Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

SS1006 Social Analysis and Child Care Policy I
SS1008 Social Inclusion and Health Policy
SS1012 Social Practice and the Social Professions
SS1015 Social Policy and Society Part 1
SS1016 Social Policy and Society Part 2
SS1017 Politics and Social Policy (Part 1)
SS1018 Politics and Social Policy (Part 2)
SS1101 Introduction to Youth and Community Work
SS1102 Social Analysis
SS1104 Principles and Practice of Youth and Community Work
SS1105 Introduction to Social Policy
SS1107 Placement I
SS1108 Introduction to Information Technology
SS1109 Informal / Non-Formal Learning in a Community Youth Work Setting
SS1202 Introduction to Social Work Theory, Methods and Skills
SS1302 Social Policy Analysis
SS2003 Social Services and Welfare: Policy and Practice
SS2004 Personal Lives and Family Policy
SS2006 Child Care Policy
SS2007 Penal Policy and Practice
SS2008 Social Work 1
SS2012 Research Methods
SS2018 Politics and Social Policy II
SS2021 Critical Perspectives on Irish Health Policy
SS2024 Fieldwork Placement
SS2025 The Politics of Health and Medicine
SS2026 Special Education and Disability: Principles, Policies and Practices
SS2027 Childcare Placement and Preparation
SS2028 Social Justice and Mental Health: Combating Discrimination, Labelling and Stigma
SS2030 Conflict Transformation and Peace Building
SS2101 Communications and Community Youth Work
SS2102 Working with Individuals in a Community Youth Work Setting
SS2103 Working with Groups in a Community Youth Work Setting
SS2104 Social Analysis II
SS2105 Social Policy II
SS2107 Placement II
SS2108 Introduction to Research Methods
SS2201 Skills Laboratory
SS2208 Child Care Policy
SS2211 Mixed Economy of Welfare and Personal Social Services II
SS2213 Social Work Methods I
SS2214 Social Work Practice Contexts
SS2216 Social Recovery Approaches to Mental Health
SS2217 Social Research
SS2219 Social Policy and Social Work
SS2220 Introduction To Social Work Practice
SS2401 Social Analysis and Child Care Policy II
SS3005 Housing and Homelessness
SS3006 Education and Welfare
SS3008 Poverty and Social Exclusion
SS3009 Communities, Activism and Development
SS3010 Social Science and Social Work
SS3011 Youth Policy and Practice
SS3015 The Politics of Racism
SS3016 Social Perspectives in Mental Health
SS3019 Science, Technology and Public Controversy
SS3021 Sexuality and Society
SS3024 The Politics of Health and Medicine
SS3027 Comparative Social Policy II
SS3030 Fieldwork Placement
SS3031 Social Research Report
SS3032 Politics and Social Policy III
SS3033 Issues in Planning and Sustainable Development
SS3041 The Politics of Health & Medicine
SS3044 Contemporary Social Issues in Midwifery Practice
SS3045 Critical Perspectives on Age and Ageing
SS3102 Law, Rights and Equal Opportunities
SS3104 Reflective Action in Youth and Community Work
SS3105 Social Policy Studies the Position of Minorities
SS3107 Placement III
SS3111 Personal Lives and Family Policy
SS3112 Penal Policy and Practice
SS3113 Research Methods II
SS3118 Community Conflict Transformation and Peace Building
SS3206 Placement I
SS3207 Placement Portfolio
SS3208 Life Courses, Biographies and Reflective Learning
SS3209 Child Care and Protection Practice
SS3210 Deviance, Welfare and Justice
SS3211 Social Work Methods II
SS3212 Social Research Field Study
SS3213 Organisational Evaluation Research Study
SS3401 Social Analysis, Gender and Society
SS3402 Social Research in Early Years and Childhood Studies
SS4000 Science, Technology and Public Controversy
SS4208 Placement II
SS4209 Placement Portfolio
SS4210 Social Research Plan
SS4211 Anti-Racism and Anti-Discriminatory Practice
SS4212 Contemporary Issues in Social Work
SS4214 Action Research Study
SS4215 Social Research Triangulated Study
SS4304 Applied Housing Research
SS4801 Multiculturalism, Gender and Social Policy
SS5016 Social Policy Analysis
SS5017 Policy and Politics
SS5020 Education and Welfare
SS5021 Communities, Activism and Development
SS5022 Social Science and Social Work
SS5023 Youth Policy and Practice
SS5024 The Politics of Racism
SS5025 Social Perspectives in Mental Health
SS5026 Sexuality and Society
SS5027 Introduction to Planning and Sustainable Development
SS5029 Community Conflict Transformation and Peace Building
SS5030 Critical Perspectives on Age and Ageing
SS5317 Social Policy and Social Theory
SS5400 Research Project (H Dip Social Policy)
SS5806 Social Policy and Midwifery Practice
SS6015 Community Development
SS6016 Health and Personal Social Services
SS6017 Critical Social Science Perspectives on Public Health
SS6019 Critical Social Science Perspectives on Public Health
SS6020 Principles and Practice of Youth Work
SS6021 Principles and Practice of Community Arts
SS6022 Youth, Ethics and Welfare
SS6023 Project Planning, Management and Leadership Skills
SS6024 Arts and Social Action
SS6026 Dissertation in Youth Work with Community Arts and Sports Studies
SS6028 Critical Social Science Perspective on Public Health
SS6029 Development Education and Community Arts
SS6030 Practice Placement I
SS6031 Practice Placement II
SS6036 Youth Work: Working with Individuals and Groups
SS6037 Youth Work: Informal and Non-Formal Learning
SS6038 Dissertation in Youth Work
SS6101 Social Work Theory 1: Theory and Practice
SS6102 Human Growth and Development
SS6105 Social Policy and Social Exclusion
SS6106 Applied Social Research
SS6107 Social Work Settings 1
SS6108 Child and Family Welfare I
SS6111 Crime prevention and society: policies, governance and interventions
SS6112 Practice Skills and Fieldwork Placement 1
SS6200 Social Work Theory II: Theory and Practice
SS6201 Child and Family Welfare II
SS6202 Social Work Settings II
SS6205 Practice Project
SS6206 Dissertation in Social Work
SS6207 Practice Skills and Fieldwork Placement II
SS6305 Dissertation in Social Policy
SS6306 Contemporary Social Policy Issues
SS6307 Social research: methodology and ethics
SS6308 Mental Health and Disability
SS6309 Children and Young People
SS6310 Critical Social Policy
SS6311 Conflict Transformation and Peace Building
SS6312 Social Policy Analysis
SS6318 Mental Health and Disability
SS6319 Children and Young People
SS6321 Conflict Transformation and Peace Building
SS6600 Principles, Values and Practice in the Voluntary and Community Sector
SS6602 Applied Social Research in the Voluntary and Community Sector
SS6605 Dissertation in Voluntary and Community Sector Management
SS6606 Social Policy in the Voluntary and Community Sector
SS7000 Civil Society: Concepts, Case Studies and Theories
SS7001 An Introduction to Social Research
SS7002 Philosophies of Social Science
SS7003 Research Methods and Skills 1: Qualitative
SS7004 Social Policy Debates and Processes
SS7005 Research Methods and Skills 2: Quantitative
SS7006 State and Society
SS7007 The Politics of Social Research
SS7008 Designing for Research and Evaluation
SS7102 Research Seminar in Social Policy
SS7104 Social Policy Methods and Methodology I
SS7106 Workshop in Theory and Thesis Construction
SS7107 Social Policy Methods and Methodology II

SS1006 Social Analysis and Child Care Policy I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the main concepts, perspectives and methods used in the study of society.

Module Content: Students will be assisted to think conceptually about the systems and structures of society. They will examine key sociological perspectives including the discourse around childhood.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Present and explain the key concepts and the main perspectives in sociology
· Identify and discuss the significant changes that have shaped modern society and sociological thinking
· Provide an understanding of the process of globalisation and how it has contributed to the uneven development of the global economy
· Discuss the concept of childhood, tracing the origins of childhood in modern society.
· Identify and discuss key theoretical perspectives on childhood with a particular emphasis on the new sociology of childhood
· Analyse research on childhood well-being in the context of childhood diversity
· Examine the discourse on children's rights and citizenship
· Demonstrate an ability to think crtically about social issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 2000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS1008 Social Inclusion and Health Policy (Last updated 09/10/2014)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module is aimed at the developing an awareness of social policy interventions for improving health and wellbeing.

Module Content: Social Policy (20 hours)
This module will provide students with an introduction to key areas of social policy in the delivery of healthcare. A particular focus will be placed on issues relating to welfare, recognition, redistribution, equity, social inclusion, and the relationship between poverty and health. Key concepts such as anti-discrimination, empowerment, advocacy and rights will be explored. Marginalisation with reference to mental health, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, and status will be examined. The social versus medical perspective on disability, and issues relating to social justice will be highlighted with a view to developing awareness, anti-discrimination, and intercultural skills and competency in professional practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain and discuss key issues relating to social policy, social inclusion and health.
· Evaluate health practice and its impact on marginalised social groups.
· Discuss concepts relating to anti-discrimination, oppression, inequality, race/ethnicity, and disability.
· Consider the position of individuals with disabilities within current social policy and assess the impact of social policy on the lives of individuals with disabilities.
· Employ an anti-discriminatory and culturally sensitive approach to professional practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination. Attendance and participation in all timetabled teaching activites.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS1012 Social Practice and the Social Professions

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 110.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 4 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to introduce students to key principles, ethics, values and contexts of social practice and the social professions in Ireland.

Module Content: Principles, ethics and values which apply in a range of social practice contexts including social work, probation, youth work, and community work. The module will also address the policy context and service delivery settings for a variety of social groups including people with disabilities, older people, children and families, and minority ethnic groups.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key principles, ethics and values which apply in social work and other social practice settings.
· Outline the theoretical and policy issues relevant to social work, probation, youth work and community development practice.
· Demonstrate a familarity with the application of the concepts such as equality, social justice, anti discriminatory and anti racist practice in a range of settings.
· Show a knowledge of the range of settings within which Irish social services are delivered.
· Utilise the necessary skills to undertake and complete a learning portfolio.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. This is an applied introductory module with a strong focus on portfolio based learning designed to meet the learning needs of aspiring social professionals and which will underpin placement modules in the second and third years of the degree.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS1015 Social Policy and Society Part 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Shirley Martin, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Shirley Martin, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the main concepts, theories and perspectives underpinning social policy and trace its origins and evolution as a discipline.

Module Content: Definitions of social policy will be explored; the development of Irish Social Policy its history and key concepts will be examined. There will be an emphasis on children throughout. In particular, how key social policy and welfare developments reflect our understanding of childhood and impact on children's lives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise the main concepts, theories and perspectives underpinning the discipline of social policy
· Describe the main features of the Irish Welfare State
· Critically evaluate Irish social policy development since 1922.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x book review (1,000 words) 20 marks, 1 x essay (1,200 words) 70 marks. Attendance at workshops 10 marks. Those attending less then 80% of workshop will forfeit the attendance mark.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at tutorials will be monitored by a class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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SS1016 Social Policy and Society Part 2

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Shirley Martin, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Shirley Martin, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the main concepts, theories and perspectives underpinning social policy and trace its origins and evolution as a discipline.

Module Content: Contemporary themes in social policy will be examined, poverty and inequality and ideological perspectives on welfare explored. There will be an emphasis on children throughout. In particular, how key social policy and welfare developments reflect our understanding of childhood and impact on children's lives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically evaluate Irish social policy development since 1922.
· Recognise the ways in which social inequality can influence equality of access to health, housing and education in Ireland
· Identify and consider the position of children within current social policy and assess the impact of social policy issues on the lives of children
· Evaluate the impact of poverty on the lives of children in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 150 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Group Presentation (40 marks), Attendance at workshops (10 Marks). Those attending less than 80% of workshops will forfeit the attendance mark.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance at tutorials will be monitored by a class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. A pass Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward. Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (t re-submit assignments by the second Friday in August, as prescribed by the Department). Mark for Group Presentation and Attendance at workshops will be carried forward.

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SS1017 Politics and Social Policy (Part 1)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 150.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 12hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mairead Considine, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mairead Considine, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce the basic concepts and theories associated with the study of Social Policy and trace its evolution as a discipline.

Module Content: Defining social policy, history of Irish social policy, social policy formation in Ireland, analysis of core concepts and ideological perspectives of relevance to key welfare debates.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· trace the history of Irish social policy
· outline the influencing factors on the development of social policy
· recognise key social policy concepts and demonstrate their relevance in analysing contemporary social issues.
· demonstrate knowledge of the main social policy concepts studied and the debates associated with them.
· analyse significant welfare and social policy debates in contemporary Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 150 marks (1 x 3 hours); Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Continuous Assessment 1 x 1000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. as prescribed by the School.

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SS1018 Politics and Social Policy (Part 2)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 150.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 16 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mairead Considine, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mairead Considine, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Fiona Dukelow, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce and develop a critical analysis of various aspects of the Irish welfare state

Module Content: Social policy and the Irish welfare state; education policy, health policy, housing policy and social protection policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· describe the main features of the education, health, housing and social protection systems in Ireland
· analyse poverty, inequality and social exclusion with reference to relevant policy issues
· Critically explore key policy issues related to welfare and social services in Ireland
· Comprehensively examine and present on a selected social policy topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word social policy report/presentation (50 marks) 1 x 1,500 assignment (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS1101 Introduction to Youth and Community Work

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 50 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (50hrs Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael O'Haodain, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the background of Youth and Community Work, as well as its social, economic and cultural contexts and the philosophies and practices underpinning it.

Module Content: Historical development of youth work; voluntary, school-based and non-school based provision; social issues; unemployment; poverty; economic growth/decline; gender inequities, sexual activity among young people. Foundation of community work practice in Ireland; changing economic, social and cultural circumstances and the shaping of people's view of community and community activism. Concept of community as a source of locality; co-operation, new communities, neighbourhood centres, power bases, social institutions; community associations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Trace the historical origins of youth and community work.
· Describe the changing economic, social and cultural context for the work.
· Identify and discuss the key values and theoretical perspectives which underpin the practice.
· Outline the main models of youth and community work and evaluate their potential to address contemporary challenges within communities.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500-3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS1102 Social Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 50 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (47hrs Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies, Period 1; Dr Fiona Dukelow, Department of Applied Social Studies, Period 2.

Module Objective: To examine the main concepts, perspectives and methods used in the study of society.

Module Content: Students will be assisted to think conceptually about the systems and structures of society. They will examine how sociological analysis throws light on the social institutions and processes within contemporary society. This module examines the nature of sociology, and the nature and consequences of industrialisation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the major theoretical perspectives through which society can be studied and understood.
· Critically assess and compare the ideas of Durkheim, Marx, Weber and other theorists and theoretical perspectives on society including Functionalism and Postmodernity, throughout the 20th and the early part of the 21st centuries.
· Describe and evaluate contrasting theoretical perspectives on power, ideology and equality, and assess their relevance for youth and community work practice.
· Recognise the fundamentally contested status of key concepts in the social sciences, including, masculinity/femininity, gender, race, ethnicity, and evaluate the merits of alternative theorizations of those concepts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500-3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS1104 Principles and Practice of Youth and Community Work

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 50 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (50hrs Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Catherine Forde, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide opportunities for students to reflect upon the values and assumptions of their own practice as youth and community workers.

Module Content: Addresses the nature and purpose of youth and community work practice, especially the role of the youth and community worker as educator with youth and community groups. Illustrations of the role of youth and community workers will be drawn by examining approaches to community development and exploring the origins of educational initiatives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and evaluate key definitions of "youth work" and "community work".
· Identify the principles and values that underlie youth and community work.
· Construct a reflective template that incorporates models of youth work, community work and applied intervention theory that will allow for effective deconstruction of practice and the integration of theory into their roles as practitioners within the context of an agency.
· Identify and address key current issues in youth and community work practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4000 - 5000 word Portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Portfolio, he/she must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS1105 Introduction to Social Policy

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (72hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Nicola Maxwell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of social policy and the historical processes that have contributed to the formation of modern Ireland.

Module Content: Impact of social policy developments, e.g. housing policy and its effects on the growth decline of local communities. The structures and processes of government in Ireland, with reference to the Irish Modernisation project. The nature of social policy and the social divisions of welfare; social policy, justice and equality. Structure and scope of the main social services. Delivery of social services in Ireland.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the main features of Irish social policy and social services and the historical influences on their development.
· Define the main theoretical concepts, ideas and models in social policy.
· Differentiate between different welfare systems in different countries, and identify the main features of differentiation and similarity between the Irish welfare system and others.
· Debate and analyse the causes of major contemporary social issues including crime, poverty, educational disadvantage, health inequalities and homelssness.
· Critically evaluate different social policies designed to address a range of different social needs including housing, education, health and welfare.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2500 - 3000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS1107 Placement I

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (1,000hrs).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Cindy O'Shea, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop the students' professional practice in an agency placement setting.

Module Content: This module seeks to afford students the opportunity of identifying their own training needs and exercise theoretical learning and skills development - through praxis - within a field work environment. This takes place on an on-going basis throughout the academic year.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an ability to work effectively within the confines of an agency/team structure.
· Locate theory within their practice.
· Develop effective methods of recording their practice.
· Make effective use of skills within the context of the agency/service.
· Have developed a basis for professional practice within the context of Youth and Community Work.
· Have a basic knowledge of service delivery and structures within the Youth and Community Work sector.

Assessment: Submission of Report to Practice Assessment Board.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at Placement Agency and submission of work for assessment on due dates.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Opportunity to repeat Professional Practice once only (125hrs duration, 4-8 wks). This will be reviewed periodically from halfway to assess whether student can continue). If repeat Placement is failed the student must withdraw from the programme.

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SS1108 Introduction to Information Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (40hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael O'Haodain, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To offer students the opportunity to explore technological developments within the profession, and further develop their communication skills through new technologies.

Module Content: Information technology: computer hardware, software; LANs and WAN; network management; databases; word processing packages. Communications technology: fax; telephone; conference facilities; Aertel; computer post. Computer technology skills: keyboard skills; word processing skills; data retrieval; information from databases; basic desk-top publishing. Training technologies skills: overhead projectors; slide projectors; video equipment; printing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Interact effectively with a range of information technology including computer hardware and software, word processing and databases.
· Work with a range of communications technology including the Internet and electronic mail.
· Make relatively skilled use of various computer technology including keyboards, word processing, databases, data storage and retrieval, and basic desktop publishing.
· Make appropriate use of training and presentation aids including Powerpoint, Multimedia sources and printing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Computer Practical Assessment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Computer Practical Assessment, he/she must submit alternative).

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SS1109 Informal / Non-Formal Learning in a Community Youth Work Setting

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Directed Study 75hrs Self-directed Learning & Practice placement skills.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies; Mr David O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the concepts and potentialities of informal / non-formal learning within a community youth work setting.

Module Content: Students are introduced to the key philosophies underpinning non-formal learning within a community youth work setting and is designed to develop the student's knowledge and skills in this context. The module places particular emphasis on 'communication' as a means of promoting informal learning and engaging effectively with young people and communities. Opportunities taken from Agency Placement settings are utilised to draw upon 'real-life' scenarios. There is an emphasis on critical reflection which seeks to locate information learning with in the wider social dilemmas and issues of power relations; ethics; gender exclusion; sexuality; race and social class.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· recognise how social theories can underpin informal learning when applied in a social sciences context and therefore generate different kinds of knowledge.
· understand the key concept of communication / conversation / dialogue within informal learning perspectives.
· identify / reflect upon the key concepts of Professionalism; Friendship and Boundaries and discuss the strengths and limitations of these in an informal learning setting.
· Show an appreciation of the significance of ethical issues in the conduct of workers engaged in sensitive worker / client inter-face communication.
· Formulate a set of critical and reflective practice skills requiring self-awareness and accountability for inverventions in the lives of others.
· Display an understanding of young people's physical and psychological 'Transitional Space'.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 5000 word Skills / Practice based project Assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((If a student fails or does not submit the project assignment, he/she must submit an alternative assignment, as perscribed by the School).).

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SS1202 Introduction to Social Work Theory, Methods and Skills

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48hr(s) Lectures; 12hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alastair Christie, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce social work as an academic subject: the theoretical perspectives and academic skills of social work study.

Module Content: Conceptual foundations of social work. The development of skills of research and academic writing in a social work context. The use of theoretical frameworks and research evidence from the social science disciplines to assess social work policy and practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· o define the role of social work in a range of different practice contexts;
· o recognise the importance of specified knowledge, skills and values in social work;
· o critically examine social work methods;
· o apply social work methods to case scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay (50 marks) and 1 x 1,500 word case study (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS1302 Social Policy Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Dukelow, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Dukelow, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to aspects of the discipline of Social Policy.

Module Content: The course content offers students an opportunity to explore the origins and evolution of social policy, to acquire an understanding of the basic concepts, theories and ideological perspectives underpinning the discipline, and to develop policy analysis skills. The development of Irish social policy and social services will also be critically appraised in the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define social policy
· Identify the key underlying principles of social policy.
· Discuss and recognise key welfare ideologies.
· Identify major developments in the evolution of the modern welfare state.
· Critically evaluate Irish social policy development since 1922.
· Understand the core social services areas and critique contemporary policy debates of relevance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS2003 Social Services and Welfare: Policy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To familiarise students with the key concepts associated with the structures for and delivery of personal social services.

Module Content: Organisation and delivery of personal social services including Statutory, Voluntary, Private and Informal models of care and their relationship; Citizenship and Client participation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· define the personal social services
· analyse the provision and delivery of personal social services
· define the concept of the mixed economy of welfare
· discuss the role of the statutory, voluntary and informal bodies in the development of personal social services
· discuss developments in Ireland's Health Strategy with regard to the development of personal social services
· discuss and analyse debates on care.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS2004 Personal Lives and Family Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jacqui O'Riordan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide a social policy perspective on a range of issues which impact upon family life.

Module Content: Definitions and Ideologies of Family; Changing Family Structures and Personal Lives; Reproduction Issues; Sexuality; Strategies for Policy Change in family and personal lives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and discuss major theories on the family
· Outline and engage in an analysis of central developments in family life in Ireland
· Be conversant with major policy developments relating to family in Ireland
· Have an understanding of the diversity of family forms in contemporary society and have an ability to critically discuss them.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay / assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to submit and pass the essay,.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2006 Child Care Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 13 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide an analysis of the Irish child care system within the context of international developments in children's rights.

Module Content: The concept of childhood; Child care and the risk society; Prevention/family support services; Alternative care; Juvenile Justice system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine the social constructions of childhood.
· Identify and discuss concepts of well-being and the whole child perspective.
· Assess children's rights and citizenship including the UNCRC and children's Constitutional rights in Ireland.
· Discuss family support: conepts and models of intervention with a specific focus on the role of early childhood care and education.
· Examine child proection and welfare systems and policy.
· Analysis of the situation of 'looked after children'.
· Discuss and evaluate the apporaches to juvenille justice with a specific focus on the Children's Act, 2001.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay / assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to submit and pass the essay/assignment.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2007 Penal Policy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Elizabeth Kiely, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To analyse historic and contemporary penal policies and practices.

Module Content: Analysing penal strategies - historic and theoretical perspectives. Philosophies and current trends in Irish penal policy, principles and practices of juvenile justice, sexual offences and the criminal justice system, community and the Politics of crime prevention.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· utilise theory to explain key developments in penal policies and interventions over time
· identify and discuss the merits and demerits of different philosophies underpinning punishment and their practical application
· define and analyse key trends in criminal justice policy and provision in Ireland
· recognise the key features of the new penology thesis and examine the extent to which this thesis explains changes in penal policy and provision in recent years
· recognise the key features of Irish juvenile justice legislation, policy and provision
· discuss Irish legislative and policy responses to the crime of rape
· analyse key crime prevention and correction strategies and the implications for communities.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS2008 Social Work 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Hurley, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Mairie Cregan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide a critical understanding of the development and provision of care in the community and the ensuing implications for social work practice.

Module Content: The ideological bases of caring will be discussed and the principles, policy and practice of community care will be explored with reference to Irish and European social work practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Trace the history of family welfare, from its ideological origins to tis place in contemporary Irish society.
· Demonstrate a knowledge of the principles, policy and practice of community care in the State.
· Explore the role of social work services, both statutory and voluntary in meeting the needs of individual and groups with society.
· Demonstrate a knowledge of the demographic changes in Irish society over recent years and the challenges these changes generate for social work service delivery.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board.

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SS2012 Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Tutorials as appropriate).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Elizabeth Kiely, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To familiarise students with the uses of theory for the conduct of research and with qualitative and quantitative approaches / research methods in the social sciences.

Module Content: This course introduces students to the key research paradigms and to qualitative and quantitative approaches / research methods in the social sciences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· (a) identify different theoretical approaches to research in the social sciences
· (b) formulate an original research question and design a basic research proposal
· (c) source relevant information and conduct a comprehensive literature review
· (d) identify the strengths and limitations of different methods of data collection
· (e) appreciate the importance of ethical issues in the research process
· (f) gather primary data using an appropriate research methodology.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 Research Assignment (3,500)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to submit a research assignment and achieve a grade of 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board.

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SS2018 Politics and Social Policy II

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mairead Considine, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mairead Considine, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Fiona Dukelow, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module aims to explore the normative and explanatory theoretical basis of social policy, with particular emphasis on political ideologicies and key concepts in social policy.

Module Content: Introduction to the ideas and influences of various political ideologies and perspectives on welfare. These include liberalism, conservatism, social democracy, socalism, feminism and greenism. The thought and work of key figures in social and economic policy will be critically examined. A number of core social policy concepts will also be explored.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the main philosophies of welfare.
· Analyse the impact of key ideological perspectives on the development of social policy.
· Appraise the impact of key ideological perspectives on the development of welfare and welfare states.
· Evaluate the difference philosophies of welfare with reference to key aspects of social policy.
· Describe the meaning of core social policy concepts.
· Illustrate the relationship between various philosophies of welfare and core social policy concepts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (1 x 3 hour examination); Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to complete all elements, i.e. to submit Continuous Assessment and sit the Written Examination, and achieve a grade of 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward. Failed Continuous Assessment must be repeated for the Autumn Board.

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SS2021 Critical Perspectives on Irish Health Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Lectures and Seminars 24hrs).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eluska Fernández, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide students with an introduction to 'critical perspectives' in the social services, and to explore how these perspectives can be a resource in helping us think about and analyse the history of Irish health policy.

Module Content: Critical approaches to thinking about health policy suggested by critical theory, feminism, the post-development school, and science and technology studies are considered. Central to these critical perspectives on policy is their rejection of technocratic and liberal democratic understandings of the policy process. The alternative understandings of policy that are discussed emphasise how policy is shaped by the historical, political, economic and socio-cultural context in which it emerges. In contrast to the technocratic approach, the scientific evidence that allegedly guides health policy is understood to be culturally and politically saturated. With these approaches to understanding policy in mind, we consider the history of Irish health policy and reflect on the forces that have shaped the contemporary Irish healthcare system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the Irish healthcare system.
· Analyse key equity issues in the context of access to healthcare.
· Discuss contemporary debates on the biomedical model from a critical perspective
· Identify the political dimension of public health and health promotion.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded. Attendance at lectures is compulsory.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2024 Fieldwork Placement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 150hr(s) Placements; 3 x 2hr(s) Tutorials ((consultative tutorials will be provided during the semesters immediately preceding and following the Fieldwork Placement)).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To give students experience of working in an area related to their studies.

Module Content: Following completion of BSocSc1 coursework and before the commencement of BSocSc2, students will, with staff guidance and advice, arrange and complete an approved work placement amounting to 4 weeks full-time (or equivalent of 150 hours) with an approved agency or organisation related to their studies. During this placement students will keep a logbook of their fieldowork practice and will assemble reflective documentation on the host agency.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate pesonal skills such as problem solving, decision making and engagement skills.
· Identify strengths and weaknesses of their work practice.
· Connect academic and practical aspects of social policy.
· Assess the impact of relevant social policies in the work environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at placement setting 150 hrs and submission of portfolio.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed Continuous Assessment must be repeated for the Autumn Board.

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SS2025 The Politics of Health and Medicine

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: In her beautifully bookish but bleak essay Illness as Metaphor (1977) Susan Sontag brought to light the wounds of certain forms of metaphoric thinking about illness, wounds she herself felt, inflicted by the "stereotypes of the natinal character" on those who inhabit the "kingdom of the ill". Due largely to the metaphor-work of those involved in disabilty and health movements who have sought to replace stigmatizing language with healing and sometimes fighting words, the afflictions of such illness metaphors are increasingly recognized. The objective of the module is to introduce students to the social science literature of these struggles about how we talk and think about health and illness, and to foster students' curiosity and capacity to think about them critically.

Module Content: We begin the module by discussing Sontag's famous essay and responses to it. But most of our discussions focus on the meaning and metaphor-work of health movements and patients' organisations, their contributions to shaping and reshaping how we talk and think about health and illness, and also medicine. Key ideas and concepts in theories of social movements are reviewed, including those that emphasise how movements can subvert taken-for-granted ideas, cultural codes and expert systems of knowledge, and create spaces where new identities, relationships and ideas can emerge. Efforts to develop typologies of social movements mobilised around health concerns are discussed, particularly those that emphasise that these movements vary in respect of their relationship with "medicalisation" and "pharmaceuticalisation". We then move on to discuss a number of specific health social movements, including those mobilised around mental health, Alzheimer's disease, breast cancer, and child birth. We consider texts written by movement intellectuals who specialise in articulating ideas that have inspired some of these movements. We also discuss specific struggles in which these movements have been involved, such as efforts by breast cancer activists to gain recognition for citizen expertise and popular epidemiology in relation to breast cancer risk, and by mental health activists to outlaw coercive psychiatric treatment and thus alter the relationship between patients and health professionals. The final theme explored in the module is the move in recent years to include certain health movement activists, sometimes cast as service users, experts by experience or healthcare consumers, in medical research and health policy-making. We discuss potential ways in which these new research and governance spaces may be transforming medical research and health policy-making, but also health movements and patients' organisations themselves.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss some of the key themes and concepts in contemporary social scientific analyses of health and medicine.
· Outline and critically comment upon selected classic texts that challenge prevailing orthodoxies about health and medicine.
· Question conventional 'progressive' histories of biomedicine.
· Explain how 'power' has been variously understood in social scientific analyses of health and medicine.
· Appraise the contribution of different health social movements to extending and resisting biomedical frames of understanding.
· Demonstrate a familiarity with debates about where and how 'the limits of medicine' should be set.
· Discuss key social forces that are identified as contributing to the flourishing of capitalist biomedical industries.
· Propose strategies for effecting change in the healthcare system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit CA, he/she must submit revised assessment(s), as prescribed by the School.

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SS2026 Special Education and Disability: Principles, Policies and Practices

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Colman Motherway, School of Education; Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: A focus on the principles, policies and practices involved in the provision of special education and disability services to children and young people in Ireland.

Module Content: Special education ? language and terminology, history, current practice, inclusion, special schools, legislation.

Disability ? models of disability, categories of disability, responses, legislation, rights, advocacy, views of persons with disability.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the historical development of special education and disability services at a local, national and international level.
· Interpret the central role of language and terminology in the development of special education and disability services provision.
· Identify the policies and practices that shape current special education provision at local and national level.
· Theorise and critique the concepts of inclusive education / segregated education from a variety of perspectives
· Assess the causes, characteristics and teaching strategies that can be effective in respect of students with a range of special educational needs.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 assignment (3,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass this module students are required to submit the assignment and achieve a grade of 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed continuous assessment must be repeated for the Autumn Board.

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SS2027 Childcare Placement and Preparation

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 125.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12weeks(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Shirley Martin, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To enable students to integrate theory with practice in various early years and childhood settings. Skills in working directly with children, including listening to children, play therapy, observation and meeting challenges posed by diversity are developed.

Module Content: Individual and Group approaches will be examined in the context of a skills laboratory that utilises audio-visual aids, role play and simulation exercises; each student is required to undertake a number of Assignments and to compile a Reflective Journal and Diary.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify, explore and apply skills required in working with children within early years settings
· Identify and describe the role of reflection in child care practice. Begin a process of self-reflection that will enable the student to become aware of their own values, skills and knowledge
· Discuss theoretical ideas and approaches that are relevant for child care practice and to apply these to practice on placement
· Reflect on and make explicit/articulate core principles and values that underpin working with children in early years settings
· Demonstrate the confidence to work in an early years setting
· Critically explore ideas about diversity and inclusive practice and discuss the application of these to practice situations
· Demonstrate the ability to write a reflective portfolio that represents experiences of students on placement and displays integration of theory and practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Reflective Portfolio and Diary 300 marks. Attendance at Professional Practice classes is compulsory. Students are required to attend a minimum of 80% of these classes in order to be eligible to proceed to placement. Placement practice is marked on a Pass/Fail basis.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and attendance at Professional Practice classes. Attendance in class and on placement will be monitored by class register and timesheets.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% in Continuous Assessment and a Pass Judgement in the Placement. Students who fail to satisfy this requirement will fail the module overall. Candidates must normally meet a requirement of 100% attendance for the placement. If students do not complete the required number of placement hours due to illness, etc any time off must be made up by extending the placement. before progression onto third year.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Students failing the placement may repeat it once only, as directed by the Programme Board of Studies). Students failing a repeat placement must withdraw from the programme.).

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SS2028 Social Justice and Mental Health: Combating Discrimination, Labelling and Stigma

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 23 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Harry Gijbels, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Module Objective: To develop students' knowledge and understanding of issues related to access, anti-discrimination, and inclusion in mental health.

Module Content: Access, stigma, discrimination, disability awareness, human rights, mental health law, poverty, inequality, institutionalisation and advocacy.
Social Policy Content
This module aims to provide students with an introduction to key areas of social policy relating to mental health. The module content will focus specifically on issues relation to inequality, social exclusion, discrimination and stigma. The relationship between poverty and mental health will be a major focus. The module explores the social construction of mental health and examines how this impacts not only on individuals but also communtiies and society as a whole. An applied analysis on how particular social groups suffer stigma and discrimination will be explored. Key concepts such as anit-discrimination, empowerment, advocacy and rights will also be examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically discuss the connection between social policy and mental health.
· Describe key issues relation to discrimination, stigma, and exclusion in mental health promotion.
· Critically analyse the relationship between poverty and mental health.
· Identify vulnerable social groups who are susceptible to poor mental health.

· Critically assess access to primary care services among the homeless community.
· Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse perspectives in relation to the promotion of a rights based approach to mental health.
· Describe the concepts of access and inclusion and the contemporary issues affecting them as applied to mental health.
· Explain the basic principles of human rights and mental health law.
· Demonstrate an understanding of the services available nationally and internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 1,500 essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and re-submit essays, as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery and the School of Applied Social Studies).

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SS2030 Conflict Transformation and Peace Building

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Discussion/Groupwork).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the causes and dynamics of conflict in society and the range of differing approaches associated with conflict transformation and peace-building. To critically analyse aspects of the current peace process in the North of Ireland in the context of international conflict transformation strategies.

Module Content: Theories about conflict, conflict transformation and peace-building in society. Conflict in Ireland, and in particular, Northern Ireland and attempts at resolution. The Irish Peace Process and micro and macro level approaches to conflict transformation in the North. Comparative approaches to peace-building and conflict transformation internationally.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically assess a range of theoretical perspectives about the causes and dynamics of conflict in society
· Critically analyse the causes and dynamics of conflict in Ireland and in the North of Ireland in particular
· Critically analyse various attempts to develop conflict transformation and peace-building in Ireland and N. Ireland
· Critically assess the current peace process and approaches to conflict transformation in the North
· Compare and contrast different approaches to conflict transformation and peace-building internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project/Essay (4000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students must submit the Project/Essay and achieve a grade of 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by the Dept.)).

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SS2101 Communications and Community Youth Work

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 50 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (42hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop students' analytical and communication skills through an understanding of communication theory, verbal/non-verbal communication, sociology of media.

Module Content: Non-verbal communication - listening, understanding, body language. Visual communication - leaflets, posters, video, art, photography. Written communication - notes, letters, reports, memoranda. Modern media and public relations - press, sociology of media, history of language.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Display an analytical ability in the area of communications theory.
· Apply theoretically based hypotheses in the area of communication skills.
· Identify the general principles/models pertaining to a number of modes of communication.
· Display a level of intellectual discourse/engagement in the area of sociology of media.
· Display the necessary skills to give a public presentation in an area petinent to the social sciences.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Oral Presentation).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2102 Working with Individuals in a Community Youth Work Setting

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (50hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael O'Haodain, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To equip Youth and Community Workers to respond effectively to the requirements of individuals, whilst observing professional boundaries.

Module Content: Examination of counselling theories: Analysis of student's interpersonal style, through student's capacity for self-awareness, expression of emotion, understanding and acceptance of self and others. Basic listening skills: empathy, non-verbal cues, responding to indirect cues, working with feelings and silences, confronting etc. Ethical dilemmas: information sharing, confidentiality, record keeping. Responding to individuals in crisis: use and management of referrals for specialist counselling.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Be aware of a range of theories that inform the practice of counselling and working with individuals.
· Recognise their interpersonal style and have developed their understanding and acceptance of self and others.
· Practise basic listening skills that are appropriate.
· Consider the ethical dilemmas inherent in the work.
· Be capable of responding effectively to individuals in crisis, inluding making appropriate referrals where necessary.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4000 word Case Study).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Case Study, he/she must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2103 Working with Groups in a Community Youth Work Setting

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (75hrs Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Cindy O'Shea, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with the theory and practice of group work, and focus on skills necessary in working with groups.

Module Content: Definition and theories of groups. Formation of groups. Stages of group development. Group processes, roles and pressures. Facilitation techniques, observation, task and maintenance functions, interaction, recording processes. Designing developmental group work; curriculum planning; objective setting; method selection; performance indicators; curriculum content.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an awareness and understanding of key group work concepts.
· Have developed group work skills and the ability to apply them in practice.
· Demonstrate an ability to practice, deconstruct and record group work processes in action through the development of a group work case study.
· Differentiate between the personal and professional in the field of group work.
· Be familiar with and able to source group work resources.
· Apply group work to a practice setting using appropriate theoretical frameworks.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Group Work Assignment (4000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Portfolio, he/she must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2104 Social Analysis II

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 50 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (47hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Catherine Forde, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To focus on the key role of leadership and leadership development within the context of Youth and Community Work.

Module Content: Theories of leadership and leadership development within the context of youth and community work. Leadership roles and functions. Leadership and volunteer development. Monitoring and management of volunteer involvement. The inter-relationship between leadership, educational planning and development functions of youth and community work. Inter-relationship between leadership, planning and development functions. Leadership and development of partnership structures. Leadership and Change.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Employ critical, liberal, neo-liberal, participatory and globalist perspectives on the State to the Irish context.
· Theorise citizen agency with reference to theories of social action, social movements and cultural resistance.
· Identify, theorise and critique key elements of contemporary Irish democracy, in particular state-civil society relations.
· Identify the rights of children and young people and specifically theorise their participation in decision-making on matters that affect them.
· Explain the concept of "voluntarism", "volunteering" and "active citizenship" and the relevance of these terms to contemporary Irish social policy.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500-3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2105 Social Policy II

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 25 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (50hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Nicola Maxwell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: The principles and practice of Youth and Community Work will inform a study of participation within specific interest groups.

Module Content: Students will have the opportunity to compare, contrast and evaluate perspectives relevant to the group being covered; identify the assumptions behind psychological and sociological perspectives on the group being studied; and tease out the ethical implications of these assumptions for their roles as youth and community workers.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain what accounts for the differentiated experience of poverty, inequality and social exclusion.
· Examine the ways poverty and social exclusion interact with social divisions in society.
· Review the concept of social exclusion and discuss the way this concept is applied in the field of social policy.
· Summarise the nature of social inequality and generate argument that would support identifiable strategies for change.
· Identify the broader global and European context of social policy and show the relevance of this to Irish Social policy.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500-3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass End of Year Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2107 Placement II

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (1,000hrs Placement/Practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr David O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop the students' professional practice in an agency placement setting.

Module Content: The module seeks to afford students the opportunity of identifying their own training needs and exercise theoretical learning and skills development - through praxis - within a field work environment. This takes place on an on-going basis throughout the academic year.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Select and apply one theoretical perspective relevant to youth and community work practice.
· Practice and apply group work theory and principles to practice.
· Develop a reflective framework for deconstruction of their practice.
· Record and demonstrate professional competency in portfolio format/case study format.
· Develop and consolidate skills based on year one experiences and feedback.
· Develop professional reporting and recording skills which meet agency requirements for submission to key services/agencies within the sector.
· Develop and deconstruct theory in action.

Assessment: Submission of Report to Practice Assessment Board.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at Placement Agency; Submission of work for assessment on due date.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Repeat Placement - 125hrs duration, over 4-8 wk period. Placement will be reviewed from midway to assess whether student can continue. Placement can be repeated once only).

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SS2108 Introduction to Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (75hrs Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Elizabeth Kiely, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the basic tools/skills of research methodology.

Module Content: Students are introduced to the key philosophies underpinning the social sciences and to the relationship between research approach, method and knowledge generation. Quantitative and qualitative approaches to research are outlined and discussed. The key methods used to gather data in the social sciences are outlined and their strengths and limitations are considered. The purpose of reviewing the literature and the key skills required to compile a review are imparted. The significance of ethical dilemmas and issues in the conduct of social scientific research is appreciated.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise how social theories inform research conducted in the social sciences and generate different kinds of knowledge.
· Explain the key differences between quantitative and qualitative approaches to research.
· Identify the key methods used to gather research data.
· Outline and discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods of data collection.
· Show an appreciation of the significance of ethical issues in the conduct of research.
· Formulate a research aim and a set of objectives.
· Display the skills required to access information for research purposes.
· Access and review a journal article in the social sciences concerned with the presentation of research findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,500 word research exercise (200 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Research Report, he/she must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2201 Skills Laboratory

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48hr(s) Lectures (Skills Laboratory).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine the social, political and conceptual conditions of social work in the context of globalisation.

Module Content: To provide students with an opportunity to develop basic social work skills in the laboratory setting and to develop a critical understanding of self and others in a variety of professional encounters.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the social work skills as identified by CORU/The Social Workers Registration Board.
· Introduce students to the micro skills of social work practice i.e. listening, responding observing, questioning and attending
· Critically analyse the range of personal and situational factors associated with a variety of social work encounters
· Engage students in critical reflection on their use of the self in social work practice
· Explain the application of various social work theories and methodologies in a variety of social work practice situations and contexts
· Use creative methods to help develop students capacity to critically reflect on their social work practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Professional Portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement.), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS2208 Child Care Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine the historical, legal, political and social contexts of child care in Ireland.

Module Content: This module traces the origins of childhood in a modern society. The concept of, and approaches to 'prevention' in child-care are explored. The nature of 'child abuse' and 'risk' are discussed in relation to the reception of children into 'care'. Alternatives to 'care' are discussed and the final section of the module examines social work with young offenders and the 'care' system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine the social consturctions of childhood.
· Identify and discuss conepts of well-being and the whole child perspective.
· Assess children's rights and citizenship including the UNCRC and children's Constitutional rights in Ireland.
· Discuss family support: concepts and models of intervention with a specific focus on the role of early childhood care and education.
· Examine child protection and welfare systems and policy.
· Analysis of the situation of 'looked after children'.
· Discuss and evaluate the approaches to juvenile justice with a specific focus on the Children's Act, 2001.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attandance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS2211 Mixed Economy of Welfare and Personal Social Services II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide a broad introduction to the history and development of personal social services.

Module Content: This module provides analysis of the personal social services in the statutory, voluntary, private and informal sectors. Definitions of 'need' and 'consumer participation' will be examined in relation to citizenship and rights in a period of modernity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define the personal social services
· Analyse the provision and delivery of personal social services
· Define the concept of the mixed economy of welfare
· Discuss the role of statutory, voluntary and informal bodies in the development of personal social services
· Discuss developments in Ireland's Health Strategy with regard to the development of personal social services
· Discuss and analyse debates on care
· Examine the discourse on service user participation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS2213 Social Work Methods I

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a variety of social work methods including individual and family work, and social work with young people.

Module Content: Students will critically examine a range of social work theories and methods. This module is divided into two parts: individual and family work, and social work with young people.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate knowledge of the key theoretical ideas that inform contemporary policy and practice with young people.
· Competently critique and evaluate contemporary Youth work policy and practice.
· Identify the social and cultural factors and forces that shape young peoples lives.
· Employ bereavement and loss theory and research to support practice with persons who are bereaved.
· Employ the pessimists demoralization and optimists democratization theses to analyze the changing contours of family lives and personal relationships.
· Evaluate how Irish & European family policies influence the welfare of service users and shape social work practice with families.
· Outline the behaviours that constitute domestic violence and identify the skills and required in working with adults and children that have lived in environments characterised by domestic violence.
· Describe how the emotional labour aspect of social work can lead to job strain and burnout.
· Examine the concept of client 'resistance' in the helping relationship and evaluate intervention models to support practice in this area.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass each essay independently.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS2214 Social Work Practice Contexts

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine social work within health care contexts.

Module Content: This module examines social work in a variety of contexts, namely: disability; substance misuse; medical social work and multicultural contexts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify a diverse range of contexts for social work practice.
· Critically analyze social work practice in diverse social contexts.
· Recognize the role of policy in shaping social contexts.
· Outline and discuss the strengths and limitations of different theoretical approaches to specific social work contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3 x 2,000 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attandance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Each essay must be passed independently.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement.), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS2216 Social Recovery Approaches to Mental Health

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the role of social work in the area of mental health and consider innovative ways of working which promote equality and social justice.

Module Content: The context of mental health health care; the experience of emotional distress for service users and their families; social recovery approaches in mental health; mental health and social exclusion/inclusion; advocacy and users' rights; conceptual and practice innovations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically evaluate current discourses in the field of mental health, as well as the key conceptual and policy developments shaping service provision.
· Develop a knowledge base of emotional distress and recognise its impact on service users, families and communities.
· Identify the role of social work in mental health by considering hospital, community and generic settings of practice.
· Recognise the contribution of contextual and environmental factors in the experience of emotional distress.
· Recognise and apply the principles of (a) recovery- oriented practice; (b) service user involvement and advocacy; and (c) social justice.
· Demonstrate an appreciation of values and ethical issues in mental health.
· Evaluate the contribution of social work in developing a holistic, recovery-oriented practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement.), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS2217 Social Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Shirley Martin, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the range of social research methods and methodologies.

Module Content: Introduction to the research process and writing a research proposal; research methods; research methodologies and research ethics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise how social theories inform research conducted in the social sciences and generate different kinds of knowledge.
· Explain the key differences between quantitative and qualitative approaches to research. Identify the key methods used to gather research data.
· Outline and discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods of data collection.
· Appreciate the significance of ethical issues in the conduct of research.
· Formulate a research aim and a set of objectives.
· Display the skills required to access information for research purposes.
· Access and review a journal article in the social sciences concerned with the presentation of research findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500 word research proposal).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS2219 Social Policy and Social Work

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To contextualise social work practice in Ireland within social policy.

Module Content: Students visit a range of social work agencies in Ireland as part of researching the history, work and objectives of the agencies, and the social, economic and cultural contexts in which the agencies originated and currently practice. Implications for social work practice with regard to social and economic policy is considered through the consideration of welfare regimes and other social theory.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Engage in informed discussion on a range of Irish social work agencies.
· Identify and discuss the social policy context in which these social work agencies are located.
· Engage in analysis of the social, political and economic contexts in which a range of social problems exist and are responded to.
· Contextualise the experience of service users in both social policy and sociological perspectives.
· Take the initiative and responsibility for planning, carrying out and evaluating their learning experience.
· Appreciate and value the practice of enquiry based learning and working in collaboration with each other towards achieving a shared goal.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Practicum report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS2220 Introduction To Social Work Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1. (Students will undertake a 30 hour practicum with a suitable agency).

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 30hr(s) Fieldwork; 3 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to social work practice within an agency context

Module Content: Students are provided with learning opportunities in basic practice and assessed towards Social Work competence. By the end of the module students are required to demonstrate a basic level of competence and the potential to engage with the third year placement module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Negotiate and enage with relevant agencies in the professional and voluntary fields
· Communicate effectively with service uses and service providers.

· Demonstrate required professional values and ethical standards

· Critically evaluate professional interventions

· Demonstrate proficiency in professional record keeping and report writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Practicum Evaluation Report (3,000 word)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS2401 Social Analysis and Child Care Policy II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 125 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To review and analyse key issues in child care policy and practice.

Module Content: Services for children, their origins and background. Trends and developments within child care policy and practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine key sociological perspectives around childhood
· Identify and discuss theoretical perspectives of the family
· Identify and discuss key issues in global diversity
· Identify how social problems in the area of child care have been constructed and how Irish society responds to them.
· Identify key policy developments in child care in Ireland using a comparative framework
· Analyse policy and practice developments specifically in early years care & education in Ireland in the context of prevention and early intervention within child and family work.
· Identify and discuss current concerns in child care policy and provision in Ireland with specific reference to child protection, family support, children in care and juvenile justice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3005 Housing and Homelessness

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To outline the main features of the Irish Housing system; to highlight the main problems in different housing tenures and assess potential solutions.

Module Content: Key concepts and theories in housing; sources of Irish housing data; the policy and administrative framework of Irish housing, trends and issues in the Irish housing system, with particular reference to aspects of social disadvantage; homelessness

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline and trace changes in the Irish tenure system over time.
· Differentiate the main drivers of Irish tenure transformation.
· Situate homelessness policy within the context of housing policy and provision.
· Assess current debates around the definition and measurements of homelessness.
· Evaluate different theories of adult homelessness.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS3006 Education and Welfare

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module offers a guide to some differing perspectives in the approach to studying education in its (i) sociological, (ii) political and (iii) policy context.

Module Content: This module contains subject matter focusing on class, race and gender inequalities in education, and offers an overview of education systems and educational policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate the role of education in contemporary society and the impact of educational policies on access to educational opportunity.
· Evaluate key issues in contemporary policy and practice in education in the light of different theoretical interpretations.
· Critically examine current International education commitments and targets (such as the Millennium Development Goals).
· Examine some of the different forms of educational inequality evident in the Irish educational system.
· Identify and review current key strategies and innovations focused on the reduction of educational disadvantage in Ireland at preschool, primary secondary and third level education.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio 1 x 3000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS3008 Poverty and Social Exclusion

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine concepts and measures of poverty and social exclusion; to examine current trends and policy initiatives in addressing poverty and social exclusion in the Irish context.

Module Content: Concepts and measures of poverty and social exclusion; Anti-Poverty Strategies in Ireland and the EU.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the concepts, frameworks and theories which inform the literature on poverty and social exclusion.
· Differentiate the varied approaches to measuring poverty and social exclusion in Ireland and in selected other countries.
· Identify and analyse the origins of policies to combat poverty and social exclusion.
· Question the extent to which anti-poverty policy rhetoric matches actual policy provision and impacts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS3009 Communities, Activism and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To theorise the status and practice of community activism in Ireland with reference to the wider political and policy context

Module Content: Changing conceptions of community and communitarianism, alternative traditions of community action, issues related to partnership, professionalisation and state power and the contribution of communities to broader social change

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Theorise the values and politics of community activism and development
· Evaluate community development's contribution to the democratisation of Irish social, political and cultural life
· Know key trends in state/community sector relationships in Ireland
· Evaluate the implications of professionalisation for the community sector in Ireland
· Theorise how community resistance is expressed in contemporary Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to submit and pass a portfolio. Instructions for portfolio preparation and submission will be provided in class.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS3010 Social Science and Social Work

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alastair Christie, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine how the social sciences seek to explain and shape the nature of social work in (post) modern society.

Module Content: Social work and theories of helping; (post) modernity; gender; power and organisational analysis; consumer perspectives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define the role of social work within the welfare system in Ireland;
· recognise the importance of specific knowledge, skills and values in social work;
· critically examine difference discourses of social work practice;
· apply social science theories to critical examine social work policies and practices.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass the Formal Written Examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS3011 Youth Policy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elizabeth Kiely, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To critically assess the principles, policy and practice of youth interventions in Irish Society.

Module Content: Theory of Youth Work; Young People and Social Policies; Youth Work Practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Display a knowledge of the key theoretical ideas that inform contemporary youth work policy and practice in Ireland.

· Competently critique and evaluate youth work policy and practice in contemporary Ireland.
· Be familiar with key developments in Irish youth policy and practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS3015 The Politics of Racism

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide a grounding in concepts and theories of 'race' and racism, ethnicity, and migration in society and to explore the meaning and uses of 'race' in contemporary politics and social policies.

Module Content: This module examines the concept of 'race' as a social construction. The course will theorise 'race' within social, political, cultural and ideological contexts, with particular reference to racism in the Irish experience. This module will be interactive in nature, involving debate and discussion that draws on contemporary issues of 'race' and racism in Irish society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the social construction of 'race' in a historical context
· Theorise the emergence and experience of racism in the Irish context
· Critically evaluate social policy development in relation to ethnic minority groups in Ireland
· Assess Irish immigration policy and practice
· Analyse the success of anti-racism strategies in the Irish context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (E-portfolio 4,000 words.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3016 Social Perspectives in Mental Health

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To present a critical overview of mental health from its evolution in institutional care forms to present day community care strategies.

Module Content: Institutional care; community care initiatives; social and economic integration; normalisation and human rights.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine the history of mental health care and the shift from institutional to community based care.
· Describe and review the key conceptual and policy developments shaping current mental health care.
· Consider the impact of service provision on users and carers and critically evaluate the implementation of mental health policy.
· Recognise and analyse the impact of social and environmental factors on the experience of mental distress.
· Examine the role of legislation in promoting a rights- based approach to mental health care.
· Appreciate the role of advocacy and service user involvement in mental health.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to pass the Formal Written Examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS3019 Science, Technology and Public Controversy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Classes will be of 2 hours duration).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: In this module you are invited to read, think about and discuss ideas about science, tehcnology and public controversy that might result in you never being the same again. Just as the feminist theorist and philosopher of science and technology Donna Haraway (2006) found that reading the ideas of people like Michel Foucault changed her, it is an invitation to read and discuss her work and that of others who call on us to recast what have become conventional ways of thinking about science and technology, but also more broadly about our humanity and relationships with each other, other species and nature.

Module Content: Through an introduction to literature from the multidisciplinary field of social studies known as Science and Technology Studies (STS) you are invited to reflect on some of the basic categories, distinctions and dualisms commonly used to organise how we understand science and technology. Included in these dualisms and categories, or "thinking technologies" that Haraway (2006: 153) reminds us are always provisional, are the mind and body, human and animal, culture and nature, objective and subjective, lay person and expert, and the natural and social sciences. Because so many science and technology controversies are conflicts about knowledge, debates about what can count as knowledge (as distinct from opinion) and as science (as distinct from pseudoscience) will be a key focus of our discussions. Likewise, because "the body" is the site for so many of these controversies another key focus will be the very Western and very modern ways of thinking about it, such as "possessive individualism" (we own our bodies and therefore can do what we want with them) and that the body is bounded, self-contacted but divisible. Consideration of these various "thinking technologies" will nto be done in an abstract way but with reference to specific public controversies and debates about how they might be resolved democratically. Controvversies, past and present, that will be explored include those surrounding human dissection, organ donation, "enchancement medicine", genetic screening and animal experimentation. Many of these controversies have involved calls on governments, and sometimes suprastate institutions, to prohibit, permit, regulate or subsidise scientific research and citizens' access to the various technologies. Throughout the module, how these calls have been articulated in the Irish context will be explored. So too will we explore specific policy initiatives, such as the current government's proposals to introduce a system of presumed consent to organ donation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss some of the key concepts, themes and debates in the multidisciplinary field of social studies, Science and Technology Studies (STS).
· Demonstrate a familiarity the goals of STS, particularly in regard to democratising and opening up the 'black box' of science and promoting 'scientific citizenship'.
· Explain how STS can be a resource in helping us to understand the public controversies surrounding many scientific and technological 'advances' that are increasingly a feature of 21st century biopolitics (e.g. new reproductive technologies, surgical reshapings of the body, biobanking, genetic engineering and stem cell research).
· Critically comment on science and technology controversies as struggles over meaning, morality and the distribution of resources.
· Demonstrate a familiarity with debates about the role of social movements in generating science and technology controversies.
· Outline how state institutions almost invariably become embroiled in many science and technology controversies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by School.

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SS3021 Sexuality and Society

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maire Leane, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine both the historical and contemporary interactions between sexuality and society. To examine the insights of social theorists who have considered the issues of power and sexuality.

Module Content: Analysis of the changing nature and mechanisms of sexual regulation, case study analysis of contested issues of sexuality, e.g. reproductive rights, homosexuality and the social movements which have emerged around them.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and distinguish between key social theories of sexuality.
· Interpret the changing nature and mechanisms of sexual regulation.
· Critique social policies on sexuality.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to pass the Formal Written Examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS3024 The Politics of Health and Medicine

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Mary McDermott, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of critical social scientific perspectives on the politics of health and medicine, and to develop their capactiy to think critically about the Irish healthcare system, political strategies for effecting change in that system, and their own biomedical encounters.

Module Content: A series of questions that have preoccupied social scientists with an interest in health and medicine are explored in this module. We consider literature from a range of perspectives in the sociology of health, medical anthropology and science and technology studies. Questions that are explored include - Why did biomedicine become established as the dominant health paradigm? How did the medical profession gain a legally enshrined monopolistic position within our healthcare system? How is the marginalisation of 'alternative' health paradigms maintained? How can the widespread belief in new medical technologies as a means to solving health problems be explained? What are the forces impelling the commodification of health and emergence of more and more capitalist biomedical industries? How can contemporary transformations in patienthood be explained? What are the forces driving the privatisation of healthcare and what are the consequences of this trend? What part do the growing numbers of patients' organisations and health social movements play in the extension or contestation of biomedical frames of understanding?

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss some of the key themes and concepts in contemporary social scientific analyses of health and medicine.
· Outline and critically comment upon selected classic texts that challenge prevailing orthodoxies about health and medicine.
· Question conventional 'progressive' histories of biomedicine.
· Explain how 'power' has been variously understood in social scientific analyses of health and medicine.
· Appraise the contribution of different health social movements to extending and resisting biomedical frames of understanding.
· Demonstrate a familiarity with debates about where and how 'the limits of medicine' should be set.
· Discuss key social forces that are identified as contributing to the flourishing of capitalist biomedical industries.
· Propose strategies for effecting change in the healthcare system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Essay - Assignment 1500 - 2500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Spring Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Spring Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Continuous Assessment, he/she must submit revised assessment(s), as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3027 Comparative Social Policy II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To familiarise students with the diversity of welfare systems and approaches and the various factors influencing the development of social policy globally.

Module Content: This module will promote students' understanding of social policy and practice in other countries and global influences on social policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Compare the development of social policy and welfare provision in Ireland with that in one or more other developed welfare states
· Critically assess how specific social policy areas such as health care, education, and care in the community are addressed by different states
· Critically assess the impact and influence of global organisations/institutions such as the EU, UN, IMF, World Bank and Transnational Corporations on the development of Irish and global social policy


· Critically assess different methods of financing welfare internationally.
· Critically assess different methods of providing welfare internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1x 4,000 word Portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS3030 Fieldwork Placement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 150hr(s) Placements (Supervised by Agency Personnel); 3 x 2hr(s) Tutorials (Consultative tutorials will be provided during the semesters immediately preceding and following the Fieldwork Placement.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To give students experience of working in an area related to their studies.

Module Content: Following completion of BSocSc year 2 examinations and before the commencement of BSocSc year 3, students will, with staff guidance and advice, arrange and complete an approved work placement amounting to four weeks full-time (or equivalent, approx. 150 hours) with an approved agency or organisation related to their studies. During this placement, students will keep a logbook of their work and will assemble reflective documentation on the host agency.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate personal skills such as problems solving, decision making and engagement skills
· Identify strengths and weaknesses of their work practice
· Connect academic and practical aspects of social policy
· Assess the impact of relevant social policies in the work environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at placement (150 hrs) and submission of portfolio.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS3031 Social Research Report

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (Computer Lab Project Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Fiona Dukelow, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To identify appropriate research topics and to produce a research report under supervision of staff supervisor.

Module Content: Elements of research; research strategies; data selection; data collection; collation and analysis; application of statistical packages; final report writing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Be familiar with the theoretical, methodological and policy contexts informing the choices open to researchers in undertaking a small-scale undergraduate research project
· Be familiar with the choices involved at the data selection stage and their implications
· Display familiarity with the many aspects of data collection, via either the primary or secondary data collection process
· Have developed a capacity to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data
· Demonstrate a good grasp of the ethics and politics of social research
· Exhibit the skills required in writing an undergraduate research report.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 12,500 - 15,000 word Research Report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who fail or do not submit Continuous Assessment must submit alternative assessment as presc).

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SS3032 Politics and Social Policy III

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Elizabeth Kiely, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Fiona Dukelow, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the changing contexts of welfare from the perspectives of political economy, feminism, civil society, identify and cultural politics.

Module Content: Elements of the post WW2 Welfare Consensus; The Crisis of the Welfare State; New Right critique; feminist critique; civil society, citizenship and social welfare; political ecology; the Third Way. Human rights and social welfare.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have advanced insights into a range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives on welfare.
· Be in a position to interpret and analyse the factors which influence the formation, implementation, and efficacy of social policies in contemporary societies.
· In a position to apply a range of welfare paradigms to particular social policy initiatives.
· Demonstrate a capability to critically appraise social policies using insights drawn from theories of citizenship, political economy, feminist perspectives, critical theory, and social movements theory.
· Be able to critically analyse different concepts about the links between rights and the provision of welfare internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to complete all elements, i.e. to submit Continuous Assessment and sit the End-of-Year Written Examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who fail or do not submit Continuous Assessment must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the School.).

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SS3033 Issues in Planning and Sustainable Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Jonathan Hall, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine a range of issues in relation to the practices of planning and sustainable development.

Module Content: Planning policies and practices in the Irish and wider context. The institutional, regulatory and legal contexts of planning practice. Public participation in planning and development. Exploration of principles of sustainable development in planning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an understanding off issues in strategic planning
· Describe the main planning process
· Understand the dynamic influence of society, the environment and the economy
· Engage with contemporary dialogues in planning.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Full attendance at lectures and tutorials is required and will be monitored by a class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated.

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SS3041 The Politics of Health & Medicine

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of critical social scientific perspectives on the politics of health and medicine, and to develop their capacity to think critically about the Irish healthcare system, political strategies for effecting change in that system and their own biomedical encounters.

Module Content: A series of questions that have preoccupied social scientists with an interest in health and medicine are explored in this module. We consider literature from a range of perspectives in the sociology of health, medical anthropology and science and technology studies. Questions that are explored include - Why did biomedicine become established as the dominant health paradigm? How did the medical profession gain a legally enshrined monopolistic position within our healthcare system? How is the marginalisation of 'alternative' health paradigms maintained? How can the widespread belief in new medical technologies as a means to solving health problems be explained? What are the forces impelling the commodification of health and emergence of more and more capitalist biomedical industries? How can contemporary transformations in patienthood be explained? What are the forces driving the privatisation of healthcare and what are the consequences of this trend? What part do the growing numbers of patients' organisations and health social movements play in the extension or contestation of biomedical frames of understanding?

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss some of the key themes and concepts in contemporary social scientific analyses of health and medicine.
· Outline and critically comment upon selected classic texts that challenge prevailing orthodoxies about health and medicine.
· Question conventional 'progressive' histories of biomedicine.
· Explain how 'power' has been variously understood in social scientific analyses of health and medicine.
· Appraise the contribution of different health social movements to extending and resisting biomedical frames of understanding.
· Demonstrate a familiarity with debates about where and how 'the limits of medicine' should be set.
· Discuss key social forces that are identified as contributing to the flourishing of capitalist biomedical industries.
· Propose strategies for effecting change in the healthcare system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Essay - Assignment 1500 - 2500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Summer Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Continuous Assessment, he/she must submit revised assessment(s), as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3044 Contemporary Social Issues in Midwifery Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 10hr(s) Workshops; 60hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To promote students' awareness on social issues and the social policy context that frames midwifery practice.

Module Content: Introduction to Social Policy Concepts in the Context of Midwifery Practice; Historical and Contemporary Social Policy Issues in the Development of Midwifery Practice; Introduction to Feminist Thought and Midwifery Practice; Women and Welfare; Women and the Healthcare Industry; The Family in Society and Developments in Family Policy; The Deconstruction of Motherhood and Fatherhood in Families; The Role of Fathers in Childbirth; Lone Parenthood, Adoption and-the Role of the Midwife, Working with Women from Ethnic Minority Communities; Developing Culturally Sensitive Midwifery Practice; Home Births Discourse; Breast Feeding Discourse; The Abortion and Contraceptive Debates.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the relevance of social policy to midwifery practice, the historical positioning of women within welfare.
· Describe the changing nature of motherhood, fatherhood and the family within society and have an increased appreciation of the range of different family forms.
· Discuss historical and contemporary social policy issues impacting on the development of midwifery practice in Ireland and in particular the rise of the home-birth movement.
· Describe legislation and policies surrounding adoption and outline the role of the midwife in supporting mothers and fathers who are engaged in this process.
· Explore key strands of feminist thought and their relevance for midwifery practice.
· Appraise the relationship between women and healthcare including the politics of risk and the resultant impact on women's health.
· Demonstrate an increased awareness of the need for culturally sensitive midwifery practice.
· Explore breastfeeding discourses and policy.
· Analyse the abortion and contraceptive debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Group Presentation 75 x marks, 1 x 800-1,000 word Written Statement of Learning 25 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance and praticipation at all timetabled teaching activities.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS3045 Critical Perspectives on Age and Ageing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Mairead Considine, Department of Applied Social Studies; Mr Michael O'Haodain, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop students' understanding of the social, cultural, political and economic context of the ageing experience in Ireland with wider reference to demographic change and policy developments internationally.

Module Content: Age-related health, social and welfare policies and practices; historical and socio-cultural perspectives on ageing; ageism and human rights; citizenship; social inclusion and equality.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically engage with historical, theoretical and cultural constructs of age and ageing
· Recognise the diversity of the ageing experience in Irish society and the structures that shape these experiences.
· Critically analyse social, health and welfare policies as these impact older people
· Contribute to current debates on social inclusion and citizenship as these relate to older people.
· Critically examine the rights and welfare issues relevant to older people and the emerging policy responses/practice issues related to these and other contemporary debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS3102 Law, Rights and Equal Opportunities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 22 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (50hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To further the students' understanding and awareness of the law as it applies to marginalised groups in Irish society.

Module Content: Re-examination of concepts of gender, sex and race. Social division and rights. Introduction to the Irish legal system and legal profession. Social welfare law, and administration of social welfare law and appeals procedures. Child Care, Juvenile Justice and police power. Lone parenthood: custody and access; maintenance and welfare legislation. Minority rights: incitement to hatred and race laws. Housing: local authority housing; law of landlord and tenant.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Display required cognisance of concepts pertaining to gender, sex and race in a legal context.
· Display a rudimentary understanding of the Irish legal system and legal profession.
· Reflect critically on aspects of Social Welfare law, and administration of Social Welfare law and appeals procedures.
· Display required cognisance of issues pertinent to Child Care, Juvenile Justice and police power.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass End of Year Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3104 Reflective Action in Youth and Community Work

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (20hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr David O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To assist students prepare for final placement. To provide a setting through which they are assisted to integrate theory and practice.

Module Content: The skills-lab workshops will focus on the development of the indirect skills of the youth and community worker. The orientation of the programme will come from the students themselves. The skills-lab aims to equip each student with a level of competence in each of the skills outlined below. Self-Evaluation: Re-evaluation of skill development. Advocacy: Verbal and written. Empowerment through knowledge: sources of information and knowledge; information gathering. Conflict: conflict in self and others in the agency; assertiveness skills. Identification of effective uses of power.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Display a level of competence in core Youth & Community Work skills.
· Re-evaluate their skills base and offer evidence of self-evaluation.
· Display cognisance of 'Advocacy' in verbal and written form.
· Show ability to gather information and to apply it practically.
· Show cognisance of conflict in self and others in an agency setting.
· Display assertiveness skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Case Study).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Case Study, he/she must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3105 Social Policy Studies the Position of Minorities

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 22 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (50hrs Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine policy issues and responses as they affect minority groups. To examine aspects of discrimination in Irish society.

Module Content: Exploration of elements of discrimination and prejudice in society. Each class will be organised around the exploration of an issue or problem as: theoretical issues; problems experienced by individuals and groups; problems that are encountered by youth/community/social workers. Classes will be taught in a lecture/discussion format, with about equal time allocated to each. The broad themes informing the module are as follows: Class; Race; Gender; Ethnicity; Religion and Sectarianism; Sexuality; Disability.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Reflect critically on policy issues and responses as they affect minority groups.
· Reflect critically on aspects of discrimination in Irish society.
· In the context of discrimination and prejudice, display cognisance of problems experienced by individuals and groups; problems that are encountered by youth/community/social workers.
· Be familiar with policy regarding the themes informing the following: Class; Race; Gender; Ethnicity; Religion and Sectarianism; Sexuality; Disability in Irish society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500 - 3000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass End of Year Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3107 Placement III

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (1,000 hrs Placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr David O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop students' professional practice in an agency placement setting.

Module Content: This module seeks to afford students the opportunity of identifying their own training needs and exercise theoretical learning and skills development - through praxis - within a field work environment. The placement in Year Three is a block placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Strategic decision making and planned intervention in the workplace.
· Development of reflective practice as a concept within their work.
· Make clear links between skills, methods and theory and the ability to document these within the practice case study.
· Demonstrate an ability to construct themselves as professionals within the context of youth and community work.
· Frame their work within the context of over-arching theoretical perspectives.
· Be familiar with the construction of their 'theory in action' as professional workers.

Assessment: Submission of Report to the Practice Assessment Board.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at Placement Agency and submission of work for assessment on due dates.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Placement can be repeated over an 8 wk period and will be reviewed periodically after halfway to assess whether student should continue. This module can be repeated once only).

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SS3111 Personal Lives and Family Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 21 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Forde, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jacqui O'Riordan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide a social policy perspective on a range of issues which impact on family life.

Module Content: Definitions and Ideologies of Family; Changing Family Structures and Personal Lives; Reproduction Issues; Sexuality; Strategies for Policy Change in family and personal lives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and discuss major theories on the family
· Outline and engage in an analysis of central developments in family life in Ireland
· Be conversant with major policy developments relating to family in Ireland
· Understand the diversity of family forms in contemporary society and have an ability to critically discuss them.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay / assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3112 Penal Policy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Elizabeth Kiely, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Elizabeth Kiely, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To analyse historic and contemporary penal policies and practices.

Module Content: Analysing penal strategies - historic and theoretical perspectives. Philosophies and current trends in Irish penal policy, principles and practices of juvenile justice, sexual offences and the criminal justice system, community and the politics of crime prevention.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Utilise theory to explain key developments in penal policies and interventions over time.
· Identify and discuss the merits and demerits of different philosophies underpinning punishment and their practical application.
· Define and analyse key trends in criminal justice policy and provision in Ireland.
· Recognise the key features of the new penology thesis and examine the extent to which this thesis explains changes in penal policy and provision in recent years.
· Recognise the key features of Irish juvenile justice legislation, policy and provision.
· Discuss Irish legislative and policy responses to the crime of rape.
· Analyse key crime prevention and correction strategies and the implications for communities.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass End of Year Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3113 Research Methods II

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (75hrs Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Burgess, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Catherine Forde, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To continue improvement of students' social research skills.

Module Content: Nature and methodology of research methods in the social sciences. Implementing research: defining research problems, research questions, hypotheses, research statement, literature review, research plan, research approach, data collection, data analysis and writing up.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Write a dissertation proposal.
· Identify the principal theoretical perspectives that underpin research.
· Plan and carry out primary and secondary research in accordance with the dissertation proposal.
· Write up a dissertation in accordance with academic conventions.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (12,000 word dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Dissertation, he/she must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3118 Community Conflict Transformation and Peace Building

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Discussion/Groupwork).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the causes and dynamics of conflict in society and the range of differing approaches associated with conflict transformation and peace-building. To critically analyse aspects of the current peace process in the North of Ireland in the context of international conflict transformation strategies.

Module Content: Theories about conflict, conflict transformation and peace-building in society. Conflict in Ireland, and in particular, Northern Ireland and attempts at resolution. The Irish Peace Process and micro and macro level approaches to conflict transformation in the North. Comparative approaches to peace-building and conflict transformation internationally.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically assess a range of theoretical perspectives about the causes and dynamics of conflict in society
· Critically analyse the causes and dynamics of conflict in Ireland and in the North of Ireland in particular
· Critically analyse various attempts to develop conflict transformation and peace-building in Ireland and N. Ireland
· Critically assess the current peace process and approaches to conflict transformation in the North
· Compare and contrast different approaches to conflict transformation and peace-building internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project/Essay (4000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by the Dept.)).

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SS3206 Placement I

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (14 week block Professional Placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with learning opportunities to meet professional competence requirements and to demonstrate critical integration of theory and practice.

Module Content: Students are provided with learning opportunities and assessed towards National Social Work Qualification competence. By the end of the placement, students are required to demonstrate a basic level of competence and the potential to successfully achieve professional competence by the end of the fourth year/final practice placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Communicate and engage effectively with service uses, fellow professionals and other stake holders
· Complete assessments and plan appropriate professional interventions
· Undertake and critically evaluate professional interventions
· Demonstrate required professional values and ethical standards
· Demonstrate proficiency in professional record keeping and report writing.

Assessment: 14 week block Professional Placement.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Attendance at lectures and tutorials, which will be monitored by practice teachers and university tutors.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (students may, at the discretion of the Exam Board, repeat Placement once only over a minimum of 10wks). Students failing repeat placement must withdraw from BSW deegree programme.

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SS3207 Placement Portfolio

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (24hrs practice supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To link professional practice (placement one) and university based modules.

Module Content: This module prepares students for placement one and provides a series of seminars and tutorials before, during and after the placement. These seminars and tutorials will focus on both professional and theoretical issues

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appraise their professional development while on placement and identify their future learning needs.
· Critically evaluate social work and the social worker's role in various practice contexts.
· Examine and evaluate the influence of students' own values on their practice.
· Demonstrate knowledge and application of at least one theoretical approach to social work.
· Recognise the impact of social policy and legal frameworks on social work practice.
· Critically analyse how social justice is promoted or discouraged in a professional setting.

Assessment: Professional portfolio.

Compulsory Elements: Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3208 Life Courses, Biographies and Reflective Learning

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures; 5hr(s) Other (Tutorials/Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore biography and related concepts in terms of their contribution to knowledge and understanding in social science and to apply this self-understanding to learning and practice.

Module Content: This module is divided into two parts. The first part consists of lectures based on various elements of the use of (auto)biography in social science. The second half will be seminar based and will consist of student presentations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discover that writing is a process that facilitates the understanding self in a social context
· Contribute to self and social knowledge
· Explore and evaluate individual experiences
· Critically analyse how values, experiences and personality form and shape lives
· Discover and share how these influences contribute to shaping personal and professional identities
· Engage in creative presentation of self/subject, to actualise and experience the value of diversity
· Experience the challenges of self-disclosure
· Debate, relate and integrate issues of identity, relationships, disclosure and risk to social work practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word (auto).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attandance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS3209 Child Care and Protection Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Caroline May Shore, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the major issues facing social workers working in the field of family and child care.

Module Content: The module will help students: 1) explore how social problems in child care have been identified and defined and 2) develop good practice in the areas of child care and child protection.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically engage with theory and contemporary research to inform and support assessment, and decision-making and intervention in child protection and welfare work;
· Critique and apply the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and Their Families (Department of Health et al., 2000), based on ecological development theory, as a framework or `conceptual map? to gather and analyse information on children and their families;
· Interpret and apply knowledge gained from the child abuse inquiries, government policy, international conventions and legislation to child and family welfare assessments;
· Appreciate and make explicit, professional social work values, ethics and principles that guide assessment, decision-making and interventions in working with children and families;
· Apply social work skills in the areas of report-writing, information gathering and analysis;
· Reflect on and their own value base and articulate how this impacts on their practice with children and families;
· Display the capacity to value and participate in projects that require teamwork and self-directed learning.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((1) Group Assignment (7,000 word) and (2) Individual Reflective Piece Assignment (1,000 word).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attandance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Both Assigments Must be Passed Independantly.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS3210 Deviance, Welfare and Justice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to current practice in the Probation and Welfare Services in Ireland.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to current practice in the probation and welfare services. In particular, the module provides a critical examination of: the criminal justice system (including recent policy developments); custody; work with young offenders and alternatives to custody; and community service.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the themes issues and debates in the area of deviance, welfare and justice.
· Explain the variety of influences on the development of criminal justice policy and practice with particular reference to Ireland.
· Critically appraise students of current research in the area of deviance and offending.
· Use creative means to engage students in critical reflection on practice issues arising for social work professionals working in the field of Probation.
· Identify environmental, social, economic, political and psychological factors associated with crime and deviance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attandance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS3211 Social Work Methods II (Last updated 20/10/2014)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a variety of social work methods including group work and community development.

Module Content: Students will critically examine a range of social work theories and methods. This module is divided into two parts: group work and community development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe different theories of community, community development and groupwork intervention and critically assess their relevance to social work practice.
· Explore the value bases of social groupwork and community development and critically assess how values influence all aspects of intervention.
· Critically assess social groupwork and/or community development perspectives on human rights, empowerment, participation, capacity-building and needs analysis.
· Critically review the concepts of leadership and roles in groupwork and analyse how they relate to the practice context.
· Develop skills in group dynamics using awareness of group development.
· Assess and evaluate the use of groupwork by means of the groupwork practice analysis.
· Critically assess the relationship between the state, the 'community and voluntary sector' and social work in the development of social policy provision.
· Analyse the dynamics of group/community conflict and change and assess different ways of dealing with conflict in groups and in the community.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attandance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass each essay independently.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS3212 Social Research Field Study

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 72 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide opportunities for students to develop a field study in a third sector organisation chosen in consultation with the fieldwork coordinator in the Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Content: The development of advanced research skills to demonstrate competence in social research. The focus will be on the student's ability to investigate and analyse the workings of voluntary sector provision in the social sphere leading to the production of a comprehensive field study report of a third sector organisation .
This module will provide the knowledge and skills to develop and undertake such a research project. The focus of the research will be on encouraging the development of each individual student's research, analytical and report writing practices and to promote the growth of high quality social services.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate the ability to design and undertake a research project.
· Analyse the complex policy and practice environment of third sector organisations.
· Critically evaluate the role of the third sector organisation in the provision of social services.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (2000 word Research Proposal (100 marks) + 10,000 word Field Study Report (300 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% All elements of CA must be passed independently of one another.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3213 Organisational Evaluation Research Study

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 36 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide opportunities for students to develop a field study in a third sector organisation, chosen in consultation with the fieldwork coordinator in the Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Content: The development of advanced evaluation skills to demonstrate competence in social research. The focus will be on the student's ability to evaluate and analyse the work of a voluntary sector organisation in the social sphere.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate competence in evaluation methods.
· Analyse organisational theory and practices.
· Critical evaluate the role of a third sector organisation in the provision of social services.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (8,000 word maximum Report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3401 Social Analysis, Gender and Society

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 125 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Pat Twomey, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Jacqui O'Riordan, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine the main concepts, perspectives and methods used in the study of society. To examine anti-racism and anti-oppressive practice as a vital element of working with children and families.

Module Content: Students will be assisted to think conceptually about the systems and structures of society. They will examine how sociological analysis throws light on the social institutions and processes within contemporary society. There will be a specific emphasis on the social construction of gender; and a feminist re-evaluation of the discourse on diversity in childhood and anti-discriminatory practice..

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Assess the social world from a critical perspective.
· Identify and analyse how the concepts of 'power' and 'social order' are explained by various sociological theorists (Parsons, Gramsci and Foucault).
· Discuss and evaluate the ways in which the concept of childhood may be socially constructed.
· Explain gender as a socially constructed principle of social organisation.
· Critically evaluate the contribution of the women's movement to social and political change, particularly in the Irish context.
· Evaluate the structural barriers preventing people from experiencing equal opportunity in all areas of life.
· Explore issues of diversity and discuss the development of prejudice in children.Critically evaluate the concept of anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive policy and practice.
· Explore the children's rights discourse and its implications in the context of anti-oppressive practice in early years settings.
· Engage in a process of self reflection that will enable students to become more aware of their own values, attitudes, beliefs and biases and discuss the impact of these on their work with children and families.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 150 marks; Continuous Assessment 150 marks (1 x 3000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS3402 Social Research in Early Years and Childhood Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 125.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (incorporating student presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jacqui O'Riordan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Shirley Martin, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Jacqui O'Riordan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To support students to identify and develop their social research skills in early childhood studies.

Module Content: Students are introduced to elements of social research and required to identify a social research topic on which they will develop a literature review. The learning is supported and developed through full class lectures and also through the mediums of student presentation and class discussion in smaller groups where the students act as critical friends to each other.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and formulate a research question which is personally and professionally salient to the student.
· Identify social and analytical theories relevant to this research question.
· Develop the skills to formulate a literature review in social research.
· Develop good presentation skills.
· Display good presentation skills.
· Develop their teamwork capacity.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Research Question and Literature Review (70 marks); In-class Presentation (30 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance will be monitored by a class register. 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted where students attend less than 80% of classes.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and re-submit assignment, as prescribed by the Department). Mark for in-class Presentation and Attendance at workshops will be carried forward.).

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SS4000 Science, Technology and Public Controversy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and Seminars.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies (Lecturer(s) Orla O'Donovan and Eluska Fernandez, Department of Applied Social Studies.).

Lecturer(s): Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Mary McDermott, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide students with an introduction to the fascinating multidisciplinary field of social studies known as Science and Technology Studies (STS). It aims to familiarise students with key ideas and concepts developed in this field to help us understand how science and technology are socially embedded and in turn how science and technology shape the way we live.

Module Content: The module begins by considering the origins of the field of study known as Science and Technology Studies and how its emergence has been characterised by conversations across boundaries between groups such as anthropologists, historians, policy analysts, sociologists, philosophers and health and environmental activists. Students are introduced to a number of influential texts in the field and to central concepts. Particular emphasis is placed on debates concerning public participation in decision-making about science and technology and on related concepts, such as 'public understanding of science', 'the scientific citizen' and 'civic epistemologies'. Consideration is also given to the emergence of new social identities associated with the development of new technologies, such as those in the field of genetics. A number of controversial or contested medical technologies are discussed at length in order to explore the political and cultural dimensions of knowledge production and knowledge contests.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss some of the key concepts, themes and debates in the multidisciplinary field of social studies, Science and Technology Studies (STS).
· Demonstrate a familiarity the goals of STS, particularly in regard to democratising and opening up the 'black box' of science and promoting 'scientific citizenship'.
· Explain how STS can be a resource in helping us to understand the public controversies surrounding many scientific and technological 'advances' that are increasingly a feature of 21st century biopolitics (e.g. new reproductive technologies, surgical reshapings of the body, biobanking, genetic engineering and stem cell research).
· Critically comment on science and technology controversies as struggles over meaning, morality and the distribution of resources.
· Demonstrate a familiarity with debates about the role of social movements in generating science and technology controversies.
· Outline how state institutions almost invariably become embroiled in many science and technology controversies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 1,500-2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass the Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assesment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded. Attendance at lectures is compulsory.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by Department).).

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SS4208 Placement II

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (14 week block Professional Placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary Wilson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with learning opportunities to meet professional competence requirements and to demonstrate critical integration of theory and practice.

Module Content: Students are provided with learning opportunities and assessed towards National Social Work Qualification competence. By the end of the placement, students are required to have demonstrated National Social Work Qualification competence.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Engage and communicate effectively with service users, fellow professionals and other stakeholders
· Make assessments and plan appropriate interventions
· Use appropriate and effective models of intervention
· Critically evaluate models of professional intervention
· Demonstrate required professional values and ethical standards
· Show proficiency in report writing and record keeping.

Assessment: 14 week block professional placement.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance on placement and at tutorials, which will be monitored by practice teachers and university tutors.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (At the discretion of the Summer Exam Board, students may be offered a repeat Placement over a minimum of 10 wks. Placement may be repeated once only. Students failing retaken Placement must withdraw).

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SS4209 Placement Portfolio

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary Wilson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary Wilson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To link professional practice (placement two) and university based modules.

Module Content: This module prepares students for placement two and provides a series of seminars and tutorials before, during and after the placement. These seminars and tutorials will focus on both professional and theoretical issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appraise their professional development while on placement and identify their future learning needs.
· Critically evaluate social work and the social worker's role in various practice contexts.
· Examine and evaluate the influence of students' own values on their practice.
· Demonstrate knowledge and application of at least one theoretical approach to social work.
· Recognise the impact of social policy and legal frameworks on social work practice.
· Critically analyse how social justice is promoted or discouraged in a professional setting.

Assessment: Professional portfolio.

Compulsory Elements: To meet professional requirements, attendance at lectures and tutorials will be monitored by a class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS4210 Social Research Plan

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 8.

Pre-requisite(s): Students must meet BASS entry requirements

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Supervisor to be appointed by the School of Applied Social Studies); 12 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to develop a detailed research plan

Module Content: The module will provide advanced knowledge and skills in the design, development and planning of social research. The focus will be on the student's ability to plan research in a specific social area under the supervision of the School of Applied Social Studies

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify specific research methodologies appropriate to specific social contexts.
· Design a quantitative research questionaire
· Design a qualitative research interview schedule
· Submit a detailed research plan using a specific methodology to research a specific social context.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1,500 word essays; (1) Quantitaive Questionaire, (2) Qualitative Schedule, (3) Research Plan).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails, or does not submit Continuous Assessment, they must submit revised Continuous Assessment as prescribed by the School of Applied Social Studies).

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SS4211 Anti-Racism and Anti-Discriminatory Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary Wilson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alastair Christie, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Caroline May Shore, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To critically examine anti-racism and anti-discriminatory practice in social work.

Module Content: In this module, discourses of 'race' will be examined in the context of social work/welfare. Topics covered include: the role of social policy and social professionals in promoting social cohesion; anti-racism, social rights and citizenship; migration and migration policies in Europe; and liberation movements, Black self-awareness and empowerment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· To define the role of social work in promoting anti-racist and anti-discriminatory practice;
· To describe a range of approaches to anti-discriminatory practice;
· To understand the social policy context and legal frameworks for anti-discriminatory practice;
· To critically examine different theoretical approaches to promoting social justice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS4212 Contemporary Issues in Social Work

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary Wilson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mary Wilson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To enable students to identify, debate and share dilemmas arising from their contemporary experience in professional practice. To enhance knowledge of the issues and possibilities that promote good practice in social work. To demonstrate evidence of the integration of theoretical material with their placement experience.

Module Content: The module will introduce key issues in social work and policy. Students will work in small groups to research an area of professional practice or policy. Students will be offered the opportunity to choose and review themes related to their professional development as practitioners. Students will be encouraged to draw on their own experiences from practice and other course units to facilitate and demonstrate the process of integrating theory and practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Facilitate discussion of the key contemporary social work issues students encountered while on placement which promoted learning opportunities (both professional and personal).
· Critically analyse the range of personal and situational factors associated with a variety of social work encounters while on placement.
· Identify and explore the different models of practice, social work skills and research carried out and implemented during placement.
· Reflect on the development of the professional self while identifying the role the personal self plays in all areas in the delivery of social work practice.
· Critically explore and review present social work practice and policy in an effort, to draw on the strengths of students, in identifying creative means of engaging with and working with involuntary clients.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,500 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the School).

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SS4214 Action Research Study

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 40 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mary Wilson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Katharina Swirak, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide opportunities for students to develop an action research project.

Module Content: This module will provide basic knowledge and skills to develop and undertake an action research project. The focus of the action research will be on encouraging the development of each individual student's professional practices and to promote the growth of high quality social services.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine and respond to research questions relevant to social work through completion of an undergraduate dissertation.
· Employ the skills of literature searching and analysis through completion of a literature review
· Distinguish between the key qualitative and quantitative methods and engage in debate about their application to social work research.
· Employ knowledge and skills of data collection, analysis and representation through implementation of a chosen research method(s)
· Demonstrate an awareness of research ethics and integrity
· Be able to outline and discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of the research methods selected within their dissertation.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x max. 10,000 word Research Report, 1 x 2,500 word Research Proposal).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met (Students who have not fulfilled the attendance requirements for the module cannot avail of the supplemental examination arrangement), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit Continuous Assessment, he/she must submit revised assessment as prescribed by the School).

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SS4215 Social Research Triangulated Study

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 8.

Pre-requisite(s): Students must meet BASS entry requirements

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Workshops (Supervisor to be appointed by the School of Applied Social Studies); 24 x 1hr(s) Fieldwork; 24 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to conduct a triangulated social research study within a defined social context

Module Content: This module will provide the skills and knowledge required to complete social research using eclectic methodologies appropriate to the social context under investigation

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Administer quantitative research questionaires
· Conduct qualitative research interviews
· Access and review relevant literature appropriate to the research area
· Devise research methodolgies appropriate to the research topic
· Outline and discuss the ethical dimensions of the research area
· Evaluate the effectiveness of their own research strategy
· Present research findings in an appropriate format.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (1 x 10,000 word Dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails or does not submit continuous assessment they must resubmit revised continuous assessment as prescribed by the School of Applied Social Studies).

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SS4304 Applied Housing Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 85.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of housing research methodologies.

Module Content: Introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods; Structuring housing surveys, policy evaluation, tenant satisfaction surveys; Evaluating performance indicators in housing management. Examination of Irish housing policy and provision.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe, at a level appropriate to final year undergraduate standard, the core features of housing systems in an Irish and comparative context.
· Be familiar with a range of applied housing research methods and the theoretical, epistemological and discursive foundations of these.
· Demonstrate a practical knowledge of applied housing research skills including literature and policy reviews, data analysis, research project management, team work, division and assignment of research tasks, organisation of material and collation of reports.
· Undertake small scale applied housing research projects on a supervised basis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to pass CA.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS4801 Multiculturalism, Gender and Social Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the students' issues of cultural and social diversity and prepare them to develop the intercultural skills and competencies necessary for professional practice in a changing society.

Module Content: This module will examine the meaning of mulitculturalism with reference to race, ethnicity, gender, age, and the role of carers. Race and gender issues in health care will be a particular focus with an emphasis on marginalised groups. The module will also focus on women's health, health and masculinity and carers and caring . Anti-discriminatory practices will provide a focus for this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain and discuss key issues relating to multiculturalism, diversity and difference.
· Formulate a critical discussion on concepts relating to anti-discrimination, oppression, race/ethnicity and gender.
· Employ an anti-discriminatory approach to professional practice.
· Evaluate health practice and its impact on minority groups.
· Evaluate the role of carers in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Written Examination - end of Period 1).

Compulsory Elements: Winter Examination - end of Period 1. To meet professional requirements attendance at lectures, tutorials, seminars etc. will be monitored by a class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (Written Examination) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS5016 Social Policy Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the changing contexts of welfare from the Keynes/Beveridge Model to new formations in post-industrial society.

Module Content: Welfare Consensus; Welfare Crisis; the New Right Critique and Policy measures; Political Ecology; Critique of the 'Third Way'.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have advanced insights into a range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives on welfare.
· Be in a position to interpret and analyse the factors which influence the formation, implementation, and efficacy of social policies in contemporary societies.
· In a position to apply a range of welfare paradigms to particular social policy initiatives.
· Demonstrate a capability to critically appraise social policies using insights drawn from theories of citizenship, political economy, feminist perspectives, critical theory, and social movements theory.
· Be able to critically analyse different concepts about the links between rights and the provision of welfare internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS5017 Policy and Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Dukelow, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine Fordism, Post-Fordism and globalisation in relation to welfare and the information of welfare states.

Module Content: An analysis of Fordist, Post-Fordist and Globalisation theories in terms of their implications for social policy and welfare state.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have advanced insights into a range of theoretical and conceptual perspectives on welfare.
· Be in a position to interpret and analyse the factors which influence the formation, implementation, and efficacy of social policies in contemporary societies.
· In a position to apply a range of welfare paradigms to particular social policy initiatives.
· Demonstrate a capability to critically appraise social policies using insights drawn from theories of citizenship, political economy, feminist perspectives, critical theory, and social movements theory.
· Be able to critically analyse different concepts about the links between rights and the provision of welfare internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1x 2000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Formal Written Examination and Continuous Assessment independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS5020 Education and Welfare

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Shirley Martin, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module offers a guide to some differing perspectives in the approach to studying education in its (i) sociological, (ii) political and (iii) policy context.

Module Content: This module contains subject matter focusing on class, race and gender inequalities in education, and offers an overview of education systems and educational policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate the role of education in contemporary society and the impact of educational policies on access to educational opportunity.
· Evaluate key issues in contemporary policy and practice in education in the light of different theoretical interpretations.
· Critically examine current International education commitments and targets (such as the Millennium Development Goals).
· Examine some of the different forms of educational inequality evident in the Irish educational system.
· Identify and review current key strategies and innovations focused on the reduction of educational disadvantages in Ireland at preschool, primary secondary and third level education.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS5021 Communities, Activism and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Rosemary R. Meade, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To theorise the status and practice of community activism in Ireland with reference to the wider political and policy context

Module Content: Changing conceptions of community and communitarianism, alternative traditions of community action, issues related to partnership, professionalisation and state power and the contribution of communities to broader social change

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Theorise the values and politics of community activism and development
· Evaluate community development's contribution to the democratisation of Irish social, political and cultural life
· Know key trends in state/community sector relationships in Ireland
· Evaluate the implications of professionalisation for the community sector in Ireland
· Theorise how community resistance is expressed in contemporary Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to submit and pass a portfolio. Instructions for portfolio preparation and submission will be provided in clas.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination:

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SS5022 Social Science and Social Work

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alastair Christie, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine how the social sciences seek to explain and shape the nature of social work in (post) modern society.

Module Content: Social work and theories of helping; (post) modernity; gender; power and organisational analysis; consumer perspectives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define the role of social work within the welfare system in Ireland;
· recognise the importance of specific knowledge, skills and values in social work;
· critically examine difference discourses of social work practice;
· apply social science theories to critical examine social work policies and practices.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS5023 Youth Policy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Elizabeth Kiely, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To critically assess the principles, policy and practice of youth interventions in Irish Society.

Module Content: Theory of Youth Work; Young People and Social Policies; Youth and Work Practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Be familiar with the key theoretical ideas that inform contempoary Youth work policy and prctice in Ireland.
· Competently critique and evaluate youth work policy and practice in contemporary Ireland.
· Be familiar with key developments in Irish youth policy and practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School.).

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SS5024 The Politics of Racism

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide a grounding inn introduction concepts and theories of to the role of 'race' and racism, ethnicity, and migration in society and to explore the meaning and uses of 'race' in contemporary politics and social policies.

Module Content: This module examines the concept of 'race' as a social construction. The course will theorise 'race' within social, political, cultural and ideological contexts, with particular reference to racism in the Irish experience. This module will be interactive in nature, involving debate and discussion that draws on contemporary issues of 'race' and racism in Irish societydiscussion and group learning exercises.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the social construction of 'race' in a historical context
· Theorise the emergence and experience of racism in the Irish context
· Critically evaluate social policy development in relation to ethnic minority groups in Ireland
· Assess Irish immigration policy and practice
· Compare and contrast Irish experiences of racism and multiculturalism with the wider European and international contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4000 word E-portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to submit all elements of CA.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment , as prescribed by the Department.

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SS5025 Social Perspectives in Mental Health

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To present a critical overview of mental health from its evolution in institutional care forms to present day community car strategies.

Module Content: Institutional care; community care initiatives; social and economic integration; normalisation and human rights.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine the history of mental health care and the shift from institutional to community based care.
· Describe and review the key conceptual and policy developments shaping current mental health care.
· Consider the impact of service provision on users and carers and critically evaluate the implementation of mental health policy.
· Recognise and analyse the impact of social and environmental factors on the experience of mental distress.
· Examine the role of legislation in promoting a rights- based approach to mental health care.
· Appreciate the role of advocacy and service user involvement in mental health.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In order to pass the module students are required to pass the Formal Written Examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS5026 Sexuality and Society

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maire Leane, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine both the historical and contemporary interactions between sexuality and society. To examine the insights of social theorists who have considered the issues of power and sexuality.

Module Content: Analysis of the changing nature and mechanisms of sexual regulation, case study analysis of contested issues of sexuality, e.g. reproductive rights, homosexuality and the social movement which have emerged around them.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and distinguish between key social theories of sexuality.
· Interpret the changing nature and mechanisms of sexual regulation.
· Critique social policies on sexuality.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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SS5027 Introduction to Planning and Sustainable Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Jonathan Hall, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine a range of issues in relation to the practices of planning and sustainable development.

Module Content: Planning policies and practices in the Irish and wider context. The institutional, regulatory and legal contexts of planning practice. Public participation in planning and development. Exploration of principles of sustainable development in planning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an understanding off issues in strategic planning
· Describe the main planning process
· Understand the dynamic influence of society, the environment and the economy
· Engage with contemporary dialogues in planning.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Full attendance at lectures and tutorials is required and will be monitored by a class register.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS5029 Community Conflict Transformation and Peace Building

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Discussion/Groupwork).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the causes and dynamics of conflict in society and the range of differing approaches associated with conflict transformation and peace-building. To critically analyse aspects of the current peace process in the North of Ireland in the context of international conflict transformation strategies.

Module Content: Theories about conflict, conflict transformation and peace-building in society. Conflict in Ireland, and in particular, Northern Ireland and attempts at resolution. The Irish Peace Process and micro and macro level approaches to conflict transformation in the North. Comparative approaches to peace-building and conflict transformation internationally.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically assess a range of theoretical perspectives about the causes and dynamics of conflict in society
· Critically analyse the causes and dynamics of conflict in Ireland and in the North of Ireland in particular
· Critically analyse various attempts to develop conflict transformation and peace-building in Ireland and N. Ireland
· Critically assess the current peace process and approaches to conflict transformation in the North
· Compare and contrast different approaches to conflict transformation and peace-building internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project/Essay (4000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated for the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS5030 Critical Perspectives on Age and Ageing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mairead Considine, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies; Mr Michael O'Haodain, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop students' understanding of the social, cultural, political and economic context of the ageing experience in Ireland with wider reference to demographic change and policy developments internationally.

Module Content: Age-related health, social and welfare policies and practices; historical and socio-cultural perspectives on ageing; ageism and human rights; citizenship; social inclusion and equality.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically engage with historical, theoretical and cultural constructs of age and ageing;
· Recognise the diversity of the ageing experience in Irish society and the structures that shape these experiences;
· Critically analyse social, health and welfare policies as these impact older people;
· Contribute to current debates on social inclusion and citizenship as these relate to older people;
· Critically examine the rights and welfare issues relevant to older people and the emerging policy responses/practice issues related to these and other contemporary debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA work must be re-submitted in advance of the Autumn Board 2015.

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SS5317 Social Policy and Social Theory

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module offers a comparative guide to different approaches to studying social policy and social theory.

Module Content: This module will explore key debates within modern social theory that are relevant for contemporary social policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Be familiar with the concepts, frameworks and theories which inform the literature on studying social theory and social policy.
· Have developed the capacity to pursue comparative research in applied social studies.
· Exhibit a basic understanding of different subjects from social science for existing sub-disciplines as namely social work, youth work and social policy.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA must be repeated.

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SS5400 Research Project (H Dip Social Policy)

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Joseph Finnerty, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To identify appropriate research topics and to produce a research report under staff supervision.

Module Content: Elements of research; research strategies; data selection; data collection; collation and analysis; application of statistical packages; final report writing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Be familiar with the theoretical, methodological and policy contexts informing the choices open to researchers in undertaking a small-scale postgraduate research project.
· Be familiar with the choices involved at the data selection stage and their implications.
· Display familiarity with the many aspects of data collection, via either the primary or secondary data collection process.
· Have developed a capacity to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data.
· Demonstrate a good grasp of the ethics and politics of social research.
· Exhibit the skills required in writing a graduate research project.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 10,000 word Research Report.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA must be resubmitted to the Autumn Exam Board.

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SS5806 Social Policy and Midwifery Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 10 x 1hr(s) Other (Presentations); 60 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To promote students' awareness of the social policy context that frames midwifery practice.

Module Content: Introduction to social policy, women and social policy, motherhood, fatherhood, lone parenthood, family policy, historical social policy issues and the development of midwifery, contemporary social policy issues and developments in midwifery practice, adoption, race and ethnicity, working wtih women from ethnic minority communities, feminist thought and midwifery practice, women and the healthcare, the politics of risk and the promotion of women's health, discourses of breastfeeding and breastfeeding policy, the abortion debates and home births.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the relevance of social policy to midwifery practice, the historical positioning of women within welfare and the impact this has on current welfare policies.
· Assess the changing nature of motherhood, fatherhood and the family within society.
· Review historical and contemporary social policy issues impacting on the development of midwifery practice in Ireland and in particular the rise of the home-birth movement.
· Summarise legislation and policies surrounding adoption and the role of the midwife in supporting mothers and fathers who are engaged in this process.
· Apply an anti-discriminatory approach to midwifery practice.
· Explore key strands of feminist thought and their relevance for midwifery practice.
· Appraise the relationship between women and healthcare including the politics of risk and the resultant impact on women's health.
· Evaluate the interaction between breastfeeding discourses and policy development.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Group Presentation 75 marks, 1 x 800-1,000 word Written Statement of Learning 25 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Continuous assessment. Attendance and participation in all timetabled teaching activities. Submission of written work.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Students must repeat assignment as prescribed by Module Co-ordinator).).

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SS6015 Community Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 2hr(s) Fieldwork; 10 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Self directed and blended learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module examines the meaning of community and its significance as a locus for service delivery.

Module Content: Introduction to community development, the meaning of community, community development in Ireland, origins and approaches. Issues in community development including, funding, partnership and participation, the interface between statutory, voluntary and community organisations. Community based approaches to health and social care: primary healthcare versus medical outreach, working with marginalised groups and individual in communities. This module also includes two field visits to community organisations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Reconstruct the concept of community.
· Synthesise the values underpinning community work.
· Formulate an understanding and analysis of the concepts of partnership and participation as used in community development projects.
· Summarise the role of women in community development work and describe ways of engaging women in community projects.
· Argue the contribution that the process of community development makes to health enhancing activities.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word Academic Paper).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails, or does not submit Continuous Assessment he/she must complete revised or alternative assignments, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS6016 Health and Personal Social Services

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 80 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Self-directed and blended Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Claire Dorrity, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to the main features of health and personal social services that form the context of their practice.

Module Content: Introduction to the health and personal social services, restructuring of the health care services and health reform. The mixed economy of health and welfare. Organisation and administration of health and social services in Ireland. Key areas in child-care policy. Poverty and health inequalities. Inter-agency co-operation, multidisciplinary teamwork. Community care for key user groups, empowering patients, and working with diversity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Compare and contrast Irish health and social care services with those in other European countries.
· Summarise the current organisation and administration of the health and personal social services.
· Formulate the determinants of the mixed economy of health and welfare in Ireland.
· Compile the key issues in social policy impinging on health and welfare.
· Explain the impact of poverty on health status.
· Identify key socially excluded user groups.
· Reconstruct the criteria of good team, multidisciplinary and interagency work in health and personal social services.
· Differentiate between policy and health and welfare services for key groups the public health nurses encounters.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word Academic Paper).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (If a student fails, or does not submit Continuous Assessment he/she must complete revised or alternative assignments).

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SS6017 Critical Social Science Perspectives on Public Health

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 27 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to critical social science perspectives and to demonstrate how they can be a resource for critical analysis of interventions made in the name of public health.

Module Content: Introduction to critical social science perspectives on health, health policy and public health; critiques of common sense and taken-for-granted ideas in the field of public health; citizenship and public health; consumerism and public health; power, expertise and public health; democratising public health.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss some of the main concepts and themes in critical social science perspectives health, health policy and public health.
· Demonstrate a familiarity with selected classic theoretical texts that have been influential in social, scientific thinking about public health.
· Demonstrate an understanding of critical social analysis.
· Appraise the contribution of different social movements to extending and resisting public health frames of understanding.
· Critically examine public health policy, particularly in respect of equity.
· Appraise the potential of "scientific citizenship" and social movements to democratise public health policy-making.
· Develop critical analyses of specific public health measures.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3,000 word essay 50 marks; in-class test 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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SS6019 Critical Social Science Perspectives on Public Health

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to critical social science perspectives and to demonstrate how they can be a resource for critical analysis of interventions made in the name of public health.

Module Content: What is a "critical" perspective?; public health, knowledge and expertise; public health and "disabling professions"; public health and governing the body; public health and the "participatory turn"; public health and social movements; public health and the "death of the social"; public health and "post development"; public health and contested epidemics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss some of the main concepts and themes in critical social science perspective on public health.
· Discuss and debate selected classic texts that have been influential in social scientific thinking about public health.
· Appraise the contribution of different social movements to extending and resisting orthodox public health frames of understanding.
· Critically examine public health policy, particularly in respect of equity.
· Critically analyse specific public health measures.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed CA must be repeated (as prescribed by the School).

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SS6020 Principles and Practice of Youth Work

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the historical, cultural and socio-political background of youth work and to critically evaluate the philosophies and practices underpinning youth work and the role of the youth worker.

Module Content: This module assesses the nature and purpose of youth work practice in contemporary society through reviewing youth work's history, development and context within wider society. It introduces students to the different constructions and meanings of the terms 'youth' and 'youth work', and it reviews the changing subjective experiences of young people in contemporary society.

The module further explores the tensions and debates within youth work, the ideologies that have shaped its development, and introduces students to the differing operational structures that pertain in youth work (such as clubs, projects and streetwork). The module presents students with the core theoretical and policy knowledge required to practice in a professional setting.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Trace the historical and contemporary development of youth work within wider social structures
· Identify and evaluate key definitions youth and of youth work
· Identify the principles and values that underlie and inform youth work
· Identify and analyse current issues in youth work practice.
· Outline, analyse and evaluate different models of youth work
· Demonstrate awareness of youth policy at national and international levels
· Demonstrate awareness of the contexts of young people's lives
· Engage with the principles of reflexive practice in youth work
· Critically evaluate the implementation of quality standards in youth work.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 2,000 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6021 Principles and Practice of Community Arts

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the historical, cultural and socio-political background of community arts and to critically evaluate the philosophies, principles and practices underpinning community arts.

Module Content: This module explores the evolution of community arts with reference to socio-cultural contexts. It invites students to critically reflect on the relationship between community and the artist. Students will evaluate the impact of community arts through case studies and workshops and will consider the importance of community arts with reference to the welfare of marginalised individuals and groups in society and in relation to urban planning and regeneration.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Trace the historical development of community arts with reference to cultural and socio-political contexts.
· Identify and evaluate key definitions of `community arts?
· Identify the principles and values that underlie community arts
· Outline the main models of community and participatory arts
· Critically evaluate the potential of community arts practices to address contemporary challenges within communities.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 3,000 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Marks in passed element(s) of Continous Assessment are carried forward. Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (50% is the maximum mark awarded in the Winter Exam Board). Students must achieve a minimum of 75% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (50% is the maximum mark awarded in the Winter Exam Board).

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SS6022 Youth, Ethics and Welfare

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael O'Haodain, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Michael O'Haodain, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop skills in working with children and young people which are ethically informed.

Module Content: This module considers the application of appropriate principles and values in working with children and young people. It is informed by a child- or youth-centred approach to working with children and young people and their families and/or carers in a multi-agency setting. It also introduces students to the legislative framework for working with children and young people.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically reflect on their own ethical values and the ethical responsibilities of working with children and young people.
· Identify and critically analyse the legislative policies, practices and procedures in place for working with children and young people.
· Demonstrate an awareness of personal and professional roles and boundaries.
· Be capable of developing and critically evaluating organisational policies, practices and procedures for working with children and young people.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6023 Project Planning, Management and Leadership Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 3hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To prepare students for the process of project planning and project management in youth and community settings.

Module Content: This module prepares students for the planning and management of projects, with a particular focus on participatory projects. It examines funding opportunities, develops skills in writing funding proposals, strategy development, project implementation and evaluation, management and leadership skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify key sources of funding in Irish and European contexts.
· Formulate funding proposals.
· Identify mechanisms for successful strategy development.
· Identify the stages involved in project implementation.
· Use a range of methods in evaluating project outcomes.
· Critically reflect on the politics of funding mechanisms in the Irish and European contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word project proposal).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6024 Arts and Social Action

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module equips students with the creative tools to support young people to challenge social injustices.
and express messages for a more positive future to wider communities

Module Content: The student will develop practical creative tools to engage youth in exploring social justice issues that
affect them. How we use the arts as a tool of expression advocating for social change and challenging
current systems of power and oppression. It provides the learner with the skills to facilitate creative action
challenging the underlying causes of social justice issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Facilitate workshops with young people advocating for social change using creative methodologies:
· Develop an understanding of the role of the artist in activism
· Develop an understanding of public arts as a form of communication with the wider world.
· Identify specific case studies which demonstrate the role of the arts and community in creatively responding to development issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward. Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (50% is the maximum mark awarded in the Winter Exam Board).

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SS6026 Dissertation in Youth Work with Community Arts and Sports Studies

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To enable students to apply research skills to investigate an aspect of policy and/or practice in depth.

Module Content: This module requires each student to complete a 15,000-word dissertation in an area of policy and/or practice related to youth work, community arts and sports studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key components of the research process.
· Identify potential ethical issues in undertaking social research, and be able to suggest ways in which these might be addressed.
· Differentiate between different research methods (both qualitative and quantitative) and the purposes for which they can be used.
· Have developed a capacity to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data.
· Exhibit the skills required in writing a research proposal.
· Conduct a piece of social research in an area of youth work, community arts and/or sports, using a range of different research methods.
· Undertake a literature review, methodology, analysis of data and presentation of findings.
· Connect primary research data with theoretical debates and concepts.
· Identify the original contribution which their research makes to the production of social scientific knowledge.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (1 x 2,000 word research proposal, 1 x 15,000 word dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit revised thesis, as prescribed by the School).

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SS6028 Critical Social Science Perspective on Public Health

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 27 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to critical social science perspectives and to demonstrate how they can be a resource for critical analysis of interventions made in the name of public health.

Module Content: Introduction to critical social science perspectives on health, health policy and public health; critiques of common sense and taken-for-granted ideas in the field of public health; citizenship and public health; consumerism and public health; power, expertise and public health; democratising public health.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the main concepts and themes in critical social science perspectives health, health policy and public health.
· Discuss and debate selected classic theoretical texts that have been influential in social scientific thinking about public health.
· Discuss critical social analysis.
· Appraise the contribution of different social movements to extending and resisting public health frames of understanding.
· Critically examine public health policy, particularly in respect of equity.
· Appraise the potential of "scientific citizenship" and social movements to democratise public health policy-making.
· Critically analyses of specific public health measures.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (4,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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SS6029 Development Education and Community Arts

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To consider the way in which culture has been used as a tool of oppression and a tool of resistance, focusing on local cultures in a global context. To develop the skills in facilitating creative workshops in development themes. To consider the role of the arts and creative approaches in Development Education.

Module Content: This module develops an understanding of development issues from both local and global perspectives, fostering an awareness of human rights and responsibilities and how young people can effect change in a global community. It explores the subordination of local cultures through processes of colonialism and globalisation. It also considers how culture has been used as a way of challenging social exclusion and oppression by marginalised artists and communities during periods of political and cultural upheaval in international contexts. Finally, it considers the role of community arts in contemporary global contexts, focusing on discourses of development education and the impact of migration.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the historical impact of colonialism and globalisation on local cultures.
· Explain the principles of development education.
· Identify specific case studies which demonstrate the role of the artist and community in creatively responding to oppression.
· Explain the role of community arts in contemporary global contexts.
· Utilise facilitation skills in non-formal education processes, drawing on creative tools for engaging youth in development education issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (50% is the maximum mark awarded in the Winter Exam Board).

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SS6030 Practice Placement I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 4hr(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr David O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, External Institution, YouthWork Agency; Mr David O'Donovan, Department of Applied Social Studies; Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To practice youth work for 100 hours in a voluntary youth work setting

Module Content: Youth work activities in a voluntary setting

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Facillitate youth groups in a youth club type setting
· Demonstrate appropriate engagment and communication skills
· Engage with the process of reflexive practice in youth work
· Demonstrate an awareness of the host agency's history, ethos and methodologies in the practice of youth work
· Respond appropriately to the needs of young people in a voluntary setting
· Practice in an ethical manner
· Record, analyse and evaluate their practice in a youth work setting
· Incorporate relevant theoretical knowledge into their youth work practice
· Demonstrate competance in core youth work skills.

Assessment: 100 hours in a voluntary youth work setting.

Compulsory Elements: Placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail/Deferred/Incomplete judgement. Assessment by Practice Assessment Board.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Subject to the approval of the Practice Assessment Board, students may be permitted to repeat the placement once only.

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SS6031 Practice Placement II

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 17 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Practice Supervisions and 3 way meetins); 300 x 1hr(s) Placements (in a professional youth work setting).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, External Institution, Youth Work Agency.

Module Objective: To develop analyse and evaluate professional youth work practice.

Module Content: 300 hours (minimum) placement in a professional Youth Work setting, practice supervision, agency line management, 3-way meetings and self-directed learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Deconstruct, record, analyze and evaluate their own youth work practice in a detailed and reflective manner using relevant theoretical ideas.
· Evidence the incorporation of theoretical ideas and models of youth work into their own youth work practice through appropriate engagement with practice supervision.
· Demonstrate proficiency in recording, writing and presenting professional reports from their practice.
· Demonstrate competence in youth work skills in a professional youth work setting with reference to the National Quality Standards Framework for Youth Work (Ireland) and the Youth Work National Occupational Standards (UK).
· Demonstrate the professional values and ethical standards required for professional youth work practice.
· Respond to the needs of young people and promote young people?s rights in a professional youth work setting.
· Evidence knowledge of the relevant policy areas that impact on youth work practice in different settings.
· Demonstrate knowledge of the host agency's mission, ethos and practice methodologies.

Assessment: Pass/Fail/Incomplete/Deferred Judgment for Practice Placement. Assessment by Practice Assessment Board. Continuous Assessment (Placement Portfolio 1 x 8,000 word (approx.) portfolio containing practice deconstruction sheets, reflective journal, placement contracts, 3-way reports and practice notes.).

Compulsory Elements: Minimum of 300 hours recorded practice; 50% of which involves face-to-face contact with young people. Assessment by Practice Assessment Board. Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement on Practice Placement and Continuous Assessment.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: At the discretion of the Summer Exam Board and the recommendations of the Practice Assessment Board, students may be offered a repeat Placement over a minimum of 10 wks. Placement may be repeated once only. Students failing retaken Placement must withdraw.

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SS6036 Youth Work: Working with Individuals and Groups

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Cindy O'Shea, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To equip students with the skills required to respond effectively to the needs of young people in individual (one to one) and group situations

Module Content: This module builds on the theoretical and practical foundations of reflective youth work practice methodologies in developing student skills for working with individuals and groups.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise and apply appropriate theories of counselling
· Practice appropriate engagement and communication skills
· Recognise professional limits and boundaries in youth work
· Respond effectively to individuals in crisis
· Facilitate youth groups
· Design and implement developmental group work programmes using appropriate resources
· Record and evaluate group work processes and outcomes
· Record and evaluate work and outcomes with individual young people.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Case Study 1 (Individuals), 1 x 3,000 words. Case Study 1 (Individuals), 1 x 3,000 words. Case).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (50% is the maximum mark awarded in repeat examinations.).

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SS6037 Youth Work: Informal and Non-Formal Learning

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Pat Leahy, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Cindy O'Shea, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the philosophies and concepts underpinning informal and non-formal learning within a youth work setting and to develop students' skills in this context.

Module Content: This module explores the use of the informal and non-formal learning mechanisms in youth work that contribute to young people's development and young people's participation in society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically analyse the capacity of youth work providers to facilitate informal and non-formal learning
· Develop informal and non-formal learning opportunities for young people within specific youth work agency contexts
· Develop the requisite knowledge and skills to facilitate informal and non-formal learning in a youth work setting
· Demonstrate awareness of the techniques and methods used for informal and non-formal learning in youth work
· Recognise and evaluate the impact of informal and non-formal education structures in contemporary society
· Identify and deconstruct the key components of transitional structures in contemporary society
· Critically analyse and assess the impact of informal and non-formal learning on young people's participation in youth programmes and in the wider context of young people's lives.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6038 Dissertation in Youth Work

Credit Weighting: 45

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Student centred learning supported by academic supervisor).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Eileen Hogan, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: Design and undertake a social research dissertation relevant to youth work practice.

Module Content: The subject of the dissertation will be decided by individual consultations with students.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key components of the research process.
· Differentiate between research methods (both qualitative and quantitative) and the purposes for which they can be used.
· Analyse both qualitative and quantitative data.
· Write a research proposal.
· Design and conduct a participatory research project within a youth work, community arts and/or sports context.
· Demonstrate a high-level, reflexive understanding of ethical engagement in research by evidencing the development and use of collaborative and participatory research methods throughout the research process.
· Undertake high-quality, independent research that demonstrates a systematic and integrated understanding of a research problem.
· Critically evaluate theory and empirical evidence and demonstrate ability to generate evidence-based policy recommendations.
· Identify the original contribution that the student?s research makes to the production of social scientific knowledge.

Assessment: Total Marks 900: Continuous Assessment 900 marks (20,000 words Research Dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit revised dissertation as prescribed by the Department.).

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SS6101 Social Work Theory 1: Theory and Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (Assignment submitted in April (Semester 3). Teaching Semester 1. Assignment based on application of S1 teaching on placement in S2.).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Seminars/Lectures); 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Seminars/Lectures); 5 x 2hr(s) Other (Seminars/Lectures).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alastair Christie, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Mairie Cregan, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Hilary Jenkinson, Department of Applied Social Studies, Staff, School of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to social work theory.

Module Content: The module is composed of four distinct elements: a) social work theory and methods, b) theories of counselling, c) group work, d) community work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· a) Social work theory and methods:
-Reflect on the nature of social work theory and examine the major theoretical perspectives which have influenced social work practice.
- Examine the humanistic values and ethical codes of social work in context.
· b: Theories of counselling:
Link counselling theories and practices with social work;
· c) GroupWork
- Explain and illustrate theories of groupwork;
- Identify different models of groupwork intervention and critically assess their relevance to practice;
- Explore the value bases of social groupwork and appreciate how values influence all aspects of intervention;
- Describe and defe
· d) Community Work
- Critically engage with the concepts of `community and `community work;
- Reflect on the principles and values that underpin community work;
- Identify models of community work and consider how they can be applied in practice;
- Use Ife's framework to explore the competing disc.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Groupwork Essay, 2,000 - 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 80% Attendance at Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessments, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS6102 Human Growth and Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (12 x 2hr Seminars/ Lectures).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module explores human development and self-awareness.

Module Content: There are two parts to the module: a) human growth and development; b) reflective counselling skills in social work practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· a) human growth and development
Adopt a critical perspective towards the concept of development and explore how social constructionist
· Integrate the developmental literature into their understanding of their own personal and professional journey;
· Be open to exploring the shadow aspects of their professional identity
· Actively engage with self-care and see the maintenance of their own well-being as a professional responsibility.
· b) reflective counselling skills
Participate in setting up, building and maintaining relationships within a small group;
· Understand the importance of developing a climate of trust, support and challenge for new learning in a group;
· Explore some of the main concepts and methodologies of Person-Centred counselling and their application, relevance and influence on the participants in their professional and personal lives;
· Practice some of the basic skills of counselling, such as active and reflective listening;
· Develop some self-awareness by exploring their own personal process in a safe and confidential setting.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 - 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 80% attendance at seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessments as prescribed by the School).

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SS6105 Social Policy and Social Exclusion

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1 and 3. (Teaching Semester 1. Assignment submitted in April S3 based on application of teaching in S1 while on placement in S2.).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (12 x 2hr Seminars/Lectures).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Frederick Powell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alastair Christie, Department of Applied Social Studies; Prof Frederick Powell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module provides students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge on issues related to oppression and social exclusion, and using social justice as a basis, to engage in discussion about anti-discriminatory practice.

Module Content: Students will have the opportunity to critically appraise policy and its implications for social service provision, practice and disadvantaged groups. Students will be presented with a range of analytical lenses that can be used to critically analyse social structures, systems and practice. Through completion of a placement-based assignment, students will begin to critically reflect on the frameworks outlined in this module in relation to their practice experience.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically appraise policy and its implications for practice
· Critically engage with the conceptual frameworks outlined in this module and begin to apply these frameworks to practice experiences
· Critically reflect on issues relating to social justice and anti-discriminatory practice in social work and begin to use this as a basis for evaluating practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( 2,500-3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 80% Attendance at lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit new assignments, as prescribed by the School).

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SS6106 Applied Social Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the applications of social research methods to social work practice.

Module Content: The module examines the planning, implementation, interpretation, evaluation and dissemination of research on social work practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Participate in debates about the role of research-informed and evidence-based practice in supporting social work practice
· Recognise and debate the application of the main methodological traditions and their associated research methods to social work research
· Identify and develop researchable questions from practice and placement experience


· Plan a research project relating to social work practice and define the form and function of each stage of that process within a written research proposal.
· Employ the techniques associated with several main research methods in particular, surveys, interviews and focus groups.
· Develop the skills to search and critically appraise the research literature.


· Evaluate the potential of participatory action research as a means of increasing public engagement in research.

Assessment: Marked on attendance only.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance and Participation. 80% attendance is compulsory.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6107 Social Work Settings 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 2hr(s) Other (Seminars/Lectures).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with an opportunity to develop expertise in particular areas of practice.

Module Content: The module includes the following three areas: a) mental health; b) health care; c) substance misuse

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· a) In relation to Mental Health:
- Identify and critically evaluate current discourses in the field of mental health, as well as the key conceptual and policy developments shaping service provision;
- Develop a knowledge base of mental distress and recognise its impact on service users, families and communities;
- Identify the role of social work in mental health by considering hospital, community and generic settings of practice;
- Recognise the contribution of contextual and environmental factors in the experience of mental distress;
- Recognise and apply the principles of (a) recovery- oriented practice; (b) service user involvement and advocacy and (c) social justice;
- Demonstrate an appreciation of values and ethical issues in mental health;
- Evaluate the contribution of social work in developing a holistic, recovery-oriented practice.
· b) In relation to Health Care:
- Demonstrate knowledge of key social work roles and practice interventions in the various health care settings.
- Utilise key conceptual themes for working effectively and ethically in healthcare in particular, loss and grief work.
· c) In relation to substance misuse:
- Recognise the social and cultural factors in substance use;
- Critique the social policy response to substance issues;
- Critically analyse the core practice responses to problematic substance use.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000-3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 80% Attendance at Lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit new assignments as prescribed by the School).

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SS6108 Child and Family Welfare I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (12 x 2hr Seminars/Lectures).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Caroline May Shore, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to social work in a child welfare and protection context.

Module Content: Child abuse theory, legal and policy context; social work assessment and prevention in child welfare and protection practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically engage with theory and contemporary research to inform and support assessment, and decision-making and intervention in child protection and welfare work;
· Critique and apply the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and Their Families (Department of Health et al., 2000), based on ecological development theory, as a framework or `conceptual map? to gather and analyse information on children and their families;
· Interpret and apply knowledge gained from the child abuse inquiries, government policy, international conventions and legislation to child and family welfare assessments;
· Appreciate and make explicit, professional social work values, ethics and principles that guide assessment, decision-making and interventions in working with children and families;
· Apply social work skills in the areas of report-writing, information gathering and analysis;
· Reflect on and their own value base and articulate how this impacts on their practice with children and families;
· Display the capacity to value and participate in projects that require teamwork and self-directed learning.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Group Assignment, 70 marks; Individual reflective piece, 30 marks. Students must pass the Group Assignment and the Reflective piece independently.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 80% attendance at lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition students must achieve at least 40% in both elements of Continuous Assessment.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessments as prescribed by the School.).

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SS6111 Crime prevention and society: policies, governance and interventions

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus student presentations.); 220 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Recommended reading, independent research and self-directed learning.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Katharina Swirak, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Katharina Swirak, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce students to different actors, models and practices of crime prevention in both Irish and international contexts.

Module Content: This module aims to look at different aspects of crime prevention in late modern societies, with particular attention paid to the Irish crime prevention landscape. Starting with the contextualisation of actors and specific crime prevention practices within a variety of different models, underpinned by different legacies and ideologies, this module outlines how a 'governmentality' perspective can contribute to understanding contemporary features and practices of crime prevention. Trends such as the involvement of communities, civil society organisations and the private sector in crime prevention through various 'partnership' arrangements, will be explored, with a view to understand both continuities and shifts in modes of crime control and governance. The deployment of different tools, such as risk assessments or various programmes aimed at the 'ethical reconstruction' of participants, is also investigated in detail. The course also focuses specifically on the implication of the increasing focus on children, young people and their families through a network of various preventative activities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Situate different crime prevention policies and practices in respective theoretical frameworks
· Apply key concepts of governmentality theory to issues of social control and crime prevention
· Be knowledgeable in the main developments and trends related to Irish crime prevention more generally as well as youth crime prevention and youth justice more specifically
· Have an understanding of practical crime preventional intiatives, their evidence base and critiques thereof.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (2 x 4000 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit an alternative essay as prescribed by the department).

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SS6112 Practice Skills and Fieldwork Placement 1

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 7 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Group and Individual); 12 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Skills Laboratories); 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1.5hr(s) Other (Integration Seminars); 1 x 14weeks(s) Placements (Fieldwork Placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Hurley, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Rachel Rice, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Caroline May Shore, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Mairie Cregan, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Eilish Forrest, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop students' social work practice skills. To provide students with fieldwork experience.

Module Content: The module consists of five components: skills laboratory; integration seminar; group and individual tutorials; practice seminars and a 14 week fieldwork placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a satisfactory standard in all 6 CORU proficiencies;
· Identify their strengths and their learning needs and how these will be further addressed within the fieldwork placement and classroom setting;
· Evaluate their practice skills and the professional ethics and values that inform them;
· Be aware of appropriate professional boundaries in class and on fieldworks placement;
· Review how skills, values and knowledge inform and guide practice interventions;
· Undertake appropriate planning and preparation for social work interventions;
· Write letters and social work records to a professional standard;
· Engage in professional supervision for the purpose of personal learning and development over the period of their professional training;
· Practice within an anti-discriminatory framework.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (1 x Fieldwork Placement assessed on a pass/fail basis; 1 x Portfolio 8,000 - 10,000 words (400 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Complete 14 weeks Fieldwork Placement, Complete Portfolio. Comply with 80% attendance requirement (attendance will be monitored by class register) and have satisfied the UCC Fitness to Practice requirements.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Portfolio. Pass judgement on the Fieldwork Placement. Students must pass the Fieldwork Placement element prior to submitting the portfolio to pass the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (however students who fail the fieldwork placement are required to repeat the fieldwork placement and the portfolio).

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SS6200 Social Work Theory II: Theory and Practice (Last updated 16/10/2014)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (6 x 2hr Seminars/Lectures); Other (12 x 1hr Seminars / Student Presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Simone McCaughren, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Catherine Forde, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To promote students' own construction of theory and practice.

Module Content: The module will build on Social Work Theory 1 and develop the students understanding of social work theory.Different approaches to working with families are examined, with a focus on 'specialist' and systemic approaches to family work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise the applicability of the motivational interviewing approach within social work.
· Examine the cognitive-behavioral approach to working with people.
· Examine crisis theory as it applies in social work practice.
· Apply different approaches to working with families such as strategic and systemic family therapy and attachment perspectives.
· Examine different perspectives on community work practice.
· Make links between community work and social work.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000-3,000 essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; 80% attendance at Seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessments, as prescribed by the School).

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SS6201 Child and Family Welfare II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Caroline May Shore, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To build on Child and Family Welfare I.

Module Content: Specialist workshops on topics relating to theory and practice in the area of altenate care; issues of child participation and rights; occupational welfare and social work practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explore their own value base and appreciate how this impacts on their work;
· Identify and examine alterative care options in the Irish context;
· Evaluate current research and best practice in the area of alternative care;
· Explore issues of child participation, children's rights and legal representations in the light of the work of the Guardian ad Litem;
· Recognise organizational factors that influence child protection and welfare work and examine the impact of 'frontline' work on social workers.
· Explore the central importance of and develop skills in professional supervision.

Assessment: Attendance and participation are compulsory but not assessed.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance and participation at Workshops. 80% attendance required.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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SS6202 Social Work Settings II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Lectures/Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with an opportunity to develop expertise in particular areas of practice.

Module Content: Students must choose two of the following four areas of social work practice: a) probation and offenders; b) social work with young people; c) social work with older people; d) disability; e) contemporary debates and critical practice: Adoption and fostering.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· a) Probation and Working with Offenders
- Demonstrate knowledge of the important themes, issues and debates on the area of deviance, welfare and criminal justice.
- Identify environmental, social, economic, political and psychological factors associated with crime and deviance.

· b) Social Work with Young People
- Identify the key theoretical ideas that inform contemporary youth work policy and practice in Ireland.
- Competently Critique and evaluate youth work policy and practice in contemporary Ireland.
· c) Social Work with Older People
- Identify and analyse the important themes, issues and debates in regard to the experience of ageing in Ireland.
- Recognise the roles and contexts of social work with older adults and employ knowledge and skills in assessment and intervention

· d) Disability
- Examine different theories/models of disability, and critically consider their implications for the social work role.
-Gain insight into the experience of disability and the ways it impacts in people's lives.
-Explore micro level practice issues in working with disabled people.

· e) Adoption and Fostering
- Explore the Irish context, current trends, legal developments, discourses and debates in adoption and fostering.
- Critically examine adoption through the children's rights lens and explore key theoretical ideas that inform adoption and fostering social work.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000-3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 80% attendance at lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessments, as prescribed by the School).

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SS6205 Practice Project

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To enable students to apply research skills to investigate an aspect of practice in depth.

Module Content: The module requires each student to complete a 5,000 word project and to participate in a research conference, whereby s/he makes a public presentation of the research process and findings. In this way, students are encouraged to engage in dissemination of research and to become research-minded practitioners.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine and respond to research questions relevant to social work through completion of a 5,000 word research project
· Employ the skills of literature searching and critical appraisal through completion of a literature review
· Identify and explain the methodological choices made in completion of the research
· Describe and discuss the application of various research methods to social work research.
· Demonstrate an awareness of research ethics and integrity
· Reflect upon and articulate in written form their own learning arising from the process of engaging in research
· Deliver a professional presentation at the student research conference demonstrating clarity, accountability and integrity.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Project - 5,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Presentation at Conference.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit revised Project, as prescribed by the School).

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SS6206 Dissertation in Social Work

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To enable students to apply research skills to investigate an aspect of practice in depth.

Module Content: The module requires each student to complete a 10,000 word dissertation and to participate in a research conference, whereby s/he makes a public presentation of the research process and findings. In this way, students are encouraged to dissemination of research and to become research-minded practitioners.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine and respond to research questions relevant to social work through completion of a 10,000 word dissertation
· Employ the skills of literature searching and critical appraisal through completion of a literature review
· Make considered methodological choices and justify these choices in the context of social work research
· Demonstrate knowledge and skills of data collection, analysis and representation through implementation of a chosen research method(s)
· Demonstrate an awareness of research ethics and integrity
· Reflect upon and articulate in written form their own learning arising from the process of engaging in research
· Deliver a professional presentation at the student research conference demonstrating clarity, accountability and integrity.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Dissertation, 10,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit revised dissertation, as prescribed by the Department).

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SS6207 Practice Skills and Fieldwork Placement II

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Group and Individual); 6 x 2hr(s) Practicals (Skills Laboratories); 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 3 x 1.5hr(s) Other (Integration Seminars); 1 x 14weeks(s) Placements (Fieldwork Placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Carmel Halton, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Mary Hurley, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Kenneth Burns, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Rachel Rice, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Caroline May Shore, Department of Applied Social Studies; Dr Eleanor Bantry White, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Eilish Forrest, Department of Applied Social Studies; Ms Mairie Cregan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop students' social work practice skills. To provide students with fieldwork experience.

Module Content: The module consists of five components: skills laboratory; integration seminar; group and individual tutorials; practice seminars and a 14 week fieldwork placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a satisfactory standard in all 6 CORU proficiencies;
· Identify their strengths and their learning needs and how these will be further addressed within the fieldwork placement and classroom setting;
· Evaluate their practice skills and the professional ethics and values that inform them;
· Be aware of appropriate professional boundaries in class and on fieldworks placement;
· Review how skills, values and knowledge inform and guide practice interventions;
· Undertake appropriate planning and preparation for social work interventions;
· Write letters and social work records to a professional standard;
· Engage in professional supervision for the purpose of personal learning and development over the period of their professional training;
· Practice within an anti-discriminatory framework.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (1 x Fieldwork Placement assessed on a pass/fail basis; 1 x Portfolio 8,000 - 10,000 words (400 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Complete 14 weeks Fieldwork Placement, Complete Portfolio. Comply with 80% attendance requirement (attendance will be monitored by class register) and have satisfied the UCC Fitness to Practice requirements.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% and a pass judgement on the Fieldwork Placement. Students must pass the Fieldwork Placement element prior to submitting the portfolio to pass the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (however students who fail the fieldwork placement are required to repeat the fieldwork placement and the portfolio).

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SS6305 Dissertation in Social Policy

Credit Weighting: 40

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Student centred learning supported by academic supervisor).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eluska Fernández, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: The development of theoretical understanding and methodological tools necessary to conduct a piece of social research.

Module Content: Writing a literature review, the role of theory in research, qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Conduct a piece of social research in an area of social policy.
· Undertake a literature review, methodology, analysis of data and presentation of findings.
· Connect primary research data with theoretical debates and concepts
· Indetify the original contribution which their research makes to the production of social scientific knowledge.

Assessment: Total Marks 800: Continuous Assessment 800 marks (Dissertation 20,000 - 25,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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SS6306 Contemporary Social Policy Issues

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (On-line); 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eluska Fernández, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To assess key contemporary issues and debates in social policy.

Module Content: This module covers substantive issues and debates in contemporary social policy, including: inequality and class, disability, children and social policy, ethnicity and race and care.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply theoretical knowledge to the analysis of contemporary social policy issues.
· Critically evaluate the construction and impact of contemporary social policies on different social groups.
· Indentify the major debates surrounding the provision of social services in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 5,000 policy report (200 marks), 1 x online seminar posting 100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6307 Social research: methodology and ethics

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (online guided seminars); 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eluska Fernández, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce basic principles and methods of social research.

Module Content: Introduction to basic principles and methods of social research and planning the research process. The module will explore qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the theoretical, methodological and policy contexts informing the choices open to researchers in undertaking a research project for a taught Masters degree.
· Identify the key components of the social research process.
· Differentiate between different research methods (both qualitative and quantiative) and the purposes for which they can be used.
· Have developed a capacity to anaylse both quantitative and qualitative data.
· Identify potential ethical issues involved in undertaking social research, and be able to suggest ways in which these might be addressed.
· Exhibit the skills required in writing a research proposal.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (5,000 word research proposal (200 marks); online seminar posting (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6308 Mental Health and Disability

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and online guided seminars); 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide a critical understanding of key perspectives in the area of mental health and disability, and their implications for policy, research and practice. Particular consideration will be given to innovative approaches grounded in the principles of human rights and citizenship.

Module Content: Discourses in the field of mental health and disability; key conceptual and policy developments shaping service provision; values and ethical issues in mental health and disability.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically evaluate current discourses in the field of mental health and disability, as well as the key conceptual and policy developments shaping service provision.
· Develop a knowledge base of mental distress and disability and recognise its impact on service users, families and communities.
· Recognise the contribution of societal and contextual factors in the experience of mental distress and disability.
· Recognise and apply the principles of (a) social justice and human rights (b) autonomy and self-determination (c) recovery-orientated practice; (d) service user involvement and advocacy.
· Demonstrate an appreciation of values and ethichal issues in mental health and disability.
· Develop innovative ways of understanding and working with people experiencing mental distress and / or disability.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (5,000 word essay (200 marks); online seminar posting (100 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6309 Children and Young People

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and online guided Seminars); 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: The specialist pathway in children and young people on the Masters is designed for a wide range of professionals working with children and young people. A broad range of topics are covered and students are encouraged to critically reflect on policy and address theory and research relevant to their own interests.

Module Content: Children and Young People in Society.
Children's Rights, Participation and Democratic Engagement
Theorising and Researching Childhood and Youth
Contemporary Issues in Childhood and Youth
Safeguarding Children and Young People

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and discuss concepts and theoretical perspectives relating to children and young people including identities (children and young people as consumers and social actors) and transitions.
· Critically evaluate contemporary evidence and issues in the promotion of child and family wellbeing.
· Understand the multiple factors that correlate with outcomes for children and young people.
· Examine the discourse on children?s rights, citizenship and democratic praxis.
· Identify the political, policy and statutory paradigms within which interventions are based
· Evaluate key policy developments in relation to children and young people in Ireland and internationally.
· Analyse ongoing concerns in child care policy and provision in Ireland with specific reference to vulnerable children and young people - child protection, family support, and children in the care and detention systems.
· Explore the social inclusion / exclusion of children and young people (social class, disability, race, ethnicity, gender).
· Evaluate the construction of parenthood in social policy discourse.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (5,000 word essay (200 marks); online seminar posting (100 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6310 Critical Social Policy

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and online guided Seminars); 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eluska Fernández, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To analyze the crisis from a social science perspective.

Module Content: This module will analyze the crisis in terms of its social and political impacts. Issues explored include the contested nature of the welfare state, ideology and the provision of social services, globalization and neo-liberalism and the analysis of contemporary developments in Irish social policy from a critical perspective.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the impact of the crisis of social and political terms.
· Theorize the crisis from a social scientific perspective.
· Make sense of the austerity programme.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (5,000 word essay (200 marks); online seminar posting (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6311 Conflict Transformation and Peace Building

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and online guided Seminars); 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the causes and dynamic of conflict in society and the range of differing approaches associated with conflict transformation and peace-building. To critically analyse aspects of the current peace process in the North of Ireland in the context of international conflict transformation strategies.

Module Content: Theories about conflict, conflict transformation and peace-building in society. Conflict in Ireland, and in particular, Northern Ireland and attempts at resolution. The Irish Peace Process and micro and macro level approaches to conflict transformation in the North. Comparative approaches to peace-building and conflict transformation internationally.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically assess a range of theoretical perspectives about the causes and dynamics of conflict in society.
· Critically analyse the causes and dynamics of conflict in Ireland and in Northern Ireland in particular.
· Critically analyse various attempts to develop conflict transformation and peace-building in Ireland and Northern Ireland.
· Critically assess the current peace process and approaches to conflict transformation in the North.
· Compare and contrast different approaches to conflict transformation and peace-building internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (5,000 word essay (200 marks); online seminar posting (100 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6312 Social Policy Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Other (presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eluska Fernández, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop the skills for conducting social policy analysis and develop policy report writing skills.

Module Content: This module will provide students with the skills necessary to engage in social policy analysis, design a policy report and make a presentation on a social policy issue.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the key methodological debates and issues for undertaking social policy analysis.
· Design a policy report.
· Present a social policy analysis report.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Presentation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS6318 Mental Health and Disability

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and online guided seminars); 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lydia Sapouna, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide a critical understanding of key perspectives in the area of mental health and disability, and their implications for policy, research and practice. Particular consideration will be given to innovative approaches grounded in the principles of human rights and citizenship.

Module Content: Discourses in the field of mental health and disability; key conceptual and policy developments shaping service provision; values and ethical issues in mental health and disability.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically evaluate current discourses in the field of mental health and disability, as well as the key conceptual and policy developments shaping service provision.
· Develop a knowledge base of mental distress and disability and recognise its impact on service users, families and communities.
· Recognise the contribution of societal and contextual factors in the experience of mental distress and disability.
· Recognise and apply the principles of (a) social justice and human rights (b) autonomy and self-determination (c) recovery-orientated practice; (d) service user involvement and advocacy.
· Demonstrate an appreciation of values and ethichal issues in mental health and disability.
· Develop innovative ways of understanding and working with people experiencing mental distress and / or disability.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (5,000 word essay (200 marks); online seminar posting (100 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have not participated in the online seminar will be required to submit an essay (1 x 2000 words) reflecting on online seminar materials, which will continue to be available up to the resubmission deadline for the Autumn Examinations Board.).

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SS6319 Children and Young People

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and online guided Seminars); 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deirdre Horgan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: The specialist pathway in children and young people on the Masters is designed for a wide range of professionals working with children and young people. A broad range of topics are covered and students are encouraged to critically reflect on policy and address theory and research relevant to their own interests.

Module Content: Children and Young People in Society.
Children's Rights, Participation and Democratic Engagement
Theorising and Researching Childhood and Youth
Contemporary Issues in Childhood and Youth
Safeguarding Children and Young People

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and discuss concepts and theoretical perspectives relating to children and young people including identities (children and young people as consumers and social actors) and transitions.
· Critically evaluate contemporary evidence and issues in the promotion of child and family wellbeing.
· Understand the multiple factors that correlate with outcomes for children and young people.
· Examine the discourse on children?s rights, citizenship and democratic praxis.
· Identify the political, policy and statutory paradigms within which interventions are based
· Evaluate key policy developments in relation to children and young people in Ireland and internationally.
· Analyse ongoing concerns in child care policy and provision in Ireland with specific reference to vulnerable children and young people - child protection, family support, and children in the care and detention systems.
· Explore the social inclusion / exclusion of children and young people (social class, disability, race, ethnicity, gender).
· Evaluate the construction of parenthood in social policy discourse.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (5,000 word essay (200 marks); online seminar posting (100 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have not participated in the online seminar will be required to submit an essay (1 x 2000 words) reflecting on online seminar materials, which will continue to be available up to the resubmission deadline for the Autumn Examinations Board.).

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SS6321 Conflict Transformation and Peace Building

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and online guided Seminars); 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore the causes and dynamic of conflict in society and the range of differing approaches associated with conflict transformation and peace-building. To critically analyse aspects of the current peace process in the North of Ireland in the context of international conflict transformation strategies.

Module Content: Theories about conflict, conflict transformation and peace-building in society. Conflict in Ireland, and in particular, Northern Ireland and attempts at resolution. The Irish Peace Process and micro and macro level approaches to conflict transformation in the North. Comparative approaches to peace-building and conflict transformation internationally.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically assess a range of theoretical perspectives about the causes and dynamics of conflict in society.
· Critically analyse the causes and dynamics of conflict in Ireland and in Northern Ireland in particular.
· Critically analyse various attempts to develop conflict transformation and peace-building in Ireland and Northern Ireland.
· Critically assess the current peace process and approaches to conflict transformation in the North.
· Compare and contrast different approaches to conflict transformation and peace-building internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (5,000 word essay (200 marks); online seminar posting (100 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have not participated in the online seminar will be required to submit an essay (1 x 2000 words) reflecting on online seminar materials, which will continue to be available up to the resubmission deadline for the Autumn Examinations Board.).

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SS6600 Principles, Values and Practice in the Voluntary and Community Sector

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): "None"

Co-requisite(s): "None"

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 100hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: Critically assess principles and values underpinning management practice in the Voluntary and Community Sector.

Module Content: Principles and values in the voluntary and community sector; concepts of community and community development; ideas about equality in a culturally diverse socity, anti-discrimination measures designed to promote equality of opportunity in the voluntary sector, professional, evidence-based and human rights based practice; how such principles and values underpin management practice in the sector, dealing with conflict in the voluntary sector based on human rights and inclusivist approaches.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and critically analyse the core principles and values that underpin practice in the Voluntary and Community Sector.
· Identify, explain and critically analyse a range of theories and practice relating to community and community development
· Identify and critically analyse the nature of professional/managerial evidence-based and human rights based practice in the Voluntary and Community Sector and the ways in which it can become a tool for challenging poverty and social exclusion
· Identify, explain and critically analyse concepts of equality in a culturally diverse society
· Describe and assess anti-discrimination legislation and affirmative action practices designed to promote equality of opportunity in a culturally diverse society
· Identify and critically assess the nature and source of conflict in organisations and a range of methods of dealing with it based on inclusivist and human rigths based principles and values .

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (learning journal / portfolio (5,000 words max.)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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SS6602 Applied Social Research in the Voluntary and Community Sector

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop a critical understanding of the theory and practice of applied social research in the Voluntary and Community Sector.

Module Content: Researching in the Voluntary and Community Sector; Philosophical debates/Research Paradigms/Theory and hypotheses; evaluation of different quantitative and qualitative research methods in social research; data selection; data collection; collation and analysis; application of statistical packages; final research report writing; planning, operationalising, interpretation, evaluation and presentation of results in social research; doing Participatory and Action Research; Commissioning research; Presentation of findings for different constituencies; Ethical and political issues; User and participant involvement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop a research proposal for conducting research of relevance to Voluntary and Community Sector organisations
· Explain and critically analyse how research enquiry derives from different underlying epistemological and ontological perspectives.
· Critically analyse approaches to enquiry in fields relevant to students professional areas of practice.
· Identify and evaluate the main features of evaluative studies and participatory / action approaches to research.
· Identify and critically analyse the range of political, ethical and equality issues which exist in conducting research in the sector.
· Conduct a literature review relevant to research in the Voluntary and Community Sector
· Evaluate and apply different quantitative and qualitative research methods, in particular, surveys, interviews and focus groups, for use in Voluntary and Community Sector research.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word Research Exercise).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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SS6605 Dissertation in Voluntary and Community Sector Management

Credit Weighting: 25

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (Student centred learning supported by staff supervision.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: Critically evaluate, design and undertake a participatory social research enquiry relevant to their practice.

Module Content: The subject of the dissertation will be decided by individual consultations with students.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Conduct an analysis of an area of theory and/or policy and/or practice within the sphere of Third sector management.
· Develop a structured research proposal to peers and tutor.
· Undertake a literature review, an analysis and evaluation of research methodology, an analysis of research data and a summary of main research findings.
· Design and conduct a participatory research project, with a voluntary/community sector organisation, on a research topic which addresses the local research needs of the organisation
· Work in a participatory and collaborative way with a voluntary/community sector organisation on a research project of relevance to it.
· Communicate research findings and recommendations to the participating community/voluntary organisation
· Make a contribution to the emerging field of Third Sector Management.

Assessment: Total Marks 500: Continuous Assessment 500 marks (12,000 words Research Dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit revised dissertation as prescribed by the School.).

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SS6606 Social Policy in the Voluntary and Community Sector

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): "None"

Co-requisite(s): "None"

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 100hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Feilim O'Hadhmaill, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To develop a critical awareness of and ability to analyse the social policy context in which the Voluntary and Community Sector operates.

Module Content: Critical assessment of social policy relevant to the Voluntary and Community Sector

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· describe and critically assess the development of social policy and welfare provision in Ireland Identify and critically analyse the core principles and values that underpin practice in the voluntary and community Sector.
· interpret and analyse the factors which influence the formation, implementation, and efficacy of social policies in relevant to the voluntary and community sector in Ireland and in other societies
· Identify and critically evaluate current discourses in policy relating to the voluntary and community sector in Ireland
· Critically assess how specific social policy areas such as health care, education, and care in the community are addressed in Ireland and other societies
· Critically analyse different concepts about the links between rights and the provision of welfare
· Critically assess different methods of financing and providing welfare.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (learning journal / portfolio (5,000 words max.)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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SS7000 Civil Society: Concepts, Case Studies and Theories

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Martin Geoghegan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To critically examine the concept of civil society, and to explore its deployment in classical and contemporary social and political theory.

Module Content: Exploration of the chronological development of the concept of civil society, from classical Greece, through modernity and into contemporary usage. To examine theories of civil society. To explore the implications of the material outcomes of the use of the concept in social policy, particularly in relation to welfare provision, voluntarism and citizenship via case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine the evolution of the concept of civil society in various historical contexts.
· Relate the concept of civil society to contemporary social theory.
· Identify and explain theories of civil society.
· Relate the concept of civil society to contemporary social policy.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (5,000 word paper).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed items of continuous assessment must be repeated.

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SS7001 An Introduction to Social Research

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 week residential and 3 months online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To introduce basic principles of social research and consider the purposes of the D.Soc.Sc. from both participants' and tutors' perspectives.

Module Content: Introduction to social research and social policy debates, planning the learning/research process and establishing an online learning group.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify social research a 'situated practice', undertaken in different contexts and for different purposes.
· Explore the relationship between social science, social research and society.
· Critically discuss different perspectives regarding the purpose and role of social research and the social researcher in society.
· Apply debates regarding the value and purpose of social research, and the role of the social researcher, to their own practice/organisation, and position as developing researchers.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (1 x 5,000 word assignment: participation in online discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Autumn exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negotiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as fail.

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SS7002 Philosophies of Social Science

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 week residential and 3 months online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To understand the philosophical basis of the social sciences and the relationship between theory and practice.

Module Content: The philosophy of social science encompasses debates about the nature and status of knowledge in the social science. These debates include: Positivism; the Interpretative Tradition; Marxism and Structuralism; Critical Approaches; Feminist Epistemologies; and Postmodernism.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explore the relationship between theory and practice in social research.
· Differentiate between the concepts of epistemology, ontology and methodology in terms of how social research is framed.
· Outline the key issues and areas of debate within and between some of the main schoos of thought within the philosophy of social sciences, including positivism, interpretivism, feminism and poststructuralism.
· Examine the implications of using a particular school of thought on the research process.
· Assess the impact of particular philosophies of social science within the discipline of social policy.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (1 x 5000 word assignment; participation in online discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A pass/fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Autunm exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negotiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as a fail.

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SS7003 Research Methods and Skills 1: Qualitative

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 week residential and 3 months online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the methods and skills required to conduct and analyse qualitative research.

Module Content: General principles of qualitative research: data collection, data analysis, sources of information and research study design.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Differentiate between different qualitative research methods and the purposed for which they can be used.
· Employ sampling strategies in addressing qualitative research questions.
· Design key research tools in undertaking qualitative research, including interview formats.
· Identify different ways of analysing qualitative data.

Assessment: Contunuous Assessment (1 x 5000 word assignment; participation in online discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Autumn exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negoiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as a fail.

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SS7004 Social Policy Debates and Processes

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 week residential and 3 months online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine current debates in social policy and explore social policy processes.

Module Content: This module covers substantive and processual issues in social policy including: social exclusion; citizenship; equality and social justice; neo-liberal social policy; civil society; and policy making processes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline some of the key transformations in the nature of the welfare provision within Ireland and other advanced capitalist economies over the latter half of the twentieth century.
· Explore the impactsof the neo-liberal agenda in shaping welfare reform, and consider the ways in which this has shifted the structures, processes and discourses associated with welfare provision.
· Examine the changing relationship between the state, market and civil society in the deliverty of welfare over the past twenty years.
· Connect contemporary welfare debates to national and global transformations.
· Apply debates about the transformation of welfare to the analysis of their own work / organisational contexts.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (1 x 5,000 word assignment plus participation in on-line discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Autumn exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negotiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as a fail.

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SS7005 Research Methods and Skills 2: Quantitative

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 week residential and 3 months online.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the methods and skills required to conduct and analyse quantitative research.

Module Content: General principles of quantative research: sampling, data collection, data analysis, sources of information and research study design.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the purposes for which quantitative research methods can be used.
· Employ different sampling strategies in conducting quantitative research.
· Design key research tools in undertaking quantitative research, in particular the survey questionnaire.
· Identify different ways to analysing quantitative data.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (5000 word assignment; participation in online discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Autunm exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negotiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as a fail.

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SS7006 State and Society

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 week residential and 3 months online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To critically examine relationships between state and society.

Module Content: Relationships between the state and society are never static. This relationship is undergoing particular change at present and this module seeks to focus on the changes by addressing: globalisation and the state; social movements; social policy and social control; and management of risk.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the complex linkages between organisation and research.
· Critically analyse research on organisations and organisations' use of research.
· Explore different approaches to organisational analysis/evaluation.
· Apply debates on research and organisation to their own organisational contexts and practice.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (1 x 5000 word assignment: participation in online discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Autumn exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negotiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as a fail.

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SS7007 The Politics of Social Research

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 week residential and 3 months online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To examine the politics and processes of research production.

Module Content: Social research involves a series of discussion frequently of an epistemological/methodological/political and/or ethical nature. Therefore, this module addresses the research process by considering the following topics: ethics and values in conducting research; reflexivity in the research process; social relations of research production; and social justice and research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically examine the different political relations and contexts which inform the research process.
· Discuss the concept of reflexivity, and its implications for participants' own role as researchers, and researchers within the organisations.
· Identify potential ethical issues involved in undertaking social research, and be able to suggest ways in which these might be addressed.
· Connect theoretical debates regarding the politics of social reserach to the practicalities of research design and methodology.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (1 x 5000 word assignment: participation in online discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Autumn exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negotiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as a fail.

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SS7008 Designing for Research and Evaluation

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (1 week residential and 3 months online).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Edwards, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To explore research design in a variety of applied contexts.

Module Content: This module offers students pathways into designing and implementing research project/evaluation studies. Topics covered include: relationship between design and implementation; research design; evaluation methods; and using research in organisations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Differentiate between different approaches to research design in the social sciences.
· Identify the different elements of the research design process.
· Examine different evaluation methodologies.
· Design a coherent research proposal as the basis of study for Years Three and Four of the programme.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment (1 x 5,000 word assignment: participation in online discussion and submission of online work as prescribed by the Department) which will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of CA may be re-submitted to the Autumn exam board. Work that is submitted late, without negotiated agreement, will not be accepted and will be designated as a fail.

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SS7102 Research Seminar in Social Policy

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Martin Geoghegan, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with the analytical skills to critically interrogate the core constituents of social policy and develop capacities to engage in terms of its historical, and contemporary articulations.

Module Content: Exploring the terrain of social policy analysis. Interpreting the role of theoretical and applied concepts on social policy analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically evaluate the significance of selected social policy debates.
· Document and explain the main components of a particular social policy debate.
· Analyse social policy in historical and contemporary contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (5000 word seminar paper).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS7104 Social Policy Methods and Methodology I

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 6hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the core competencies and applications of social policy.

Module Content: The objective of this module is to provide students with the analytical skills to critically interrogate the core constituents of social policy and develop capacities to engage with the discipline in terms of its historical, and contemporary articulations. The module will take the form of intensive inputs focusing on such topics as social policy concepts, the evolution of the welfare state, a critique of citizenship, the mixed economy of welfare, civil society and the third sector, the impact of neo-liberalism and the impact of welfare retrenchment. Substantive topics explored will be poverty and social exclusion, social security and income maintenance and the role of sectoral welfare in such areas as health, housing, and education.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply theoretical constructs to the analysis of social policy issues in relation to the development and evolution of the welfare state.
· Critically evaluate the construction and impact of contemporary social policies on different social groups in society issues of poverty and social exclusion, citizenship and participation, rights and entitlements.
· Identify the major normative debates surrounding the provision of social services in Ireland and other advanced capitalist societies.
· Demonstrate a capacity to undertake social policy analysis in a range of sectoral areas including income maintenance, health, housing, and education.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Seminar paper 5,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS7106 Workshop in Theory and Thesis Construction

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 6hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: The objective of this workshop is to explore with students the theoretical and applied elements involved in the process of thesis construction.

Module Content: Selecting theoretical approaches to thesis construction, core competencies in thesis research, topic selection and elaboration.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Be competent in thesis problem identification.
· Contextualise thesis construction within a relevant body of theoretical knowledge.
· Present a clearly defined research question and research schedule.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (5000 word research paper).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SS7107 Social Policy Methods and Methodology II

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 6hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cathal O'Connell, Department of Applied Social Studies; Staff, Department of Applied Social Studies.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to further develop their policy analysis competencies to enable them to critically interrogate the core constituents of social policy.

Module Content: This module will identify the jurisdiction and boundaries of social policy. It will interpret the role of theoretical and applied concepts in social policy analysis. It will interpret the factors which shape and influence the formulation and implementation of social policies in contemporary society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically evaluate the significance of selected social policy debates in an Irish and international context.
· Document and explain the main components of a particular social policy debate from a variety of normative and ideological perspectives.
· Analyse sectoral areas of social policy in historical and contemporary contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Seminar paper 5,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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