microsystems - Description of the design, fabrication and application of microsystems. The current and emerging business markets for microsystem technology.
· Component Specification and Design - System level specification of suitable components and technologies for real-world applications. Layout of ICs and MEMS components.
· Modelling and Design - Electrical, thermal and mechanical modelling and design of microtechnology components and sensors. Combined sensor and interface modelling.
· Fabrication - IC fabrication processes and industry. Microsystems fabrication options. Integration issues.
· Microsystem testing - Characterisation of MEMS system performance using FEM modelling combined with electrical, optical and thermal test equipment.
Case Studies - Perform case studies in microelectromechanical systems engineering. Describe, model and characterise components with a comparison of system level specifications with modelled and measured performance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the emerging microsystems and embedded smart systems industries, the products they are beginning to bring to the market, how these products can be used in existing business and industry and the new businesses and industries springing up based on these products.
· Realise integrated microsystem components by generating CAD layout files and relating those files to the fabrication process flow.
· Evaluate process and design options for integration of microsystem components.
· Identify packaging and interconnect options suitable for microsystems applications.
· Derive component and system level specifications from the application description and develop application driven integrated microsystem designs.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 25 marks (open book); Continuous Assessment 75 marks (Written report, 20 marks; Workshop assessment, 30 marks; Presentation, 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (open book) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on the module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

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SE6005 Photonic Devices (EE506 - Dublin City University)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (video conference delivery/e-learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Pascal Landais (DCU) and Dr Guillaume Huyet (CIT).

Module Objective: This module aims to equip students with an understanding of the physics, properties and performances of the most common photonic devices and their integration in optical communication networks.

Module Content: · Description of light as an electromagnetic wave and as a particle.
· Optical properties of semiconductors materials.
· Conditions for light emission or detection.
· Simulation of light emitting devices based on rate-equation in time and frequency domains
· Short pulse generation by Gain switching, Q-switching and passive or active mode-locking schemes.
· All optical function generated by semiconductor lasers, wavelength conversion, and clock recovery for instance. Applications of semiconductor devices in OTDM or WDM.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Select semiconductor materials for light emission and detection applications based on an understanding of photoemission photoabsorption and band structure.
· Be capable of solving various problems related to light emitting and light detecting device designs.
· Mathematically analyse various types of semiconductor lasers and detectors.
· Identify key principles of optical communication devices.
· Identify and distinguish various optical data processing schemes.
· Identify growth and processing technologies for light emitter and detector fabrication
· Analyse the propagation of an electromagnetic wave in free space, at a media interfaces, and in various guides.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must obtain at least 40% in each of the End of Year Written Examination and Continuous Assessment components of the assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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SE6006 Scientific Programming Concepts (PH502 - NUI Galway)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals (practical sessions (supplementary lecture material and reading list will be given)); 12hr(s) Lectures (material also available on-line).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Simon Wong, ICHEC.

Module Objective: This module is an introduction to programming concepts aimed at scientists who have had minimal or no formal training in the subject. The focus is on C and Fortran yet the general concepts should be applicable to other programming languages.

Module Content: · Overview of computer architecture
· The UNIX/Linux shell
· The imperative programming paradigm
· Data types & arithmetic operations
· Loops & conditional statements
· Object-oriented programming
· Standard libraries
· Compilation
· C pointers & memory management
· Modern Fortran
· Scripting languages
· Introduction to HPC

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Gain an understanding of what constitutes a computer program and how it is constructed.
· Comprehend written source code.
· Write and compile basic programs in C/Fortran.
· Make use of standard libraries in own code.

Assessment: 4 x practical assignments, 20 marks each; MCQs, 20 marks.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 60% A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

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SE6007 Electronic Structure Theory

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (in the first term; special topics seminar during second term. Supporting documents and notes will be available via web download.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Stephen B. Fahy, Department of Physics.

Lecturer(s): Prof Stephen B. Fahy, Department of Physics; Staff, Tyndall Institute; Staff, Department of Physics.

Module Objective: To introduce electronic structure theory and associated computational methods at a level that the relevant research literature becomes accessible to first year postgraduate students; to survey available electronic structure methods to allow research students to identify the level of approximation appropriate to a given problem.

Module Content: Quantum mechanics review; Variational method; Bonds and bands; Kronig-Penney model; Tight binding method; Hartree-Fock approximation; Self-consistent field (SCF) calculations; Many-electron wavefunctions and reduced density matrices; Correlation energy; Kinetic and electron-electron interaction energies in the uniform electron gas; Thomas-Fermi and Slater exchange density functionals; Hohenberg-Kohn and Kohn-Sham theorems- Density functional theory (DFT) in the local density approximation (LDA); Gradient corrected potentials; LDA eigenvalues and the band-gap problem; Modern ab initio pseudopotentials.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Relate the fundamental equations of quantum mechanics to the computer algorithms used to solve many-electron problems;
· Apply electronic structure theory by selecting an appropriate level of approximation to problems in solid state physics and material science;
· To provide error estimates to computational results obtained from approximate electronic structure programs;
· Modify existing electronic structure theory computer programs to perform customised tasks.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Problem sheets, 80 marks and presentation of solutions in tutorials, 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (with substituted projects/problems.).

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SE6008 Statistical Mechanics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Supporting documents and notes will be provided via web download. External module delivery via video conferencing and subsequent downloading of lectures).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Module Objective: To apply statistical mechanics to the calculation of finite size effects for nanoscale systems; to introduce descriptions of non-equilibrium (open) systems and to relate the underlying physics of nanoscale systems to electronic device operation; to make the research literature on statistical mechanics and nanoscale physics accessible to beginning graduate students.

Module Content: Review of thermodynamics; Maxwell relations; Thermodynamics of finite systems and applications examples such as lattice gas/Ising model, crystallites, and nucleation; Statistical mechanics and ensembles; Photon Gas; Electron Gas; Statistical and reduced density matrices in quantum mechanics; Entropy and information; Maximum entropy principle; Application of maximum entropy at equilibrium and in open systems; Electronic devices as open systems; Minimum entropy production versus maximum entropy; Near-equilibrium electron transport; Far from equilibrium electron transport; Unresolved issues and current research topics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse and calculate physical and chemical properties of systems with many degrees of freedom using partition functions;
· Identify a sub-system interacting with reservoirs and to apply the correct statistical ensemble required to describe the system;
· Relate the methods of statistical mechanics to finite systems;
Apply the concept of entropy to statistical problems using the formalism of information theory.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Problem sheets, 80 marks; presentation of solutions in tutorials, 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (with substituted projects/problems).

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SE6009 High Performance Computing and Parallel Programming (PH504 - NUI Galway)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 Lectures (material also available on-line); 4 x 3hr(s) Workshops (or Tutorials. Supplementary lecture material and reading list will be given).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Simon Wong, ICHEC.

Module Objective: This module introduces key topics in high performance computing (HPC), including parallel programming. Prior programming experience; basic knowledge of UNIX/Linux shell is expected.

Module Content: · Evolution of computer architecture
· High performance computing concepts and scientific applications
· Parallel decomposition
· Shared memory multiprocessing programming (OpenMP)
· The Message Passing Interface (MPI)
· Hybrid programming (OpenMP + MPI)
· Numerical libraries & high performance I/O libraries (e.g. NetCDF, HDF5)
· Introduction to multi-threading accelerators

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand key HPC concepts and how they are applied in scientific research.
· Devise parallel strategies to solve computational problems.
· Develop basic parallel applications using OpenMP and/or MPI.
· Leverage numerical, I/O libraries for better performing code.

Assessment: 4 x practical assignments, 20 marks each; MCQs, 20 marks.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 60% A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

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SE6010 Optical Design and Image Formation (PHY506 - NUI Galway)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 Lectures (Material also available on-line. Supplementary lecture material and other text and web references will be given); 2 Workshops (or tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Alexander Goncharov, NUI Galway.

Module Objective: This module covers the fundamentals of optic al design and image formation. The course will provide graduate students using optical systems with an in-depth knowledge of optical design.

Module Content: · Basic Concepts of Geometrical Optics
· Basic concepts of image formation
· Paraxial Optics
· Ray Tracing and Ray Aberrations
· Wave Aberrations
· Chromatic Aberrations
· Basic Principles for Aberration Correction
· Principles of Optical System Layout
· Optimization of Optical Systems
· Optimization Examples
· Synthesis of new Lens Designs

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand basic principles of optical design
· Develop a basic optical design for an research application in lasers and optics
· Evaluate optical designs of commercial optical instruments.

Assessment: 2 x assignments, 30 marks each; 10 x MCQs, 40 marks. Two assignments are given using ray tracing programme. Review of optical design of imaging instrument and regular MCQ.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 60% A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

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SE6011 Nanobiomaterials (CH508 - NUI Galway)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 2 Lectures (per week. Standard lectures using powerpoint).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Yury Rochev, NUI Galway.

Module Objective: To provide an in-depth understanding of biological interactions of different materials.
To explain the importance of nano-scale structures and surfaces on the biological interactions
To enable an appreciation of regulatory issues relating to applications of biomaterials.

Module Content: · Introduction to biomaterials
· Description of material science considerations for metals, polymers, ceramics and composites.
· Surface considerations, role of coatings and micro- and nano-scale patterning.
· Biomaterials Characterisation across different length scales.
· Biocompatibility
· Design and material choice considerations for implant devices. Sterilisation.
· Biomaterials for replacement of skeletal hard tissues.
· Biomaterials for soft tissue and organ replacement.
· Biomaterials for therapeutic or diagnostic applications.
· Nanobiomaterials in drug delivery, biomimetics, & tissue engineering.
· Regulatory issues

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand biological interactions of different materials
· Explain the importance of nano-scale structures and surfaces on the biological interactions for different materials
· Develop applications of biomaterials with due recognition of the regulatory context.

Assessment: Project assignment, 60 marks; 3 x MCQs, 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 60% A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modues at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on the module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examination Board which will meet if required.

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SE6012 Biomaterials (MT8001 - University of Limerick)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 27hr(s) Lectures (teaching delivered one intensive week of 27 hours); 8weeks(s) Directed Study (distance learning to deliver lecture material, tutorial assignments, design exercises and case studies - total 40 hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr Eamonn Debarra, UL.

Module Objective: This module is for postgraduate students and assumes an undergraduate background in the subject. It is designed to meet the needs of engineering, science and medical students undertaking a Masters or structured PhD programme. The module provides a concise introduction to the microstructures and processing of materials (metals, ceramics, polymers and composites) and shows how these are related to the properties required in engineering design, as well as instrumented analytical methods used to quantify such relationships. In addition students will gain an appreciation for soft tissue replacement materials in current use as well as an understanding of materials selection and design requirements for hard and soft tissue replacement applications.

Module Content: Classification of natural and synthetic materials: metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. Relate stress/strain responses of such classes to composition, structure and other relevant parameters.
Case Studies: Biomaterials for replacement of skeletal hard tissues.
Case Studies: Biomaterials for soft tissue replacement.
Biomaterials characterisation across different length scales.
Thermal methods of characterisation of biomaterials
Characterisation of biomaterial surfaces.
Design and material selection considerations for implant devices.
Sterilisation and effects on material properties

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the microstructural characteristics of the main classes of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, composites.
· Explain the relationship between such microstructural features of each class of material and how they influence material properties.
· Describe stress/strain response of all material types, and appropriate models, and list those parameters (temperature/strain rate/humidity etc) that modulate such responses.
· Explain how the processing, including sterilisation, can influence microstructure and hence mechanical/physical properties.
· List the design limiting properties of each class of material in current device applications.
· Understand the material selection process and the design requirements for soft and hard tissue replacement applications
· Relate the concepts in outcomes 1-4 above to the following analytical techniques, the instruments used and the types of results expected
o Thermal Analysis methods: DSC, DMTA, DETA, TGA
o X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction analysis of materials

· o Describe SEM/TEM and how they are used to identify and analyse materials; FIB; SIMS. o Understand how X-ray spectroscopy is used in the analysis of phases in electron microscopy. o Describe the different types of spectroscopic techniques eg FTIR, UV-vis and ssMASNMR
· 4 lab experiments are incorporated into the module. All require the students to actively participate. These may be altered to suit specific specialist areas of participants. Examples may include: Spectroscopic analysis of protein materials. Measurement of a polymer molecular weight by gel permeation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on the module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

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SE6013 Advanced Characterisation Techniques (PH5093 - University of Limerick)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1. (Lectures using Powerpoint. Case studies and practical examples are used. Tutorials provide opportunities for students to practice calculations from real analytical data. Series of lab experiments undertaken and series of demonstrations on advanced analytical research equipment.).

No. of Students: Min 0.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 Lectures; Tutorials; Practicals (8 hrs lab experiements plus case studies).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Dr David Tanner, UL.

Module Objective: · To give students an understanding of modern analytical techniques used in Materials research
· To develop students analytical skills in solving problems in Materials and Surface Science.
· To enable students to select the most appropriate combination of techniques for solving problems.
· To provide an introduction to the physical principles and applications of advanced surface analytical technique

Module Content: · Thermal Analysis techniques: thermogravimetry, DTA, DSC, DMTA and DETA.
· Review of X-ray diffraction techniques, electron diffraction, and analysis of simple diffraction patterns.
· Microscopy: Transmission electron microscopy, image formation, SAD; Scanning electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), EPMA, Surface Analysis, FIB; SIMS; Atomic force microscopy.
· X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)
· Review of spectroscopic techniques, Infra red, Visible and UV. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy.
· Nuclear magnetic resonance. X-ray Spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence (XRF).
· Atomic Adsorption.
· Porosimetry, BET analysis.
· Case studies involving application of the above techniques to specific materials problems

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe a range of thermal analysis techniques, the instruments used and the types of results expected.
· Understand Bragg's law and its basis and apply this to X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction analysis of materials.
· Describe the different electron microscope instruments and how they are used to identify and analyse materials; FIB; SIMS.
· Understand how X-ray spectroscopy is used in the analysis of phases in electron microscopy.
· Describe the different types of spectroscopic techniques including FTIR, UV-vis and NMR.
· Discuss the importance of advanced surface analytical techniques and modern measurement in advanced characterisation of materials.
· A series of lab experiments is undertaken to provide practical experience of: Thermal Analysis: thermogravimetry, DTA, DSC, DMTA FTIR This is combined with a series of demonstrations on advanced analytical research equipment housed in the Materials and Surface Science Institute.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (70 marks); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (2 x mid-term exams, 15 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must obtain at least 40% in each of the End of Year Written Exam and Continuous Assessment components of the assessment. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: For students failing to achieve the pass standard in taught modules at Spring or Summer exams there may be a Supplemental examination in the Autumn, depending on the module, and marks presented at the Autumn Examinations Board which will meet if required.

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SE6016 Special Topics in Nanoscience

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 5day(s) Lectures (to be delivered in a block session over five days with 22 lecturer/presentations and 3 practical sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr James Greer, Tyndall Institute.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Tyndall Institute, Invited lecturers from the INSPIRE national graduate education programme.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to introduce students to nanoscience and nanotechnology; particularly nanoelectronics, nanophotonics and nanobiomaterials.

Module Content: Introduction to nanoscience and nanotechnology:
Nanomaterials synthesis and characterisation; size dependence of properties; introduction to microscopy and spectroscopic methods of measurement at the nanoscale; applications of nanomaterials and devices.

Nanoelectronics: review of fundamentals; historical perspective; fabrication of nanoelectronic devices; application of nanoelectronics; quantum effects.

Nanophotonics: General introduction; review of fundamentals of lasers; optical devices;
historical overview; Description of light as an electromagnetic wave; introduction of the quantum aspect of light; Definition of photon; Overview of active materials bulk; quantum well; wire dot and quantum dot; Fabrication of photonic devices; quantum dot materials

Nanobiomaterials: Review of fundamental properties of cells, amino acids, polypeptides, proteins, DNA/RNA; hierarchial organisation in biological systems; Interface between biological and nonbiological entities at the nanoscale; Biosensors and biocatalysts; Medical devices and drug delivery ; nanotechnology for environmental, health and safety

Commercialisation and Exploitation of nanoscience and nanotechnology

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the theoretical concepts behind nanoelectronics, nanophotonics and nanobiomaterials.
· Discuss the fabrication processes for nanoelectronics, nanophotonics and nanobiomaterials.
· Describe the application potential for nanoelectronics, nanophotonics and nanobio devices.
· Outline commercialisation potential in nanoscience and nanotechnology applications.

Assessment: Oral presentation and report.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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