Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

ZY2000 Vertebrate Diversity
ZY2005 Invertebrate Diversity
ZY2006 Vertebrate Diversity 2
ZY2007 Practical Invertebrate Skills
ZY3015 Advanced Vertebrate Biology
ZY3019 Adaptations to Extreme Environments
ZY3020 Animal Behaviour
ZY4016 Biology of Marine Mammals
ZY4020 Temperate Marine Biology
ZY4021 Evolutionary Ecology

ZY2000 Vertebrate Diversity

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the taxonomic, morphological and functional diversity of vertebrates, covering fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Module Content: An introduction to the taxonomy and systematics of major vertebrate groups and the comparative processes which govern morphology, adaptations, biology and ecology. Topics include the origin of vertebrates; evolution of major vertebrate groups; present day diversity; animal function (locomotion, respiration, reproduction, feeding and digestion).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Classify animals within the major groups.
Describe body form within each class of vertebrate.
Recall the key aspects of the biology of each group and how they are adapted to particular environments.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

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ZY2005 Invertebrate Diversity

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 90.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 1.5hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To provide an in-depth theoretical knowledge of selected invertebrate animal groups.

Module Content: This module provides the opportunity for an in-depth study of selected invertebrate animal groups, including relating structure to function.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Recall the key morphological characteristics of each of the invertebrate groups covered and be able to distinguish between them.
Appraise the structure to function relationship within and between each group.
Integrate this knowledge into understanding the evolutionary history of each of the invertebrate groups.
Integrate directed reading with lecture information into a scientifically written essay.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks ( Essay 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences.).

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ZY2006 Vertebrate Diversity 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): ZY2000

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 10hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the taxonomic, functional and morphological diversity of vertebrates, covering fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Module Content: Lab based work, based on museum collection, video material, examine in detail vertebrate groups. The module will focus on the morphology and adaptation to the environment of the major vertebrate groups.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify and classify animals within the major groups.
Describe body form, morphological adaptations within each class of vertebrate.
Produce scientific illustrations showing adaptive features.
Produce scientific poster or video on a relevant topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (MCQ/Practical exam (50 marks); Lab notebook (25 marks); video project or poster (25 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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ZY2007 Practical Invertebrate Skills (Last updated 08/11/2016)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): ZY2005

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 2 x .5day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To provide an in-depth practical knowledge of selected invertebrate animal groups.

Module Content: This module provides the opportunity to gain necessary practical skills in identification and morphology of selected invertebrate animal groups, including relating structure to function.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Recall the key morphological characteristics of each of the invertebrate groups covered and be able to distinguish between them.
Appraise the structure to function relationship within and between each group.
Develop skills in invertebrate identification using taxonomic keys.
Develop skills in the use of microscopy for identification of different invertebrate groups.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In class test (40 marks); 2 dissection reports (10 marks each); Invertebrate portfolio (40 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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ZY3015 Advanced Vertebrate Biology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): ZY2000

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: The aim of the module is to further advance students knowledge of the taxonomy diversity, origins, evolutionary history and biology of selected vertebrate groups

Module Content: An in-depth look at the taxonomy and systematics of selected vertebrate groups and the comparative processes which govern morphology, adaptations, biology and ecology. Topics include evolution of major vertebrate groups, taxonomic diversity, cranial morphology and life history parameters.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Classify animals within the selected groups
Discuss and describe form, adaptations and biology within the vertebrate groups
Perform dissections of selected animals
Describe and compare mammalian skulls
Produce scientific illustrations showing adaptive features.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (3 In class practical reports (7 marks each); Research seminar (9 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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ZY3019 Adaptations to Extreme Environments

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 2 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To study the adaptations of vertebrate and invertebrate animals from a range of habitats.

Module Content: This module will examine the different types of adaptations of animals, in response to extreme environments.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the key components of the various physiological processes
Analyse how different animal groups have adapted these various processes to different environmental habitats
Interpret and synthesise current scientific literature on these adaptations into a literature review format
Integrate directed reading with lecture information to present an individual seminar.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Essay 20 marks; Individual Seminar 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Seminar marks are carried forward whether passed or failed).

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ZY3020 Animal Behaviour

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 90.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6hr(s) Fieldwork; 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ruth Ramsay, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ruth Ramsay, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To illustrate the range of behaviours in invertebrates and vertebrates and explore a number of basic concepts in animal behaviour.

Module Content: Animal behaviour covers a wide range of areas but this module will concentrate on a number of the more important ones, using examples to illustrate the ideas drawn from both invertebrates and vertebrates. Topics include: recording and measuring behaviour, mechanisms of behaviour, cognition, optimal foraging, sexual selection, kin selection and eusociality, communication and mimicry. The fieldwork practical will be conducted in Fota Wildlife Park.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Define the key concepts in the study of animal behaviour
Identify the range of behaviours in invertebrates and vertebrates
Integrate directed reading with lecture information
Demonstrate an ability to record animal behaviour
Construct an ethogram for an individual species
Describe, quantify and interpret specific animal behaviours.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practical report (15 marks); Short question exam (15 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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ZY4016 Biology of Marine Mammals

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): ZY3015

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the biology of marine mammals (whales, seals, sea lions, manatees, polar bears).

Module Content: Topics covered include the evolution, behaviour, ecology and management of marine mammals. Detailed consideration is given to adaptations (anatomical and physiological) that allow mammals to live in the sea.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe in detail physiological and behavioural adaptations of marine mammals to the environment
Compare and contrast how the various taxa have tackled life in sea water
Describe and compare mammalian skulls
Assess reproductive status and age, and carry out diet analysis in marine mammals
Critique marine mammal related research papers
Construct a research proposal addressing a set hypothesis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks ( Research Proposal (30 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Resubmission of revised reports, as prescribed by the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences.).

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ZY4020 Temperate Marine Biology

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 33.

Pre-requisite(s): BL3001, AE3016

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1day(s) Fieldwork (Minimum 9 hours per day); 9 x 1hr(s) Lectures (during residential fieldcourse).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: This module will be a week-long residential fieldcourse. This module will build on previous knowledge gained at 2nd and 3rd Year and provide students with the opportunity for in depth study of a range of marine habitats.

Module Content: The course will examine the fauna and flora of rocky shores, sandy shores and subtidal habitats. Students will gain an understanding of the key processes influencing life in these intertidal and subtidal habitats. In addition the students will gain experience of identifying larval stages, plankton and meiofauna. Furthermore, the students will design and undertake a short project at the end of the course utilising their experience in one of the habitats to gain experience of project design and analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify key organisms from intertidal rocky and sandy shores as well as subtidal habitats.
Demonstrate the use of taxonomic keys to identify marine fauna and flora.
Outline a range of marine biological sampling techniques.
Recall key processes influencing marine life in these intertidal and subtidal habitats.
Design, conduct and analyse their own short research projects.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Two Practical Reports @ 50 marks each; Identification test 40 marks; Project write up 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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ZY4021 Evolutionary Ecology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Reed, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas Reed, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Module Objective: To provide insight into key principles and concepts in evolutionary ecology and behavioural ecology, to equip students with critical thinking skills and to provide a broad overview of classical and current topics in this discipline.

Module Content: Topics include: Hierarchical variation and scaling in biology, adaptation and levels of selection, game theory, life history evolution, population dynamics, predation, phenotypic plasticity, parental care, sexual conflict, animal personalities and cognition, kin selection and eusociality, coevolution and community ecology, modelling, gene-culture co-evolution, evolutionary applications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Define key concepts in evolutionary ecology..
Apply these general concepts to different species and ecological circumstances.
Integrate directed reading with lecture information.
Display critical thinking skills and an appreciation for hypothesis testing and making predictions.
Describe the range of techniques used by evolutionary ecologists to answer key questions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (One Practical report, 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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