Book of Modules 2013/2014

Electrical Engineering

Choose by Subject Category or Module Code:
EE1005 Electrical and Electronic Systems
EE2001 Power Engineering
EE2007 Electronic Circuits
EE2011 Digital Electronics
EE2012 Linear Circuit Analysis
EE2013 Non-Linear Circuit Analysis
EE2014 Signals and Systems 1
EE2015 Signals and Systems 2
EE3001 Control Engineering
EE3011 Power Electronic Systems
EE3012 Electromechanical Energy Conversion
EE3013 Electromagnetic Fields for Engineers
EE3014 Signal Processing
EE3015 Telecommunications
EE3021 Electrical and Electronic Engineering in the Commerical World and Work Placement
EE3901 Biomedical Design
EE4001 Power Electronics, Drives and Energy Conversion
EE4002 Control Engineering
EE4004 Telecommunications
EE4007 Optical Electronics
EE4008 Digital Signal Processing
EE4010 Electrical Power Systems
EE4011 Radio Frequency IC Design
EE4012 Biomedical Design
EE4013 Renewable Energy Systems
EE4014 Industrial Automation and Control
EE4015 Robotics
EE4020 Project
EE4021 Electrical and Electronic Engineering in the Commercial World
EE6002 Preliminary Research Report in Sustainable Energy
EE6003 Dissertation in Sustainable Energy
EE6006 VLSI Digital Signal Processing
EE6019 Research Report
EE6020 Optical Detectors
EE6021 Industrial Placement
EE6022 Research Project
EE6055 Photodetectors and Photodetection
EE6101 Advanced Analogue and Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuit Design
EE6102 Advanced Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuit Design
EE6103 Advanced VLSI Architectures
EE6104 Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks
EE6105 Wireless Communications
EE6106 Robotics and Mechatronics
EE6107 Advanced Power Electronics & Electric Drives
EE6108 Optoelectronics
EE6109 Adaptive Signal Processing & Advanced Control
EE6163 Telecommunications for Electronic Business
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Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

International visiting students should consult the International Education Office regarding selection of modules.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

EE1005 Electrical and Electronic Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 2hr(s) Other (Project support sessions; Team Project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Padraig Cantillon-Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Padraig Cantillon-Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide students with a broad overview and introduction to Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Content: Electrical and electronic systems examples, system block diagrams; introductory circuit theory; electrical and electronic components; sensors and actuators; amplifiers and amplification; introduction to op-amps; principles of control and feedback; basic digital and sequential logic; signals, phasors, measurement and noise; introduction to semiconductor devices; basic electrical machines; data acquisition and communication.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe complex systems using block diagrams and divide a complex system into component sub-systems
· Solve elementary circuit problems
· Identify and describe the purpose of electrical and electronic components, including diodes, transistors, capacitors, inductors, resistors and operational amplifiers, as well as basic electrical machines.
· Design elementary analogue and digital circuits
· Design and implement a complex system using a "black-box" approach
· Work in a team-environment to solve engineering problems and communicate their work effectively using reports and oral presentations in groups and as individuals.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks (End of year written examination); Continuous Assessment 50 marks ((In class examination, Group projects , Project demonstrations, Oral presentation, Individual Project Report). A detailed description of the Continuous Assessment will be provided to the students at the beginning of the Teaching Period).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE2001 Power Engineering

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of power engineering.

Module Content: Electromagnetism revision; Self inductance; Transformer Inductances; Ferromagnetism; DC Machines (brushed); Single-Phase and Three-Phase Power Circuits: AC Circuit Analysis, Real, Reactive and Complex Power, Power Factor Correction, Star, Delta Circuits; Thyristor Converters; Electrical Safety and Wiring.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply the laws of electromagnetism to power components.
· Characterize these power components for their electrical properties.
· Apply these power components in suitable circuits and applications.
· Provide an overview of power systems.
· The student will be able to test, characterize, experiment with, and report on commonly-used power machines.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 110 marks (End of year written examination); Continuous Assessment 90 marks (Power Laboratory Sessions and Laboratory Examination 30 marks; In-class Written Examinations 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE2007 Electronic Circuits

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 90.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To further the analysis and design of analogue circuits.

Module Content: Power Amps: Classes A, B and C. JFETs: Characteristics, biasing and operation. Op-amps: Analysis and circuit elements. Application examples of above: Design and implementation issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse and design linear operational amplifier circuits (including, but not limited to, inverting/non inverting amplifiers, summer, differential amplifier, integrator and differentiator).
· Analyse and design such common non-linear operational amplifier circuits as a comparator and a Schmitt trigger.
· Report upon the operating characteristics of Op-amp based amplifiers and comparators they have built in the laboratory.
· Analyse and design suitable DC biasing circuits for bipolar Class A and B power amplifiers.
· Calculate the power consumption, output power and efficiencies of bipolar Class A and B power amplifiers, and determine their DC and AC load lines.
· Report upon the static (e.g. biasing) and dynamic (e.g. load line analyses) operating characteristics of bipolar Class A and B power amplifiers they have built in the laboratory.
· Analyse and design suitable DC biasing circuits for field effect transistor based Class A power amplifiers.
· Calculate the power consumption, output power and efficiencies of field effect transistor based Class A power amplifiers, and determine their DC and AC load lines.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Laboratory and Written Reports; software based assignment and report; design and construction of electronic circuits).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE2011 Digital Electronics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): EE1005

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Other (Continuous Assessment).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: On completion of this course the student should have learned the fundamentals of Boolean Algebra as applied to the analysis and design of Digital Electronic Circuits. The student should have developed the capacity to simulate, analyse, design and implement a variety of combinational and sequential digital logic circuits.

Module Content: Boolean algebra, combinational logic design and minimisation. Synchronous circuit design: Moore and Mealy state machines. Asynchronous circuit design, state assignment and circuit hazards. Programming Micro Controllers. Analog to Digital and Digital to Analog conversion.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Manipulate, minimise and implement Boolean expressions using digital electronics.
· Prove and use the various theorems of Boolean Algebra.
· Use Karnaugh-maps for the minimisation of Boolean expressions up to 5 variables.
· Design and implement synchronous and asynchronous sequential logic circuits
· Describe the internal architecture and operation of a microcontroller device.
· Apply the principles of A/D and D/A conversion for the capture and analysis of signals.
· Complete a digital system design project with aspects of teamwork, project management, project budgeting, problem solving, report writing, circuit design, trade-off analysis and presentation skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks (End of Year Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Continuous Assessment (10 Marks Class Test, 20 marks Group Assignments, 20 marks Individual Assignment)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE2012 Linear Circuit Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Padraig Cantillon-Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of linear electrical circuit analysis

Module Content: Circuit elements, laws and theorems of linear circuit analysis, application of circuit theorems to DC circuits, nodal analysis of DC circuits, Thevenin and Norton network theorems, maximum power transfer and superposition, network i-v characterisation, time-varying signals, complex magnitude and phase, AC circuit analysis, resonance, damping and Q factor, introduction to filters, first-order RC and RL networks, second order networks, step response.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Carry out nodal analysis of (i) passive, and (ii) first and second order DC and AC circuits.
· Analyse, by hand calculation, the time and (where applicable) frequency response of first and second order DC circuits composed of resistors, capacitors and inductors.
· Describe second-order circuit response in terms of Q factor, damping factor, natural frequency and damped natural frequency.
· Design simple first and second-order filter circuits which perform important electrical functions (e.g., filtering).
· Perform computer simulation of the circuits described above in the time and (where applicable) frequency domains.
· Construct first and second-order filter circuits and characterise their behaviour in the time and frequency domain.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks (Written Exam); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Laboratories 40 marks; In-class Written Examinations 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE2013 Non-Linear Circuit Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): EE2012

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Padraig Cantillon-Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Padraig Cantillon-Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of non-linear electrical circuit analysis.

Module Content: Non-linear circuit elements, diodes and their application, linearisation and DC operating points, small signal circuit models, transistors as digital switches, transistors as amplifiers, fundamental MOSFET circuits, MOSFET digital logic circuits (NOR, NAND and NOR), load lines, amplifier configurations and applications; input and output impedance, voltage and current gain; fundamentals of operational amplifiers (op-amps), negative feedback in op-amp circuits; common op-amp applications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Carry out small-signal linearization of a two terminal non-linear device about a DC operating point
· Predict, by hand calculation, the time domain waveforms and behaviour of common diode circuits (e.g., clipper, rectifier, clamp).
· Implement Boolean functions with MOSFET circuits operating as digital switches.
· Implement and analyse common transistor amplifier configurations and calculate important figures of merit.
· Implement and analyse common op-amp configurations.
· Perform computer simulation of the circuits described above.
· Design and construct non-linear electronic circuits and characterise their behaviour in the time and frequency domains.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks (written Examination); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Continuous Assessment Laboratories 40 marks; In-class Written Examinations 10 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE2014 Signals and Systems 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): MA1008

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Peter Kennedy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Prof Michael Peter Kennedy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of signals and systems in the context of engineering

Module Content: Continuous and discrete-time systems analysis with illustrative applications. Linear and time-invariant systems, transfer functions. Fourier series, Fourier transform.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the abstraction concepts of signals and systems, the uses and properties of fundamental signals (step, ramp, impulse, pulse, exponentials and sinusoids), the uses and properties of systems (stability, memory, invertibility, time (in)variance and linearity.
· Describe the time represenation of signals and systems (convolution and impulse response)
· Describe the spectrall representation of signals and systems (Fourier analysis), the use of frequency response to characterize linear systems

· Use Matlab to analyse discrete and continuous time signals and systems.
· Apply concepts to Electrical Engineering problems, signals and systems
· Apply difference and differential equations to describe the behavior of systems
· Analyse the response of linear systems to periodic and non-periodic signals
· Utilize the 4 Fourier representations to analyse linear system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks (End of year written examination); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (continuous assessment (in class tests 15 marks; Matlab exercises 5 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE2015 Signals and Systems 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s):

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): MA1008

Co-requisite(s): EE2014

Teaching Methods:

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gordon Lightbody, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of signals and systems in the context of engineering.

Module Content: System modelling and simulation; Linearisation; the state space module; Laplace transforms; Time and frequency response of linear systems; block diagrams; Feedback; Stability of linear systems; Introduction to discrete-time signals and systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Model and simulate nonlinear processes in Matlab/Simulink.
· Obtain the linear state-space representation of the system.
· Use the Laplace transform to obtain the process transfer function.
· Develop and simplify block diagram models of MIMO processes.
· Use the Laplace transform to determine the time response of a linear system and show how this response depends on the poles (and zeros) of the transfer function.
· Sketch the Bode frequency response plot and describe how the shape of these plots depend on the poles and zeros of the transfer function.
· Describe how feedback can be used to change system dynamic performance.
· Use the Routh-array technique to analyse the stability of a linear system.
· Specify correctly the sampling rate and choose the anti-aliasing filter.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks (End of year written examination); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Two Matlab/Simulink mini projects (25 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE3001 Control Engineering

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 40 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gordon Lightbody, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gordon Lightbody, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamentals of control engineering.

Module Content: Classical Control: Principles of control; Modelling and simulation; Frequency and time responses; Properties of feedback; Stability-Routh-Hurwitz, Nyquist; Relative Stability; Design of compensaters in the frequency domain; Root Locus design; PID controllers - tuning; Practical issues - cascade control, windup, etc. Introduction to digital control

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appreciatee the need for and the benefits that come from automatic control.
· Model, simulate and linearise basic non-linear dynamic processes.
· Identify a process transfer function model from its time or frequency responses.
· Analyse the stability and performance of a closed-loop system from its Nyquist and Nichols plots.
· Design PID, phase-lead and phase-lag controllers in the frequency domain.
· Predict the closed-loop performance of a process from its open-loop poles and zeros, using the root-locus method.
· Design PID, tacho-feedback and phase-lead compensators using the root-locus method.
· In the laboratory they will observe some of the practical issues of both computer and analog implementation of controllers for the closed-loop control of a wide variety of realistic processes.
· In the case-study design exercise students learn how to apply what they have learnt to set realistic design objectives, to design a controller, test the design in simulation and justify their results.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Laboratory and Case Study).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE3011 Power Electronic Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): EE2001

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the theory of power electronic converters and their applications in electrical motor drives and switched mode power supplies.

Module Content: Review of ac circuit theory; Static magnetic circuits; Transformers; Review of dc machines; Power semiconductor devices; Phase controlled rectifier circuts; Dc-dc converter circuits.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse and solve problems in single-phase and three-phase sinusoidal voltage and current-fed electrical systems.
· Appreciate the different forms of magnetic materials available for a given application and understand their associated loss mechanisms.
· Analyse, solve and design magnetic circuits for inductors and transformers.
· Analyse, simulate , solve and design the fundamental power converter circuits used in the efficient processing of electrical power in both motor drives and power supply systems.
· Analyse, simulate (via PSpice), design and construct the fundamental power electronic topologies, including line commutated ac/dc converters and non-isolated dc/dc converters.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Laboratory Classes 10 Marks; In-Class Test 10 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE3012 Electromechanical Energy Conversion

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): EE2001, EE3011

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of electromechanical energy conversion systems including solenoids, contactors, reluctance motors, stepper motors, synchronous machines, dc machines and three-phase induction machines.

Module Content: The generalised theory of electromagnetic energy conversion; Practical applications of electromechanical energy conversion systems; Solenoids and contactors. Reluctance machines; Stepper motors and positioning systems, Synchronous machines; Dc machines; Three-phase induction machines and wind generator systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand and appreciate the generalised theory of electromechanical energy conversion based on the fundamental principle of conservation of energy.
· Analyse and solve the magnetic circuits which underpin the principal forms of electrical machines, including singly-fed and doubly-fed magnetic devices, based on both linear and rotary motion.
· Analyse and solve application-oriented problems involving the major electromechanical energy conversion devices, specifically contactors and relays, reluctance machines and synchronous machines, stepper motors, dc and universal motors as well as induction motors and generators.
· Set up and operate in practice a typical electrical machine drive system. The student will also develop expertise in the modelling and simulation of complex electromechanical systems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Laboratory Classes 10 marks; In-Class Test 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE3013 Electromagnetic Fields for Engineers

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): EE2008 and MA2013

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nabeel Riza, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To gain an understanding of electromagnetism and its application in Electrical Engineering. This module will focus on a physical understanding of electromagnetism using mathematics as a tool to solve problems.

Module Content: Static Electric and Magnetic Fields; Moving Charges; Dynamic Electromagnetic Fields; Boundary Conditions; Interaction of Electromagnetic waves with matter; Plane Wave Solutions; Poynting Vector; Antennas.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Give a description of what causes electromagnetic waves.
· Solve problems in electrostatics and magnetostatics using fundamental laws/equations of electromagnetism.
· Give a physical description of how electric and magnetic polarizability arise and their equation representations including capacitance and inductance.
· Demonstrate an understanding of Maxwell's Equations and be able to apply them to solve some basic problems in linear homogeneous isotropic media including application in motors and generators.
· Demonstrate knowledge of how to solve problems involving electromagnetic waves at boundary interfaces including transformers.
· Give a description of the physical and mathematical basis of polarization of an electromagnetic wave and wave propagation in bounded and freespace unbounded mediums.
· Solve for power flow of an electromagnetic wave.
· Describe the electromagnetic wave radiation from antennas.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks (Written Paper); Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Two In-Class Tests, each 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Students who do not attend the in-class tests will be assigned a mark of zero for this component of assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE3014 Signal Processing

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): EE2014/EE2015

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Made available to students).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To apply frequency-domain techniques for the analysis of circuits in the analogue domain. To apply such frequency-domain techniques for the design of analogue filters. Some introductory insights into the operation and choice of digital filters will also be provided.

Module Content: Application of Fourier Series and Fourier Transforms; s-plane Analysis and Design methods; Transient responses - relationship to poles; Frequency response; Filter design; Common Filter Types Butterworth, Chebyshev, Bessel, Elliptic; Active filter design; Passive filter network design. Digital filters: Shannon Sampling Theorem; Comparison of analogue and digital filters; Examples of digital filters; Comparison of FIR and IIR filters.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply s-domain and s-plane techniques to represent transfer functions and use these to analyze simple passive networks.
· Perform in-depth analysis of low pass, high pass, band stop and band pass Butterworth and Chebysev filters, in addition to an appreciation of the relative merits of these filters and of Bessel and Elliptic filters.
· Design the filters in as both active and passive circuits.
· Design, simulate (via Matlab), build (using breadboards), measure (using signal generators and oscilloscopes) and compose a written performance report pertaining to two types of analogue filter (two sample op-amp-based filters will be designed and constructed)
· Use the frequency sampling method for designing FIR digital filters.
· Make a detailed comparison of different analogue filter types and compare the performance of analogue and digital filters.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks (End of Year Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Continuous Assessment (software-based assignments and reports 10 marks; design and construction of electronic circuits 10 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE3015 Telecommunications

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2. (as determined by course schedule).

No. of Students: Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce the principles of modern communication systems.

Module Content: Types of electronic communication systems; public switched telephone network; mobile/cellular communication systems; radio wave propagation; analogue and digital modulation techniques; noise; data communications networks; line codes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse and use mathematical expressions describing different modulation types and the associated bandwidth.
· Analyse and use mathematical expressions for radio wave propagation and associated calculation of received power.
· Analyse the operation of transmitter/receiver systems including the effect of noise.
· Describe the principles and operation of the Public Switched Telephone Service (PSTN).
· Describe the principles and operation of Mobile/Cellular systems.
· Describe the principles and operation of data and communication network.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks (End of Year written examination); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Continuous Assessment (laboratory work 20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE3021 Electrical and Electronic Engineering in the Commerical World and Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1 and Teaching/Research Period 3. (Teaching Period 1 and Teaching/Research Period 3 of Third Year and Teaching Period 1 of Fourth Year.).

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Lectures; Seminars; Workshops; Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Staff, Faculty of Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the world of commerce and broaden their engineering experience by (i) assisting students in obtaining a work placement in a commercial organisation or research institute (ii) developing career planning and transferrable skills, and (iii) developing a business understanding, with lectures, readings, and workshops on current business leaders and practices.

Module Content: Developing job search and transferable skills. Internship or placement in an enterprise relevant to Electrical, Electronic or Microelectronic Engineering. Commercialisation of engineering ideas and exposure to current business issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop transferable skills, such as report writing and seminar presentation.
· Research job and careers options

· Work experience by placement in an enterprise relevant to Electrical, Electronic or Microelectronic Engineering.

· Appreciate Commercialization of engineering ideas and current business issues.
· Work effectively in a commercial organisation or research institute.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Based on assessment of written assignments (55%) and student seminars (45%).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Work Placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. No supplementary Examination required.

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EE3901 Biomedical Design

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1. (with Seminar presentations in January).

No. of Students: Max 15 ((will vary depending on clinical mentor availability)).

Pre-requisite(s): None. In the event of more students than available places, selection will be based on academic record and individual interview.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Padraig Cantillon-Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce the student to the process of innovation and design in the biomedical/clinical environment through a combination of lectures, problem-based and mentored learning (with both engineering and clinical mentors).

Module Content: Introduction to design of clinical devices and process. Design strategies (e.g. TRIZ) considering product development techniques, human factor engineering, safety and testing. Market analysis techniques. Medical device intellectual property, patents and an introduction to IP law with particular application to biomedical systems and devices. Commercialisation pathway (e.g. device regulation, insurance etc.). Case studies. Team project to design a biomedical device, process or system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and apply design strategies such as TRIZ;
· Describe the fundamentals of intellectual property law and patents with application to biomedical devices;
· Describe the commercialisation pathway for biomedical devices;
· Perform a preliminary market survey to identify commercial conditions for a new concept/device and critically assess the feasibility of a new concept or device in the biomedical field;
· Evaluate the intellectual property landscape for a new biomedical concept;
· Design a solution for a well-defined biomedical engineering device or system as part of a team of 3-5 students.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment (In-class tests - 20 marks; individual goal attainment within team - 25 marks; team written report- 30 marks; team seminar presentation - 25 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Lecture attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% If a student misses 1/3 of scheduled classes, without supplying relevant documentation to the module co-ordinator, they automatically fail the module.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the module co-ordinator.).

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EE4001 Power Electronics, Drives and Energy Conversion

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): EE3011

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To study power electronics and motor drives following an integrative approach.

Module Content: Electric vehicle powertrain and batteries; isolated and non-isolated converters; modelling, characterization, operation and speed control of squirrel cage induction machines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Characterize, analyze, solve, design and specify components, circuits and systems for power electronics and electric drives.
· The following technical areas are studied:
Power Electronic Circuits
AC Machine steady state operation and characterization
Induction machine wiring configurations and speed control.
AC machine space vector control and modulation
· Induction motor wiring configurations and speed control
· Electric vehicle powertrain
· Batteries.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (In-class Written Examinations).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE4002 Control Engineering

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 90.

Pre-requisite(s): EE3001

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gordon Lightbody, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gordon Lightbody, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To extend the fundamentals of control to include digital and state space control techniques.

Module Content: Modern Control: Introduction to state-space techniques, solution of state equations; Controllability; Pole placement regulator design; Observability; Estimator design. Non-linear Control. Digital Control: Review of Digital Control basics; Direct design techniques; Pole placement design; State-space control; System identification.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Correctly specify sampling rates and anti-aliasing filters for digital control applications.
Analyse the dynamics of discrete and mixed signal systems.
Implement digital controllers through emulation
· Analyse the dynamics of discrete and mixed signal systems.
· Implement digital controllers through emulation.
· Design digital controllers using inverse model and pole-placement techniques.
· Identify discrete time models from experimental data, using the least square algorithm.
· Utilise state space theory for conversion of state-space models to transfer functions and vice-versa; transforming state-space models into other representations; solve for the state trajectory; determine the transition matrix; convert a continuous model into a discrete time model.
· Design a state space controller. This includes how to analyse the state space model for controllability; regulator design using the pole-placement technique for high order processes; the design of controllers for tracking applications and how to use Ackermann's gain formula.
· Design an estimator for use within a state space control scheme. Understand the separation principle and be able to design a state-space compensator which uses a full state estimator.
· In the design exercise, students learn how to use Matlab and Simulink for the system simulation and the design and testing of a controller for a realistic case-study system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks (End of Year Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Design exercise).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE4004 Telecommunications

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 130.

Pre-requisite(s): EE3015

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To study the principles of modern digital telecommunication systems.

Module Content: Source coding techniques; Fundamental limits in information theory; Error control coding; Cryptography; Digital modulation/detection techniques and associated reliability.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· State and use information-theoretic constructs to characterise source coding efficiency and channel capacity.
· Design single error correcting linear block codes. Analyse convolutional encoding/decoding (Viterbi)
· Perform relevant Galois field calculations and analyse the performance of BCH/RS error correcting codes.
· Describe the Advanced Encryption Standard algorithm.
· Derive optimum detection conditions, in terms of signal to noise ratio, for digitally modulated data subject to additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN).
· Describe/analyse the performance of DSSS and FHSS spread spectrum communications.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks (End of Year Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 40 marks (In-class written examinations).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE4007 Optical Electronics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 130.

Pre-requisite(s): PY1006, PY1007

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Peter James Parbrook, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Professor Peter James Parbrook, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Prof Nabeel Riza, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To present the principles and applications of semiconductor optoelectronics and photonics.

Module Content: Introduction to semiconductor physics (revision). Introduction to quantum mechanics and application to semiconductor optoelectronic devices: quantum confinement, elementary band structure. Fundamentals of laser operation and design, Semiconductor emitters: Light Emitting Diodes and Lasers. Wavelength stability in semiconductor laser devices. Non communications based applications of lasers.
Introduction to properties of light: geometric optics, coherence and dispersion. Optical fibre designs and application in communication and other systems. Optical communication system design and limits on transmission rates. Maxwell's equations as applied to light, behaviour of light in materials and at interfaces. Optical antennas and analogy to RF antennas. Applications of signal to noise ratio in photonic system. Polarisation of light and modification. Principles and applications of interferometry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Solve problems related to the design of enhanced efficiency light emitting devices, the use of semiconductor lasers in optical communications, optical data storage applications and other applications.
· Solve problems related to the propagation of light in and between optical components and the impact polarization, dispersion, electrical signal modulation bandwidth and other factors may have on system bandwidth or sensitivity.
· Describe, analyse, compare and utilise a variety of passive and active optical components, particularly optical waveguides, modulators, amplifiers, light-emitting devices, and optical detectors.
· Describe and design simple systems using the above components, particularly for communications, but also for other applications, showing knowledge of the relevant limitations that may be expected.
· Describe Fermat's principle and optical path length, the derivation of laws of geometrical optics and application to optical sensor design.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks (End of Year Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Continuous Assessment (two separate 1 hour in-class examinations - 20 marks each covering the semiconductor optoelectronics (Exam A) and photonics content (Exam B) of the course.).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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EE4008 Digital Signal Processing

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): EE3010

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 Other (Design Exercise).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To study the design and implementation of Digital Filtering and spectral analysis techniques.

Module Content: FIR Filter Design; Z-Transforms; IIR Filter Design; Bilinear Transformation; Fast Fourier Transform; Spectral Estimation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Derive the Fast Fourier Transform implementation of the Discrete Fourier Transform.
· Use the Z-Transform for the analysis and design of Infinite Impulse Response Filters.
· Design an appropriate FIR or IIR Filter, given a filter specification.
· Design an appropriate digital filter and compose a written report outlining the design choices, given an unseen signal and filtering requirement.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks (Written paper); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Design Exercise (two design exercises for 10 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE4010 Electrical Power Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): EE3011 and EE3012

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrea Ahern, Department of Chemistry; Ms Judy Rea, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To develop the theory and application of electrical power systems tracing the processing of energy from generation, through transmission and distribution to final utilization in electrical form.

Module Content: Overview of electrical power supply systems. Energy sources. Generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy. Three-phase ac circuit theory, network equations and power flow. Unbalanced three-phase systems. Symmetrical components and sequence networks. Synchronous generators: torque equation and equivalent circuit, real and reactive power flow. Power transformers: equivalent circuit, per-unit theory, three-phase and auto- transformers, Transmission lines and faults: symmetrical and asymmetrical faults, utility/consumer interface: loads, wiring, protection, system modelling.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appreciate the trends in global electrical energy requirements.
· Analyse the options available for bulk electrical power generation.
· Assess the environmental impact of fossil fuel, nuclear fission and hydroelectric power generation technologies andperform a critical comparison of the choices.
· Analyse the operation of synchronous generators, transformers, transmission lines and other equipment in the electrical grid.
· Analyse and solve the normal balanced operation of electrical power generation and transmission systems.
· Develop a familiarity with modern industry-standard computer aided engineering software for electrical systems analysis and design.
· Analyse and solve the abnormal operation and protection of electrical power systems which arise from the onset of asymmetrical faults within the network.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks (End of year written examination); Continuous Assessment 40 marks (In-class Written Examinations).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE4011 Radio Frequency IC Design

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Design Exercise).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To present design techniques for integrated RF transceivers.

Module Content: Architectures of modern RF Tranceivers; performance specifications such as noise and non-linear effects; oscillators; mixers; phase-locked loops; low noise amplifiers.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Partition an RF system into functional sub-blocks.
· Determine characteristics such as noise figure and non-linear effects.
· Analyse and design RF oscillators.
· Analyse and design RF mixers.
· Analyse and design an RF phase locked loop.
· Analyse and design an RF low noise amplifier.
· Use a simulation tool to design/analyse a typical RF block or system and communicate the findings in a report.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Other (Design exercise)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE4012 Biomedical Design

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1. (with Seminar Presentations in January).

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None. In the event of more students than available places, selection will be based on academic record and individual interview.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 16 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Other (Tutorials and mentored learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Padraig Cantillon-Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce the student to the process of innovation and design in the biomedical/clinical environment through a combination of lectures, problem-based and mentored learning (with both engineering and clinical mentors).

Module Content: Introduction to human anatomy and physiology (including the cardiovascular, neural, musculosketetal, and digestive systems). Design strategies (e.g., TRIZ) considering product development techniques, human factor engineering, safety and testing. Market analysis techniques. Medicat device intellectual property, patents and an introduction to IP law with particular application to biomedical systems and devices. Commercialisation pathway (e.g., device regulation, insurance etc.). Case studies. Team mini-project to design a biomedical device or system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and apply design strategies such as TRIZ;
· Describe the fundamentals of intellectual property law and patents with application to biomedical devices;
· Describe the commercialisation pathway for biomedical devices;
· Perform a preliminary market survey to identify commercial conditions for a new concept/device and critically assess the feasibility of a new concept or device in the biomedical field;
· Evaluate the intellectual property landscape for a new biomedical concept;
· Design a solution for a well-defined biomedical engineering device or system as part of a team of 3-5 students.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous assessment (In-class tests - 20 marks; individual goal attainment within team - 25 marks; team written report - 30 marks; team seminar presentation - 25 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Lecture attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% If a student misses 1/3 of scheduled classes, without supplying relevant documentation to the module co-ordinator, they automatically fail the module.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the module co-ordinator.).

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EE4013 Renewable Energy Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the fundamental principles relating the generation of electrical energy from renewable energy sources and to examine the integration of energy from such sources into the electrical grid. To study electric and hybrid-electric vehicles and the associated energy storage and power conversion technologies.

Module Content: Overview of global energy requirements. Renewable energy systems and grid integration. Basic principles of photovoltaics and cells. Concentrator photovoltaic systems. Solar tracking. Operation and control of wind farms. Electric and hybrid-electric vehicles. Fuel cells and advanced battery technology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appreciate present-day global energy needs and understand the technical and environmental implications of growing electrical energy demands.
· Analyse renewable energy sources and assess the impact which the use of these devices has on the operation of the electrical grid.
· Describe the different photovoltaic technologies currently available and identify the differences between them.
· Appreciate the challenges facing the development of high-efficiency photovoltaic systems for meeting future energy needs.
· Model and simulate key wind-turbine paradigms and analyse the dynamic systems present within a typical wind-farm.
· Appreciate the need for control within a modern wind-farm and be able to design controllers for maximum power tracking, power regulation, grid support, etc.
· Analyse and model electric and hybrid-vehicle systems and components.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks (End of Year Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Continuous Assessment (In-Class Written Examination and, when practicable, a power generation site visit together with a written report on that visit).).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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EE4014 Industrial Automation and Control

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (PLC-based design exercise).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide an insight into the design of automation systems and associated hardware elements.

Module Content: PLCs (Programmable Logic Controllers); Industrial Communications. Components: Sensors (Non-Vision); Use of software observers. Vision Systems: Homogeneous transformations; Image Processing techniques; Perspective Transformations; Industrial applications of Servosystems, including Hydraulic Servosystems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Perform analytical calculations for design purposes and to describe and analyze some of the fundamental technologies associated with workcells and automation systems.
· Design algorithms for the filtering of camera images and identification of the objects therein.
· Perform calculations and develop transformations for camera-based systems relating world and image frames.
· Analyze the range of applications of Profibus and the technologies available for Profibus-based automation systems.
· Develop a ladder-diagram, PLC-based controller for a wide variety of automation systems.
· Write a detailed engineering report describing extensive project work (including original design implementation) on a prescribed automation system requiring a PLC-based solution.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks (End of Year Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Project Report on a specified PLC-based design exercise).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE4015 Robotics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Project on analysis of forward and invese kinematics of some typical robotic structures).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide an insight into various robotic structures and their associated components and control.

Module Content: Perspective transformations; Palletizing and depalletizing; Basic configurations of serial robots; Spatial descriptions and transformations; Forward kinematics; Inverse kinematics; Continuous path control; Jacobians; Trajectory generation of robots and mechatronic systems; Workcells.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Utilize homogeneous transformations to solve engineering problems in applications such as palletizing and depalletizing.
· Analyze a wide variety of previously unseen robotic structures including frame assignment and forward kinematic analysis, principally for the purpose of hand matrix derivation.
· Develop inverse kinematic equations and perform numerical solutions of inverse kinematics problems for robotic structures.
· Write a detailed engineering report based on a software-based project (utilizing Mathematica), in which the forward and inverse kinematics of prescribed robots are investigated in detail.
· Formulate interpolation-based strategies for trajectory generation for robots and other automation and servo-based systems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 75 marks (End of Year Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 25 marks (Project Report on a Mathematica-based analysis of selected robotic structures (20 marks); In class test(s) (5 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EE4020 Project

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (Project Work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Staff, Tyndall Institute.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge to a substantial electrical engineering problem requiring analytical and/or design and/or experimental effort.

Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Plan an engineering project with resource and time constraints.
· Conduct research into an engineering problem including the use of printed and computer-based literature.
· Apply technical knowledge and skills to solving an engineering problem as part of a project team.
· Manage an engineering project with respect to a plan incorporating intermediate and final goals.
· Communicate the results of an engineering project by means of an oral presentation, by means of written reports and by means of a practical demonstration of the project outcomes during a public open day.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Preliminary Report 15 marks; Seminar 30 marks; Open Day 30 marks; Performance 75 marks; Final Report 150 marks). (Oral if required).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EE4021 Electrical and Electronic Engineering in the Commercial World

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3. (May - September, after the Third University Spring Examination and Teaching Periods 1 and 2 of Third Year and Teaching Period 1 of the Fourth Year).

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Lectures; Seminars; Workshops; Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the world of commerce and broaden their engineering experience by (i) assisting students in obtaining a work placement in a commercial organisation or research institute (ii) developing career planning and transferrable skills, and (iii) developing a business understanding, with lectures, readings, and workshops on current business leaders and practices.

Module Content: Developing job search and transferable skills. Internship or placement in an enterprise relevant to Electrical, Electronic or Microelectronic Engineering. Comercialisation of engineering ideas and exposure to current business issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· (i) experience work placement in a commercial organisation or research institute; (ii) begin career planning and develop transferable skills and (iii) develop a business understanding with lectures and readings on current business leaders and thinkers.
· The student will be assisting in developing the following life skills:
I. Researching job and careers options
II. Developing transferable skills, such as report writing and seminar presentation.
· III. Work experience by placement in an enterprise relevant to Electrical, Electronic or Microelectronic Engineering.

· IV. Commercialization of engineering ideas and exposure to current business issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Based on assessment of written assignments (70%) and student seminars (30%).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Work Placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students failing this module must repeat it as prescribed by the Department.

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EE6002 Preliminary Research Report in Sustainable Energy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 30 ((Resources Permitting)).

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: Other (Continuous Assessment).

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their aptitude for research in the field of sustainable eneergy.

Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with Supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Carry out a focused literature review.
· Acquire and analyze relevant data for an energy research topic.
· Demonstrate investigative research skills in sustainable energy.
· Undertake a preliminary research project in sustainable energy.
· Prepare and deliver a structured research report in a timely manner.
· Prepare and deliver a research seminar presentation.
· Discuss and defend research approach, results and limitations.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 170 marks (Written Report 170 marks); Oral Assessment 30 marks (Oral Assessment 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Seminar.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. No supplemental Examination.

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EE6003 Dissertation in Sustainable Energy

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s):

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): EE5002

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: Other (Project Work).

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge to a substantial sustainable energy problem requiring analytical and/or design and /or experimental effort.

Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Carry out a sustainable energy research project
· Acquire and analyze relevant energy data for research topic
· Demonstrate investigative research skills
· Undertake a detailed research project in sustainable energy
· Prepare and deliver a dissertation in sustainable energy
· Prepare and deliver a research seminar presentation
· Discuss and defend research approach, results and limitations.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation Report (which must be submitted on a date in September as specified by the Department): 525 Marks; Seminar Assessment: 75 Marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. No Supplemental Examination.

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EE6006 VLSI Digital Signal Processing

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the principles of VLSI digital signal processing

Module Content: Algorithims: filtering (including FIR and IIR) and Spectral Analysis.
Architectures: Pipelining, Parallel Processing, retiming, Systolic Architectures (Synchronous), Asynchronous.
Arithmetic Functions: Adders and Multipliers, number representation and redundant arithmetic.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Design a Digital Filter
· Estimate the Spectrum of a signal
· Design a VLSI Architecture to implement a Digital Filer and a spectral estimator
· Design the arithmetic units required for digital signal processing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks (End of year written examination 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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EE6019 Research Report

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods:

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Peter Kennedy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their aptitude for research in Electrical & Electronic Engineering.

Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with Supervisor and approved by the Head of Department.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Disseminate/communicate their work through seminar presentations, oral examinations in the presence of an extern.
· Write research reports
· Plan and develop milestones.
· Demonstrate their aptitude for research in electrical and electronic engineering.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Interim report 100 marks, Final report 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students failing this module must repeat it as prescribed by the Department.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing this module must repeat it as prescribed by the Departament.). Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EE6020 Optical Detectors

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): UE2003 or similar

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals (Design Exercises).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce a variety of semiconductor optical detectors and their applications.

Module Content: Optical absorption in semiconductors. Carrier transport. The physics of p-n and Schottky junctions. Design of photodiodes, including MSM, p-n, and p-i-n photodiodes. Design of high-speed detectors. Carrier impact ionization, noise, multiplication gain and avalanche photodiodes. Geiger-mode devices for photon counting applications. Characterisation of optical detectors. Detector circuits and applications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the physical principles and operating mechanisms for a wide variety of semiconductor detectors;
· Match a particular detector to an application requirement;
· Design a p-i-n photodiode optimized for speed and response;
· Physically characterize a photodiode electrically and optically;
· Design appropriate support circuitry for the reliable operation of detector devices;
· Knowledgably describe photodiode operation from material selection, device parameter optimization, fabrication process, characterization and test, circuit design and application.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks (End of Module written exam); Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Continuous Assessment (Design Exercises 30; Experiments 10)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Module Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2013.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EE6021 Industrial Placement

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3. (Summer months).

No. of Students: Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (Project Work).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Peter Kennedy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the world of industry and broaden their engineering experience by assisting students in obtaining a work placement in a commercial organisation or research institute.

Module Content: Developing job search and transferable skills. Internship or placement in an enterprise relevant to Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Work in a commercial organisation or research institute, relevant to Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
· Develop career planning and transferable skills such as report writing and presentation skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Interim Report 100 marks, Final Report 500 marks) ).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EE6022 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s):

No. of Students: Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): EE6019

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (Project Work).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Michael Peter Kennedy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (Dept. Electrical & Electronic Engineering).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge to a substantial design problem requiring analytical and/or design and/or experimental effort.

Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with supervisor and approved by the Head of Department.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Write a minor thesis.
· Plan and develop milestones.
· Research and implement within a chosen theme.
· Pursue project work in a research environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Interim Report 100 marks, Dissertation 500 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EE6055 Photodetectors and Photodetection

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce and develop the basic ideas of semiconductor photodetectors, photomultipliers, solar cells and their applications.

Module Content: Optical absorption in semiconductors. Carrier transport. Physics of p-n junctions. Design of photodiodes, including MSM, p-n, and p-i-n photodiodes. Carrier impact ionization, noise, multiplication gain and avalanche photodiodes. Geiger-mode devices for photon counting, including photomultiplier tubes, microchannel plates and semiconductor photon counters. Imaging detector devices such as charge-coupled devices and APD arrays. Photodetection techniques, such as direct and coherent detection; balanced detectors. Solar cell structures and principles of operation. Infra-red and thermal detectors. Detector circuits and applications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the physical principals and operating mechanisms for a wide variety of semiconductor detectors.
· Distinguish between various detector types and have an understanding of the selection criteria for matching a particular detector to an application requirement.
· Design a p-i-n photodiode optimized for speed and response.
· Physically characterize a photodiode electrically and optically, including measuring the gain of an APD and the performance of Geiger-mode devices.
· Appreciate the design of support circuitry for the reliable operation of detector devices.
· Knowledgably describe photodiode operation from material selection, device parameter optimization, fabrication process, characterization and test, circuit design and application.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (in-term assigned work, midterm exam and laboratories).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Laboratories; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must obtain at least 40% in each of the End of Year Written Examination and Continuous Assessment components of the Examination. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (ie A pass mark is achieved in the Continuous Assessment portion), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks in in-term Lab Work; Homework Assignments, labs etc.).

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EE6101 Advanced Analogue and Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuit Design

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Domenico Zito, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Prof Michael Peter Kennedy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Domenico Zito, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: Principles of advanced analogue and mixed-signal IC design.

Module Content: Design of analogue and mixed-signal ICs in CMOS and BiCMOS technologies; noise in devices and circuits; voltage and current references; Gm/C filters; sample and hold circuits; switched capacitor filters. Design of precision data converter (ADC and DAC) blocks in CMOS and BiCMOS technologies; Successive Approximation; Flash converters; Pipeline and folded pipeline converters; Sigma Delta low pass data converters.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Perform noise analysis on circuits containing resistors, inductors, capacitors, diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers;
· Design analog and mixed-signals integrated circuits with optimized performance;
· Analyse sample-and-hold circuits, taking into account non-idealities;
· Design bipolar and MOS circuits for bandgap references;
· Perform the spectral transformations in a typical signal processing chain resulting from anti-alias filtering, sampling, analog-to-digital conversion up- and down-sampling, digital-to-analog conversion, and reconstruction filtering;
· Use the bilinear transform to design first- and second-order discrete time filters;
· Model and analyse switched-capacitor circuits in the time and z-domains;
· Analyse and design digital to analog converters;
· Analyse and design analog to digital converters.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Assignments 2 x 30 marks and In-Class Written Examination 1 x 140 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (3hr written examination to be organised by the Department).

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EE6102 Advanced Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuit Design

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): EE6101 Advanced Analogue and Mixed-Signal IC Design

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Domenico Zito, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (Dept. Electrical & Electronic Engineering).

Lecturer(s): Prof Michael Peter Kennedy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Dept. Electrical & Electronic Engineering; Dr Domenico Zito, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Dept. Electrical & Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To study the principles of advanced RFIC design in silicon technology.

Module Content: Design of radiofrequency transceivers in CMOS and BiCMOS technologies for wireless applications. Wireless applications; transceiver architectures; systems and circuits design challenges; system and circuit specifications; design constraints and technology limitations; circuit topologies and design techniques for the main building blocks and subsystems. Low Noise Amplifiers, Voltage Controlled Oscillators, Mixers, Power Amplifiers. PLL theory and stability analysis; single loop PLL: analysis and design, high frequency prescalers and dual modulus prescalers, phase detectors, charge pumps, loop filters, VCOs, sideband noise spurs and harmonics; fractional-N synthesizers; direct digital synthesis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and analyze the main challenges at system and circuit levels for the implementation of radiofrequency transceivers and their building blocks in silicon technology;
· Design the building blocks of radiofrequency transceivers for wireless applications by means of advanced circuit topologies and design techniques;
· Analyse and design phase-locked loops and frequency synthesizers.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Assignments 2 x 30 marks and In-Class Written Examination 1 x 140 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (3hr written examination to be organised by the Department).

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EE6103 Advanced VLSI Architectures

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emanuel Popovici, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Emanuel Popovici, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach the principles of Advanced Digital VLSI Design through applications in VLSI Digital Signal Processing.

Module Content: Algorithms: filtering (including FIR and IIR) and Spectral Analysis. Architectures: Pipelining, Parallel Processing, retiming, Systolic Architectures (Synchronous), Asynchronous. Arithmetic Functions: Adders and Multipliers, number representation and redundant arithmetic. Advanced Digital Signal Processing, System Level Design Flow, Hardware-software co-design, Power optimization for hardware-software systems, Systems on a Chip(SoC), Networks on a Chip(NoC), 3D-IC and Field Programmable systems(FPSoC), VHDL for Synthesis and Verification.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Design a Digital Filter;
· Estimate the Spectrum of a signal;
· Design a VLSI Architecture to implement a Digital Filer and a spectral estimator;
· Explain the importance and challenges of designing digital systems;
· Describe an embedded(hardware-software) system design flow from specification to physical realization;
· Estimate the cost and the performance of a hardware-software system(timing, power consumption);
· Define a SoC, NoC, FPSoC.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Assignments 3 x 20 marks and In-Class Written Examinations 2x70 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((1 x 3hr written examination to be organised by the Department.).

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EE6104 Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Emanuel Popovici, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Emanuel Popovici, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To allow students to utilize the knowledge of fundamental concepts of transduction principles and mathematical, signal processing, system level design, networking and communications for the design of intelligent sensors and wireless sensor networks. A particular emphasis on wireless sensor networks/body area networks provides the students with a fundamental insight and experimental appreciation of various applications.

Module Content: Sensor types and transduction principles; Sensor performance characteristics: static and dynamic; Analysis of measurement system errors; Description and analysis of linearization, calibration and compensation techniques for sensor improvement; Model-based methods for derived quantities, using observers and Kalman filtering; Detailed application to selected sensors; Wireless Sensor Platforms;
Network Topologies in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and Body Area Networks; Communication Protocols; Power Analysis and Optimisation; Energy Harvesting; Applications and requirements of WSNs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Specify and evaluate types of sensors based on their fundamental characteristics;
· Implement linearization, calibration and compensation techniques for sensors;
· Design a sensor system for a specific application;
· Describe a wireless sensor platform;
· Account for power and energy constraints when specifying hardware for accurate, reliable sensing;
· Design a wireless sensor network for a specific application.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Assignments 3 x 20 marks and In-Class Written Examinations 2 x 70 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 3hr written examination to be organised by the Department.).

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EE6105 Wireless Communications

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): EE4004 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Colin Murphy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To study the principles of advanced modern digital telecommunication systems.

Module Content: Spectral analysis of data signals, performance of single symbol transmission and detection via coherent and noncoherent demodulation, multiuser/multicarrier transmission systems, Reed-Solomon error control codes, architecture and operation of modern cellular wireless networks, operation of wireless Local Area Networks and wireless Personal Area Networks.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Calculate the power spectral density and bandwidth requirements of coded modulations;
· Quantify the reliability of single symbol detection for popular M-ary modulations and simplex signalling in Gaussian noise (coherent demodulation) and slow, nonselective Rayleigh fading channels (noncoherent demodulation);
· Describe and analyse such contemporary multicarrier/multiuser systems as orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), frequency hopping/direct sequence spread spectrum and code division multiple access (CDMA);
· Use Reed-Solomon encoding and decoding techniques to protect data against transmission errors;
· Describe the operation of modern cellular communications systems;
· Analyse at a block level transceiver systems for cellular communications such as 2G/3G and LTE;


· Outline and analyse at a block level communications systems for wireless Local Area Networks such as the IEEE 802.11 family;
· Describe and analyse the operation of Personal Area Network systems such as ZigBee.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 200 marks (End of Year Written Examination 200 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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EE6106 Robotics and Mechatronics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Guangbo Hao, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Richard Kavanagh, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide the student with theoretical and practical knowledge and practice on serial robotics (kinematics and dynamics), mobile robotics, the corresponding mechanisms, including parallel mechanisms and compliant mechanisms and manipulators, thereby simultaneously providing examples of mechatronic systems.

Module Content: Serial robotics: Basic Configurations; Spatial descriptions and
transformations; Mobile robotics; Forward and inverse kinematics, Jacobians; Trajectory following; Robotic dynamics; Robotic parallel mechanisms (closed-loop mechanisms) and compliant/flexure mechanisms and manipulators; DOF and kinematics of parallel mechanisms; Kineto-static and dynamic modelling of compliant mechanisms; Mechatronics: Outline of mechanical, electrical actuation sensor and software elements of mechatronic components; Contromechanics with examples.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyze a wide variety of previously unseen robotic structures, including frame assignment and forward kinematic analysis, principally for the purpose of hand matrix derivation;
· Develop inverse kinematic equations and perform numerical solutions of inverse kinematics problems for robotic structures;
· Formulate interpolation-based strategies for trajectory generation for robots and other automation and servo-based systems;
· Design strategies for the control of a mobile robot;
· Using exemplar products, evaluate the procedures involved in the design of mechatronic products;
· Identify various types of robotic mechanisms including parallel mechanisms and compliant mechanisms, and calculate their DOF;
· Derive the kinematic and dynamic equations of rigid-body robots;
· Develop kineto-static (load-displacement) and dynamic equations of compliant mechanisms;
· Complete two robotics projects, both utilizing appropriate software, and requiring problem solving and report writing skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ((Assignments 3 x 20 marks and In-Class Written Examinations 2 x 70 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((1 x 3hr written examination to be organised by the Department).).

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EE6107 Advanced Power Electronics & Electric Drives

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To study advanced power electronics and electric drives.

Module Content: Power Semiconductors (silicon and wide-bandgap devices). Power converter circuits (switch-mode and resonant). Control of a power supply (voltage and current modes). High-frequency Magnetic devices, d-q modeling of converters and machines (squirrel-cage and wound-field induction machines, synchronous wound-field and permanent-magnet machines). Computer simulation: PSPICE, Matlab-Simulink, Mathematica.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyze, solve, design, and model components, circuits, and systems for power electronics and electric drives.
· Analyse, model, control and design power electronics converters and specify circuit components based on converter requirements.
· Analyse, model and control an electric drive system.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Assignments 3 x 20 marks and In-Class Written Examinations 2x70 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 3hr written examination to be organised by the Department).

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EE6108 Optoelectronics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): UE2003 or similar

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Professor Peter James Parbrook, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce a variety of semiconductor optoelectronic devices and their applications.

Module Content: Review of basic semiconductor physics leading to understanding of the diode equation. Optical processes in semiconductors. Design of photodetectors, including photoconductors, MSM, p-n, and p-i-n photodiodes. Design of high-speed detectors. Carrier impact ionization, noise, multiplication gain and avalanche photodiodes. Geiger-mode devices for photon counting applications. Characterisation of optical detectors. Detector circuits and applications. Design of light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, modulators, switches and amplifiers. Device parameters and figures of merit. Applications in lighting, communications and sensing. Practical device fabrication. Introduction to optoelectronic integrated circuits and their applications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the physical principles and operating mechanisms for a variety of semiconductor devices;
· Match a particular optoelectronic device to an application requirement;
· Design a p-i-n photodiode optimized for speed and response;
· Design a laser for frequency stability;
· Design a LED for maximum extraction efficiency;
· Physically characterize an optoelectronic device, both electrically and optically;
· Design appropriate circuits for the reliable operation of optoelectronic devices;
· Knowledgably describe optoelectronic device operation from material selection, parameter optimization, fabrication process, characterization and test, circuit design and application.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Assignments 3 x 20 marks and In-Class Written Examinations 2 x 70 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((1 x 3hr written examination to be organised by the Department).).

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EE6109 Adaptive Signal Processing & Advanced Control

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gordon Lightbody, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr Gordon Lightbody, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To develop relevant skills in adaptive signal processing and control, optimal filtering, control and estimation and nonlinear systems.

Module Content: Stochastic Processes, Optimal Filtering, Spectral Estimation, Adaptive Filtering, Optimal Control, Kalman Filtering, Model Based Predictive Control. Nonlinear Control, Describing Functions, Stability of Nonlinear Systems, Lyapunov Stability Theory, Model Reference Adaptive Controllers.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Design an optimum digital filter and implement it as a FIR Wiener Filter;
· Estimate the spectrum of a random process through parametric and non-parametric methods;
· Design an Adaptive FIR filter using the LMS algorithm;
· Understand the theory of optimal control and estimation;
· Build both unconstrained and constrained, model based, receding horizon, predictive controllers;
· Predict and analyse limit cycles for nonlinear systems;
· Shape the dynamics of basic switched control systems;
· Analyse the stability of a nonlinear system using Lyapunov stability theory;
· Design a stable model reference adaptive controller using Lyapunov theory.In the design exercise, students learn how to use Matlab and Simulink for the design and testing of a controller for a realistic case-study system.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks (End of year written examination); Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Assignments 2x20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) (3hr written examination.) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 3hr written examination to be organised by the Department).

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EE6163 Telecommunications for Electronic Business

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kevin McCarthy, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Dr William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide students with knowledge of telecommunications technologies that support electronic business systems.

Module Content: Data Networks including Local Area Networks and Wide Area Networks, the ISO 7-layer model, Internet Protocol and World Wide Web, Mobile Networks for voice and data. Cryptography as used in Secure Sockets Layer including encryption algorithms, key exchange, authentication and digital signature.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the operation of basic electronic communications networks
· Review information relating to communications technologies for e-business applications.
· Participate in telecommunications technology choices for e-business applications.
· Consider potential weaknesses of security measures for internet and mobile business transactions.
· Choose appropriate security measures for electronic transactions based on the strengths and knowledge of the different techniques.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 50 marks (Written Examination); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Continuous Assessment with two assignments of 25 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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