Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

PO1001 Introduction to Politics
PO2001 Political Analysis
PO3001 Dissertation
PO3004 Issues in Irish Politics 1
PO3005 Issues in Irish Politics ll
PO3007 Political Violence
PO6001 Dissertation in Politics
PO6003 Revolution, Decolonization & the Arab Spring

PO1001 Introduction to Politics

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 50, Max 320.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 72 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 22 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Dockstader, Department of Philosophy.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Fitzgerald, Department of History; Dr Jason Dockstader, Department of Philosophy; Dr Theresa Reidy, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the scope and variety of issues studied in an interdisciplinary approach to Politics.

Module Content: Basic concepts of political theory (including the state, democracy and liberalism); issues in contemporary international politics (war, terrorism, globalisation, underdevelopment, the United Nations); Government in Ireland, both national and local.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key features of the political system in Ireland
· Explore the concepts of political culture, party systems, electoral systems and political institutions
· Appraise the applicability of the main theories of political science to the Irish context
· Outline key theoretical traditions of the state, liberalism and democracy
· Describe the positions of central theorists of the state, liberalism and democracy
· Evaluate the importance of political ideas on contemporary political life
· Describe the contemporary historical framework of international politics
· Identify critical developments in the emergence of the international system
· Challenge the meaning of and rationale for political developments internationally.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (3 x Assignments (1,500 word essay or report ) (Each worth 45 marks) and 3 in-class tests.( Each worth 45 marks). Tutorial attendance and participation (30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Politics programme.).

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PO2001 Political Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Dockstader, Department of Philosophy.

Lecturer(s): Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government; Dr Michael Cosgrave, School of History; Dr Jason Dockstader, Department of Philosophy.

Module Objective: Develop critical awareness of different approaches to the study of politics

Module Content: Introduces a range of approaches and methods used in the study of contemporary political phenomena
Examines how we acquire knowledge about political ideas, institutions, processes, practices and outcomes.
Attention is devoted to positivist and interpretivist understandings

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the nature of political knowledge and its conceptual and methodological underpinnings
· Evaluate the various analytical and theoretical approaches to studying politics
· Place empirical material in a conceptual and theoretical context and move from the abstract to the concrete and vice versa
· Apply logic, reasoned argument and evidence to test the validity of political approaches , theories and arguments
· Communicate effectively in written form
· Locate, evaluate and analyse source materials for at a level appropriate for undergraduate research based learning
· Explore the dominant quantitative methods to the study of political science.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x In class test ( 30 marks) and 2 assignments(2 x 35 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Politics programme).

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PO3001 Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (Independent supervised research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jason Dockstader, Department of Philosophy.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of History; Dr Jason Dockstader, Department of Philosophy; Staff, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To equip students with a detailed knowledge of one particular subject within politics; to develop students' capacity to undertake independent political research in their own research time and in consultation with an academic supervisor.

Module Content: Independent research on a theme chosen in consultation with a Politics lecturer.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Formulate an original research question
· Perform a detailed literature review
· Demonstrate an ability to work independently
· Identify and apply appropriate research methods
· Identify and access bibliographical resources, databases and other sources of relevant information
· Draw appropriate conclusions and interpretations from assembled data
· Present a well-structured dissertation employing the appropriate academic conventions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1,000 word research proposal (20 marks) to be submitted by the end of October, presentation in November (20 marks) and 9,000 word dissertation (160 marks) to be submitted in April).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit work as prescribed by the Politics programme.).

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PO3004 Issues in Irish Politics 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To analyse current issues in Irish Politics

Module Content: This module examines current issues in Irish Politics

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key issues in contemporary Irish politics;
· Describe the suggested flaws in Irish political institutions and the proposed remedies;
· Evaluate policies enacted by various Irish governments;
· Assess the workings of the Irish political system;
· Assess whether the key issues are uniquely Irish and/or whether lessons can be learned from the comparative experience.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class test 50 marks, 1 x 2,000 word essay 30 marks, In-class presentation 20 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PO3005 Issues in Irish Politics ll

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Liam Weeks, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Ms Fiona Buckley, Department of Government.

Module Objective: To analyse current issues in Irish Politics

Module Content: This module examines current issues in Irish Politics

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key issues in contemporary Irish politics;
· Describe the suggested flaws in Irish political institutions and the proposed remedies;
· Evaluate policies enacted by various Irish governments;
· Assess the workings of the Irish political system;
· Assess whether the key issues are uniquely Irish and/or whether lessons can be learned from the comparative experience.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class test 50 marks, 1x 2,000 word essay 30 marks, In-class presentation 20 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PO3007 Political Violence

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Fitzgerald, Department of History.

Module Objective: Develop critical awareness of the multiple forms of collective violence and their relationship to Politics.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the various manifestations of political violence. It will use historical case studies to examine a range of phenomena such as civil wars, insurgencies, non-state terrorism, state terrorism and mass killings.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate the relationship between Politics and collective violence.
· Demonstrate knowledge of the connection between theories of collective action and social movements and political violence through class participation and examination.
· Discuss critically the various debates surrounding the ontology of political violence.
· Analyze a variety of manifestations of political violence through historical case studies.
· Demonstrate an ability to creatively search for sources and analyse the methods used by scholars of this topic.
· Communicate effectively, orally and in writing, and to present work in a manner which conforms to scholarly and subject conventions.
· Construct a relevant argument that demonstrates an adequate use of evidence and a selection of historical interpretations.
· Demonstrate the ability to work independently under the constraints imposed by the components of assessment, for example: word limit, time limit and deadlines.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay 60 marks; In-class presentation 20 marks, In-class response 10 marks, In-class participation 10 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed or non-submitted coursework must be submitted by the 3rd Thursday in August or as specified by the Politics programme.).

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PO6001 Dissertation in Politics

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (May-September).

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study; 18 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Readings and Methods in Politics).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Fitzgerald, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Discipline of Art History; Staff, Department of Government, Staff, Department of Philosophy.

Module Objective: To train students in Research

Module Content: A dissertation ( up to 20,000 words) written under supervision on an approved topic in Politics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify a valid research topic.
· Propose a line of study that will facilitate this research.
· Engage in systematic study of primary and secondary source material.
· Articulate a thesis based on a synthesis of the research material.
· Deliver a dissertation that reflects the student's mature consideration of the research topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (dissertation max 20,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% It is obligatory to (a) attend at least two-thirds of scheduled seminar classes and (b) give an oral presentation to the class on the research project.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PO6003 Revolution, Decolonization & the Arab Spring

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (Associated Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Crowley, Department of French.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of French.

Module Objective: To understand revolution and decolonization through a focus on Twentieth Century Algerian history.

Module Content: To present and analyse the dominant features of decolonization as a historical phenomenon that continues to mark much of the contemporary world. Through a close examination of the history of pre- and post- independence Algeria up to the present, we will assess the nature of revolution, nation building , contemporary Islamism and the Arab Spring. In doing this we will explore the interrelationship between the ideas, practices and politics of decolonization, revolution and their post-colonial legacies- both political and cultural.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explore the historical background to twentieth century decolonization with specific attention to Algeria from 1954 to the present.
· Identify the main threads of socio-political developments in post-revolutionary Algeria.
· Appraise the geo-political significance of Algeria in the context of contemporary global challenges.
· Appraise the significance of Algerian decolonisation from the perspective of other examples of decolonization.
· Engage with leading thinkers on decolonization.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ((1 x 1,500 word article review - 67 marks; 1 x 3,000 word essay - 100 marks; seminar participation and presentation - 33 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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