Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

IP3008 Palliative Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach
IP5001 Holistic Approach to Palliative Care
IP6001 Philosophy, Development and Governance in Palliative Care
IP6002 Pain in Palliative Care
IP6003 Symptoms in Palliative Care
IP6004 End of Life Care, Grief and Bereavement
IP6005 Clinical Practicum in Palliative Care
IP6006 Psychosocial and Spiritual Aspects of Palliative Care

IP3008 Palliative Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Lectures, e-Learning, Case Studies, Workshops, Discussion, Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Sweeney, School of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Ms Ann McAuliffe, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Dr Catherine Sweeney, School of Medicine; Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Staff, School of Medicine, Staff, St. Patrick's Hospital.

Module Objective: Students from the College of Medicine and Health will develop fundamental knowledge, attitude and skills in the area of palliative care and interdisciplinary team work.

Module Content: Principles of palliative care including fundamentals of assessment and management of common symptoms. The role of the interdisciplinary team and settings in which specialist palliative care is delivered. Ethics and decision making in palliative care. Practical session on breaking bad news. Tour of facilities in St Patrick's Hospital/Marymount Hospice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the main principles of palliative care
· Outline a basic approach to assess and manage common symptoms experienced by palliative care patients
· Describe the fundamentals of ethics in palliative care
· Identify the settings in which specialist palliative care services are delivered and know how to access these services
· Describe the importance of holistic, collaborative, individualised care of patients and their families
· Identify the key components of breaking bad news
· Compare the palliative care approach with the traditional medical model of care
· Argue the case for early referral to palliative care
· Discuss the strengths, opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinary education and healthcare practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written Assignment - 80 marks; Participation in Small Group Work - 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Co-ordinator).

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IP5001 Holistic Approach to Palliative Care

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2 or 3.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Lectures, workshops, group work, discussion, DVD); Directed Study (directed study (70 hours reflective practice, course work, self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis O'Mahony, Department of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Medicine, and Staff, Education Centre, St Patrick's Marymount.

Module Objective: To develop the learner's fundamental palliative care knowledge, attitudes and skills and to apply these to clinical practice.

Module Content: A holistic approach to palliative care, pain and symptom management in palliative care., specialist palliative care services and palliative care skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse the philosophy and principles of palliative care and their application to the clinical area
· Discuss the assessment and management of pain and the main common symptoms experienced by palliative care patients
· Appreciate the importance of holistic, collaborative, individualised care of the patient and family in the provision of quality palliative care
· Discuss the importance of interpersonal skills and factors that influence communication in palliative care
· Describe the services provided by a specialist palliative care unit and how to access the services; Outline the role of individual members of the multidisciplinary team in the holistic care of palliative patients and their families
· Value the role of family carers and appreciate the importance of caring for the carer, including caring for self as a healthcare professional in palliative care
· Critically analyse your contribution to the care of the palliative patient and their family in your clinical setting.
· Identify the early recognition signs of a palliative care emergency and discuss the management of same.
· Demonstrate the correct procedure to set up, administer and monitor a continuous subcutaneous infusion using either the McKinley T34 Syringe Pump or the Graseby MS16A Syringe Driver.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written Assignment (1,500 - 2,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at all timetabled teaching sessions and submission of the required assignment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit assignment as subscribed by the School of Medicine.).

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IP6001 Philosophy, Development and Governance in Palliative Care

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 50hr(s) Lectures (Group work/Field Trip); 150hr(s) Directed Study (Course work, self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis O'Mahony, Department of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Medicine, Staff, Marymount Hospice.

Module Objective: To enable healthcare professionals to critically examine the concept of palliative care and analyse the service and quality of care provided to palliative patients and their families.

Module Content: The historical developments of palliative care internationally and nationally. The philosophy of palliative care. Epidemiology of disease for palliative care patients. Clinical governance and quality of life. The interdisciplinary team, roles and dynamics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the historical development of hospice and palliative care and analyse the sociological and political influences on the development of palliative care services in Ireland.
· Critically examine the philosophy of palliative care and assess its impact on the provision of care to palliative patients.
· Demonstrate a belief in the philosophy and principles of palliative care.
· Examine the concept of holism within the palliative care context and discuss the function of the interdisciplinary team in the provision of holistic palliative care.
· Summarise the physical, psychological, sociological and spiritual effects of a palliative care diagnosis on the patient and their family based on research studies.
· Design and utilise an audit tool to measure standards of care for palliative patients.
· Participate in class discussion and work effectively as part of an interdisciplinary team in the classroom and in clinical practice.
· Critically analyse relevant research and evidence based palliative care literature on quality of life.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Essay (90 marks), Practical Library Skills (10marks), Report on audit of clinical practice (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination:

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IP6002 Pain in Palliative Care

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48hr(s) Lectures (Group work/tutorials); 152hr(s) Directed Study (Coursework, self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis O'Mahony, Department of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Medicine, Staff, Marymount Hospice.

Module Objective: To advance the knowledge and skills of healthcare professionals in the assessment and management of pain in palliative patients and to demonstrate application of this advanced knowledge to clinical practice.

Module Content: Pain explored. The concept of total pain examined. The role of the interdisciplinary team in the management of pain. The physiology of pain. The assessment of pain in palliative care. The pharmacological management of pain. Principles of pain management in palliative care. Non-pharmacological management of pain.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define the term pain and critically examine the concept of total pain.
· Outline the aetiology and physiology of pain for palliative care patients.
· Critically analyse a variety of different pain assessment tools and determine their relevance to patients requiring palliative care.
· Demonstrate the skills required to undertake an accurate pain assessment.
· Explain the pharmacology of the three analgesic groups and the common adjuvant drugs used in palliative care.
· Discuss the pharmacological management of pain in palliative care patients.
· Evaluate the scientific evidence of the non-pharmacological methods of pain management.
· Appreciate the value of an interdisciplinary approach to the management of pain for palliative care patients.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Case Study).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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IP6003 Symptoms in Palliative Care

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 50hr(s) Lectures (Group work/problem based learning/peer presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis O'Mahony, Department of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Medicine, Staff, Marymount Hospice.

Module Objective: To advance the healthcare professionals knowledge and skills in managing symptoms in palliative care and to apply this knowledge in handling complex symptoms by demonstrating an advanced ability to problem solve.

Module Content: Common symptoms in palliative care. Symptom assessment tools. The role of the interdisciplinary team in symptom management. The assessment and management of : fatigue, confusion, sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal symptoms, respiratory symptoms, integumentary system, lymphatic system. The assessment and management of palliative care emergencies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Review the literature to identify the common symptoms experienced by palliative care patients.
· Critically analyse a variety of symptom assessment tools and determine their relevance to palliative care patients.
· Apply evidence and research based knowledge to the management of a variety of symptoms in palliative care patients.
· Critically assess and interpret complex information in managing palliative care patients with multiple symptoms.
· Devise and present a protocol to assess and manage a palliative care emergency for his or her clinical practice.
· Value the roles of the interdisciplinary in the management of symptoms for palliative care patients.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Peer teaching session supported with written work 100 marks; In-class Test 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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IP6004 End of Life Care, Grief and Bereavement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48hr(s) Lectures (Group work/reflective practice); 152hr(s) Directed Study (Coursework and self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis O'Mahony, Department of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Medicine, Staff, Marymount Hospice.

Module Objective: Reflectively analyse on the physical, psychological, sociological and spiritual care of patients and their families at the end of life and during the grief and bereavement process.

Module Content: Loss explored. The physical care of the dying patient. The psychological care of the family. Communication with patients and families at the end of life. Legal aspects at end of life. The physical, sociological, psychological and spiritual effects of grief on the bereaved. Psychological and sociological theories of grief and bereavement. Cultural aspects of mourning. Grief and bereavement along the lifespan. The role of the interdisciplinary team. Grief in difficult circumstances. Bereavement support. Complicated grief.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Provide evidence and research based holistic care that meets the needs of the dying patient and family.
· Devise a holistic careplan/carepathway for a terminally ill patient.
· Formulate procedure(s) to be followed on the death of a patient to satisfy legal, religious and cultural requirements.
· Critically analyse the psychological and sociological theories of grief and bereavement and their application to clinical practice in palliative care.
· Compare and contrast the grief and bereavement process along the lifespan.
· Critically analyse the psychological and sociological aspects of grief in difficult circumstances.
· Assess families at risk of complicated grief using a validated assessment tool.
· Ascertain the bereavement support services available for families.
· Acknowledge own feelings and attitudes towards dying and death and the need for selfcare within the context of providing care to patients and families at the end of life.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3000 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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IP6005 Clinical Practicum in Palliative Care

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1000hr(s) Other (Clinical Hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis O'Mahony, Department of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Medicine, Staff, Marymount Hospice.

Module Objective: To facilitate students to advance their knowledge, skills and attitudes by integrating theory with clinical practice, to enable the learner to practice as a reflective, innovative, healthcare professional who can effectively manage the palliative care needs of patients and families.

Module Content: Practice of palliative care in a variety of palliative care settings. Students will participate in specialist and non-specialist palliative care environments with the supervision of the course co-ordinator, preceptors and appropriate healthcare professionals in the area. The development of individual portfolios demonstrates the achievement of learning through critical thinking, analysis, reflection and problem solving.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Establish an effective therapeutic relationship that recognise the individual person centred care needs of palliative patients and families.
· Consistently apply the principles and philosophy of palliative care to the holistic individualised care of palliative patients and families and the interdisciplinary team.
· Assess, plan, implement and evaluate the holistic care required by individual palliative patients and families by analysing complex clinical data, applying clinical judgements, managing complexity and reflecting on clinical practice.
· Demonstrate the ability to work as an effective member of the interdisciplinary team.
· Formulate and apply a framework to assist in the solving of ethical and moral decisions in palliative care at varying levels of complexity.
· Critically analyse and apply research findings and evidence based knowledge and skills to the provision of quality holistic clinical care to patients as part of the interdisciplinary team.
· Utilise advanced knowledge, skills and self awareness to support patients, families and members of the interdisciplinary team experiencing loss and during the grief and bereavement process.
· Value the importance of self-care and personal development in caring for palliative patients and families.

Assessment: Continuous assessment, completion of portfolio and completion of clinical placement.

Compulsory Elements: Must be completed prior to the Summer exam board.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A pass judgement in the portfolio and clinical practice.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing the portfolio must revise and resubmit for the Autumn. Students who do not complete the required clinical placement must do so before the Autumn, as prescribed by the Programme Co-ordinator).

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IP6006 Psychosocial and Spiritual Aspects of Palliative Care

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25hr(s) Lectures (Group work/tutorials); 75hr(s) Directed Study (Course work, self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis O'Mahony, Department of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Medicine, Staff, Marymount Hospice.

Module Objective: To develop the healtcare professionals congitive, affective and skill domains, in assessing and managing the psychosocial and spiritual issues for palliative patients and their families.

Module Content: Holism explored. Psychological theories and sociological family theories. Spirituality and culture explored. Psychological, sociological, spiritual effects of life threatening illness on patients and families. Assessment tools. Managing psychosocial and spiritual situations in palliative care.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically analyse the concept of holism and its application to the provision of palliative care.
· Analyse the psychological and sociological theoretical frameworks underpinning the provision of palliative care to patients and families.
· Assess and manage the psychological, sociological and spiritual issues for palliative care patients and families.
· Develop cultural awareness and responsiveness to cultural diversity and beliefs in palliative care.
· Evaluate the physical, psychological, sociological and spiritual effects on self in providing palliative care.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Module Coordinator).

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