Book of Modules 2013/2014

Geography

Choose by Subject Category or Module Code:
GG1003 Cultural Geography: An Introduction to Place, Space and Globalisation
GG1004 Economic Geography: An Introduction to Societies, Economies and Global Development
GG1005 Physical Geography: An Introduction to the Earth and the Atmosphere
GG1006 An Introduction to Cultural Geography: Place, Space and Globalisation
GG1007 An Introduction to World Regions: Societies, Economies and Development
GG1008 An Introduction to Physical Geography: Earth and Atmosphere
GG1009 An introduction to Online Sources, Writing Skills and Field Techniques.
GG1010 Physical Geography and Applied Earth Systems
GG2005 Quaternary Environments and Geomorphology
GG2010 Cities and People
GG2014 Geography of Tourism
GG2016 The Atmospheric Environment
GG2022 Field Work
GG2023 Economic and Rural Geography
GG2024 Social Geography
GG2025 Biogeography
GG2027 Environmental Analysis: Field Data Course
GG2037 Introduction to Geoinformatics
GG2038 Geographical Research Methods
GG2039 Geographical Data Analysis
GG2040 Geographies of Environment and Sustainability
GG2041 Contemporary Human Migration and European Settlement and Society
GG2042 Marine Environments
GG3001 The Nature of Geography
GG3003 Contemporary Studies of the European Union
GG3006 Research Methods and Dissertation
GG3007 Coastal and Marine Geomorphology
GG3009 Geography as Human Ecology
GG3010 Cities and their Planning
GG3012 Advanced Geographical Information Systems
GG3027 Regional and Local Planning Issues and Policies
GG3028 Field Work
GG3037 Geography of Heritage
GG3038 Geographies of the Irish Diaspora
GG3039 Dynamic Climatology
GG3041 Environmental Remote Sensing
GG3043 Historical Geographies of the City
GG3045 Food Geography
GG3046 Geopolitics and Geostrategies
GG3048 Environmental Economic Geography
GG3049 Historical Geographies of Ireland: Social, Economic and Cultural Transformations
GG3051 Landscape Palaeoecology and Palynology
GG3052 Geography Literature Review
GG4008 Research Project
GG6007 Coastal Zone Management
GG6401 Introduction to Migration and Diaspora Studies
GG6402 Research Methods and Sources in Migration and Diaspora Studies
GG6403 Case Studies and Current Issues in Migration and Diaspora Studies
GG6404 Dissertation, Migration and Diaspora Studies
GG6405 Work Placement, Programme for Migration and Diaspora Studies
GG6501 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems
GG6502 Introduction to Remote Sensing
GG6503 Cartography and Visualisation
GG6504 Digital Image Processing
GG6505 Applications of Geoinformatics
GG6506 Technologies and Systems
GG6507 Implementation of Geoinformatics
GG6509 Spatial Data Analysis
GG6510 Research Methods
GG6511 Dissertation in Geoinformatics
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Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

International visiting students should consult the International Education Office regarding selection of modules.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

GG1003 Cultural Geography: An Introduction to Place, Space and Globalisation

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GG1004, GG1005

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Liam Coakley, College of ACSSS; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the methods and scope of the geographical study of world cultures, nations and lifestyles, paying particular attention to key concepts such as place, time and space and globalisation.

Module Content: This module introduces the student to the philosophical basis of the discipline and its methods and, in particular, examines the relationship between culture and landscape transformation; between politics and territorial organisation; and contemporary issues in the 'new' cultural geography.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine key fundamental concepts in cultural geography;
· Enhance technical skills to think and write geographically;
· Develop a greater understanding of the complex interactions between global and local forces as evident, for example, by development in the Cork region.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Workshops, 5 marks. Workshop essay 1500- 2500 words, 25 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG1004 Economic Geography: An Introduction to Societies, Economies and Global Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GG1003, GG1005

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Practicals).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sage, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the complexities and contemporary patterns and processes of development.

Module Content: This module explores the dynamics of contemporary development and its relationships with society, economy, culture and environment. The concept of globalisation is introduced and how local/regional communities can respond to such powerful global forces. Themes addressed include: multinational coporations, foreign direct investment and trade, local enterprise, consumerism, urbanisation, changing land uses and personal spaces. The Cork region will be used to identify some of these patterns and processes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine the factors which shape contemporary development at a variety of spatial scales - global, national, regional and local.
· Appreciate geography as a discipline which emphasises complex patterns of development.
· Identify global processes as central elements in influencing local activities and prospects.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practical Report 1500-2500 words).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG1005 Physical Geography: An Introduction to the Earth and the Atmosphere

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GG1003, GG1004

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To establish the principles of physical geography, concentrating upon the operation of environmental systems, Earth surface and atmospheric processes.

Module Content: Module content: The module will cover foundational elements of Earth environmental processes, as linked to the study of mass and energy flows, environmental systems, geomorphology, biogeography, meteorology and climate science. Specific treatment will be given to geomorphic systems (e.g., weathering, slopes fluvial, ice, arid and coastal systems), atmospheric structure and climate processes, biogeography and of the links of physical Earth processes with the biosphere. The role of people in Earth environments will be considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have awareness of and a foundational understanding of the key elements and processes involved in the functioning of key Earth environmental systems.
· Have developed an understanding of the operation of environmental systems at a range of scales, from the global level to regional scales (e.g., the Cork region).
· Collect and examine primary geographical field data and have begun to work in a field setting.
· Identify how the physical and cultural-human areas of geography are linked and have awareness of the importance of field-based research in studying environmental components and processes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Fieldwork Report 1500-2500 words).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG1006 An Introduction to Cultural Geography: Place, Space and Globalisation

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GG1007, GG1008, GG1009

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To examine the relationships between culture and landscape transformation; between politics and territorial organisation; and to review contemporary issues in the 'new' cultural geography

Module Content: Students will be introduced to key concepts in cultural geography including place, belonging, society, time and space, westernisation and globalisation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define key fundamental concepts in cultural geography;
· Identify global processes that impact on local cultures.
· Discuss the complex interactions between global and local forces as evident, for example, through developments in the Cork region.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay (50 marks) and 1 assignment (50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG1007 An Introduction to World Regions: Societies, Economies and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GG1006, GG1008, GG1009

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To introduce students to global regions and the complexities of contemporary patterns and processes of development.

Module Content: This module explores the dynamics of contemporary development and its relationships with society, economy, culture and environment in different global regions; these regions will include Europe, North and South America, Africa, Asia and Oceania.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Assess the factors which shape contemporary development at a variety of spatial scales - particularly the regional and the global.
· Discuss geography as a discipline which emphasises complex patterns of development.
· Identify global processes as central elements in influencing the prospects of local and regional development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((1 x 1,500 word essay (50 marks) and 1 assignment (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG1008 An Introduction to Physical Geography: Earth and Atmosphere

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GG1006, GG1007, GG1009

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To establish the principles of physical geography, concentrating upon the operation of environmental systems, Earth surface and atmospheric processes.

Module Content: The module will cover fundamental elements of Earth environmental processes, including landform development, atmospheric processes and climate change, biogeography and human impacts on the physical environment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify key elements and processes involved in the functioning of Earth environmental systems.
· Develop an understanding of the operation of environmental systems at a range of scales, from the global level to regional scales (e.g. the Cork region).
· Assess how the physical and human areas of geography are linked in the context of environmental change.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay (50 marks) and 1 assignment (50 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG1009 An introduction to Online Sources, Writing Skills and Field Techniques.

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): GG1006, GG1007, GG1008

Teaching Methods: 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 1 x 6hr(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the key techniques and skills required to undertake research in the discipline of Geography.

Module Content: This module provides an introduction to a variety of skills needed for research in geography. Students will be introduced to maps and fieldwork; to techniques of primary data collection and the analysis of data. Writing skills, bibliographic skills and referencing are integral to this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Collect and examine primary geographical field data and undertake work in a field setting.
· Construct a bibliography and cite correctly source material in assignments and essays.
· Utilise and analyse online data sets.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 Practical Assignment (40 marks), 1 Field Assignment (30 marks), 1 Citation and Bibliographic Assignment (30 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG1010 Physical Geography and Applied Earth Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Fieldwork (1 day Field Course); 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography; Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography; Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To establish the principles of physical geography in a scientific context, and their application to earth science.

Module Content: The module addresses the interactions between the atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere, and their link with the human environment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the key elements and processes of Earth environmental systems and explain their functioning.
· Distinguish between the operation of environmental systems at a range of scales, from the global level to regional scales (e.g., the Cork region).
· Collect and examine primary, geographical field data.
· Make basic interpretations and evaluations of data in a field setting.
· Integrate physical and socio-cultural geographical processes to explain the functioning of environmental systems.
· Assess the importance of field-based research in studying environmental components and processes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (3 x 3hr practicals, 5 marks each; 1 day Field Report 20 marks; 1 MCQ test 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG2005 Quaternary Environments and Geomorphology

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1002 or ER1006 or GG1005

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Fieldwork (8hrs Fieldwork (or alternative practical work); 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maxim Kozachenko, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To examine the primary issues of Quaternary environment and changes and to build on the principles and practices of geomorphology.

Module Content: This examination will include the study of the geomorphology and associated sedimentary processes of key environmental system(s), for example, glacial-cold regions, fluvial, and coastal. Quaternary environmental changes of, for example, glacial/inter-glacial cycles, linked climate changes, plant and animal history, human impacts on the environment and key analytical techniques in Quaternary studies and geomorphology will be treated.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify key concepts and understanding in the fields of Quaternary Studies and in linked areas of geomorphology;
· Understand the key principles of the palaeoenvironmental work;
· Interpret landscapes in terms of past processes that were responsible for their creation;
· Enhance their ability both to think and write geographically and to have a greater understanding of the complex of environmental interactions operating between global to local scales.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Field Reports and/or Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG2010 Cities and People

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1003 or GG1004

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Therese Kenna, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Therese Kenna, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To appreciate the development of modern cities and their impact on human behaviour.

Module Content: This module examines the processes which have shaped and modified cities in the developed world over the past two centuries. It considers the impact of the changes on the people living in urban areas and examines problems like transport and social life, together with policies and plans for them.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appreciate the evolution of cities over the past two centuries,
· Investigate the nature and causes of major urban problems,
· Evaluate the major policies and plans that seek to address these issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 assignments (500 words each) : 30 marks , Participation: 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG2014 Geography of Tourism

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1002 or GG1003 or GG1004

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Crowley, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Crowley, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To outline the evolving nature of tourism development and its impact on society.

Module Content: This module will examine the rapidly changing geographical relationships and environmental impacts of the tourist industry. Particular attention will be focused on the geography of tourism in Ireland and Western Europe generally. Special emphasis will also be placed on the expanding heritage industry in Ireland.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and evaluate the key factors underpinning the growth and development of the Irish tourist industry.
· Apply the principles of sustainability to tourism developments in an Irish and wider European context.
· Analyse the differing socio-economic, environmental and cultural impacts that tourism may exert on a destination.
· Identify and review new forms of tourism and the creation of new tourist geographies.
· Evaluate the role of marketing and the creation of niche markets in the tourist sector.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG2016 The Atmospheric Environment

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1002 or GG1005

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide an opportunity of understanding the processes involved in the Earth's weather patterns.

Module Content: A study of major processes influencing weather worldwide. Particular attention will be given to weather conditions that occur during the period of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss weather events in terms of meteorological processes.
· Analyse meteorological charts and satellite images in terms of theoretical meteorological processes for forecasting and diagnostic purposes.
· Present appropriately referenced reports on the role of meteorological processes in producing specific weather events and regional climates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Project 55 marks 2500 words approx; 4 weather analysis assignments 20 marks (5 marks each); 1 x 1hr In-class Examination 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit project, as prescribed by the Department. Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of in-class examination and assignments, as prescribed by the Dept).

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GG2022 Field Work

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1003 and GG1004 and GG1005

Co-requisite(s): GG2038/ GG2039 or equivalent

Teaching Methods: Fieldwork (1-week fieldwork); 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography; Dr Therese Kenna, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: The module provides students with the opportunity to practice methods of geographical field work and carry out on-site study of a geographical area.

Module Content: In lectures students will be introduced to the cultural, economic, historical and physical background of the area they are to study. Students will then spend seven days based in a location either in Ireland or abroad during which time they will carry out assignments that require the use of geographical field research methods, attend visits/lectures on local issues and discuss issues related to research in the area at course seminars.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop a variety of different methodological approaches relating to the retrieval of data, the interpretation of data and their analysis.
· Report findings in workshops, focus groups.
· Work as a team and prepare group reports.
· Demonstrate knowledge of concepts, theories and ideas that can be applied in practice to the 'real world' in an unfamiliar location
· Design and undertake research activities through selection and application of appropriate methods in order to explore spatial dimensions of the human and physical environment
· Describe, analyse and evaluate at first hand the landscapes, places, people and inter-relationships of the location in which you have been based
· Demonstrate independent learning through the keeping of a detailed field notebook
· Develop a 'Geographer's Eye' for reading and interpreting landscapes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Field Practice 30 marks; 1 pre-departure assignment 15 marks; 1 field report 35 marks; Presentation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance/ Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirement of the module may not avail of the supplemental examination. The module co-ordinator will use discretion where a student fails for good cause such as illness).

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GG2023 Economic and Rural Geography

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 130.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1003 or GG1004

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography; Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To understand the complexities and interactions of economic and rural geography.

Module Content: Both rural and industrial societies changed significantly through the twentieth century. These changes are underlined by a variety of forces such as innovation and technology, business restructuring, rural industrialisation, new opportunities for service employment, counter-urbanisation, migration, flexible labour markets and regional development policies. In the emergence of new industrial and rural spaces, the relationships between outside forces - such as MNEs, the EU and the state - and local interests are critical.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key socio-cultural processes which transform rural Europe.
· Assess the influences of the globalised economy in reshaping rural space.
· Utilise methodologies to analyse socio-economic changes in rural space.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG2024 Social Geography

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis Linehan, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Denis Linehan, Department of Geography; Dr Allen White, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To provide a foundation in contemporary social geography.

Module Content: Within the context offered by social geography, this module explores current approaches to the study of identity and social and racial exclusion to develop critical and grounded understandings of social geography in both students' immediate geographical milieux and in cultural regions in Ireland and Europe. The course will investigate the relationships between society and space and demonstrate how the mapping identity on to geography can expose unequal relationships between groups and individuals. Topics will range over issues concerned with the geographies of race, migration, gender, minorities, sexuality, home, children and disability.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand key aspects of the sub-disciplines of Social Geography.
· Examine critical debates within Social Geography.
· Critically consider key concepts such as place, space, home, identity, and difference.
· Work through empirical examples of interconnections between people, places and spaces.
· Develop confidence and competency in critical reading of a range of academic, popular, and visual texts, and to synthesise these materials in both online discussions and in high quality essays.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay 60 marks 2000 words; Module Blogging 40 marks 1000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department -3000 word essay).

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GG2025 Biogeography

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Rourke, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Rourke, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To study the distribution of biological material over the Earth's surface, and the factors responsible for the observed spatial variations.

Module Content: A grounding is provided in fundamental ecological relationships between organisms and their environment, within an ecosystems framework. A combined ecological, geographical and historical approach is taken to understand current biogeographical patterns of distribution. The reciprocal relationship between humans and the biosphere will be studied within such topics as evolution, biodiversity, nature conservation and island biogeography.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify global biogeographical patterns in the distribution of organisms.
· Analyse the historical, geographical and ecological factors that shape global biogeographical distribution patterns.
· Outline the centrality of the theory of evolutionary in biogeography.
· Assess the Theory of Island Biogeography along with its application to the design of nature reserves and in conservation practices.
· Outline the principle theories and practices in conservation biogeography.
· Examine the key issues in the study and measurement of biodiversity.
· Assess the reciprocal relationship between humans and the biosphere.
· Outline the understanding of species extinction.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class test taken in January).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of in-class test) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG2027 Environmental Analysis: Field Data Course

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1002 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: Fieldwork (7 x 1 day Field Days).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To study and practice geographical and wider physical environmental field analytical techniques.

Module Content: The following topics will be covered at an advanced level: mapping and terrain analysis techniques, map interpretation, field survey and GPS, slopes analysis and linked process geomorphological techniques (e.g. of glaciated, river-humid, coastal environments) Quaternary sedimentary evaluation and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions (e.g. coring and ground survey techniques), approaches to the analysis of human impacts on environments - treatment of environmental management issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· provide the student with key concepts and understanding in the fields of physical geography and in related areas of the Earth and other environmental sciences
· collect and examine earth and geographical field data and to have practised a range of field techniques
· have awareness of the importance of field-based reserach in studying environmental components and processes
· enhance their thinking, analytical, writing and reporting skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Field Report at end of field course 60 marks; Field Notebook at end of field course 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG2037 Introduction to Geoinformatics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1002 or GG1003 or GG1004 or GG1005

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 2hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography; Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To give students an introduction to the key concepts, principles and theory of GIS, Remote Sensing, global satellite positioning systems, and related geoinformatics technologies, their use in Geographical and Earth Sciences, and practical techniques of spatial data analysis.

Module Content: Integrated lectures and practical exercises are designed to introduce students to techniques and systems for geographical information manipulation and analysis. Concepts of spatial data, databases, data models, data sources, data acquisition and image analysis are explored in lectures and reinforced by computer-based assignments. Applications of GIS and Remote Sensing to geographical issues are considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and understand the nature, characteristics, strengths and limitations of spatial databases as models of geographical reality.
· Identify appropriate data structure(s) for representing a range of geographical objects and phenomena drawn from the real world.
· Discuss the socio-economic importance and role of geographical information in modern society.
· Demonstrate knowledge of the electromagnetic spectrum and how radiation of different wavelengths interacts with features on the earth's surface.
· Interpret digital images acquired by different sensors.
· Apply image processing techniques in order to enhance the quality of information derived from images.
· Collect data in the field using GPS handsets, and integrate these with GIS and remotely sensed data for display and analysis purposes
· Use standard, commercial Windows-based GIS and image processing software.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (8 practical exercises 10 marks each, 1 x MCQ 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department whereby an element constitutes the GIS practicals, the RS practicals, and the MCQ.).

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GG2038 Geographical Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1002 or GG1003 or GG1004 or GG1005

Co-requisite(s): GG2039

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Therese Kenna, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide students with a range of skills necessary for the collection of data related to Geographical and Earth Sciences.

Module Content: This module provides an introduction to the wide variety of quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection used for research in geospatial disciplines. Techniques of primary data collection within the physical and social geosciences are considered, and secondary sources of data examined. Maps and case studies are an integral part of the module, and underpin research design and data collection strategies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the difference between primary and secondary data.
· Identify sources of primary and secondary data.
· Describe the philosophy and rationale of the research process, and be able to formulate research questions.
· Develop strategies for data collection and assess their respective strengths and weaknesses.
· Outline how to collect data for different geospatial studies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Practical assignment 25 marks, report 25 marks (approx. 2000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG2039 Geographical Data Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1002 or GG1003 or GG1004 or GG1005

Co-requisite(s): GG2038

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Therese Kenna, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide students with a range of skills necessary for the analysis and presentation of data related to Geographical and Earth Sciences.

Module Content: This module provides an introduction to the wide variety of quantitative and qualitative methods of data analysis used for research in geospatial disciplines. Two key approaches to the analysis of data will be studied, namely cartographic presentation and visualisation of spatial data, and statistical and quantitative methods of extracting information from data.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the principles of effective cartography and map design.
· Correctly apply common basic statistical techniques.
· Collect primary data and assess their limitations.
· Develop strategies for data interpretation, analysis and presentation.
· Use Excel and Powerpoint for data analysis and presentation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 Assignments/ coursework , 25 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG2040 Geographies of Environment and Sustainability

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Sage, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sage, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To review the evolution of human demands on natural resources and the transformations of the physical environment by human societies. To examine some of the key contributions of geographers to the study of this topic. To critically evaluate the notion of sustainability and the kinds of policy measures and institutional developments required to resolve our contemporary environmental predicaments and to create more sustainable societies.

Module Content: The module critically explores the intersection of economic development and environment, outlining the ways in which a growth-centred approach has significantly impacted upon the natural environment from local to global scales with enormous consequences for the health and welfare of people and nations. Focussing upon energy, sustenance, and settlement the module will explore the degree to which current levels and patterns of resource use diverge from those that might be considered 'sustainable'. Finally, the module will examine the measures needed to bring some degree of convergence between these two trajectories, and will argue that geography has a leading role to play in a new paradigm of environmental governance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a sound general understanding of the diverse environmental challenges facing many different societies around the world and the role that market-led development plays in this process.
· Reflect upon the representation of environmental issues as they arise within public debate and be able to contribute to that debate in an informed and thoughtful manner through written and oral argument.
· Develop a more critical analytical approach toward the agents and drivers of resource depletion and environmental degradation, especially the role played by conspicuous consumption in late modern societies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x Poster presentation).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG2041 Contemporary Human Migration and European Settlement and Society

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (5 Tutorials/Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Piaras MacEinri, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Piaras MacEinri, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To understand European migration patterns and immigration policy.

Module Content: Examination of the process of European migration for the emigrations of the 19th Century to the main phases of post-war migration to western Europe. Individual state migration patterns together with policy initiatives and models of citizenship form the framework of this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine the basic facts, statistics and spatial characteristics of Irish, European and global migration.
· Evaluate the principal theories and models of migration.
· Examine state and EU policy responses in the field of immigration.
· Evaluate the principal debates concerning integration in a number of EU and other immigration states.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG2042 Marine Environments

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (24 x 1hr Lectures/Project Work).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the management of ocean environments and foundational oceanography.

Module Content: Examination of the principal geomorphological, physical, chemical and biological controls upon the oceans; studies of human influences on the oceans, including issues of resource use, fisheries management, pollution and political division.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Be provided with key concepts and understanding in the field of oceanography and of the links between the functioning of the oceans and people's impacts upon ocean environments;
· Enhance their ability both to think and write geographically and to have a greater understanding of the complex of environmental interactions operating between global to local scales.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 65 marks; Continuous Assessment 35 marks (MCQ 10 marks; 1 x 1,500 word Project Paper 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG3001 The Nature of Geography

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1002 or GG1003 or GG1004 or GG1005

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sage, Department of Geography; Dr Denis Linehan, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide students with a clear insight and understanding as to the major organising ideas and key individuals in the development of geography as a discipline.

Module Content: Analysis of the major ideas and forces which have shaped the development of geography, with the greater emphasis on current trends and debates on the relative significance of locational/spatial; ecological/environmental; regional/chorological; mathematical and behavioural approaches in the discipline. The positivist, humanist and structuralised post modern debates.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Enhance the understanding of the development of geography as a distinctive discipline.
· Identify some of the major paradigms that have emerged particularly in the recent past.
· Establish a critical appreciation of complex inter-relationships within contemporary geoggraphy.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG3003 Contemporary Studies of the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To promote a better appreciation of the impact of common European policies on socio-economic development in member states of the EU.

Module Content: This module deals with the emergence and evolution of the European Union. Themes addressed include the geographic concept of Europe, the CAP, energy systems, industrialisation and de-industrialisation, Trans European Networks, population trends and the labour market, Structural Funds and regional coherence, future prospects for the EU.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain Europe as a distinctive but evolving global region.
· Demonstrate the role of European Union policies in reshaping the geography of European development.
· Assess the complex geography of key sectors and components of socio-economic development within the EU.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (2 reports 10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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GG3006 Research Methods and Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): Students must have attained at least 55% in 2nd year Geography

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Independent Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Geography; Dr Denis Linehan, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To develop research techniques and writing skills on an agreed topic in Geography.

Module Content: (1) Topics are chosen from a range of research themes specified by the Geography Department. The chosen topic is then developed by the student in consultation with their departmental supervisor. Fieldwork (including library and laboratory work as appropriate) is an essential part of the dissertation. (2) Guidelines for submission of dissertation: The dissertation work must be submitted as a hardbound manuscript; length 8,000 words.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate the ability to carry out independent research.
· Locate, analyse and synthesise a body of primary and secondary source material appropriate to the dissertation topic.
· Produce an original piece of research which will develop interpretative, analytical and writing skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (20 marks presentation; 20 marks literature review; 160 marks final dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit dissertation for evaluation by mid-August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GG3007 Coastal and Marine Geomorphology

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Fieldwork (8hr Fieldtrip or 8 hrs Practicals or Research Project, as specified by the Department); 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maxim Kozachenko, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maxim Kozachenko, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To examine coastal and marine geomorphological and linked science themes, together with related aspects of coastal zone management and marine spatial planning.

Module Content: The study of geomorphological and other linked physical earth surface process controls influencing the development of coastal and marine environments, from local to global scales. Themes covered include those of wave studies, coastal sediments and beach development, coastal erosion, seabed mapping and sea-level changes. Study of coastal management and planning themes are also important in this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify key concepts and understanding in the fields of coastal science, coastal geomorphology and in coastal management;
· Understand the key principles of seabed mapping;
· Enhance their thinking, analytical, writing and reporting skills;
· Collect and examine primary coastal field data and have worked in a field setting;
· Have an awareness of the importance of field-based research in studying environmental components and processes and to understand how the physical and cultural-human areas of geography are linked.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (5 In-class mini-assignments at 10 marks each, Project Report 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG3009 Geography as Human Ecology

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 Other (3 x 1hr Workshops/Seminar Sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Rourke, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Rourke, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To critically examine the nature of the human - environment relationship, so that we may have a deeper understanding of contemporary human ecological issues.

Module Content: The first part of the course examines the conceptual and theoretical nature of human environmental interaction, set within a historical context. Different ways of looking at the world and ideas about what constitutes valid knowledge, along with the methodological difficulties of linking natural and social science disciplines will be discussed. In the second section of the course a number of practical examples relating to human ecological issues, such as land degradation, nature conservation and the management of cultural landscapes, will be presented.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the fundamental principles of human ecology.
· Formulate a historical perspective on the relationship between humans and the natural world.
· Critically assess contemporary approaches to the study of human - environmental interactions, drawing on insights from ecology, geography, anthropology, psychology and philosophy.
· Examine the centrality of interdisciplinarity of knowledge from both the natural and social sciences.
· Articulate human-animal relations.
· Apply human-ecological principles to the study of the cultural landscape.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (In-class presentation).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG3010 Cities and their Planning

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): GG2010

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Student Presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Therese Kenna, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Therese Kenna, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To examine the development of modern urban planning and its impact on cities.

Module Content: This module examines the processes and individuals who influenced the development of town planning in the 19th Century in Britain, the United States and Continental Europe. It considers the geography and problems of cities across the world, and the way in which planning has affected them since the Second World War.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appreciate the emergence of urban planning during the nineteenth century,
· Interrogate the different traditions in Britain, the United States, and Continental Europe,
· Investigate the geography and planning of cities.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (50 marks Major Group Project (5000 words), 20 marks Seminar, 20 marks Poster, 10 marks Participation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG3012 Advanced Geographical Information Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 35.

Pre-requisite(s): GG2037 / GG2039

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Project work may be used as an alternative to laboratory practicals, as appropriate).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To develop and expand on students' skills/knowledge of GIS, with particular emphasis on techniques for spatial analysis.

Module Content: Advanced studies in computer-based techniques and systems for geographical information handling and analysis, database designs and links with the mathematical modelling and analysis of environmental systems; case studies of GIS applications to specific environments; examination of the societal, commercial and research contexts of geographic information generation, analysis and use.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Differentiate between geographical information systems (GIS) and geographical information science (GIScience), and discuss the main components and elements of each.
· Distinguish between object- and field-based views of geographical phenomena, and identify data structure(s) for representing these in two and three spatial dimensions and in time.
· Discuss critically the professional, legal and ethical dimensions of geographical information and its use in modern society.
· Identify the relationship between GIS and related information technologies, including global positioning satellite systems (GPSS), internet mapping / GIS and the World Wide Web, and mobile telephony, and know how to work at the interface of these various technologies.
· Identify the emerging role of spatial data infrastructures within modern society.
· Create their own basic GIS application, using a standard, commercial Windows-based GIS package.
· Undertake a range of manipulations and analyses of spatial data, and generate output in cartographic and other forms.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (GPS and Mapping Project).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG3027 Regional and Local Planning Issues and Policies

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 6hr(s) Fieldwork (Field Trip); 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Brendan O'Sullivan, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Brendan O'Sullivan, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide a real-world introduction to the Irish planning system in its social, economic, political and environmental context.

Module Content: Regional and local planning issues, dialogues and strategies, the public administrative and policy context of planning within Ireland and the wider global setting

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an appreciation of the environmental, social and economic contexts in which planning decisions, strategies and decisions are made;
· Engage knowledgably on some of the key planning issues of the day; and, in a general way, to explain the systems of citizen participation, governance and political organization within which planning operates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Essay/Field Report 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG3028 Field Work

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Fieldwork (Field Work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To teach fundamentals of the Geography and linked Earth Sciences Field Work Programmes.

Module Content: To examine and interpret the geography of an area (both physical and human geography) in Ireland or abroad. To practise the techniques and skills of field work and applied environmental studies. To examine the geographical processes seen in this area and to understand the interplay between different aspects of environmental functioning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· develop and test hypotheses and models relating to geographical processes and agents
· demonstrate skills in collecting and analysing geographical data through a range of field techniques
· demonstrate an understanding of the controls on landscape development in the field area
· understand the importance of field-based research in studying environmental components and processes
· evaluate the impacts, opportunities and constraints for utilising earth resources
· present field results in oral and written formats.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( field report 60 marks; field notebook 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG3037 Geography of Heritage

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1003, GG1004 or GG1002 or equivalent (not applicable for the MA Landscape, Built Heritage and Design)

Co-requisite(s): GG3001

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Crowley, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Crowley, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To understand the role of heritage in contemporary studies.

Module Content: This module examines the meaning of heritage in contemporary societies. It will specifically deal with issues of conservation and representation. Important heritage landscapes continue to be threatened by modern development. By focusing on specific case studies, it will examine the value placed on heritage in society. The politics of heritage will also be explored. Questions of identity, nationalism, and multiculturalism are central then to any discussion of the geography of heritage.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically analyse the role of heritage in contemporary society.
· Assess the importance of conservation in an urban context .
· Interpret and evaluate the significance of a series of heritage landscapes.
· Apply the principles of good interpretation to museum exhibitions and galleries.
· Discuss the role of heritage in a divided society.
· Examine and question the extent to which specific aspects of Irish heritage have been 'commodified'.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG3038 Geographies of the Irish Diaspora

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 2 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Piaras MacEinri, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Piaras MacEinri, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To explore the social, cultural and economic dimensions of migration to and from Ireland over the past 200 years.

Module Content: We will focus on some of the key debates in the academic literature on the Irish diaspora and Irish migration. The module will draw on current theoretical perspectives on migration, globalisation and identities, and students will be encouraged to set familiar and popular stories and representations of migration within appropriate conceptual frameworks. This module will be delivered mainly via lectures, but approximately two hours of interactive workshops will be incorporated also, focusing on developing skills in critical reading and analysis

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key patterns and process of migration to and from Ireland over the past 250 years;
· Situate Ireland within the context of global migration and economic processes;
· Have an appreciation of the gendered nature of Irish migration the key social issues facing the Irish abroad;
· Identify the origins and dynamics of dominant narratives and stereotypes of the Irish abroad and of Irish migration;
· Identify the key aspects of the development of an Irish diasporic consciousness;
· Examine the role of racialisation processes in Irish experiences of emigration and immigration;
· Examine the arguments presented in some of the key debates in the academic literature on the Irish diaspora and Irish migration;
· Critically review popular cultural representations of the Irish diaspora.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG3039 Dynamic Climatology

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): GG2012 or GG2016

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Una M. Ni Chaoimh, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: A study of atmospheric dynamics and thermodynamics with particular emphasis on mid-latitude systems and their forecasting.

Module Content: This module deepens the study of the atmosphere undertaken in GG2016. Energy budget, moisture processes, convection, planetary and local-scale dynamics, synoptic and mesoscale mid-latitude systems, forecasting, pressure chart and thermodynamic diagram analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse the development of synoptic scale weather events in terms of dynamic and thermodynamic processes.
· Use reanalysis data to construct diagnostic charts of weather systems.
· Run an atmospheric model and carry out a validation of model output.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project 2500 word approx. 54 marks; In-class test 25 marks; 3 x weather analysis assignments 7 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG3041 Environmental Remote Sensing

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To give students an understanding of the role of remote sensing in identifying, monitoring and mitigating the effects of changes in the physical and human environment.

Module Content: Through analysis of examples taken from across the world the application of air and space borne remote sensing in studying environmental change will be investigated. Topics covered include changes in the biosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and urban areas. The role of remote sensing in contemporary natural disasters and in policy formation will also be addressed, and ethical issues examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the fundamental principles of radiation interactions with the atmosphere and surface that underlie remote sensing.
· Summarise a range of environmental applications in which remote sensing provides an important source of data and information.
· Evaluate the role of remote sensing with respect to enhancing our knowledge of the Earth's environment.
· Summarise the advantages and benefits offered by remotely sensed data.
· Summarise the limitations and problems of using remotely sensed data.
· Evaluate the role of remote sensing in the future.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks ( 1 X 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG3043 Historical Geographies of the City

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Denis Linehan, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Denis Linehan, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: This module is dedicated to the study of historical geographies of the city, with a particular focus on the impacts of modernity on urban life in the 19th and 20th Century. Through the study of urban transformations, the module will explore the principle geographical concerns within modernity; namely, the reconfiguration of spatial relations, the reorientation of spatial experience and the remaking spatial practices. The module will present an advanced introduction to debates in contemporary historical and cultural geography, with a particular emphasis on spatial and social theory, and conceptual and methodological strategies for considering primary research material.

Module Content: This module will investigate the transformation of the Western and Colonial City and the emergence of modernity in a number of geographical arenas. The historical geographies of key cities, notably Chicago, Dublin, Mumbai, Nairobi, Paris, Vienna and Shanghai will form the backdrop to investigations into the transformations of the urban experience. Specific topics will include: the emergence of the public sphere; modern forms of governance; the impact of communication technology; the rise of consumption; the relationships between gender and public space; the construction of subjectivity within the metropolis. Students will be guided through these thematic areas through the detailed study of a suite of urban spaces including: the coffee house; the factory; the cinema; the museum; the public park; the department store and the airport.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Introduce the main dimensions of the idea of modernity, drawing upon recent debates in historical and cultural geography.
· Demonstrate the central place of the modern city in accounts of modernity, in a global context.
· Engage in a range of social and spatial theory to assist their interpretation of the urban process.
· Identify new methodology to analyze primary source material in project contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay 60 marks 2000 words; Module Blogging 40 marks 1000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department- 3000 word essay).

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GG3045 Food Geography

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Sage, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sage, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To critically evaluate the emergence and development of the contemporary global food system; and to examine the social, economic and environmental consequences for the many different spaces that support the production, processing, distribution, retailing and consumption of food in this highly integrated global industry.

Module Content: This module addresses the contemporary global food system: what, how, where and why food is produced. It examines the evolution and co-existence of different agricultural systems around the world; the role of corporate actors in the transformation and retailing of global foods; and the changing nature of consumers and consumption within this system. The module will explore the dynamics and contradictions of a food system that, while heralding ever-widening consumer choice, leaves one billion people food insecure and hungry; and impacts significantly on the global environment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a sound general understanding of the environmental, political, economic, social and cultural dimensions of food production, distribution and consumption.
· Define and assess the nature of the linkages between producers, intermediaries and consumers in the contemporary global food system.
· Develop a more critical analytical approach toward the activities and representation of transnational food and agribusiness corporations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x poster presentation).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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GG3046 Geopolitics and Geostrategies

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Piaras MacEinri, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Piaras MacEinri, Department of Geography; Dr Liam Coakley, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To explore theories of geopolitics and the options open to states and regions in light of emerging resource shortages and conflicts as well as broader debates concerning states' and people's rights in a globalised, interdependent world.

Module Content: Relations between the different regions of the world are in a state of constant flux. The current period is characterised by new forms of globalisation and increasing competition for finite resources, including non-renewable fuels, water and scarce minerals. The struggle for access to these resources, reflected in the deployment worldwide of various forms of 'hard' 'and 'soft' power, is frequently characterised, rightly or wrongly, in terms of broad regional generalisations: a re-emergent Asia, weakening US influence, an increasingly irrelevant Europe, an unstable Middle East, a relatively marginalised South America and Africa.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify a number of key figures in debates concerning geopolitical theories and strategies
· Understand a number of the main issues of potential geopolitical conflict in the 21st century
· Analyse the geopolitical options open to Ireland and to the European Union in a changing world
· Evaluate the material, ethical and political dimensions open to individual states such as Ireland in a globalised theatre of emerging threats and increasing competition for scarce resources.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG3048 Environmental Economic Geography

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): GG1003, GG1004, GG2023

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: Environmental economic geography takes a geographical approach to the interface between production, consumption and environmental impact. In particular, to critically evaluate strategies for dealing with municipal and industrial wastes, scrap and by-products that reduce the environmental impact of production and consumption.

Module Content: The module examines the relationship between production, consumption and the environment via an examination of the evolving economic geography of wastes (particularly scrap materials, industrial wastes and by-products). Particular emphasis will be placed on ecological modernisation, industrial ecology, industrial symbiosis, eco-industrial parks, material cycling, life cycle analysis, material flow analysis, and other novel strategies to redirect wastes back into production and consumption processes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a sound understanding of the evolving role of waste in contemporary societies.
· Appreciate that industrial wastes, scrap and by-products are often internally heterogeneous resulting in widely differing geographies/strategies for reuse from local scale eco-industrial parks to global commodity markets.
· Become familiar with the policies and instruments designed to enhance the environmental performance of industry and learn how to evaluate their effectiveness.
· Understand differences in supply and demand for recyclables and by-products are driven by current potential stocks of recyclables which result from the broader development trajectories of various regions of the world.
· Appreciate the societal notions of waste and the policies that governments adopt to deal with such wastes are culturally specific and related to wider ideas about the nature of capitalism and the role of the state in regulating business and environmental protection.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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GG3049 Historical Geographies of Ireland: Social, Economic and Cultural Transformations

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): GG3001

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr David J. Butler, Department of Geography; Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive understanding of how Irish society, economy and culture has changed over time. To identify and examine the processes that underpin change. The module places social, economic and cultural change in a national and international context.

Module Content: This module will focus on the varying spatial impacts of social movements, and cultural and economic transformations. It will explain why there can be significant spatial variations in the pace of change and the adoption of innovation(s). Themes addressed will be varied and may include: place, patronage, politics in seventeenth and eighteenth century Ireland; the construction of colonial hegemony and a minority ruling elite; the impact of landlordism and landscape transformation; the distribution of secular and religious institutions; the monetisation of Irish society; the origins and expansion of banking in Ireland; charitable and loan fund societies; the Great Irish Famine; the Catholic Church; the co-operative movement; rural electrification; rural water supply; industrialisation; emigration; the voluntary sector; membership of the EU; the Celtic Tiger.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the processes that underpin social, economic and cultural change
· Identify and explain spatial variations in degrees of participation and engagement in social and cultural movements
· Demonstrate the importance of geographical concepts in enhancing our understanding of the Ireland?s past
· Demonstrate a working knowledge of archival sources and an ability to interrogate these sources
· Critically engage in an informed manner in ongoing debates in Historical Geography.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (50 marks Assignment (3,000 - 5000 words); 20 marks Seminar; 20 marks Poster, 10 marks Participation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG3051 Landscape Palaeoecology and Palynology

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 15 x 1hr(s) Lectures (/seminars); 9 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: This module will introduce students to the practice of palynology, the analysis of sub-fossil pollen. It aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in palynological approaches to palaeoecology. There will be a particular focus on the contribution that palynology can make to understanding of past human activity and impacts on the environment, and processes such as climate change. It will also highlight the role of palynology within broader palaeoecological and archaeological study in Ireland and further afield.

Module Content: This module will be structured around lectures/seminars and practical classes. The lectures will introduce students to the theory and method of palynology, with subsequent practical classes allowing students to develop 'hands on' laboratory skills, including microscopic identification of pollen grains, data presentation, interpretation and analyses. The module will also incorporate comprehensive case studies of the application of palynological data in understanding the extent and timing of long term patterns of climate change and the role of human communities in modifying and disturbing environmental systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the basic theory, method and practice of palynology, including sample collection, sub-sampling and laboratory techniques including pollen extraction, microscope identification and data presentation.
· Critically interpret palynological data in terms of patterns of vegetation change, human activity and the associated archaeological record.
· Appreciate the contribution that such data can make to understanding of long term patterns of environmental change.
· Assess the role of pollen analysis within broader palaeoecological study.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Essay 1500 words approx.).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG3052 Geography Literature Review

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 40 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Supervised literature research); 1 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (Individual oral presentation of reviews).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To give training in literature search, review and presentation of results through individual investigation of an Geography topic

Module Content: Literature-based research project on topic of relevance to Geography to be carried out individually by each student in conjunction with an appropriate department and departmental supervisor

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Source scientific literature on a given Geography topic
· Compile relevant literature and write a critical review of the literature consulted
· Summarise key points and issues from published scientific articles
· Use and cite published literature appropriately in a written article
· Compile an accurate bibliography to accompany the written review
· Discriminate between scientifically credible articles and unsubstantiated information on the world wide web
· Make a short and informative oral presentation of the literature reviewed.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project Report 90 marks; Oral Project Presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (Oral project presentation), Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Resubmission of written report).

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GG4008 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2. (Summer after Third Year University Examination).

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (6-8 weeks Field and/or Laboratory-based Research Project and 6 months independent research).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Donald Lyons, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To undertake an independent research project.

Module Content: An independent research project involving fieldwork and, as appropriate, laboratory work on an applied topic in Ireland or abroad. The fieldwork is carried out during the summer of Third Year together with some of the laboratory research work, when applicable. A 10,000 word, typed and hard cover bound report is written during the Fourth Year and is submitted prior to the last day of Teaching Period 2.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Plan and design a research project under supervision
· Formulate a research question
· Have an awareness of the importance of field-based research in studying environmental components and processes
· Collect and examine field data in order to establish relationship and patterns
· Produce a coherent and well structured analysis of a chosen research topic in geography
· Demonstrate enhanced thinking, analytical, reporting, writing and, as appropriate, technical, laboratory and numerical skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Project Aims and Procedures Document 15 marks; Project Interim Presentation 15 marks; Supervisor's Report 15 marks; in class test 45 marks; 1 X 10,000 word Research Project to be submitted during Teaching Period 2; 210 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass both research project and in class test independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit research project for evaluation by mid-August as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG6007 Coastal Zone Management

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (or Seminars); 2 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 2 x 5hr(s) Seminars; 1 x 10hr(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Ms Valerie Cummins, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science, Staff, Department of Geography and Coastal and Marine Resources Centre.

Module Objective: Study of the concepts and practice of coastal zone management

Module Content: An examination is made of the key concepts in approaches to the management of earth environments. These approaches are linked to the more detailed study of the development of coastal zone management practices and techniques, at local to regional scales, and the design of integrated coastal zone management plans. Project and small group work in the module provides practical experience of the problems faced by coastal planners.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key concepts and understanding in the fields of coastal management and of other related areas in wider environmental management and planning;
· Enhance their technical knowledge of these fields;
· Enhance their thinking, analytical, writing, communications and reporting skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word Research Project Report 50 marks; 1 x Research Seminar Presentation 30 marks; 1 x Fieldwork Report 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG6401 Introduction to Migration and Diaspora Studies

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Applied Psychology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to key principles, theories and paradigms of migration and diaspora studies from different disciplinary perspectives

Module Content: Content will include critical approaches to: world-systems theory of migration, transnationalism, theories of diaspora, feminist perspectives on migration, postcolonialism, acculturation. A section of the module will focus on migration policy, in particular on debates concerning immigration and integration.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· A knowledge of the basic facts, statistics and spatial characteristics of Irish, European and global migration patterns.
· An understanding of the principal theories and models of migration.
· An understanding of state policy responses in the field of immigration.
· An understanding of the principal debates concerning integration and of the responses of state and non-state actors including migrants.
· An understanding of the key debates concerning diaspora and transnationalism.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: End of Year Written Examination 150 marks; Continuous Assessment 150 marks (one extended essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG6402 Research Methods and Sources in Migration and Diaspora Studies

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To equip students iwth a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods, with a particular focus on sources for migration and diaspora studies

Module Content: A skills-based module covering a range of qualitative (e.g. ethnographic, life narrative/biographical and participatory action research) and quantitative (statistical analysis, questionnaire design) research methods, as well as archival and policy studies. A key element of this seminar course will be individual presentations by students of their dissertation proposals, showing evidence of their skills and understanding of the methodologies covered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have a solid understanding of the key principles, theories and paradigms of social research methods from different disciplinary perspectives
· Be able to apply these to research in migration and diaspora studies
· Have a nuanced understanding of issues of reflexivity and ethics in social research in migration and diaspora studies
· Be able to develop and present a viable research proposal
· Have an understanding of the issues involved in some of the key qualitative and quantitative research methods used in contmporary migration and diaspora studies.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Oral Presentation 90, Research Proposal 100, Essay 90, Attendance 20).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG6403 Case Studies and Current Issues in Migration and Diaspora Studies

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Piaras MacEinri, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Allen White, College of ACSSS; Dr Naomi Bushin-Tyrrell, Department of Geography; Dr Caitriona Ni Laoire, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to some of the key topical issues in the field of migration and diaspora studies through a series of seminars involving external experts and active researchers in the field.

Module Content: This module will draw upon a range of resources, including ongoing research projects and visiting lecturers, to address key current topics, notably migration and childhood/youth, return migration, racism, and a range of integration-related topics. A section of the module will involve independent student research on the work of specific public and voluntary bodies in the fields of immigration and emigration in Ireland.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have an in-depth understanding of key current issues and debates in migration and diaspora studies.
· Have an appreciation of the role of state and non-state actors (including migrants) and of the interactions between them.
· Have an understanding of migration and integration debates from a range of disciplinary and sectoral perspectives.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Essay 80 marks, Attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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GG6404 Dissertation, Migration and Diaspora Studies

Credit Weighting: 40

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (independent research under supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To allow students to develop independent research projects in an area of relevance to migration and diaspora studies, under the supervision of a member of staff

Module Content: Students select their own research topic after consultation and agreement with the relevant staff involved in the degree programme. Independent research will be carried out between May and August under the direction of a supervisor allocated to each student.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify a specific research topic and write a research proposal for presentation in class
· Produce a detailed literature review and say exactly how the proposed research will add to the state of existing knowledge
· Choose and appropriate combination of theoretical and methodological perspectives for the research proposed
· Carry out original and independent primary fieldwork and/or research
· Write up and analyse research results as part of dissertation, placing them in broader context of exisiting knowledge.

Assessment: Total Marks 800: Continuous Assessment 800 marks (Dissertation of 20,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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GG6405 Work Placement, Programme for Migration and Diaspora Studies

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 7.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 20weeks(s) Placements (part-time).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Caitriona Ni Laoire, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with experience of working in the public or voluntary sector, in a context in which they can draw on the academic debates explored in core modules, and develop key transferable skills.

Module Content: Students will be offered an opportunity to undertake a placement with a statutory or voluntary body working in a relevant field (immigrant support, emigrant advice, health research, social inclusion, etc). Placements will be on a part-time basis for 24 weeks and will involve an element of project-work. Students will be allocated a mentor. Places will be limited and allocated by interview.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· understand the challenges of working in a voluntary or public organisation in a migration- or diaspora-related sector
· utilise a range of practical and interpersonal skills
· enhance their own chances of obtaining employment or carrying out further research in a public or voluntary body in a migration- or diaspora-related sector.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Progress Report 60 marks, Final Project Report 140 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (students may, at the discretion of the Board, repeat placement once only).

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GG6501 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Ms Helen Bradley, Department of Geography; Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the key concepts underlying Geographical Information Systems (GIS), how Geographical Information (GI) may be defined, measured, structured and represented in a GIS, and the development of skills in the use and application of GIS through practical exercises.

Module Content: This module will cover the role of GI in society; the nature and construction of GI; measurement of location; principles and techniques of spatial data modelling; field-based and object-based conceptualisations of space, and their expression as spatial data structures; and concepts of spatial and non-spatial data retrieval, manipulation and analysis. Hands-on training in GIS will be provided in the laboratory sessions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a solid, critical understanding of how GI may be structured, organised and used in computer-based GIS;
· Demonstrate skills and practical experience in the use of one or more commercial GIS products;
· Identify the importance of the spatial dimension in adding value to data, and in the support of decision-making across a range of sectors, disciplines and professions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word reports (25 marks each); computer based practicals (50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (students must revise and resubmit alternative assessments in lieu of failed in-class practicals and assignments as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG6502 Introduction to Remote Sensing

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide a foundation course in Remote Sensing and image processing as applied to environmental data in geography and the earth sciences.

Module Content: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic concepts and principles in Remote Sensing and to explore the application of the technology. Hands-on training in image processing and interpretation will be provided in the laboratory sessions. The module focuses on the treatment of digital data as acquired through a variety of orbiting and airborne platforms.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain how digital images are acquired by satellite sensors.
· Differentiate between a range of different satellite platforms and the data they collect.
· Demonstrate knowledge of the electromagnetic spectrum and the interaction of radiation of different wavelengths with the Earth's surface.
· Describe some of the applications of digital images.
· Use a standard image processing software package.
· Interpret digital images acquired by different sensors.
· Correctly apply basic image processing techniques in order to enhance the quality of information derived from images.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word reports (25 marks each); 5 x computer based practicals (10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. .

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed in-class practicals and assignments as prescribed by the Department).

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GG6503 Cartography and Visualisation

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 16 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 14 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography; Ms Helen Bradley, Department of Geography, CMRC Staff.

Module Objective: To give students a comprehensive understanding of cartography and visualisation, both the underlining principles and their practical application in map-making.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the principles of cartography and visualisation. Emphasis will be placed on the production of effective maps based on established principles of cartographic design. The module will also focus on recent developments in geographic visualisation and the areas of internet mapping and interactive visualisation. Topics covered include projections and scale, cartographic design, symbology and colour, thematic and topographic mapping, 3D mapping and web GIS.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have a critical understanding of the principles of cartography and visualisation.
· Appreciate what makes an effective map and how to use GIS software to create a wide range of map outputs.
· Investigate newly emerging visualisation techniques and their applications.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word report (30 marks); 2 x practical projects (35 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed in-class practicals and assignments, as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG6504 Digital Image Processing

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 30 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography, Dr Ned Dwyer, CMRC.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the principles underlying the acquisition and nature of Earth Observation data and advanced practical techniques for image processing.

Module Content: This module will cover aspects of image processing, including enhancement, algebra, fusion, classification, manipulation of data from different passive and active sensors including optical, thermal, hyperspectral, radar and lidar imagery, and ground truthing of imagery through field techniques.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Manipulate imagery from different sensors to derive higher order information.
· Evaluate the different data products that can be produced from raw imagery.
· Combine data from multiple sources for retrieval of more advanced surface characteristics.
· Demonstrate competency in using a common image processing software package.
· Collect and analyse field reflectance data.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x practical projects; 25 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed-in-class praticals and assignments, as prescribed by the Department).

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GG6505 Applications of Geoinformatics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 44 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 4 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography, Staff, Department of Geography and Invited Speakers.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of some of the applications of GIS and RS in academic and commercial environments.

Module Content: Through seminars led by experts in academia and industry, this module will cover a range of applications of GIS and RS from practitioners in those fields such as environmental, marine, socio-economic and transport domains. Students will also prepare and present their own seminars on applications of GIS and RS.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss a range of local, national and global perspectives on Geoinformatics.
· Evaluate the role of Geoinformatics in commercial and research settings.
· Assess the future role of Geoinformatics.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 150 marks (2 x 3,000 word reports (50 marks each); presentation (30 marks), seminar attendance and participation (20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed-in-class praticals and assignments, as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG6506 Technologies and Systems

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 30 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Cawkwell, Department of Geography; Ms Helen Bradley, Department of Geography; Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography, CMRC Staff.

Module Objective: To establish an understanding of some of the different technologies fundamental to the growth and development of GIS, RS and GPS, and an appreciation of the organisational and logistical issues surrounding the collection, use and dissemination of data.

Module Content: This module will cover; Geoinformtics software, technological principles and data acquisition for a range of different satellite and airborne sensors, and the development of global positioning networks. The development and role of national and international programmes for the collection, processing and production of data will be examined and the ethical, logistical and practical constraints on data use considered. The future directions of Geoinformatics will be assessed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate knowledge of the physical principles of remote data collection by a range of instruments.
· Describe the chain of data acquisition, production and dissemination at a practical and an institutional level.
· Identify the historic development and future trends of Geoinformatics technologies.
· Critically evaluate the issues constraining and encouraging the establishment of Geoinformatics within academic and commercial arenas.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( tutorial exercises (50 marks), 2 x 1,500 word reports (25 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed in-class practicals and assignments, as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG6507 Implementation of Geoinformatics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Ms Helen Bradley, Department of Geography; Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: This module will cover a range of methodologies for the design and implementation of Geoinformatic solutions in the research and commercial arenas. Different types and scales of implementation will be investigated.

Module Content: This module will look at the methodologies for the successful implementation of Geoinformatic solutions into organisations. The topics include user/project requirements, general system design principles, system design models, and formal design methodology, spatial data infrastructures, database design, implementation planning, system verification and validation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have a comprehensive understanding of the importance of planning in the implementation of Geoinformatic solutions.
· Identify the important steps in an implementation project and how to develop an effective implementation strategy.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x 2,000 word reports (25 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed in-class practicals and assignments, as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG6509 Spatial Data Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography; Ms Helen Bradley, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the principles and practice of spatial data analysis, by means of GIS technologies.

Module Content: The aims and methods of spatial data analysis will be explored through Boolean and other logic systems, database querying, vector and raster analysis, site selection, model building and map algebra. Principles of spatial and geo-statistics will be introduced and applied via a GIS to issues such as interpolation, uncertainty and error.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have a critical understanding of the principles underpinning analysis of spatial data through GIS and other tools.
· Have through practical, hands-on experience in the implementation of spatial data analysis techniques in both vector and raster systems students will be familiar with the application of such methods.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 X 1,500 word report (25 marks);computer based practicals (25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed in-class practicals and assignments, as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG6510 Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography, Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide a foundation in theoretical and practical and scientific research skills necessary to develop and undertake research project, and prepare students for commencing the dissertation.

Module Content: Through a series of workshops students will be introduced to concepts and skills needed to conduct independent and effective research, including reading; writing; summarising information; critical evaluation; data sourcing presentation and analysis; preparing a research proposal; and project management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an appreciation of the research process by engaging with practitioners
· Critique academic research in the form of a literature review
· Evaluate the state of the discipline's current research agenda
· Undertake statistical analysis of a range of numerical data
· Write and present a research proposal.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (5 x practicals (20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and re-submit alternative assessments in lieu of failed in-class assignments as prescribed by the Department.).

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GG6511 Dissertation in Geoinformatics

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2. (and the summer months).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 16weeks(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Darius Bartlett, Department of Geography, Department of Geography, Staff.

Module Objective: To develop research skills and appropriate methods necessary to undertake an independent project relevant to contemporary geoinformatics technologies and applications.

Module Content: Students will develop their research proposal in agreement with relevant staff and carry out independent research over a 4-5 month period.

Learning Outcomes:

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (600 marks for dissertation, maximum 15,000 words. The submission date for all students will be 1st September (or the closest Monday to this date) and must be registered in the Geography Department Office.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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