Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

SC1005 Introduction to Sociology (Part 1)
SC1006 Key Issues in Sociology (Part 2)
SC1011 Sociology of Health, Public Health and Health Promotion
SC1012 Introduction to Sociology (Part A)
SC1013 Key Issues in Sociology (Part B)
SC1015 Sociological Concepts For Nursing
SC1016 Sociological Concepts For Midwifery
SC2001 Foundation in Sociological Theory
SC2002 Research Project 1
SC2003 The Sociology of Class
SC2004 Political Sociology
SC2012 Race, Ethnicity, Migration and Nationalism
SC2017 Sociology of Education, Learning and Work
SC2018 Sociology of Culture and Art
SC2021 Sociology of Crime and Deviance
SC2026 Sociology of the Family
SC2027 Sociology of Health, Illness and the Body
SC2034 Cultures of Cities
SC2052 Forensic Sociology
SC3001 Social Theory II
SC3003 Sociology of Development and Globalization
SC3004 The Sociology of Community
SC3007 Introduction to Planning and Sustainable Development
SC3009 Sociology of Religions and Civilisations
SC3012 Sociology of the Media
SC3016 Research Seminars and Project
SC3017 Sociology of Law: Legal Justice, Human Rights and Social Change
SC3018 Research Essay
SC3020 Citizenship and Global Community
SC3023 Sociology of Health and Illness: New Directions and Current Debates
SC3025 Health and Scientific Deviance
SC3029 Sociology of the Environment
SC3036 Living Spaces: Social Construction of Habitat
SC3039 Philosophy of Social Science
SC3046 Family, Gender, Sexualities
SC3053 Societal Regulation and Environmental Governance
SC3055 Research Project 2
SC4001 Sociology of Health: Contemporary Debates and Holistic Healthcare for the 21st Century
SC6001 Economy and Society Summer School
SC6002 Economy and Society Summer School - 2
SC6601 Sociology of Crime and Deviance
SC6602 Rethinking Borders: Global Challenges to Social Justice
SC6603 Social Pathology and Civic Health
SC6608 Social and Sociological Theory
SC6611 Sociology of Crime and Deviance
SC6614 Sociological Methodology
SC6615 Dissertation in Sociology
SC6616 Online Child Sexual Exploitation
SC6623 Globalisation and Culture
SC6624 Civilisation and Globalisation: The Rise and Dynamics of the Modern World in the Context of Civilisational Analysis
SC6625 Contemporary Ireland: Formations of Gender, Race, Ethnicity and Class
SC6626 Sociology of the Public Sphere
SC6627 Social Pathology and Civic Health
SC6631 Sociology of Sustainable Development
SC6632 Minor Dissertation
SC6633 Literature Review
SC6638 Rethinking Borders: Global Challenges to Social Justice
SC7106 Social Theory Paradigms and Thesis Definition I
SC7604 Sociology of the Mass Media
SC7623 Globalisation and Culture
SC7624 Civilisation and Globalisation
SC7626 Sociology of the Public Sphere
SC7627 Social Pathology and Civic Health
SC7628 Communication and Learning in the Constitution of Society

SC1005 Introduction to Sociology (Part 1)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 360.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to substantive themes and empirical topics in Sociology

Module Content: This module introduces students to the subject of sociology; to the development of modern society; to key people and ideas in sociology; and to issues and problems in contemporary society, both in Ireland and globally.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the field of sociology and outline its historical development
Identify key people and their theories in the discipline of sociology
Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of sociological concepts by applying them to analyse contemporary social issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 750 word essay (20 marks) 2 x 1000 word essays (40 marks each ) 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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SC1006 Key Issues in Sociology (Part 2)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 360.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): SC1005

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (consultations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to substantive themes and empirical topics in Sociology

Module Content: This module introduces students to a number of key issues in the discipline of sociology by focusing on debates about the nature of contemporary society such as Globalization, Politics, Economics, Culture, Environment, Family, Migration, Gender, etc.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and debates.
Analyze aspects of modern society by applying sociological theories and methods.
Formulate and explain particular social phenomena in terms of general sociological theories.
Critically evaluate debates on issues in contemporary society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks (1 x 3hr written examination).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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SC1011 Sociology of Health, Public Health and Health Promotion

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (20 Lectures/Discussions; 80hrs Coursework/Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Myles Balfe, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.

Lecturer(s): Dr Myles Balfe, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.

Module Objective: To provide students with a basic introduction to sociology; to explore some key sociological concepts and examine their relevance for Public Health and Health promotion.

Module Content: Introduction to Sociology; what Sociology is, and why we should care about it. This will be followed by specific classes on gender, health inequalities, illness, stigma, medicalisation, professional-public interactions, disability, sexuality, violence and race.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain the utility of Sociology, and a Sociological perspective, for Public Health and Health Promotion
Identify and define key concepts and ideas from Sociology that are useful for Public Health and Health Promotion.
Apply Sociological concepts to particular health-related problems, issues and phenomena.
Demonstrate an understanding of the role that social factors play in individuals' experience of health and illness.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC1012 Introduction to Sociology (Part A)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 130.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to substantive themes and empirical topics in Sociology

Module Content: This module introduces students to the subject of sociology; to the development of modern society; to key people and ideas in sociology; and to issues and problems in contemporary society, both in Ireland and globally.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the field of sociology and outline its historical development
Identify key people and their theories in the discipline of sociology
Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of sociological concepts by applying them to analyse contemporary social issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 750 word essay (20 Marks) 2 x 1000 word essays (40 marks each) 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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SC1013 Key Issues in Sociology (Part B)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 130.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): SC1012

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (consultations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop students knowledge and understanding of substantive themes and empirical topics in Sociology

Module Content: This module introduces students to a number of key issues in the discipline of sociology by focusing on debates about the nature of contemporary society such as Globalization, Politics, Economics, Culture, Environment, Family, Migration, Gender, etc.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and debates.
Analyze aspects of modern society by applying sociological theories and methods.
Formulate and explain particular social phenomena in terms of general sociological theories.
Critically evaluate debates on issues in contemporary society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks (1 x 3hr written examination).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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SC1015 Sociological Concepts For Nursing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Other (Lectures, Tutorials); 76hr(s) Other (Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Myles Balfe, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.

Lecturer(s): Dr Myles Balfe, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health; Dr Angela Flynn, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Module Objective: To introduce and develop students' knowledge and understanding of how social factors underpin a). health and illness and b). the provision of healthcare.

Module Content: This module will deliver an overview of key sociological concepts that are central to nursing practice. The first class will provide an introduction to sociology and will explore what sociology is and how social factors, particularly health inequalities, influence health. The class will also examine the inter-relationships between individuals and broader social environments and social structures, as well as discussing the relevance of sociology to healthcare. Specific classes will follow on gender (where we will examine sexual and domestic violence and the role of men and women in society), representations of health and healthcare professionals in the media, illness, stigma and medicalization. The module will attend to the role of the nurse in advocating for individuals, and the importance of social justice as a core nursing value. The role that cultural identity and intercultural communication play in nursing practice will also be explored, as will the utility of health promotion for nursing. Finally the module will investigate the socialisation of nurses.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain the utility of sociology, and a sociological perspective, for nurses.
Identify and define key concepts and ideas from sociology that are useful for nurses.
Apply sociological concepts to particular health-related problems, issues and phenomena.
Demonstrate an understanding of the role that social factors play in individuals' experiences of health and illness.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50% is the pass standard for the College of Medicine and Health.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC1016 Sociological Concepts For Midwifery

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Other (Lecture, Tutorials); 76hr(s) Other (Self-directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Myles Balfe, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.

Lecturer(s): Dr Myles Balfe, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health; Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Module Objective: To introduce and develop students' knowledge and understanding of how social factors underpin - a) health and illness and b) the provision of healthcare.

Module Content: This module will deliver an overview of key sociological concepts that are central to midwifery practice. The first class will provide an introduction to sociology and will explore what sociology is and how social factors, particularly health inequalities, influence health. The class will also examine the inter-relationships between individuals and broader social environments and social structures, as well as discussing the relevance of sociology to healthcare. Specific classes will follow on gender (where we will examine sexual and domestic violence and the role of men and women in society), representations of health and healthcare professionals in the media, illness, stigma and medicalization. The utility of sociology for midwives' day to day occupational activities will be explored. Finally lectures will investigate sociological perspectives on the family, pregnancy and childbirth, as well as the socialisation of midwives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain the utility of sociology, and a sociological perspective, for midwives.
Identify and define key concepts and ideas from sociology that are useful for midwives.
Apply sociological concepts to particular health-related problems, issues and phenomena.
Demonstrate an understanding of the role that social factors play in individuals' experiences of health and illness.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1500 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC2001 Foundation in Sociological Theory

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of social theory up to the mid-20th Century, with a view to clarifying the principles of theory construction.

Module Content: This module provides a general yet contextually sensitive overview of 19th and early 20th Century social theory from a variety of perspectives. The major theoretical traditions are covered in a way that allows the students to develop an understanding both of leading authors and of basic concepts and theoretical models. While the module seeks to encourage a synthetic grasp of classical and modern social theory as such, the importance of developing a sense of the range of choices to be made in the course of theory construction is stressed throughout.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Give a historical overview of the development of social theory in relation to its changing socio-historical context between the 19th and the early 20th century.
Outline what social theory is, and identify the major classical directions and the figures representing them.
Compare and contrast the contributions of at least two major classical social theorists.
Outline and critically evaluate the contribution of a major classical social theorist.
Present and analyse the basic classical social theoretical concepts and models.
Identify the range of options available for the construction of social theory, and demonstrate a justified choice of position.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 X 1,500 word essays - 50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC2002 Research Project 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology; Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology; Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of the various methodological approaches within Sociology and to explore the theoretical, practical and political/ethnical dimensions of the research process.

Module Content: In the first part of the module, lectures will provide an overview of the variety of methodological approaches within Sociology. In the second part of the module, workshop groups will be introduced to the theoretical, methodological, practical and political/ethnical dimensions of understanding research within sociology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
To enable students:
To identify and utilize the major theoretical-methodological paradigms of the discipline of sociology
To understand basic approaches to conducting social research and the steps involved in doing a research project
To select and to minimally elaborate a research project idea
To conduct field research using a variety of different approaches
To conduct illustrative field work.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3 x Assignments 30 marks each; Attendance 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of Continuous Assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

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SC2003 The Sociology of Class

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To familiarise students with classical and contemporary theories of inequality and social stratification

Module Content: The course examines classical theories of class and inequality in the work of Marx and Weber. The work of contemporary social theorists in relation to class will then be considered, particularly Poulantzas, Wright, Giddens, Goldthorpe and Marshall. Among other themes explored will be the problem of measuring social class, women and class and class in European societies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Students who attend lectures, complete assignments and fully engage with the course material offered in this module are offered a wide range of opportunities to develop new competencies and transferable disciplinary skills. On completion of the course, students should be able to
List, describe and outline the main ideas and arguments of each of the theorists presented in the course
Summarise, discuss and compare the theories and case studies presented in the course
Critically evaluate the relevance of sociological concepts, theoretical insights and research data for the analysis of class, inequality and social stratification.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC2004 Political Sociology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology; Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To familiarise students with a number of sociological tools that can be used to understand politics in general, and Irish politics in particular.

Module Content: This module will focus on two major topics: the modern state and political culture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Students who attend lectures, complete assignments and fully engage with the course material offered in this module are offered a wide range of opportunities to develop new competencies and transferable disciplinary skills. On completion of the course, students should be able to
List, describe and outline the main ideas and arguments of each of the theorists presented in the course
Summarise, discuss and compare the theories and case studies presented in the course
Critically evaluate the relevance of sociological concepts, theoretical insights and research data for the analysis of politics and government.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word essays 50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC2012 Race, Ethnicity, Migration and Nationalism

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: This module will examine race, ethnicity, migration and nationalism from historical and contemporary perspectives.

Module Content: This module will examine the historical trajectories and contemporary interpretations of the concepts of race, ethnicity and nationhood. Through critical engagement with classical and contemporary theories of race, ethnicity and nationhood the course will examine the role that these play in the construction of social and political identities, and in the development of the modern nation-state and nationalist politics. The module will then proceed to investigate the co-constitutive relationship between interpretations of race, ethnicity and nationhood, and historical and contemporary migration. Emphasis will be placed on the role of migration in the constitution of the modern nation-state, the relationship between migrant and minority politics, and the manner in which contemporary migration continues to be affected by discourses of race, ethnicity and nationhood.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understand the central theoretical perspectives on race, ethnicity and nationhood;
Demonstaret an understand the origins and significance of racial, ethnic and national divisions, and their co-constitutive historical and contemporary relationships;
Demonstate an understand the relationship between interpretations of race, ethnicity and nationhood and the politics of migration and citizenship.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word assisgnments, 80 marks ; attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department. Marks for attendance carried forward).

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SC2017 Sociology of Education, Learning and Work

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To familiarise students with theory, analysis and empirical research on the sociology of education.

Module Content: This module on Education will take up the challenge of re-imagining and reinvigorating the core ideals of education as the life-long cultivation of wisdom and civic virtue. Education that enables human flourishing and a healthy body politic means something more than 'skills training' to be utilized for work. Educare means to cultivate, to lead forth, to draw out from within; and wisdom is derived from vis in 'vision' and dom meaning judgment and authority. When we consider the challenges of recovery we realize that it is not just enterprise and innovation in economy and technology -education for work- that is at issue, but more fundamentally a revitalization of our political, cultural and moral institutions. Our individual and collective abilities to be innovative and creative, to adapt to change and to reinvent our society and our economy to face the challenges of recovery and the future, whether in the fields of science & technology, industry & economy, law and politics, culture and the arts will come primarily from vision and the exercise of judgment based on good authority, inspired and guided by the light of higher values and ideals.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate their knowledge of the theoretical perspectives, ideas and arguments presented.
Summarise and apply the basic sociological concepts and theories presented to an analysis of contemporary issues in the field of education.
Compare and contrast theoretical perspectives.
Critique and evaluate the relevance of sociological concepts, theoretical insights and research data in relation to contemporary issues and debates
Analyse the empirical data presented in relation to contemporary issues and debates.
Apply appropriate theoretical perspectives, sociological concepts and methods to analysis ?and research in the field of education.
Synthesise theoretical ideas and arguments to support and illustrate the students own ?arguments in the presentation of their work.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word Essays (50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC2018 Sociology of Culture and Art

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: A theoretically and methodologically informed sociological
analysis of Culture and Art

Module Content: The objective of this module is to offer a theoretically and methodologically informed sociological analysis of culture and art. Dr Keohane will focus especially on the reciprocal interplay and influences between Irish literature and the philosophical discourse of modernity. Professor Szakolczai's part of the course will be based on his books Sociology, Religion and Grace: A Quest for the Renaissance, and The Re-Birth of Comedy: An effective history of the comic, from Commedia dell'Arte until the Russian Ballet of Diaghilev. The central aim is to explore the links between works of art; the character and life of the author as a personality in search of understanding; and the broader society or civilization in which it was created.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Utilize a basic knowledge of concepts from sociology, philosophy and criticism to understand & interpret culture and works of art.
Examine and explore multiple meanings and interpretations in texts, artifacts, cultural objects and representations.
Use information resources for critical research and inquiry into course themes and concepts.
Use evidence to develop and evaluate positions regarding other topics covered in the seminar.
Offer plausible interpretations and express informed opinions about topics covered in the seminar and communicate well in written and oral form.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word essays (40 marks each); attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC2021 Sociology of Crime and Deviance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To describe, explicate and illustrate the main sociological theories and research studies of crime and deviance from 1897-1975

Module Content: Within an historical narrative of their context, the module describes and assesses the main sociological theories of crime and deviance on the basis of their theory, their evidence and their research methods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
understand the main explanations and interpretive frameworks in the sociology of crime and deviance;
evaluate the main explanations and interpretive frameworks in the sociology of crime and deviance;
assess critically key empirical studies in this field;
demonstrate an analytic skill set in critical thinking about complex moral phenomena;
locate sociological theories of crime and deviance within their socio-historical context and within the history of the field;
illustrate a sensitivity to the moral and political resonances of the key moral debates in the twentieth century.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class test mid-semester (50 marks) , 1 x 1500-word essay at end (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC2026 Sociology of the Family

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To examine specific aspects of contemporary family life in relation to social research and theory.

Module Content: Families encompass a complex array of relationship networks, including: those living in heterosexual, legally-contracted unions (lifelong and re-constituted) with children; those cohabiting in heterosexual and/or same-sex partnerships without children; lone parents and their children; three generational, extended or sibling families. Families continue to flourish in their diversity. This module examines specific aspects of contemporary family/personal life in relation to social research and theory. Part 1 provides a critical analysis of theoretical approaches to the family, intimacy and personal life (including Carol Smart and David Cheal) and elucidates macro social trends and processes. Part 2 examines specific dimensions of contemporary family life, personal life and intimacy and challenges current debates. The Irish case is considered in each section.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Students who take this course should be able to:
Examine specific aspects of contemporary family life in relation to research, policy and social theory.
Critically analyse theoretical approaches to the family
Identify social trends and processes in the arena of family life
Evaluate the changes occurring in contemporary family life.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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SC2027 Sociology of Health, Illness and the Body

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive introduction to the sociology of health and illness.

Module Content: Students will be introduced to classical and new social theories in the area of health and illness. The various perspectives and analytical approaches will be developed in connection with a number of substantive areas and topics. These will include the history of the changing concepts of health and illness, medicine as a form of social power and the historical formation of health-care professions and occupations, the biomedical model and medical discourse, sociological critiques of the general model of illness categories and the various shifts that have occurred in the nature and understanding of health and illness. The course will also explore the social causation of health and illness, socio-economic inequalities and gender issues in health. A case study approach will be adopted as a way of introducing students to some of the changing concepts and pressing issues that have entered health discourse and practice, for example the concepts of risk, responsibility and lifestyle.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Give a historical overview of the development of the sociology of health, illness and the body.
Outline key concepts of the field of health, illness and the body.
Understand what is at stake in the construction of health, illness and the body as a field of study, and critically engage with some of the dominant historical and contemporary assumptions and trajectories of the field.
Outline major themes in the sociology of health, illness and the body, and analyse the issue(s) at stake therein.
Outline and evaluate the contribution of major sociologists of health, illness and the body.
Compare and contrast the basic methodological paradigms in the field.
Analyze contemporary social debates on health, illness and the body.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 X 3,000 word essay 90 marks, attendance 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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SC2034 Cultures of Cities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To explore key classical and contemporary theorists of urban culture within the broader context of Modernity and post-Modernity.

Module Content: This module looks at characteristic aspects of cultures of cities in terms of their being symptomatic of broader processes of transformation of Modernity. The module begins by showing how the discussion of urban cultural forms is synonymous with the study of modernity in general. The city is first sketched within the terms of classical social theorists Weber, Marx, Durkheim, Freud and others. Next, the formulations of the city by George Simmel and Walter Benjamin are examined, and the methodology for the study of urban culture proffered by their work is considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the following sociological cognitive competencies: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Describe the field of the cultures of cities outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms and define key concepts and ideas in the discourse of the cultures of cities.
Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena in the cultures of cities.
Analyze aspects of modern city cultures and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Explain urban cultural phenomena and formulate particular problems in terms of general sociological theories.
Criticize aspects of contemporary urban cultures and evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 essay (40 marks); in class test (40 marks), Attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC2052 Forensic Sociology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): SC2021

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To describe, explicate and illustrate the main contemporary sociological theories and research studies of social pathologies.

Module Content: Based on theory and research from Sociology as well as psychology, epidemiology, philosophy, and anthropology, this module addresses ways in which contemporary social problems and diverse malaises such as suicide, self-harm, depression and problematic forms of consumption (e.g. substance abuse, binging, purging) relate to cultural pathologies of the social body and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the following sociological cognitive competencies: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Describe the field of social pathologies outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms and define key concepts and ideas in the social pathologies.
Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena in social pathologies.
Analyze specific social pathologies and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Explain social pathologies and formulate particular problems in terms of general sociological theories.
Criticize aspects of social pathologies and evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word essays (50 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department.).

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SC3001 Social Theory II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): SC2001

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology; Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of contemporary social theory with a view to clarifying the principles of theory construction.

Module Content: This module provides a general yet contextually sensitive overview of post-war and especially 20th Century social theory from a variety of points of view. The major theoretical traditions are covered in a way that allows the student to develop an understanding both of leading authors and of basic concepts and theoretical models.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Give a historical overview of the development of social theory in relation to its changing socio-historical context between the mid-20th century and the present.
Outline what social theory is, and identify the major contemporary directions and the figures representing them.
Compare and contrast the contributions of at least two major contemporary social theorists.
Outline and critically evaluate the contribution of a major contemporary social theorist.
Present and analyse the basic contemporary social theoretical concepts and models.
Identify the range of options available for the construction of social theory, and demonstrate a justified choice of position.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1500 word essays - 50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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SC3003 Sociology of Development and Globalization

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To introduce the current state of theory in the Sociology of Development and to illustrate how Globalization has transformed understandings of development.

Module Content: The course beings with a historical overview of the concept of globalisation. The second section examines the roots of the development project and the major schools of development theory. The third part of the course reviews various theories of globalisation and explores how these frameworks have altered development theory. The final section of the course examines responses to globalization and reviews case studies illustrating the impact of globalization on development projects.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
List, describe and outline the main ideas and arguments of each of the theories presented in the course;
Summarize, discuss and compare the theories and case studies presented in the course;
Critically evaluate the relevance of sociological concepts, theoretical insights and research data for the analysis of global inequality in economic, political and cultural forms;
Draw on their experiential knowledge and on theoretical and empirical knowledge in the synthesis of new understandings of contemporary globalization and development issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3004 The Sociology of Community

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To understand community as social system, as concept, as ideology and as utopia.

Module Content: To sensitise the student to the many manifestations of community and thereby to encourage greater awareness of developments, in both sociological theory and method, which are more appropriate for handling a phenomenon such as community. The module will also explore not only the nature of community per se, but also will examine its social and political contexts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the field of the sociology of community outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify key sociological theories and paradigms and define key concepts and ideas in the sociology of community
Apply sociological theories and concepts to key debates and controversies in Ireland.
Analyse emerging forms of community using sociological concepts and theories.
Explain the development of contemporary theories and models of community.
Critically evaluate the idea of a decline of community in contemporary society.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1500 word essays, 50 marks each.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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SC3007 Introduction to Planning and Sustainable Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Mr William Brady, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: This module will introduce students to the history and the development of planning as a professional practice.

Module Content: Core principles of modern planning, planning theory, settings and contexts of planning, values and ethics, underpinning contemporary planning, corruption, crime and the Planning Tribunals.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an understanding of issues in strategic planning
Describe the main planning process
Understand the dynamic influence of society, the environment and the economy
Engage with contemporary dialogues in planning.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay (40 marks), Field visit report 1,500 words (40 marks); attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward. Students failing continuous assessment in the Summer must submit alternative Continuous Assessment as prescribed by the Department.

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SC3009 Sociology of Religions and Civilisations

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop themes and issues in the sociological study of religion, in the framework of commparative civilisational analysis. The course will incorporate developments in related disciplines like anthropology and archaelogy.

Module Content: Understanding religion in modernity; secularisation revisited; Civilisational analysis; religion and the civilising process; the rise of new religious movements; Traditionalism and fundamentalism in contemporary religious movements, varieties of religious experiences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
present a historical overview of the main approaches in the sociology of religion, especially the historically and anthropologically based ones;
understand and evaluate the theories of secularisation and their problems;
gain an understanding of the contexts in which the main world religions emerged and developed;
gain familiarity with some of the main current issues in the sociology of religion, like fundamentalism, the practice of pilgrimage, and the nature of religious experiences;
compare the rise and spread of Christianity and Islam.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word essays throughout the semester (40 marks each); Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3012 Sociology of the Media

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To assess, from a range of perspective, the nature of mediated communication, the history, form and impact of contemporary mass media, and the inherent challenges and limits of publishing and public discourse.

Module Content: An exploration of the key sociological aspects of mass media past and present, and of the location of mass media within theories of society, political hegemony and contemporary communications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
develop a critical but appreciative understanding of the problems of mass communications,
develop an ability to read media discourse or output, a sound outline of the history of the mass media
develop a solid understanding of the logistics of news production
develop a clear view of the place of mass media within modern society.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1500 word essays (50 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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SC3016 Research Seminars and Project

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Third year Research Project which must be taught in Semester 1 and Semester 2).

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): SC2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 48hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology; Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology; Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology; Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology; Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide a discursive environment enabling students carry out an extensive research project.

Module Content: Taking the form of seminars, this module focuses on a substantive research topic (e.g. the symbolic order of waste, blood and society, Northern Ireland, risk and responsibility, the media, gender and development, feminism, globalisation and the economy, subcultures, etc.). Through the discussion of theory, methodology and research, the participants are initially prepared for individual research on selected aspects of the topic. Subsequently, the emphasis shifts to the discussion of the research in progress and the presentation of research projects and research essays to the group.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Students who liaise with their supervisor and complete their Sociology Research Project are offered a wide range of opportunities to develop new competencies and transferable disciplinary skills.
On completion of the project students should be able to:
Describe both the subject matter and aim of the research
Summarize and discuss the theoretical literature relevant to the substantive subject matter of the project
Critically evaluate the methodological literature relevant to the project and clearly describe the methods utilized during the course of empirical research
Synthesize their empirical research and theoretical knowledge in order to develop new understandings of their selected topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 10,000 word Research Project 255 marks, submission of literature review 30 marks, Attendance 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmission of revised Project, as prescribed by the Department.

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SC3017 Sociology of Law: Legal Justice, Human Rights and Social Change

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology; Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: A theoretically and methodologically informed sociological clarification of law in contemporary society.

Module Content: Within the framework of the development of society from the early modern to the currently emerging global period, the module focuses on the place and role of law in the constitution and organization of social life. Law is understood in terms of a system of coercive norms and a process of constitutionalisation that both creates and protects freedoms. However, law also exists as a resource used by actors to challenge conventional readings of democracy, justice and right in a highly contested environment. This series of lectures recounts current sociological thinking on the evolving function and interpretation of law in light of debates on the ethics of contemporary war, humanitarian intervention, international tribunals and human rights violations. Attention is given to major trends and to the partially contradictory pursuit of international justice and peaceful relations amongst a community of sovereign states.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Outline the concept of law and locate it within the broader framework of society, particularly in relation to morality and politics.
Compare and contrast different theoretical and methodological approaches to the analysis of law.
Describe and analyse processes in which law dynamically interrelates with other (e.g. economic, political and cultural) factors and forces in the constitution and organization of society.
Evaluate the positive and negative outcomes generated by the interaction between law and other factors and forces involved in societal transformation.
Relate their own beliefs, ideas and attitudes to contemporary legal developments and their analysis.
Design a sociological analysis of law in society.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 90 marks; attendance 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Completion of one 3,000 word essay and weekly attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3018 Research Essay

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): SC2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology; Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology; Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology; Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology; Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide expert support and guidance to students in the completion of a sociology research essay.

Module Content: Taking the form of seminars, this module initially focuses on a substantive research topic (e.g. identity, Europe, migration, crime & deviance, social integration, the city, minorities, environment, politics, the media, gender, development, feminism, globalisation, the economy, etc.). Students will be required to collect and review literature relevant to the topic of their research essay. In addition to Sociology literature this will include research Reports, government statements , policy documents and similar materials.Through the discussion of theory, policy literature and research methods, participants are initially prepared for planning the layout and argument structure of a research essay on a selected topic. Subsequently, the emphasis shifts to a regular discussion of the research in progress and the presentation of arguments and research findings first in an extended essay format and finally, in a seminar setting.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
show competencies in research essay writing, as well as transferable disciplinary skills.
describe both the subject matter and aim of the research
summarize, discuss and critically evaluate the literature relevant to the topic of the research essay and clearly describe the methods utilized over the course of empirical research
synthesize their research and theoretical knowledge in order to develop new understandings of their selected topic and present such findings in structured essay format.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 5,000 word Research Essay 70 marks; Submission of a literature review 20 marks; Attendance 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3020 Citizenship and Global Community

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (This module, SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS, is available both in Semester 1 and Semester 2).

No. of Students: Min 10 (per Seminar).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (for students taking the module in semester 1); 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (for students taking the module in semester 2).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: This module focuses on the political, social, cultural, ecological and economic systems that define the global community.

Module Content: This module (SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS) explores the processes and experiences by and through which people are transformed into citizens and members of global communities. The module is organized around a theoretical paradigm that explains transformative experiences in terms of their being structured as rites de passage. These transformative rites of passage range, for example, from large scale historical transformations, such as the manifold structured experiences through which people from traditional rural communities were transformed into citizens of modern society throughout the 19th & 20th century; the experiences of emigrants and immigrants as they are dis-embedded from their normative contexts and become members of diasporas and citizens of a New World; to the more mundane and personal experiences of transitioning from school to University and international 'study abroad' experience.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Utilize a basic knowledge of concepts from anthropology and sociology to understand & interpret the transformation of persons into citizens of global communities.
Examine critically what it means to be constituted as a citizen / subject in a global community.
Appreciate a culture other than one?s own.
Use information resources for critical research and inquiry into course themes and concepts.
Use evidence to develop and evaluate positions regarding other topics covered in the seminar.
Offer plausible interpretations and express informed opinions about topics covered in the seminar and communicate well in written and oral form.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written assignment - 50 marks; Attendance and participation - 25 marks; In-class presentation - 25 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department; marks for attendance and in-class presentation are carried forward).

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SC3023 Sociology of Health and Illness: New Directions and Current Debates

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide students with a thorough grounding in contemporary sociological debates on the collective mental health of communities, as well as classical sociological explorations of encounters with suffering, memory, trauma, alienation, violence and denial. To connect these sociological debates to some of the more pressing concerns of contemporary societies, including collective efforts to come to terms with war, global climate change, the threat of terrorism, widespread famine and human suffering.

Module Content: This course examines those aspects of health associated with the psycho social and emotional well being of communities. In particular, it will explore various collective strategies adopted to selectively know and understand inhumane conduct and consider how publics morally disengage from acts of extreme violence and rationalize inhumane conduct, especially during periods of war or social unrest. It further assesses how societies adopt collective strategies of 'unknowing' violence (i.e., 'doing denial'), that is, devises ways of looking at the social world without seeing it, or listening without hearing its distress cries. It asks if social and political under-reactions to widespread evidence of violence, hunger, poverty, or ecological destruction today offer us any insights into the relationship between knowledge of suffering (its production and dissemination), social relations among humans, and propensity to act? Using classical Marxist and Weberian analysis, it will explore how social and affective identification with fellow humanity is routinely blocked. It will also assess the role of narrative in establishing the acceptability and coherence of certain violent realities today (e.g., those associated with escalating climate destruction, terrorism, poverty, and war).

The second part of this course considers occasions when societies choose to engage with traumatic memories of violence. It asks what are the triggering mechanisms forcing publics out of a state of denial in this instance? What social, political and cultural factors awaken societies to histories of abuse and accept perpetrator guilt, thereby precipitating a publicly staged 'coming to terms' with issues of responsibility?

Topics: collective trauma, denial, societal guilt, inhumanities, the by-stander society, alienation, societal learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the following sociological cognitive competencies: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Specifically, students should be able to: Describe the field of the sociology of health and illness, outline its relevance to understanding how societies deal with the question of collective guilt, collective trauma, an come to terms with the question of responsibility and learn from a violent past.
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms that offer key concepts and ideas for understanding how societies respond to trauma, deny the relevance of some peoples' suffering and justify the ongoing use of violence.
Apply sociological theories and concepts to specific areas of interest and relate particular problems and issues to the field of health and illness.
Analyze aspects of modern society that relate to issues of health and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Criticize aspects of contemporary society as they pertain to health and illness and evaluate issues and debates.
Identify and define key concepts and ideas in the field of sociology of health. Apply sociological concepts and relate them to particular health-related problems and ongoing issues. Use sociological concepts to analyse and explain health-related aspects of modern society.
Critically appraise the strengths and weaknesses of traditional thinking on the topics looked at in the module. Explain why and how societies register, explain and justify violent behavior.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( 1 x 3,000 word essay 90 marks, Attendance and participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3025 Health and Scientific Deviance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Myles Balfe, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.

Lecturer(s): Dr Myles Balfe, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.

Module Objective: To introduce students to key examples of health-related and scientific deviance; and to understand why health-related and scientific deviance occurs.

Module Content: This module will provide an overview of health-related and scientific deviance, explore key examples of this type of deviance and investigate why it occurs. The module will examine in detail the corruption of public health under the Nazi regime during World War 2. Additional topics will examine: healthcare professionals and torture; deviant human experimentation; the use of science and public health knowledge to facilitate apocalyptic terrorism; forbidden data; corruption and whistle-blowing in healthcare organisations; and fraud and deception in research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain what health-related and scientific deviance is.
Identify and define key sociological concepts and ideas that can explain health-related and scientific deviance.
Apply these concepts to new deviance related problems, issues and phenomena.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3029 Sociology of the Environment

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 85.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To trace the social, historical and cultural bases of environmental concern and the development of the institutional framework for environmental protection in Ireland.

Module Content: An examination of the evolution of environmental concern in Ireland in a comparative sociological perspective. This module looks at the formation of voluntary organisations, the construction of a state apparatus for environmental protection and the key changes in environmental concern up to the 1980s. Specific attention will be given to recent developments in social theory regarding the relationship between culture and nature. In particular, the module will explore the basis of environmental controversy in Ireland, in the context of broader changes in attitudes towards nature.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the field of the Sociology of the Environment, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify key sociological theories and paradigms and define key concepts and ideas in the sociology of the environment
Apply sociological theories and concepts to key debates and controversies in Ireland and the EU more generally.
Analyse specific controversies, problems and issues using sociological concepts and theories.
Explain the social and political institutionalisation of environmental discourse in Ireland.
Evaluate the social dimensions of contemporary environmental issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 X 1500 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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SC3036 Living Spaces: Social Construction of Habitat

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: Through substantive sociological and social policy analysis the module will focus on historical, contemporary and emerging practices of architecture, housing, consumption and home-making.

Module Content: Historical and contemporary housing models will be examined using sociological and social policy paradigms to explore the relationship between the built environment and social order and reproduction. In particular it will examine social constructs such as: Social architecture, planning and models of the good society; Home ownership, membership and social exclusion; The subject of private household/the object of public housing; The citizen-consumer/the welfare client; the good neighbourhood the dangerous ghetto; Domestic bliss/ delinquency and the broken home; The house as commodity fetish and the consuming practices of home-making; Sustainable living spaces for the future.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the following sociological cognitive competencies: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Specifically, students should be able to:
Describe the field of living spaces, housing & habitat, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms and define key concepts and ideas in the discourse of living spaces, housing and habitat .
Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena in the field of living spaces.
Analyze aspects of living spaces, housing & habitat and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Explain phenomena and formulate particular problems pertaining to the field of living spaces, housing & habitat in terms of general sociological theories.
Criticize aspects of contemporary living spaces, housing & habitat and evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1500 word assignments, 40 marks each, Attendance 20).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass both in-class assignments, participate in the field trips and have a minimum of 75% recorded attendance.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3039 Philosophy of Social Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To introduce the student to the philosophy of social science.

Module Content: Historical introduction to the different epistemological-methodological traditions in social science, an exploration of both historical and contemporary methodological disputes and problems. Among the traditions to be reviewed are the positivist, pragmatist, interpretative, critical, functionalist, structuralist and feminist directions. Such methodological discussions as the explanation-understanding controversy, the positivist dispute and both the current feminist epistemology and constructivism-realism debates are covered. As regards methodological problems, the module focuses on the development of methodological frameworks through which social theory is made serviceable for social research purposes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Give a historical overview of the development of the philosophy of social science.
Outline what the philosophy of social science is, and identify the key concepts of the field.
Outline the major controversies in the philosophy of social science, and analyse the issue(s) at stake therein.
Outline and evaluate the contribution of a major philosopher of social science.
Compare and contrast the basic methodological paradigms in the social sciences.
Outline and critically evaluate at least two of leading contemporary philosophies of social science.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3046 Family, Gender, Sexualities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To examine specific aspects of family, gender and sexualities in relation to social research and theory.

Module Content: Family life, gender relations and sexual orientations have been significant sites of concern, activism and contestation over recent decades. For some, a greater diversity of family forms, changing relations between women and men and an increased tolerance of minority sexual orientations have been signs of socio-cultural enlightenment. For others, the decline of the family, the erosion of traditional gender roles and sexual permissiveness have been at the forefront of a more general unravelling of socio-cultural order. The course places these differing perspectives in a sociological context as the nature and scope of changes to family life, gender relations, intimacy and attitudes to sexuality are examined and theorised from a social and cultural perspective.
This course is taught as a seminar, with student participation incorporated. Students taking this course are expected to read an identified journal article or book excerpt each week.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Students who take this course should be able to:
Examine specific aspects of family, gender and sexualities in relation to sociological research and social theory.
Critically analyse theoretical approaches to the family, gender and sexualities
Identify social trends and processes in the arena of family, gender and sexualities
Evaluate the changes occurring in the sociology of personal life.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department.).

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SC3053 Societal Regulation and Environmental Governance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To explore theories of social regulation and environmental governance in the context of global sustainability and climate change.

Module Content: 1. Theories of Societal Regulation
2. Modes of Societal Regulation: Government, Business and Civil Society
3. Environmental Risk and Environmental Harm
4. Human and Non-Human Rights and Responsibilities
5. Precaution, Prevention, Policing and Punishment
6. Varieties of Justice: Environmental and Ecological
7. Eco-feminism and Eco-racism
8. Case Studies of Transnational Environmental Crime
9. Varieties of Citizenship: Environmental, Ecological and Sustainable
10. Equity and Ethics, North and South
11. Climate Change and Global Justice
12. Rethinking Regulation in a Post Carbon World

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Compare and contrast competing theories and modes of societal regulation,
Apply key concepts of risk, harm, rights and responsibilities, precaution etc.
Appreciate the transformation of regulation in the face of `grand challenges? (e.g. global sustainability and climate change.
Be aware of the role of societal regulation in contemporary Environmental Governance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word essays (45 marks each); Participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC3055 Research Project 2

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Third year Research Project which must be taught in Semester 1 and Semester 2).

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): SC2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 48hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology; Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology; Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology; Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology; Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide a discursive environment enabling students carry out an extensive research project.

Module Content: Taking the form of seminars, this module focuses on a substantive research topic (e.g. the symbolic order of waste, blood and society, Northern Ireland, risk and responsibility, the media, gender and development, feminism, globalisation and the economy, subcultures, etc.). Through the discussion of theory, methodology and research, the participants are initially prepared for individual research on selected aspects of the topic. Subsequently, the emphasis shifts to the discussion of the research in progress and the presentation of research projects and research essays to the group.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Students who liaise with their supervisor and complete their Sociology Research Project are offered a wide range of opportunities to develop new competencies and transferable disciplinary skills.
On completion of the project students should be able to:
Describe both the subject matter and aim of the research
Summarize and discuss the theoretical literature relevant to the substantive subject matter of the project
Critically evaluate the methodological literature relevant to the project and clearly describe the methods utilized during the course of empirical research
Synthesize their empirical research and theoretical knowledge in order to develop new understandings of their selected topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 10,000 word Research Project 255 marks - submission of a literature review 30 marks- Attendance 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmission of revised Project, as prescribed by the Department.

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SC4001 Sociology of Health: Contemporary Debates and Holistic Healthcare for the 21st Century

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (24hrs Lectures/Group Work/Tutorials/Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: Module Objective: This course is designed as a discursive and interactive forum to provide a wide variety of learning opportunities and to facilitate the acquisition of a range of competencies and flexible disciplinary skills.

Module Content: Current debates: Sociology in Healthcare / Sociology of Healthcare.
Sociological Theory and Nursing practice: Issues of power, knowledge and discourse, the social process of knowledge production, communication and the media. Biomedical, Complementary and Alternative Models of Healthcare. Nursing professionalisation and the production of new nursing knowledge. Iatrogenic illness: the case of 'Medicines out of Control. Bureaucracy in healthcare, a barrier to organisational change. Lay-professional and Inter-Professional interaction in Healthcare. Changing models of healthcare, co-cultural and multicultural approaches. Understanding the process of transformation and change in healthcare. A case study approach will be used throughout in an analysis of Current Debates / biomedical solutions and alternatives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Outline and summarise the concepts of thinking sociologically and engaging the sociological imagination
Outline the main ideas and arguments of each of the theorists presented in the course
Compare and contrast theoretical perspectives presented
Critique and evaluate the relevance of sociological concepts, theoretical insights and research data for analysis of contemporary healthcare issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay, 80 marks; Attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. To meet professional requirements attendance at lectures, tutorials, seminars etc. will be monitored.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department. The mark for attendance is carried forward).

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SC6001 Economy and Society Summer School

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 40hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology, Guest professors; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School delivered with staff at Waterford Institute of Technology and guest professors designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to classical and contemporary debates and theories on economy & society.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The Department of Sociology will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment are appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in theoretical paradigms, interpretive frameworks, methodologies and epistemologies that underpin areas of substantive inquiry on economy and society in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School
Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories presented in Summer School.
Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Attendance and Participation 60 marks; 1x 2500 words reflective learning journal 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Participation and completion of asignment as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6002 Economy and Society Summer School - 2

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 40hr(s) Directed Study; 100hr(s) Other (self directed research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology, Guest Professors; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School delivered with staff at Waterford Institute of Technology and guest professors designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to classical and contemporary debates and theories on economy & society.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The Department of Sociology will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment are appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in theoretical paradigms, interpretive frameworks, methodologies and epistemologies that underpin areas of substantive inquiry on economy and society in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School
Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories presented in Summer School.
Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ( 1 x 2500 words reflective learning journal 40 marks; attendance and participation 60 marks; 1 x 5000 words seminar paper 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Participation and completion of asignment as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6601 Sociology of Crime and Deviance

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 220 hours of recommended reading, independent research and self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enable and stimulate students to understand the main models of sociological explanation of crime and deviance in the world today. This module will explicate the key theories of crime and deviance, illustrate them with the types of empirical study they generate, and outline their main weaknesses.

Module Content: The module will therefore deal with the following explanatory concepts and fields: economic division, class and exploitation, normative dislocation or cultural breakdown, subcultural or gang formation, stigmatization problems or excessive labelling, deviancy amplification, social conflict analysis, professional practice or institutionalized bias, ideology and the state, masculinity and gender difference, globalization and underdevelopment and environmental dimensions of crime.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand the main theories of crime and social deviance;
Explain the differences between them and their main weakensses
Demonstrate knowledge of some major empirical studies in this field and the main research methodologies;
Show a basic grasp of the kinds of social policy relevent to the field.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (2 x Essays 3000 to 4000 words (150 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative essay, as prescribed by the Department).

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SC6602 Rethinking Borders: Global Challenges to Social Justice

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To present a sociological account of the nature of borders and their political, social, cultural and ethical consequences.

Module Content: Even in this era of global expansion, borders remain important forms of societal organization of social practice, identities and affiliations. In more recent years, notable restrictions have been placed on borders due to issues of security, terrorist attack mass migration and disease prevention. To cross borders today (cultural, political, ethnic, religious, and geographical) over and beyond the simple entry to and exit from the political category known as the state, is therefore a complex affair. It is at the extremities of such borders (frontiers) that the limits to democracy and human rights commitments are rigorously tested.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the acquisition of a body of knowledge directly related to the concept of borders;
Evaluate the relationship between borders, politics, law, and social change;
Explore linkages between borders, justice, human rights, and social development;
Identify, devise and apply appropriate theoretical and methodologucal means for a sociological analysis of borders and social justice.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1x 5000 - 6000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1x 5,000 - 6,000word essay to be submitted by the third Friday in August).

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SC6603 Social Pathology and Civic Health

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop a sociological understanding and critical interpretation of social pathology and civic health in contemporary society.

Module Content: The module will outline, analyse and critically interpret the pattern of contemporary illnesses, ( e.g. suicide and deliberate self-harm; depression, anxiety and affective disorders; eating disorders, substance abuse; chronic fatigue syndrome, etc) that have a sociological profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These diseases are symptoms of social and cultural pathologies, and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society manifest in crime, deviance, and social disorder, and at the level of individual patients' bodies. These social pathologies arise from individual and collective experiences of profound and drastic social changes and cultural shifts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
demonstrate the following cognitive competencies with respect to the materials covered: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Specifically, students should be able to:

Describe the field of inquiry outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the seminar.
Analyze aspects of the seminar?s field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Explain phenomena and formulate particular problems covered by the seminar in terms of general sociological theories.
Criticize topics and issues covered in the seminar and evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x seminar paper (5,000 - 6,000 words) due in mid-January).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6608 Social and Sociological Theory

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: Presentation and analysis of issues in contemporary social theory with the aim of increasing theoretical knowledge and refining application skills.

Module Content: This module is devoted to a presentation and analysis of social theory on five distinct levels. First, the development of social theory is reconstructed with an emphasis on its transformation since the 1960s. Second, basic issues in contemporary social theory are explored with reference to modernity and its problems. Third, the implications of the feminist critique of social theory are clarified. Fourth, the normative dimension of social theory is linked to social learning. Finally, various methods of theorization are explored

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the field of social theory, outlining its historical development, scope and central problems.
Distinguish major theoretical paradigms and theories and define key ideas and concepts
Analyse theories and concepts and relate them to particular fields, phenomena and issues.
Evaluate issues and debates and criticise theoretical approaches and positions relative to them.
Formulate a theoretical approach to particular phenomena and hypothesise an explanation for them.
Analyse the student's own field of inquiry and outline an appropriate theoretical framework.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Essay (5,000 - 6,000 words), due in mid January).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6611 Sociology of Crime and Deviance

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 140 hours of recommended reading, independent research and self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enable and stimulate students to understand the main models of sociological explanation of crime and deviance in the world today. This module will explicate the key theories of crime and deviance, illustrate them with the types of empirical study they generate, and outline their main weaknesses.

Module Content: The module will therefore deal with the following explanatory concepts and fields: economic division, class and exploitation, normative dislocation or cultural breakdown, subcultural or gang formation, stigmatization problems or excessive labelling, deviancy amplification, social conflict analysis, professional practice or institutionalized bias, ideology and the state, masculinity and gender difference, globalization and underdevelopment and environmental dimensions of crime.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand the main theories of crime and social deviance;
Explain the differences between them and their main weakensses
Demonstrate knowledge of some major empirical studies in this field and the main research methodologies;
Show a basic grasp of the kinds of social policy relevent to the field.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Essay 5000 to 6000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative essay, as prescribed by the Department).

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SC6614 Sociological Methodology

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: Presentation and analysis of issues in contemporary sociological methodology with the aim of increasing methodological knowledge, method selection and research design.

Module Content: This module is devoted to a presentation and analysis of sociological methodology on five distinct levels. First, a range of approaches to sociological methodology is outlined. Second, basic issues in contemporary methodologies in and across these approaches are explored. Third, the implications of 'post-methodological' approaches to social research are clarified. Fourth, the implications for research practice of various methodologies are outlined. Finally, the research design cycle from theoretical formulation through methodological and method selection to analysis is outlined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the field of research methodology, outlining its historical development, scope and central problems.

Distinguish major methodological paradigms and relate them to theory traditions.

Situate a methodological approach within the overall context of their dissertations.

Evaluate issues and debates and criticise methodological approaches and positions relative to them.

Outline the research design cycle
Analyse the student?s own field of inquiry and outline an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework for their research.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Essay (5000 - 6000 words) due in April ).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6615 Dissertation in Sociology

Credit Weighting: 40

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To provide a discursive environment enabling the student to carry out an extensive disseration

Module Content: At the beginning of term students will be asked to choose an area and indicate a topic for a dissertation. On this basis they will be consulted and assigned to a member of staff who will act as their supervisor.
Students will be expected to meet with their supervisor on a regular basis (either in tutorial or on a one-to-one level) to plan, research and write their module work. Students are advised to discuss their proposals with potential supervisors.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
To undertake a research project and to complete a research dissertation.

Assessment: Total Marks 800: Continuous Assessment 800 marks (Dissertation (20,000 - 25,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Where the work described does not meet the required standard, the Examination Board on the recommendation of the Department of Sociology, may decide to permit the student to make minor corrections to achieve the pass standard (40%) for the Dissertation within six weeks of the publication of examination results. Where the work described does not meet the Masters standard, and additional research or a new project entirely is required, or the candidate fails to meet the pass standard with the required revisions within the period specified, a candidate will have ONE CHANCE to repeat the Dissertation module in the subsequent year.

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SC6616 Online Child Sexual Exploitation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Lynch, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of the problem of online child sexual exploitation, as well as strategies for its management and prevention. Students will develop their knowledge of the dynamics of online child exploitation offending and victimisation with reference to state of the art criminological literature and applied case studies. Finally, this module will enable students to evaluate a range of measures to combat and regulate this phenomenon, with attention to the particular challenges presented by Internet-enabled sexual exploitation offences.

Module Content: 1. The role of technology in the sexual exploitation of children
2. 'Child pornography'
3. Online grooming and solicitation
4. Youth 'sexting' ? the dangers of a socially networked sexuality
5. Internet-facilitated trafficking for sexual exploitation
6. The victimology of online child sexual exploitation
7. Online offending behaviour ? understanding the dynamics of child exploitation offences
8. Risk assessment and management with online offenders
9. Young people and sexually harmful online behaviour
10. Policing and regulation of online child sexual exploitation
11. Young people and Internet safety ? strategies for safeguarding and child protection
12. Preventing online child sexual exploitation

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically analyse the problem of online child sexual exploitation and its various forms, with reference to contemporary criminological theory
Evaluate the implications of information technologies for online child sexual exploitation offences
Understand the particular dynamics and victimology online child sexual exploitation offences, as well as their implications for the management and prevention of this phenomenon
Analyse the range of measures that have been introduced to combat and manage online child sexual exploitation offences, and identify their main strengths and weaknesses.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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SC6623 Globalisation and Culture

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1day(s) Seminars; 1 x 1day(s) Workshops (student symposium).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: The refinement of theoretical and methodological competences and skills in a discursive context substantively focusing on the relationship between globalisation and culture

Module Content: Theoretical perspectives within Sociology and Cultural Studies are utilized to explore how cultural changes linked to globalisation have impacted on the relationship between transnational institutions, states, regions, ethnic groups and local communities. A second focus of the course is to examine the role of communication technologies and the mass media in creating new forms of hybridity in a global cultural context.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe and analyse the process of globalisation, particularly in terms of its relationship to local, national and global cultures.


Compare and contrast different factors and forces operative within globalisation, and analyse their dynamic interaction.


Describe and analyse problems and challenges which relate to recent cultural transformations in terms of their relationship to on-going processes of globalisation.


Evaluate the positive and negative outcomes generated by the interrelation of different factors and forces which link globalisation to cultural change.


Relate their own beliefs, ideas and attitudes to changes in the global economic, political and cultural context.


Identify and devise appropriate theoretical and methodological means for sociological analysis of globalisation and culture


Design and execute a sociological analysis of globalisation in relation to cultural change in contemporary Irish society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (I x Essay (5,000 - 6,000 words) due in mid January).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6624 Civilisation and Globalisation: The Rise and Dynamics of the Modern World in the Context of Civilisational Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1day(s) Seminars; 1 x 1day(s) Workshops (student symposium).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop a comprehensive sociological understanding of the phenomenon of globalisation in the context of comparative historical civilisational analysis.

Module Content: The course provides a guide for understanding the processes that gave rise to the modern global world and still define its dynamics today. It will reconstruct the internal logic of the long-term historical developments of which the modern world is the outcome. Specific focus will be given to the origins of technology, the relative contributions of the Renaissance and the Reformation to the rise of modernity, and the role played by the theatre in the emergence of the modern public arena.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
demonstrate the following cognitive competencies with respect to the materials covered: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Specifically, students should be able to:

Describe the field of inquiry outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies
Complement the central conceptual tools of comparative historical sociology with perspectives taken over from neighboring areas: especially comparave anthropology, but also comparative mythology, archaeology, literature, and classical studies.
Identify the major sociological theories and paradigms employed, improve on them using comparative perspective, and define key concepts and ideas.
Explain phenomena and formulate particular problems covered by the seminar in terms of general sociological and anthropological theories.
Take a critical distance with respect to standard discussions on the topics and issues covered in the seminar and independently evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x seminar paper (5,000 - 6,000 words) due in early May).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6625 Contemporary Ireland: Formations of Gender, Race, Ethnicity and Class

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (plus self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Linda Connolly, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop an intersectional analysis of formations of gender, race, ethnicity and class in Contemporary Ireland

Module Content: This course theorises social change in the context of contemporary Ireland, in specific social and cultural arenas. Different ways of understanding and theorising the intersectionality of gender, class, race and ethnicity in Irish society will be outlined, in particular. The seminars in this course move beyond the prevailing economic/structural reading of the Celtic Tiger and its aftermath to look in detail at key aspects of 'change' as it has been experienced in the private as well as the public sphere in four substantive areas: family life; gender relations; sexualities/the transformation of intimacy; immigration, racism and cultural diversity. Theoretically, the analysis of contemporary Ireland advanced is embedded in theoretical debates relating to the transnational turn in Sociology as well as intersectionality theory.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate competence in defining, critically assessing, and using sociological concepts.
The ability to critically analyze a variety of sociological texts.
The acquisition of a sense of sociological consciousness, an understanding of forces,
ideas, events, movements, persons, and cultural processes.

An understanding of cross-cultural differences and of the importance of cultural context.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (5000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 5000 word essay).

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SC6626 Sociology of the Public Sphere

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1day(s) Workshops; 1 x 1day(s) Workshops (student symposium).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: The aim of the course is to provide students with basic familiarity with the sociological value of the concept of public sphere as a foundational concept for grasping all kinds of societal reflection, discussion and deliberation of a public nature, ranging from the literary to the political.

Module Content: The course will introduce students to the sociology of the public sphere.. The course will familiarize students with the early pivotal contributions of Jurgen Habermas, the ongoing critique of this work, especially that inspired by Negt and Kluge's contribution in the 70's in, amongst others, a feminist direction, Habermas's own later contributions and some comparatively recent work such as that of Emirbayer and Sheller, Mayhew and Hauser. It will also address methodological issues of the analysis of public discourse.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the major theories of the public sphere.

Describe and analyse processes of the transformation, construction and organization of society by means of communicative practices

Compare and contrast different factors and forces operative in communication societies and analyse their dynamic interrelation.

Describe and analyse problems and challenges following in the wake of societal learning by means of public disocurse and envisage potential solutions to them.

Evaluate the positive and negative outcomes generated by the interrelation of different factors and forces involved in societal learning through public discourse.

Relate their own beliefs, ideas and attitudes to contemporary society and its analysis.

Identify, devise and apply appropriate theoretical and methodological means for sociological analysis.

Design and execute a sociological analysis of contemporary society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Essay (5,000 - 6,000 words) due in April).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6627 Social Pathology and Civic Health

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop a sociological understanding and critical interpretation of social pathology and civic health in contemporary society.

Module Content: The module will outline, analyse and critically interpret the pattern of contemporary illnesses, ( e.g. suicide and deliberate self-harm; depression, anxiety and affective disorders; eating disorders, substance abuse; chronic fatigue syndrome, etc) that have a sociological profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These diseases are symptoms of social and cultural pathologies, and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society manifest in crime, deviance, and social disorder, and at the level of individual patients' bodies. These social pathologies arise from individual and collective experiences of social changes and cultural shifts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
demonstrate the following cognitive competencies with respect to the materials covered: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Specifically, students should be able to:

Describe the field of inquiry outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the seminar.
Analyze aspects of the seminar's field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Explain phenomena and formulate particular problems covered by the seminar in terms of general sociological theories.
Criticize topics and issues covered in the seminar and evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x seminar paper (3,500 - 4,000 words) due in mid-January).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6631 Sociology of Sustainable Development

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Other (Self-directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gerard Mullally, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop a sociological understanding and critical interpretation of sustainable development in contemporary society.

Module Content: The module will outline, analyse and critically interpret the evolution of the concept of sustainable development in its normative, symbolic and empirical forms in contemporary society. It will examine the debate North and South on sustainable development and consider the role of social movements after the 'death of environmentalism'. The module will critically interpret the importance of social capital and social agency in contemporary debates on sustainable development and analyse the impact of global debates in the Irish context.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
demonstrate the following cognitive competencies with respect to the materials covered: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Specifically, students should be able to:

Describe the field of inquiry outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the seminar.
Analyze aspects of the seminar's field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Explain phenomena and formulate particular problems covered by the seminar in terms of general sociological theories.
Criticize topics and issues covered in the seminar and evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Seminar paper (5,000 - 6,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC6632 Minor Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Individual Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To analyse an approved sociological topic.

Module Content: A minor dissertation written under the supervision of a staff member on an approved topic.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Engage in original research in sociology;
Develop individual research strategies and produce critical bibliographies;
Identify and utilise the major interpretive and argumentative strategies of sociology;
Analyse and criticise relevant positions and approaches on an academic level appropriate to postgraduate research;
Demonstrate ability to write critically, logically and systematically, using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research;
Argue for an original position on an advanced level of critical reflection.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (3 Copies of typed minor dissertation (max 15,000) to be submitted by the First Friday in October).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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SC6633 Literature Review

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Individual Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To read, understand and review selected literature.

Module Content: A review of literature relevant to a minor dissertation. Each student meets his/her supervisor weekly and submits written reviews of relevant literature. Submission date on or before 30th April.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Collect and report on the most relevant literature in a research area chosen by the student in consultation with a supervisor;
Identify themes and positions in the literature collected;
Organise the report according to the themes and positions thus identified;
Examine the different themes or positions in order to differentiate and contrast them;
Re-organise and summarise the different reports in one coherent review of the relevant literature;
Ascertain these literature reviews with regard to a possible minor thesis topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (A review essay of max 5,000 words 150 marks; oral presentation 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 5,000 word essay to be submitted; a second 2,000 word essay in lieu of failed oral presentation by the third Friday in August).

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SC6638 Rethinking Borders: Global Challenges to Social Justice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tracey Skillington, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To present a sociological account of the nature of borders and their political, social, cultural and ethical consequences.

Module Content: Even in this era of global expansion, borders remain important forms of societal organization of social practice, identities and affiliations. In more recent years, notable restrictions have been placed on borders due to issues of security, terrorist attack mass migration and disease prevention. To cross borders today (cultural, political, ethnic, religious, and geographical) over and beyond the simple entry to and exit from the political category known as the state, is therefore a complex affair. It is at the extremities of such borders (frontiers) that the limits to democracy and human rights commitments are rigorously tested.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate the acquisition of a body of knowledge directly related to the concept of borders;
Evaluate the relationship between borders, politics, law, and social change;
Explore linkages between borders, justice, human rights, and social development;
Identify, devise and apply appropriate theoretical and methodologucal means for a sociological analysis of borders and social justice.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1x 5000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1x 5,000 word essay to be submitted by the third Friday in August).

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SC7106 Social Theory Paradigms and Thesis Definition I

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 6hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop students' understanding of paradigms of social theory and to locate their thesis within those paradigm(s).

Module Content: The aim of this module is to develop students understanding of the relationship of their research to social theory by getting students to think about the relationship of their work to the main paradigms of sociology. Students will be expected to deliver papers on social theory and its relationship to research traditions generally and their own research project in particular.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Situate their thesis within paradigm(s) of social theory.
Define their thesis (and general research) problematics within paradigm(s) of social theory
Formulate their thesis's research question(s) in terms of social theory.
Contextualise all of the above within relevant social theoretical paradigms.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Seminar paper 5,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC7604 Sociology of the Mass Media

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Other (plus self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: Presentation and analysis of issues in the contemporary study of the mass media with the objective of increasing knowledge and developing analytic skills.

Module Content: Mass communication is inextricably linked with political and social power in contemporary society. The aim of this seminar is to explore and explicate the nature of these links. The study of the three central social processes involved in mass communication representation (how the world is presented to us in the media), production (the influences on how these representations are constructed) and consumption (how audiences receive the messages of the media) will form the central focus of this seminar.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms employed in the sociology of the mass media and define key concepts and ideas.
Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena associated with the central role of the mass media in contemporary society.
Analyze aspects of media output and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Explain the social functions of media in terms of general sociological theories and theories of culture.
Criticize and assess the relationships between media and politics.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 seminar paper (5,000 - 6,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC7623 Globalisation and Culture

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 3, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 1day(s) Seminars; 1 x 1day(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niamh M Hourigan, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: The refinement of theoretical and methodological competences and skills in a discursive context substantively focusing on the relationship between globalisation and culture

Module Content: Theoretical perspectives within Sociology and Cultural Studies are utilized to explore how cultural changes linked to globalisation have impacted on the relationship between transnational institutions, states, regions, ethnic groups and local communities. A second focus of the course is to examine the role of communication technologies and the mass media in creating new forms of hybridity in a global cultural context

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe and analyse the process of globalisation, particularly in terms of its relationship to local, national and global cultures.


Compare and contrast different factors and forces operative within globalisation, and analyse their dynamic interaction.


Describe and analyse problems and challenges which relate to recent cultural transformations in terms of their relationship to on-going processes of globalisation.


Evaluate the positive and negative outcomes generated by the interrelation of different factors and forces which link globalisation to cultural change.


Relate their own beliefs, ideas and attitudes to changes in the global economic, political and cultural context.


Identify and devise appropriate theoretical and methodological means for sociological analysis of globalisation and culture


Design and execute a sociological analysis of globalisation in relation to cultural change in contemporary Irish society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Essay (7,000 - 8,000 words) due in mid-January).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC7624 Civilisation and Globalisation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 3, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 1day(s) Seminars; 1 x 1day(s) Workshops (student symposium).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop a comprehensive sociological understanding of the phenomenon of globalisation in the context of comparative historical civilisational analysis

Module Content: The course provides a guide for understanding the processes that gave rise to the modern global world and still define its dynamics today. It will reconstruct the internal logic of the long-term historical developments of which the modern world is the outcome, situating these processes on the broadest possible horizon in space and time. Emphasis will be placed on the rise and fall of civilisations, focusing on 'dark ages' and 'renascences', the comparative analysis of Western and non-Western civilisations, and the comparative anthropology and mythology of cultures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
demonstrate the following cognitive competencies with respect to the materials covered: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation.
Specifically, students should be able to:

Describe the field of inquiry outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies
Complement the central conceptual tools of comparative historical sociology with perspectives taken over from neighboring areas: especially comparave anthropology, but also comparative mythology, archaeology, literature, and classical studies.
Identify the major sociological theories and paradigms employed, improve on them using comparative perspective, and define key concepts and ideas.
Explain phenomena and formulate particular problems covered by the seminar in terms of general sociological and anthropological theories.
Take a critical distance with respect to standard discussions on the topics and issues covered in the seminar and independently evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x seminar paper (7,000 - 8,000 words) due in mid-January. Essay length varies for MA and PhD Social Science (GREP) students. For further details see Departmental Handbook.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC7626 Sociology of the Public Sphere

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 3, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 1day(s) Workshops; 1 x 1day(s) Workshops (student symposium).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick O'Mahony, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: The aim of the course is to provide students with basic familiarity with the sociological value of the concept of public sphere as a foundational concept for grasping all kinds of societal reflection, discussion and deliberation of a public nature, ranging from the literary to the political.

Module Content: The course will introduce students to the sociology of the public sphere.. The course will familiarize students with the early pivotal contributions of Jurgen Habermas, the ongoing critique of this work, especially that inspired by Negt and Kluge?s contribution in the 70?s in, amongst others, a feminist direction, Habermas?s own later contributions and some comparatively recent work such as that of Emirbayer and Sheller, Mayhew and Hauser. It will also address methodological issues of the analysis of public discourse.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the major theories of the public sphere.

Compare and contrast different factors and forces operative in communication societies and analyse their dynamic interrelation.

Describe and analyse problems and challenges following in the wake of societal learning by means of public disocurse and envisage potential solutions to them.

Evaluate the positive and negative outcomes generated by the interrelation of different factors and forces involved in societal learning through public discourse.
Relate their own beliefs, ideas and attitudes to contemporary society and its analysis.

Identify, devise and apply appropriate theoretical and methodological means for sociological analysis.

Design and execute a sociological analysis of contemporary society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x seminar paper (7,000 - 8,000 words) due in April).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC7627 Social Pathology and Civic Health

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 3, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): Masters Degree

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To develop a sociological understanding and critical interpretation of social pathology and civic health in contemporary society.

Module Content: The module will outline, analyse and critically interpret the pattern of contemporary illnesses, ( e.g. suicide and deliberate self-harm; depression, anxiety and affective disorders; eating disorders, substance abuse; chronic fatigue syndrome, etc) that have a sociological profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These diseases are symptoms of cultural pathologies and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society manifest at the level of individual patients' bodies. These social pathologies arise from individual and collective experiences of social changes and cultural shifts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
demonstrate the following cognitive competencies with respect to the materials covered: Knowledge; Comprehension; Application; Analysis; Synthesis; Evaluation
Describe the field of inquiry outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
Identify major sociological theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
Apply sociological theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the seminar.
Analyze aspects of the seminar's field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of sociological theories and concepts.
Explain phenomena and formulate particular problems covered by the seminar in terms of general sociological theories.
Criticize topics and issues covered in the seminar and evaluate issues and debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x seminar paper (7,000 - 8,000 words) due in mid-January).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module:

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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SC7628 Communication and Learning in the Constitution of Society

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 3, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 1day(s) Seminars ((6 hours)); 1 x 1day(s) Workshops (student symposium).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr B.P. Strydom, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Mr B.P. Strydom, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: Refinement of theoretical-methodological competences in a discursive context focusing on the role of communication and learning in the constitution of society.

Module Content: The constitution or construction, transformation and organization of society is reconstructed in a theoretically and methodologically informed way in terms of the pragmatics of communication involving the viewpoint of both interaction (informal processes of subject/identity, opinion and will formation) and discourse (processes publicly mediating different or antagonistic perspectives). A cognitive sociological approach is adopted towards these processes. Continuing the tradition of moral and political sociology, examples of relevant issues are critically analysed in concrete contexts such as the currently emerging global or world society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe and analyse processes of the construction, transformation and organization of society.
Compare and contrast different factors and forces operative in social life, and analyse their dynamic interrelation.
Describe and analyse problems and challenges following in the wake of societal transformation, and envisage potential solutions to them
Evaluate the positive and negative outcomes generated by the interrelation of different factors and forces involved in societal transformation.
Identify and devise appropriate theoretical and methodological means for sociological analysis.
Relate their own beliefs, ideas and attitudes to contemporary society and its analysis
Design and execute a sociological analysis of contemporary society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x seminar paper (7,000 - 8,000 words) due in mid-January).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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