Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

PG6001 STEPS - Scientific Training for Enhanced Postgraduate Studies
PG6003 Teaching and Learning Module for Graduate Studies
PG6004 Getting Started with Graduate Research and Generic Skills
PG6005 Biotechniques
PG6008 Qualitative Data Analysis and Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software for the Social Sciences and Humanities
PG6009 Graduate Information Literacy Skills
PG6010 Editing Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences
PG6011 Digital Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences
PG6012 Scholarly Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
PG6014 Scientific Outreach and Communication
PG6015 An Introduction to Research Ethics
PG6016 Research Journal and Presentation Skills
PG6017 Teaching and Demonstrating Skills for Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES) Postgraduate Students
PG6018 Business Model Innovation Management
PG6019 Cloud Fundamentals
PG6020 Business Research Skills
PG6021 English for Postgraduate Studies (Upper-Intermediate: B2+)
PG6022 English for Postgraduate Studies (Lower Advanced: C1)
PG6023 English for Postgraduate Studies (Advanced: C1+)
PG6024 Qualitative Research Inquiry
PG6025 Community-Based Participatory Research
PG6026 Teaching and Demonstrating Skills for College of Science, Engineering and Food Science (SEFS) Postgraduate Students
PG6027 Going Public: Publishing Research in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
PG7002 Career Development, the Job Market, and Viva Preparation for end-stage PhD Students in Humanities and Social Sciences
PG7003 The PhD II: From Development to Completion
PG7004 Master Class: Contemporary Theoretical Paradigms in the Humanities and Social Sciences
PG7005 Narratives
PG7012 International Political Anthropology Summer School
PG7013 International Political Anthropology Summer School
PG7014 Creativity and Innovation for Research Students
PG7016 Systematic Reviews for the Health Sciences
PG7017 Project Management for Research Students
PG7018 Special Topics in the Humanities and Social Sciences Intensive School
PG7019 Comparing: Objects, Approaches, Problems, Opportunities
PG7021 An Introduction to Ethics of Health Research
PG7023 Classical Grounded Theory Methodology
PG7026 PhD Internship I (for the College of Science, Engineering and Food Science)
PG7027 Workplace Professional Training Module: Glucksman Futures
PG7028 PhD Internship (for College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences)
PG7029 PhD Internship (for the College of Business and Law)
PG7037 Text and Method: Critical Thinking
PG7038 Almost PhinisheD
PG7039 PhD Internship II (for the College of Science, Engineering and Food Science)
PG7040 Economy and Society Summer School
PG7041 Economy and Society Summer School 2
PG7048 PhD Generic and Transferable Skills Portfolio

PG6001 STEPS - Scientific Training for Enhanced Postgraduate Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 8hr(s) Workshops (and student assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students an introduction to principles and practice of scientific research, particularly through focussing on scientific writing and presentation skills. To use case studies from the recent history of science to illustrate principles discussed.

Module Content: Students completing the module should understand: Principles of writing and publishing papers, theses, research grant proposals and reports; Preparation of scientific presentations and posters; Ethical issuses in publishing research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Prepare a scientific manuscript for publication
?Write documents in a high standard of scientific writing
?Design a basic scientific presentation
?Explain basic principles of ethical aspects of publication.

Assessment: 1. In-class analysis and revision of a student's pre-written work as directed by the Module Coordinator; 2. Preparation of Powerpoint slides. Both assignments will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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PG6003 Teaching and Learning Module for Graduate Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Suitable for all graduates with teaching responsibilities in all disciplinary areas and in all Colleges).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 50 (If oversubscribed by closing date, students will be chosen by random selection.).

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 18hr(s) Lectures (seminars and workshops. Additional learning will involve online discussion sessions and reflection on participants' own teaching).

Module Co-ordinator: James G R Cronin, Department of VP Teaching and Learning.

Lecturer(s): Mr Daniel Blackshields, Department of Economics; Ms Jacinta C McKeon, School of Education; Dr Marian McCarthy, School of Education; James G R Cronin, Department of VP Teaching and Learning.

Module Objective: To introduce graduates to the principles and practices of teaching and learning at third level through engagement with teaching scenarios enacted through experiential learning and research informed teaching.

Module Content: Students will be invited to interrogate their teaching and student learning through a series of teaching scenario-based case studies that will incorporate scenario planning as models of good practice as drawn from the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Topics will include: educational spaces; group participation; effective communication; entry-points to learning; disciplinary identities; collaborative learning and teaching; the role reflection plays in teaching and learning; assessment and feedback.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Design, deliver and evaluate an event or activity to enable student learning
?Engage with various sources of evidence and scholarship to evaluate and improve their teaching practice
?Demonstrate critical reflection on personal teaching practice within their disciplinary contexts
?Devise appropriate strategies for further professional development of their teaching practice.

Assessment: A teaching and learning scenario plan comprising of two parts. Part One consists of identifying a critical scenario and aligning it with relevant issues in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learnng (SoTL) literature. Part Two consists of articulating a critical scenario intervention in teaching and learning.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PG6004 Getting Started with Graduate Research and Generic Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 8hr(s) Workshops (including seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English (and Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies & Social Sciences).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To introduce PhD students to research formulation, philosophy, ethics, management and the associated skills to complete the research process effectively.

Module Content: The module will guide new research students through a variety of management and organizational techniques including the introduction of Training Needs Analysis and Professional Development Planning. In addition it will provide sessions on the literature review, managing the supervision process, writing, information literacy, web based research, referencing tools and software and effective time management. It will provide an introduction to presentation skills for conference papers. The module will introduce students to research ethics and the philosophy of research and research funding techniques.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Complete the Training Needs Analysis and Professional Development Plans
?Articulate their skills set and skills that they need to acquire
?Design and reflect on their literature review
?Use reference management tools and information management systems
?Identify the appropriate presentation skills for a variety of purposes
?Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the philosophy of research and research ethics.

Assessment: 1 x 3,000 word reflective essay.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PG6005 Biotechniques

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): Registration for a postgraduate programme employing cellular and molecular techniques in a relevant Life Sciences Department

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Resources and support will be provided on Blackboard).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Morrissey, School of Microbiology.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Morrissey, School of Microbiology; Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology; Staff, Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience; Staff, Department of Physiology; Staff, School of Microbiology.

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students in the life sciences a broad overview of the range of techniques that are applied in cellular and molecular life science research.

Module Content: State of the art research methodologies that may include: PCR technology; Cell and Tissue Culture; Flow cytometry, laser scanning and cell separation techniques; Immunological techniques in protein analysis; Fluorescent and Confocal Microscopy; Bioinformatic resources for genome analysis; On-line resources for visualisation and analysis of protein structure; DNA chips, DNA arrays; Proteomic analysis; Transmission EM; Physiological techniques in whole animals; Specific models for the study of disease processes; Biochemical applications of Mass Spec; Manipulating the mouse genome.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the range of modern methodologies that are applied in life sciences research
?Describe how continually advancing methodologies facilitate new approaches to research questions
?Explain how some of these methodologies are applied to address specific research questions
?Explain how some of these methodologies could be applied in their own research projects.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (MCQ 1.5 hours end of module exam).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG6008 Qualitative Data Analysis and Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software for the Social Sciences and Humanities

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 3hr(s) Workshops; 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English (Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies & Social Sciences).

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Accss, Mr Ben Meehan.

Module Objective: To provides postgraduate students with an advanced understanding of the intersections between qualitative data analysis and Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS).

Module Content: Drawing upon data sets that relate to individual PhD research projects, this module will offers hands on training with software packages, whilst also providing a foundation in the origins and use of qualitative methodology including its ontological and epistemological principles.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand key elements of qualitative analysis and its intersection with CAQDAS.
?Interface effectively with a CAQDAS application.
?Establish a CAQDAS project directly related to an individual PhD data-set.
?Manipulate multi-media (Texts, Film, Video, Image, Transcript, or other comparable data, including archive material) in a CAQDAS environment.
?Manage, Code, Annotate and Organize qualitative data in CAQDAS system.
?Analyze and Interpret qualitative data on the basis of the results of a thematic analysis conducted with a CAQDAS application.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: PhD related CAQDAS Project.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (To be taken in the Autumn).

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PG6009 Graduate Information Literacy Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (This module taught twice, once in Semester 1 and once in Semester 2).

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 26.

Pre-requisite(s): PhD/Masters (Research) Students (if places allow)

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Seminars and Workshops); Other ((Additional sessions will involve videos and discussion sessions). Resources and support will be provided by the College Liaison Librarians' Team. The module will be accessible online via Blackboard.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Valerie King, Library.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Library, (College Liaison Librarians, Information Services, Library).

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students an introduction to the principles and practice of Information Literacy, as applied to PhD research; to enable postgraduate students to audit and update their Information Literacy Skills by expanding and acquiring a portfolio of Information Literacy Skills; to develop those skills which will enhance the quality of their research and expand their career opportunities in our knowledge-based economy.

Module Content: Students completing the module should understand: The meaning of Information Literacy and its relevance to their research: The Components of Information Literacy Skills and the significance of acquiring these as part of the complete suite of Graduate Skills: The principles and applications of Graduate / Research Information Literacy Skills to the planning, managing and undertaking of research projects; The Shape of Research Literature; The Principles governing the Use of Information; Using appropriate software to Manage Information; Publishing & Disseminating Papers and Thesis preparation; Citation Analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Plan and undertake a comprehensive search and review of the literature;
?Develop effective strategies to locate and access relevant information;
?Analyse and critically evaluate research findings (yours & others);
?Demonstrate and apply a range of these skills as part of your wider research portfolio;
?Develop effective approaches to keep up to date with the latest research in your area;
?Manage your research information saving valuable time and effort;
?Identify the legal and ethical issues relating to the use of information;
?Publish and present information in an effective way;
?Justify the application of these information literacy skills to your specific research.

Assessment: Completion of a Short Report (1500 words) which will be marked on a pass/fail basis, to be completed at end of module describing how the concepts learnt will be applied in student's own thesis work.

Compulsory Elements: Completion of 1500 Word Report and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PG6010 Editing Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To equip students with editorial skillsets necessary to create editions of humanities and social sciences material, as well as examining critical, theoretical frameworks and editorial theory.

Module Content: This module will provide professional training for postgraduate students in the humanities (in their second year or higher) and Social Sciences. Using literature as a basis and reference, students will be trained in both conventional and new theories of textual editing as well as theorising copyright issues
? the role of the editor;
? the importance of interface;
? issues of copyright and fair dealing;
? the nature of information and divisions of knowledge;
? the importance of visuals, and of different media and online spaces;
? as well as in the technical skills (XML / TEI) required to publish online.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create an edition of a text related to their course(not for publication)
?Understand key elements of editorial theory
?Participate in a joint edition of a class project: (eg) online postgraduate essay collection
?Use a standard academic submission, review and publication software.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: XML exercise 20%; Personal edition 30%; E-portfolio 20%; ETAPe class project 20%; Attendance and contribution 10%.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

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PG6011 Digital Skills for Research Postgraduates in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Orla Murphy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To equip students with digital skillsets necessary to research, create, edit, categorise and publish digital humanities and social sciences material online.

Module Content: This module will provide professional training for postgraduate students in the humanities and social sciences. It will introduce students to a range of digital skills and key concepts for online publication of a range of texts / contexts / materials within the humanities. Skills include:
? Defining content
? Managing content
? HTML - Hyper Text Markup Language
? XML - Extensible Markup Language
? TEI - Text Encoding Initiative - the international standard for markup in the humanities
? Open source softwares for graphic / image manipulation and design
? Understanding IP and copyright issues
? FTP - File transfer protocol for transfer of files

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Create a hypertext of material from their research focus
?Mark up an essay relevant to their course for online publication according to best international standards
?Generate a website for their research portfolio.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: XML Exercise 20%; Personal project 30%; E-portfolio 20%; ETAPe class project 20%; Attendance and contribution 10%.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

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PG6012 Scholarly Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Suitable for all graduates in all disciplinary areas and in all Colleges).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 50 (If oversubscribed by closing date, students will be chosen by random selection).

Pre-requisite(s): PG6003

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Seminars (additional learning will involve, critical reflection of key readings to interrogate participants' own teaching).

Module Co-ordinator: James G R Cronin, Department of VP Teaching and Learning.

Lecturer(s): Mr Daniel Blackshields, Department of Economics; Ms Jacinta C McKeon, School of Education; Dr Marian McCarthy, School of Education; James G R Cronin, Department of VP Teaching and Learning.

Module Objective: To enable graduates to critically evaluate, interrogate and discuss extracts from a selection of classic readings in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (SoTL) that have shaped understanding and approaches to scholarly teaching and learning in higher education.

Module Content: This interdisciplinary seminar series develops the ideas and practices emerging from PG6003 which focused on learning to teach in higher education. Each seminar will seek to critically evaluate, interrogate and discuss extracts from a selection of classic SoTL readings selected for their effects in conditioning the theory and practice of the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Engage with various sources of evidence and scholarship to evaluate and develop their teaching practice.
?Demonstrate critical reflection on personal teaching practice within their own disciplinary contexts
?Devise appropriate strategies for further professional development of their teaching practice.

Assessment: Part One involves the submission of two written entries of a teaching journal that students will keep to reflect on the seminar readings so as to align theories of learning with their own teaching enactments. Part Two invites students to present either an oral presentation or poster presenting a summary of their critical reflections on the application of their chosen SoTL reading for enabling student learning.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PG6014 Scientific Outreach and Communication

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (The module may be registered for, and completed, at any time during registration for a postgraduate research degree.).

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): Can be taken only by students registered for a Masters (by Research) or PhD Degree in the area of science in the Colleges of Science, Engineering and Food Science, College of Arts Celtic Studies and Social Sciences or Medicine and Health.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Other (Involvement in outreach activities designed to build links between UCC and the community, which contribute to development of key generic and transferable skills by the students involved).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Patricia O'Shaughnessy, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To develop key science communication skills for postgraduate students through discussing, explaining, and generating excitement about science in the broader community.

Module Content: Students must actively participate in outreach activities to promote Science in an understandable manner to a non-specialist audience. These activities can include but are not limitied to; participating in the Eureka Summer Camps, BT Young Scientist, Discovery Festival, Open Days, Science Week and School Visits. Blogging their experiences and/or using Social Media to explain their research in an easily understandable manner. Participating in Science competitions, such as "Science for all" or "The Doctoral Showcase".

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Communicate scientific information to the public in an effective and transparent manner
?Promote public understanding of science through a diverse range of modes of communication (e.g., blogging, social media, web, oral presentation, written pieces)
?Detail the important issues promoting the understanding and appreciation of science within the community
?Organise and lead a session that stimulates interest in the subject of Science.

Assessment: Pass/Fail. Participants will prepare a short portfolio (500-1000 words plus supporting appendices, if appropriate) of their experience, along with evidence of their outreach activities (e.g., articles, audio/visual recordings, participation in science communication competitions) and a reflection on skills acquired. A judgement will be made based on the quality of the submitted material.

Compulsory Elements: Submission of final portfolio is required for a pass judgement to be recorded on a student's transcript.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Completion of satisfactory portfolio based on undertaking outreach activities.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG6015 An Introduction to Research Ethics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (workshops and case studies, plus self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William Marnane, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (and Dean of Graduate Studies).

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Applied Psychology; Staff, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Philosophy; Staff, Department of Law; Staff, School of Medicine, and others.

Module Objective: This module will introduce students to the principles of good conduct in research and outline specific ethical considerations applying in specific disiplines.

Module Content: Issues to be discussed include: an introduction to research ethics; research misconduct; respect for subjects, including consent and confidentiality; research involving children and other vulnerable groups; research involving animals. emerging Issues in research ethics; ethics and publication; the role of Research Ethics Committees in UCC.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
? Undertake their own research at the highest professional standards
? Describe the current standards in the professional conduct of research
? Apply and critically discuss common Ethical Principles in Research
? If applicable, satisfactorily complete a Research Ethics Committee application for approval for a Research Project to either Clinical Research Ethics (CREC), Animal Research Ethics (AEEC), or Social research Ethics (SREC) Committees.

Assessment: Pass/fail Assessment based on either a completion of an Application for Ethical Approval from the relevant UCC Research Ethics Committee, or an essay on the ethical considerations applying to a student's area of research (1500-2000 words).

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and re-submit written assignment, as prescribed by the Module Co-Ordinator.).

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PG6016 Research Journal and Presentation Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Other (Consultation, Presentation and Attendance at Departmental/School Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English (and Graduate Studies Committee Chairperson in relevant School.).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences, (Individual student's supervisor).

Module Objective: This module provides the opportunity for students on the Master's by Research programme to engage with the research conducted in their own and related fields. It will help students self-direct their research and, in consultation with their supervisor(s), prepare a thesis proposal and work schedule for their major research project.

Module Content: Working with a designated supervisor/mentor, students design a work schedule which will include: the writing of a research journal, including an annotated bibliography and review of research seminars; attendance at a minimum of four research seminars in their School/Department, and the writing of a review of a least two seminars; delivery of a presentation on their chosen research topic.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conceive and articulate a viable research topic.
?Critically appraise the bibliography on their chosen topic.
?Engage constructively with the research of others.
?Prepare and present verbal presentations of their research topic.
?Participate in discussions about their own and others' research.

Assessment: Research Journal, including annotated bibliography and review of Research Seminars (2,000 words); Research Presentation; Preparation, attendance and participation.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Research presentation must be repeated as prescribed by the relevant Department/School. Judgement for preparation, attendance and contribution is carried forward.).

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PG6017 Teaching and Demonstrating Skills for Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES) Postgraduate Students

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (2 x two-hour training sessions; group discussions; supported delivery of 50 demonstrating hours across undergraduate year groups; self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Meere, Department of Geology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To develop postgraduate students' demonstrating skills and teaching methods in the laboratory/field. To reinforce and revise their basic disciplinary understanding through assisting teaching of undergraduate students. To gain experience of facilitating group activities for improved student learning. To build confidence and enable student-centred teaching. To recognise and accredit a range of demonstrating skills developed throughout the academic year.

Module Content: Discussion of the challenges involved in demonstrating, and other forms of teaching in undergraduate laboratory classes/field courses and related directed activities. Attendance at training sessions to explore topics such as student communication, encouraging interaction, course material preparation and assessment and feedback. Each student will be given the opportunity and encouraged to develop their teaching skills and reinforce their own basic knowledge of aspects of their discipline. Postgraduate students will be introduced to active learning techniques, and peer-learning, by helping fellow students reflect on and improve their teaching and demonstrating skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a range of basic skills for planning/preparation of class practical material;
?Manage both small group and classroom activities using a range of skills to encourage student participation;
?Consolidate, revise and gain a greater comprehension of fundamental disciplinary concepts;
?Demonstrate confidence in teamwork situations, team interaction and public speaking through presentation;
?Identify personal challenges in teaching and assessment and where further skills development is needed.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Group work at designated training sessions; reflective log/diary of experiences of 50 hours of demonstrating to undergraduate students; dissemination of postgraduate experiences of teaching and learning at School postgraduate symposium.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG6018 Business Model Innovation Management

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Emphasis is placed upon combining classroom learning with a creative mix of self-directed/distance learning and action-learning, promoting individual and group based problem solving.); Other (This will include practitioner seminars, class discussion, case study analysis, and individual/group enterprise-based learning assignments.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tadhg Nagle, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.

Module Objective: This Module in Business Model innovation Management provides participants with a clear understanding of the issues surrounding commercialisation of technology, development of innovative new business models and techniques/frameworks for management of the innovation process.

Module Content: The module contains five major topics. These include:
i. Business models
ii. Paths to new models
iii. Innovation and Innovation Management
iv. Structured Approaches to Innovation
v. Best Practices, Evaluation, and Measurement of es Iof innovation

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the development of theory relating to business models
?Apply frameworks to design new business models or innovate and renew existing ones
?Discuss concepts such as incremental, radical, and disruptive innovation and understand the consequences of each for the organisation
?Apply innovation frameworks so as to better manage the innovation management process
?Measure and evaluate innovation and ensure a best practice approach.

Assessment: Pass/fail judgment based on presentation and participation in the module.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and attendance at lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgment. Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG6019 Cloud Fundamentals

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Emphasis is placed upon combining classroom learning with a creative mix of self-directed/distance learning and action-learning, promoting individual and group based problem solving.); Other (This will include practitioner seminars, class discussion, case study analysis, and individual/group enterprise-based learning assignments.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tadhg Nagle, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.

Lecturer(s): Dr Tadhg Nagle, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.

Module Objective: This Module in Cloud Computing and Web 2.0 provides participants with a clear understanding of the underlying drivers of Web 2.0 and Cloud technologies.

Module Content: The module contains six major topics. These include:
(i) Underlying technology trends
(ii) Social Media Strategies
(iii) Cloud Computing Fundamentals
(iv) Cloud Computing Implementation
(v) Data on the Cloud
(vi) Business Value of Cloud Computing

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Gain an insight into the evolutionary aspect of the web and cloud computing
?Be in a position to analyse the potential impact of new technological trends on their organisations
?Understand the contribution of a social media strategy to an organisation
?Gain a clear and critical perspective of Cloud technologies
?Evaluate the challenges of moving infrastructure, applications and services to the Cloud
?Be in a position to analyse the investment of implementing Cloud based services.

Assessment: Pass/fail judgment based on presentation and participation in the module.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and attendance at lectures.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgment. Students must attend a minimum of 80% of lectures unless absence is certified.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG6020 Business Research Skills

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures, Workshops, Self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Raymond Donnelly, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Mathematical Sciences; Staff, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems; Staff, Department of Management and Marketing; Staff, Department of Government; Staff, Library; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide students with the requisite knowledge and skills to undertake business research using both qualitative and quantitative techniques.

Module Content: Literature search and analysis skills; the development of research questions for business; business research design skills; quantitative data collection and analysis; qualitative data collection and analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Formulate a research question
?Demonstrate how addressing the research question extends the extant literature
?Evaluate potential methodologies and select an appropriate method to address a research question
?Collect the requisite data
?Implement the research method
?Verify and/or carry out robustness checks on the method.

Assessment: There are three parts to the continuous assessment. Students must submit a learning journal (up to 2000 words) which will provide a summary of the student's reflections on the material covered; students must also submit an essay or research project which will involve aspects of research from the development of the research question to the reporting of results (up to 3000 words); attendance.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; attendance at lectures, seminars, workshops.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail based on the three parts of continuous assessment: the learning journal; the essay or project; attendance. All parts of continuous assessment must be passed to achieve a pass judgement for the module. A minimum of 75% attendance at lectures, seminars, workshops and other sessions will be required to achieve a Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as directed by the module coordinator).

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PG6021 English for Postgraduate Studies (Upper-Intermediate: B2+)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): At least Band 6 in IELTS or Grade C in FCE (First Certificate in English) or a B2 level of English as demonstrated by some internationally recognised examination or in an on-site placement test at UCC Language Centre.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 3hr(s) Other ((Language classes)).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Brendan McEnery, Language Centre.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Language Centre.

Module Objective: To equip students whose first language is not English to successfully begin their postgraduate studies in English.

Module Content: Vocabulary used to describe university activities, academic study, research and student life; English pronunciation (particularly vowels, consonants and syllable stress); signposting effective presentations; describing similarities and differences; presenting statistics; key grammatical structures (in particular nouns, affixes, articles and tenses); the main rules of English punctuation, spelling and sentence structure; listening for gist and detail in lectures; seeing paragraph structure and identifying factual information in texts; print and web-based resources available for self-study in EFL

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?understand and correctly use a range of vocabulary at B2+ level associated with academic life
?give an effective 5-7 presentation at B2+ level on a topic related to their academic discipline and handle follow-up questions
?produce samples of writing of at least 250 words at B2+ level (both descriptive tasks such as describing a process or presenting figures and discursive tasks such as comparing cultures) using appropriate paragraphing, sentence structure, linkers, grammar, vocabulary, spelling and punctuation
?follow extracts from recorded lectures on a range of academic topics at moderately fast speed and take appropriate notes
?demonstrate operational reading skills (e.g. identifying topic sentences and following text structure) with a range of academic reading texts (with a variety of topics, structures, and comprehension task types)
?successfully integrate grammatical structures of English at B2+ level (including the main English tenses and correct use of articles) into their speech and writing
?take control of their own learning so as to diagnose and try to solve their own language difficulties.

Assessment: The assessment will compose of an in-class test and oral assessment, both of which must be passed. While only a pass/fail judgement will be recorded on a student's transcript, informal feedback on level performance may be available from the Language Centre.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (plus oral assessment if first oral assesment was not passed) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PG6022 English for Postgraduate Studies (Lower Advanced: C1)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): PG6021 or LC6001 or at least Band 6.5 in IELTS or Grade B in FCE or a strong B2 level of English as demonstrated by some other internationally recognised examination or in an on-site placement test at UCC Language Centre

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 3hr(s) Other (Language classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Brendan McEnery, Language Centre.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Language Centre.

Module Objective: To equip postgraduate students whose first language is not English to continue their post-graduate studies with ease.

Module Content: The process of writing; advanced discourse markers and other devices to create coherence, cohesion and emphasis in writing and speech; describing ideas and writing definitions; ways of disagreeing diplomatically and formally; quoting direct speech and reporting speech indirectly; language used to describe cause and effect; structuring and developing effective presentations; linking sounds, sentence stress and intonation for effective pronunciation; key advanced grammar structures for effective self-expression; effective strategies for following and understanding fast spoken academic discourse and demanding academic texts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?give an effective 10-minute presentation at C1 level on a topic related to their academic discipline (including references to research done) and encourage follow-up questions and group discussion
?produce samples of accurate and effective academic writing at C1 level of at least 300 words in a range of descriptive and discursive task types (such as describing/summarising dissertation aims, presenting statistical trends, and agreeing/disagreeing with a given statement)
?write the above using appropriate paragraphing, sentence structure, linking devices, grammar, vocabulary, spelling and punctuation
?successfully integrate key advanced grammar structures of English at C1 level (including relative clauses, participle clauses and conditional structures) into their speech and writing
?follow extracts from recorded lectures (including unusual vocabulary and accents) at a fast speed and take appropriate and accurate notes
?demonstrate excellent reading skills (such as scanning for detailed information and following a complex argument) with a range of academic reading texts (with a variety of topics, structures and comprehension task types)
?take more control of their own further learning of English so as diagnose and solve their own language difficulties, using a range of self-access resources.

Assessment: The assessment will compose of an in-class test and oral assessment, both of which must be passed. While only a pass/fail judgement will be recorded on a student's transcript, informal feedback on level performance may be available from the Language Centre.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (plus oral assessment if first oral assessment was not passed) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PG6023 English for Postgraduate Studies (Advanced: C1+)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): PG6022 or LC6002 or at least Band 7.0 in IELTS or Grade A in FCE or Grade C in CAE or a C1 level of English as demonstrated by some other internationally recognised examination or in an on-site placement test at UCC Language Centre

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 11 x 3hr(s) Other (Language classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Brendan McEnery, Language Centre.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Language Centre.

Module Objective: To equip students whose first language is not English to successfully complete their postgraduate studies in English.

Module Content: Techniques for reformulating, paraphrasing, summarising and avoiding plagiarism; language used for classifying and categorising; describing problems and proposing solutions; discussing and evaluating ideas and points of view; formal and informal ways of expressing common academic concepts; collocations commonly used in academic English; commonly used metaphors and idioms; advanced punctuation rules; techniques for achieving good written style; abbreviations used in academic English; writing a summary or conclusion; diagnostic work on pronunciation and grammatical difficulties; handling and answering difficult questions after presentations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?produce samples of effective academic writing at C1+ level including a dissertation introduction (at least 1,000 words), a draft conclusion (at least 500 words), an essay proposing solutions to a problem (300 words) and examples of paraphrasing and summarising (50-100 words each)
?write the above using appropriate paragraphing, sentence structure, linking devices, grammar, vocabulary, spelling and punctuation
?demonstrate awareness of, and command of, grammatical flexibility, appropriate register, collocation and idiomatic expression at sentence and paragraph level at C1+ level.
?give an effective 10-minute presentation at C1+ level summarising his/her dissertation and be able to defend it in a follow-up discussion
?follow extracts from recorded lectures and seminars/tutorials (including unusual vocabulary and accents) at a fast speed and take appropriate and accurate notes
?demonstrate excellent reading skills (such as finding detailed information and inferring meaning) with a range of academic reading texts (with a variety of topics, structures and comprehension task types)
?take full control of their further learning of English by preparing a self-study plan and knowing where to access appropriate resources.

Assessment: The assessment will compose of an in-class test and oral assessment, both of which must be passed. While only a pass/fail judgement will be recorded on a student's transcript, informal feedback on level performance may be available from the Language Centre.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (plus oral assessment if first oral assessment was not passed) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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PG6024 Qualitative Research Inquiry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 3hr(s) Workshops (Interactive Workshops/Seminars;); 76hr(s) Directed Study (Self-directed learning, assessment preparation).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Eileen Savage, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Module Objective: To facilitate postgraduate students to critically engage in philosophical and methodological debates around qualitative inquiry and to develop their knowledge and skills in the application of qualitative research methods.

Module Content: Origins and philosophical traditions of qualitative inquiry. Methodological approaches e.g. phenomenology; grounded theory; ethnography; action research; feminism; historical, narrative. Research problems and question formulation. Sampling. Data collection strategies. Analytical methods and reporting. Criteria for assessing qualitative research. Ethical aspects of qualitative research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Distinguish between philosophical traditions and assumptions in qualitative inquiry.
?Critically examine a variety of methodological approaches and their appropriateness to answering different types of research questions.
?Discuss research problems and question formulation within the context of qualitative inquiry
?Demonstrate ability to apply knowledge and skills of qualitative data methods and analysis to a topic relevant to his/her research interests.
?Demonstrate capacity to critically analyse published qualitative research.
?Evaluate ethical issues in relation to qualitative research inquiry.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Reflective report (1500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at module. Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: to be taken in. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing this module at the Summer Examination Board will be required to repeat it prior to the Autumn Examination Board, as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.). No end of year written examination.

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PG6025 Community-Based Participatory Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 3hr(s) Seminars; 4 x 3hr(s) Other (Field visits to Civil Society Organisations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kenneth Burns, School of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Burns, School of Applied Social Studies; Dr Ruth Hally, Department of Medicine; Ms Catherine O'Mahony, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

Module Objective: To provide postgraduate students with a grounding in the principles, politics and practices of community-based participatory research. Case studies and role-play based on international and national experiences of community-based participatory research will illustrate principles discussed and students will work with a civil society partner to develop a research proposal consistent with participatory research.

Module Content: Students completing the module should understand: Principles of community-based research, participatory research methodology, responsible research and innovation, research design, typologies of participation and decision-making, the link between research agendas and the democratic deficit, participatory decision-making, national and international civic and engagement policies and their influence on research agendas. This module seeks to problematise students' understanding of expert knowledge, the role of the researcher in society, and seeks to explore and identify groups / 'publics' who are excluded from research relationships in society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise the principles of community-based participatory research and identify strategies for applying these.
?Outline the key steps involved in developing and sustaining community-based participatory research partnerships with civil society organisations.
?Synthesize the principles of community-based participatory research and apply in students' research/research design, principles of community-based participatory research.
?Discuss the relevance of research in society and the potential impact of research on individuals, groups, communities and society.
?Identify common challenges faced by University/student(s) and civil society organisation partnerships, and recommend strategies and resources for overcoming them.
?List paritcipatory methods for including the voices of multiple stakeholders in decision-making processes. Develop the capacity of all partners to support and sustain authentic community-based participatory research partnerships.
?Critique the role of the University in society and civic engagement in Higher Education Institutions.

Assessment: Group project (research proposal with a civil society organisation) and individual reflective research learning journal (max. 3,000 words). Students must pass the group assignment and the reflective piece independently.

Compulsory Elements: Group project (research proposal with a civil society organisation) and individual reflective research learning journal (max. 3,000 words). Students must pass the group assignment and the reflective piece independently. Due to the paritcipatory nature of the module and the importance of building a working relationship with our community partner, attendance is compulsory.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement. Students must pass the Group Assignment and the Reflective Piece independently.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing this module at the Summer Examination Board will be required to repeat it prior to the Autumn Examination Board, as prescribed by the School of Applied Social Studies). No end of year written examination.

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PG6026 Teaching and Demonstrating Skills for College of Science, Engineering and Food Science (SEFS) Postgraduate Students

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (2 x two-hour training sessions; group discussions; supported delivery of a minimum of 50 demonstrating and/or teaching hours across undergraduate/postgraduate year groups; self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ruth Ramsay, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To develop postgraduate students' demonstrating skills and teaching methods in the laboratory/field. To reinforce and revise their basic disciplinary understanding through assisting teaching of undergraduate/postgraduate students. To gain experience of facilitating group activities for improved student learning. To build confidence and enable student-centred teaching. To recognise and accredit a range of demonstrating/teaching skills developed throughout the academic year.

Module Content: Discussion of the challenges involved in demonstrating, and other forms of teaching in undergraduate/postgraduate laboratory classes/field courses and related directed activities. Attendance at training sessions to explore topics such as student communication, encouraging interaction, course material preparation and assessment and feedback. Each student will be given the opportunity and encouraged to develop their teaching skills and reinforce their own basic knowledge of aspects of their discipline. Postgraduate students will be introduced to active learning techniques, and peer-learning, by helping fellow students reflect on and improve their teaching and demonstrating skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a range of basic skills for planning/preparation of class practical material;
?Manage both small group and classroom activities using a range of skills to encourage student participation;
?Consolidate, revise and gain a greater comprehension of fundamental disciplinary concepts;
?Demonstrate confidence in teamwork situations, team interaction and public speaking through presentation;
?Identify personal challenges in teaching and assessment and where further skills development is needed.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Group work at designated training sessions; reflective log/diary of experiences of minimum of 50 hours of demonstrating and/or teaching to undergraduate/postgraduate students; dissemination of postgraduate experiences of teaching and learning at School/College postgraduate symposium.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG6027 Going Public: Publishing Research in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Suitable for all graduates in all disciplinary areas and in Colleges.).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20 (If oversubscribed by closing date, students will be chosen by random selection).

Pre-requisite(s): PG6003 and PG6012

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Seminars (and workshops; 4 hours symposium, additional learning will involve online discussion sessions, key readings, and reflection on participants' own research and writing on teaching and learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bettie Higgs, College of Accss (James Cronin, School of History and Adult Continuing Education, UCC.).

Lecturer(s): Mr Daniel Blackshields, Department of Economics; Ms Jacinta C McKeon, School of Education; Dr Bettie Higgs, College of Accss; Dr Marian McCarthy, School of Education; James G R Cronin, Department of VP Teaching and Learning; Staff, College of ACSSS; Staff, Faculty of Commerce; Staff, College of SEFS; Staff, Faculty of Law.

Module Objective: To enable graduates to publish their research in teaching and learning by mentoring graduates to prepare a manuscript for submission to a journal in the field of teaching and learning.

Module Content: This interdisciplinary seminar series develops the ideas and practices emerging from PG6003 and PG6012 that use enquiry-based learning approaches to meet the challenges of teaching in higher education.
The seminars will discuss the processes employed in scaffolding successful academic writing, including: close reading, journal keeping, concept mapping, free writing, project drafting, project reviewing and managing the writing project. Seminars will be interactive and will encourage graduates to discuss their research and writing as a process and to develop a writing project from the initial stages of abstract submission to the final manuscript submission to a journal.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Engage with various sources of evidence and scholarship to evaluate and develop their Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) research practice.
?Devise a research strategy based on their SoTL research practice.
?Formulate a writing project from evidence gathering to drafting and final project submission.

Assessment: 1 portfolio of writing to include 4 reflective research journal entries (250 words each); 1 abstract submission to a journal (500 words) and 1 paper draft (2,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at seminars and workshops.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement; [A minimum of 75% attendance at seminars, workshops and other sessions will be required to achieve a Pass Judgement and attendance will be monitored by class register].

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PG7002 Career Development, the Job Market, and Viva Preparation for end-stage PhD Students in Humanities and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3day(s) Other (workshop).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Silvia Ross, Department of Italian.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To develop the advanced doctoral student's professional profile and his/her understanding of the job market and the interview process.

Module Content: This course is designed for students in the later stages of their PhD in Humanities or Social Sciences. Delivered by staff from the Department of Italian and the Student Development & Employability Service, the course will provide professional training for students as they approach completion of their studies and prepare for the job market. Topics addressed include the following: importance of and strategies for completing the thesis; viva preparation; preparing job applications; the job market (e.g. Ireland, UK, and N. America); opportunities for PhD graduates outside the Academy; documenting evidence of good teaching practice; developing a publishing profile; conference participation and organization.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key areas in his/her curriculum vitae that need to be developed
?Present a professional dossier for job interviews
?Have an awareness of the job market, the interview process and what skills s/he needs to develop further
?Prepare for a viva voce exam.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Professional portfolio which includes the following elements: conference abstract; curriculum vitae; cover letter for job application; teaching dossier; plus participation in mock job interview.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

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PG7003 The PhD II: From Development to Completion

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 8hr(s) Workshops (including seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To guide research students through the mid-stages of the PhD and to provide supplementary skills to assist with the completion of the project.

Module Content: The module guides students through mid-stage management techniques and introduces a variety of other practical sessions on networking and collaboration, web-design, writing and editing skills, poster design, research funding applications in Ireland and the EU, it provides introductions to additional software and examines issues relating to 'writing up and writer's block'. Finally, it provides guidance and training for the final stages of the PhD, including submission and preparation for the viva.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Present their research through a poster presentation or website
?Identify the variety of networking options within their field and discipline
?Identify the range of appropriate sources of research funding and complete funding applications
?Incorporate editorial skills into their research project
?Identify the key procedures associated with submission of the thesis and the viva.

Assessment: Poster Presentation on Research Topic.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

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PG7004 Master Class: Contemporary Theoretical Paradigms in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures (seminars and workshops [teaching methods will vary from class to class]).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maire Leane, School of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To enhance the doctoral education programme through a variety of classes designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to new frontiers of knowledge, by bringing prominent representatives of the 'state of the art' (supported by UCC staff) in contemporary interdisciplinary theoretical paradigms to UCC.

Module Content: The content will vary from class to class and year to year. The proposal is that we validate a framework through which the variety of Master Classes can be channelled. The College Graduate Studies Committee will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment is appropriate. The classes would reflect the inter-disciplinary nature of contemporary research in the arts, humanities and social sciences. The classes will transcend paradigms and perspectives from the disciplines in the College. Previously narrow disciplinary focus on substantive topics has been opened up to lively and intense debates on paradigms and epistemologies that transcend traditional areas of specialization, reinvigorating them and opening new horizons of research and thought.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Masterclass(es), outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
?Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
?Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
?Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Masterclass(es).
?Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories presented in Masterclass(es).
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms & theories presented in the Masterclass(es).

Assessment: Two reflective essays (not more that 2,000 words) on the themes of two of the master classes.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

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PG7005 Narratives

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maire Leane, School of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

Module Objective: To introduce PhD students to research formulation, management and the associated skills to complete the research process effectively.

Module Content: This module investigates central issues and methods of narrative practices. These principles inform approaches to postgraduate research in linguistic, visual, sociological and historical disciplines. Students are provided with an introduction to narratology, alongside its major theorists and texts. Through textual analysis, the course explores the language we use when defining narrative. It examines the techniques essential to narrative study and how they operate - often unseen - in a variety of media. The core ideas of narrative through case studies and comparative research, drawn from film, novels, graphic art and web narratives will be explored.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Confidently display knowledge of content, method and examples of narrative theory and practice.
?Demonstrate an ability to transfer abstract skills learned during the module into an assessment project.
?Demonstrate a readiness to participate in debate and to bring sources and examples to bear on the discussion.
?Contribute creatively to an overall understanding of narrative.
?Identify and explore the limit and structure of the subject area and its intersection with other general disciplines.
?Develop an individualised methodological profile and the ability to articulate and modify this.

Assessment: One reflective essay of not more than 3,000 words.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in the Autumn.

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PG7012 International Political Anthropology Summer School

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 3. (Summer School, one week duration).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30hr(s) Lectures (classroom content - lectures & seminars); 70hr(s) Other (preparatory [assigned] reading; written assignment - learning journal of key concepts completed during the school.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences; Staff, Department of Philosophy; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to the field of International Political Anthropology.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The School of Sociology and Philosophy at UCC, in collaboration with colleagues internationally will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment is appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in International Political Anthropology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining
its historical development, scope and methodologies.

?Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key
concepts and ideas.

?Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems,
issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

?Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate
them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School.

?Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in
terms of general theories presented in Summer School.

?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of
paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Written assignments (Learning Journal).

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in Autumn.

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PG7013 International Political Anthropology Summer School

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3. (Summer School, one week duration).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30hr(s) Lectures (classroom content - lectures and seminars); 70hr(s) Other (preparatory [assigned] reading; written assignment - learning journal of key concepts completed during the school; In addition, students will write a major paper, representing 100 hours (self-directed) research & writing, to be submitted on conclusion of the Summer School).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences; Staff, Department of Philosophy; Staff, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to the field of International Political Anthropology.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The School of Sociology and Philosophy at UCC, in collaboration with colleagues internationally will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment is appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in International Political Anthropology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining
its historical development, scope and methodologies.

?Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key
concepts and ideas.

?Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems,
issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.

?Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate
them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School.

?Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in
terms of general theories presented in Summer School.

?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of
paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Written assignments (Learning Journal; plus 5,000 word paper).

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. To be taken in Autumn.

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PG7014 Creativity and Innovation for Research Students

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Research prostgraduate module delivered on a rolling basis throughout the academic year with very significant industry participation).

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): No pre-requisites, but the module is open to postgraduate research students in SEFS and M&H only.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 8hr(s) Workshops; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (tutorials); 1 x 4hr(s) Seminars; Other (plus self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Anita Maguire, Faculty of Commerce.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Science, plus guest lecturers.

Module Objective: To introduce postgraduate students in any aspect of S&T to Creativity and Innovation and to provide them with practical advice on application to research.

Module Content: Introduction to practical tools relating to Creativity and Innovation, and implementation of these tools in a research programme ? 1 day workshop
Application of this approach to an element of the research programme with tutorial support ? 6-8 weeks
Presentation of the use of the Creativity and Innovation approach in their research at end of the module

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the potential for use of tools relating to creativity and innovation to research
?Apply this approach to development of an aspect of their research programme
?Present the results of this approach and the impact on the research to a group without expert knowledge of the research field.

Assessment: Pass/fail judgment based on presentation and participation in the module.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/fail judgment based on presentation and participation in the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7016 Systematic Reviews for the Health Sciences

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of Information Literacy module PG6009 or demonstrated experience or qualification in information literacy.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Seminars (/Worshops during which students will develop a systematic review relevant to their own PhD. The module will be accessible online via Blackboard.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Patrick Browne, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Medicine and Health; Staff, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health.

Module Objective: To give postgraduate students an introduction to the principles and practice of systematic reviewing, as applied to their own PhD research To develop knowledge and understanding of systematic reviewing methods, applied to the quantitative and qualitative health research literature.

Module Content: Introduction to systematic reviewing and its role in evidence based health services. Question formulation. Development of a protocol for a systematic review. Critical appraisal of randomized controlled trials. Critical appraisal of non-randomised comparative studies. Critical appraisal of a systematic review. Critical appraisal of qualitative studies. Inclusion/exclusion rules, Data extraction. Synthesis of quantitative studies including meta-analysis. Synthesis of qualitative studies

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Develop a systematic review protocol
?Critically appraise, extract and pool quantitative evidence generated by experimental designs.
?Describe the validity, importance and generalisability of published studies.
?Extract data on the characteristics, methods and results of published studies.
?Synthesis the results of published studies in an appropriate manner.
?Conduct a systematic review of evidence generated by qualitative research studies, narrative and text
?Write up a brief original systematic review on a topic of their choice.

Assessment: Completion of a brief original systematic review which will be marked on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7017 Project Management for Research Students

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): Open to PhD students in the College of Science, Engineering and Food Science and the College of Medicine and Health.

Co-requisite(s): NA

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 8hr(s) Workshops; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 1 x 4hr(s) Seminars; Other (plus self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gerard P. McGlacken, Department of Chemistry.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce postgraduate students to the important discipline of Project Management and to provide them with practical advice on its application to both research and commercial projects.

Module Content: This course will provide an introduction to the basic skills of project management including scope management, time management, cost management, communications management and risk management. The course will provide both theory and practical tools to explain these concepts and how they are used throughout a project's lifecycle.

Students will apply this approach to an element of their research programme over a 6-8 week period. Tutorial support will be provided throughout the 8 week period. Students will present on how they applied the Project Management approach to their research at the end of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Understand the principles of project management and its benefits;
?Use a set of practical tools and templates for implementing project management;
?Apply the project management approach to their research programme;
?Present the results of this approach and its impact on their research to a seminar.

Assessment: A pass judgement, based on presentation and participation in the module.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance and completion of module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/fail judgment based on presentation and participation in the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7018 Special Topics in the Humanities and Social Sciences Intensive School

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3. ([e.g. Summer School] of one week's duration.).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48hr(s) Seminars (classroom); 120hr(s) Directed Study (assigned reading, independent research); 32hr(s) Other (written exercise).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maire Leane, School of Applied Social Studies.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Accss, and invited speakers (as appropriate).

Module Objective: To enhance research postgraduate education through an intensive week-long course, based on a special research topic and aimed at doctoral students across the Humanities and Social Sciences. This module will provide credit to those taking summer schools or intensive workshops organized by CACSSS staff at UCC (which may or may not have received outside funding).

Module Content: The module will provide an opportunity for intensive investigation on special topics of an interdisciplinary nature. The content will vary depending on the topic offered in any given year. The CACSSS Graduate School will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment are appropriate.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and demonstrate understanding of the special topic studied in the Intensive School, outlining its development, scope and methodologies.
?Identify major paradigms or theories employed and define key concepts and ideas as relevant to the specific topic investigated in the Intensive School.
?Apply theories and concepts addressed in the Intensive School and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
?Articulate phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories, paradigms or concepts presented in the Intensive School.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms or theories presented in the Intensive School.

Assessment: Written assignments as stipulated by staff organizing the Intensive School in question (e.g. a Learning journal or a 5,000 word project). The CACSSS Graduate School will provide oversight to ensure that the assessment is appropriate.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (To be taken in Autumn).

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PG7019 Comparing: Objects, Approaches, Problems, Opportunities

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1. (Summer School, one week duration).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48hr(s) Seminars (Summer School sessions (one week)); 120hr(s) Directed Study (Assigned readings; independent research); 32 Other (Written assignment).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Patrick O'Donovan, Department of French.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of French; Staff, Department of Philosophy; Staff, Discipline of Art History.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School designed to provide doctoral students in the humanities with the opportunity to scrutinize the roles comparison plays in a range of disciplines and to identify new ways of devising and pursuing research questions in the light of comparative approaches

Module Content: The Summer School will focus on state of the art critical approaches to comparison in the humanities today, with a view to reappraising the investigative and conceptuals roles of comparison and to explore the place of comparison both in specific disciplinary and interdisciplinary frameworks. The seminar component of the School will focus on the implications of comparative approaches and developments for doctoral students' individual projects. The Summer School is overseen by a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional panel responsible for ensuring that the content, level and assessment of the module are coherent and at the appropriate level.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate an understanding of state of the art approaches to comparison, both in disciplinary and interdisciplinary contexts

?use comparative methods within and across disciplines
?display a critical awareness of interdisciplinarity as a mode and practice of research, both in individual and collaborative projects

?incorporate comparative methods and approaches into the formulation of research questions and the design of research projects

?write a paper drawing on an enhanced understanding of comparative approaches and methods.

Assessment: 1 x 5000 word research paper.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7021 An Introduction to Ethics of Health Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Self Directed learning guided by course material); 8 x 1hr(s) Other (Participation in online discussion); 72 x 1hr(s) Other (Prepartion of application for Research Ethics Committee approval, incl web based learning, seminars and preparation of class preparation).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Doran, School of Medicine.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of Medicine and Health, Dr. Louise Campbell.

Module Objective: This module will examine the ethical issues which arise in the context of conducting clinical research involving human and animal participants.

Module Content: Issues to be discussed include Introduction to Research Ethics; Respect for subjects: consent and confidentiality; the risk-benefit relationship in clinical research emerging challenges in research ethics, ethics and research using new technologies and research ethics committees.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the current standards in the ethics of health research
?Critically discuss and evaluate current literature in the ethics of health research
?Apply and critically discuss common ethical principles in health research
?Satisfactorily complete a Research Ethics Committee (REC) form applying for approval for a research project involving human subjects.

Assessment: Completion of REC form and Oral assessment, and participation in online discussion.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at module; Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and re-submit written assignment, as prescribed by the Graduate School in consultation with the module coordinator.). No end of year written examination.

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PG7023 Classical Grounded Theory Methodology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 3hr(s) Workshops (Interactive Workshops/Seminars); 1 x 75hr(s) Directed Study (Self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tom Andrews, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Module Objective: To develop knowledge and skill in the application of Grounded Theory methodology to data collection, analysis and theory development.

Module Content: Origins of Grounded Theory; methodological development and elaboration; conceptual coding; constant comparison; theoretical sensitivity; theoretical saturation; data collection and analysis; memo writing; minimising preconception; theory development; dealing with confusion; core category emergence; issues of epistemology and ontology; issues of rigour.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discriminate between different types of Grounded Theory methodology
?Explain data collection methods and analysis
?Compare Grounded Theory procedures to other qualitative methods
?Design a research project using the principles of Grounded Theory
?Appraise philosophical issues in relation to the methodology.

Assessment: Continuous assessment and participation in the module; coding exercise and accompanying memo (1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at module. Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PG7026 PhD Internship I (for the College of Science, Engineering and Food Science)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (min. 10 full days Work Placement/Internship) and self-reflection.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ruth Ramsay, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To enhance students' employability and transferable skills through work experience and critical reflection.

Module Content: Research students in Year II and above, with the approval of their supervisor(s), will arrange an internship or work placement for the duration of a minimum of 10 full days. The placement can be paid or unpaid, or supported by external funding (e.g. Erasmus), and can occur in a variety of relevant national or international settings (e.g. academic, commercial, cultural, heritage, statutory, NGO etc.). Students are required to identify a mentor within the workplace. Students will also participate in a briefing session where they can complete a skills analysis and determine which skills they need to develop and set goals while on the internship. On completion of the internship they will participate in a de-briefing session where they can reflect on the learning gained, update their CV accordingly and make further plans to move their PhD/career forward in a purposeful way. At the end of the placement, students will deliver a final reflective report on their experience to their supervisor, with a copy to the module co-ordinator(s).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discover possible range of employment opportunities to aid career choice.
?Reflect on the experiential learning and personal development experienced on the placement and summarise in a Reflective Final Report.
?Demonstrate how critical learning on the work placement/internship can inform their identification of further areas for skill development.
?Articulate a deepened knowledge of transferable skills and their applicability in both academic and workplace settings.

Assessment: Pass/Fail (based on the student's final reflective written report of 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Participation in the work placement/internship (confirmed by a brief mentor's report).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7027 Workplace Professional Training Module: Glucksman Futures

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English (Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies & Social Sciences).

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS, Staff in the Glucksman Gallery.

Module Objective: To provide postgraduate students with a tangible workplace-based opportunity to develop critical thinking, project management and teamwork skills in conceiving, developing and bringing to fruition a collaborative, critically informed and interdisciplinary curatorial project. Specifically the module will:
1. Introduce the practice of curating in the public realm
2. Facilitate an interdisciplinary and collaborative experience for students from different research areas
3. Enable students to work collaboratively to devise and present a curatorial project in the public realm.

Module Content: What lies ahead? How will our current society change in the coming years, as new technologies advance and different opportunities arise? Which ideas will the next generation of artists, curators and innovators develop, and how can we help them get there?

GLUCKSMAN Futures looks to answer these questions by investing in the experiences and vision of an emerging generation of curators. It encourages them to actively get involved in curating in the public realm, to make sense of the issues that they face every day, and to gain a practical understanding of how best to display and communicate their ideas to the world.

The module involves workshop sessions on curatorial practice, research and reflection on agreed curatorial project, teamwork on the preparation and presentation of the public displays, and exhibition standard presetnation of visual and archival material in the public realm.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and execute key tasks required for effective project management
?Activate their research skills in an interdisciplinary context
?Demonstrate effective communication and teamwork skills
?Critically reflect on non-textual approaches to interpreting and communicating ideas
?Create a professional standard exhibit for display in a museum context
?Articulate the public impact of research-led curatorial projects
?Articulate the specific skills acquired on the module and identify how they are transferable to other work/project contexts.

Assessment: The module is assessed on participation in the workshops, the presentation of a curatorial project in the public domain, and completion of a reflective piece in the student's chosen medium (e.g. video, poster, digital storyboard, text, etc.).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at workshops, reflective research on agreed curatorial project, preparation and presentation of public displays.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: The module is assessed on participation in the workshops, the presentation of a curatorial project in the public domain, and completion of a reflective piece in the student's chosen medium (e.g. video, poster, digital storyboard, text, etc.).

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7028 PhD Internship (for College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (min. 20 full days Work Placement/Internship) and self-reflection).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English (Graduate School, College of Arts, Celtic Studies & Social Sciences).

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of ACSSS, Staff in the UCC Careers Service and individual student's supervisor.

Module Objective: To enhance students' employability and transferable skills through work experience and critical reflection.

Module Content: Research students in Year II and above, with the approval of their supervisor, will arrange an internship or work placement for a duration of min. 20 full days. The placement can be paid or unpaid, or supported by external funding (e.g. Erasmus), and can occur in a variety of relevant national or international settings (e.g. academic, commercial, cultural, heritage, statutory, NGO etc.). Students are required to identify a mentor within the workplace. Students will also participate in a briefing session where they can complete a skills analysis and determine which skills they need to develop and set goals while on the internship. On completion of the internship they will participate in a de-briefing session where they can reflect on the learning gained, update their CV accordingly and make further plans to move their PhD/career forward in a purposeful way. At the end of the placement, students will deliver a final reflective report on their experience to their supervisor, with a copy to the module co-ordinator(s).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Broaden their understanding of possible range of employment opportunities to aid career choice
?Reflect on the experiential learning and personal development experienced on the placement and summarise in a Reflective Final Report
?Demonstrate how critical learning on the work placement/internship can inform their identification of further areas for skill development
?Articulate a deepened knowledge of transferable skills and their applicability in both academic and workplace settings.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: student's final reflective written report of 3,000 words.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7029 PhD Internship (for the College of Business and Law)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (min. 20 full days Work Placement/Internship and self-reflection).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Frederic Adam, Department of Accounting, Finance and Information Systems (Head of the Graduate School, College of Business and Law).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Commerce; Staff, Faculty of Law.

Module Objective: To enhance students' employability and transferable skills through work experience and critical reflection.

Module Content: Research students in Year II and above, with the approval of their supervisor, will arrange an internship or work placement for a duration of min. 20 full days. The placement can be paid or unpaid, or supported by external funding (e.g. Erasmus), and can occur in a variety of relevant national or international settings (e.g. academic, commercial, cultural, heritage, statutory, NGO etc.). Students are required to identify a mentor within the workplace. Students will also participate in a briefing session where they can complete a skills analysis and determine which skills they need to develop and set goals while on the internship. On completion of the internship they will participate in a de-briefing session where they can reflect on the learning gained, update their CV accordingly and make further plans to move their PhD/career forward in a purposeful way. At the end of the placement, students will deliver a final reflective report on their experience to their supervisor, with a copy to the module co-ordinator(s).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Broaden their understanding of possible range of employment opportunities to aid career choice
?Reflect on the experiential learning and personal development experienced on the placement and summarise in a Reflective Final Report
?Demonstrate how critical learning on the work placement/internship can inform their identification of further areas for skill development
?Articulate a deepened knowledge of transferable skills and their applicability in both academic and workplace settings.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: student's final reflective written report of 3,000 words.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Participation in the work placement/internship (confirmed by brief mentor's report).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7037 Text and Method: Critical Thinking

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (per week in Semester 2 in situ).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS (Prof. of Renaissance Studies, CACSSS Graduate School).

Lecturer(s): Prof Brendan Dooley, College of ACSSS.

Module Objective: To examine current approaches to culture in a given period as background to postgraduate research in the humanities.

Module Content: The module studies current scholarship in regard to Renaissance and Early Modern culture and society, as well as new transdisciplinary methodologies in humanities research. Topics include: the religious imagination, the apocalyptical imagination, the psychology of emotions, spatial consciousness, historical consciousness, the symbolics of power, the aesthetic. Readings include but are not limited to original texts by: F. Redi, J. Calvin, B. Cellini, G. Medici, and scholarship by B. Shapiro, P. Findlen, J. B. Harley.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Read critically and thoroughly a variety of documents from the Renaissance and Early Modern period, ranging across several disciplines, modes of expression and cultures
?Understand cultural change, 1500-1800
?Read critically in the current scholarship (including texts written by their peers)
?Understand major approaches in current research on Renaissance and Early Modern history and culture.
?See how current theories and methods are used to gain a better understanding of specific problems.
?Apply particular theories and methods in creative ways to formulate questions and hypotheses on specific topics of their own devising.
?Utilize IT resources applied to their disciplines, for the issues analyzed in the course.
?Formulate analytical arguments and present them in a group, deploying resources from modern scholarship and historical documents
?Write up research results correctly and convincingly.

Assessment: 1 x 5000 word project.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: In the event of a student failing a module or not being able to complete it before the summer TCC board, the module co-ordinator with the approval of the TCC board may prescribe supplementary work in lieu.

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PG7038 Almost PhinisheD

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 1.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Webinars and Online Discussion Boards); Other (Self Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Philip Murphy, Department of Government.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Graduate Studies office, Staff, Office of Marketing and Communication; Staff, Department of Careers Service, Staff, Office of VP for Research.

Module Objective: To support students in the final write-up and submission stages and to develop the advanced doctoral student's professional profile. To develop personal effectiveness and career management skills as outlined in the IUA PhD Graduate Skills Statement.

Module Content: The module will encompass five core elements with advice on how to write, edit and submit a doctoral thesis, as well as on how to plan and prepare for life after submission;

1. Writing to Finish
2. Submission and Examination
3. Maintaining Momentum ?Preparing for the Viva
4. Disseminating your Research
5. Beyond the PhD - CV preparation and career planning

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Plan and manage their time and resources including dealing with procrastination, balancing demands and managing stress.
?Effectively communicate their research knowledge and transferable skills through oral presentations and their curriculum vitae.
?Develop a career action plan including reflection on the skills they have to offer employers, sources of relevant opportunities and strategies for taking the creative approach to job-seeking.

Assessment: Professional portfolio which includes the following elements: research press release; academic or non-academic curriculum vitae; project plan for completion, career plan.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7039 PhD Internship II (for the College of Science, Engineering and Food Science)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (min. 20 full days work placement/internship) and self reflection.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ruth Ramsay, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Staff, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To enhance students' employability and transferable skills through work experience and critical reflection.

Module Content: Research students in Year II and above, with the approval of their supervisor(s), will arrange an internship or work placement for the duration of a minimum of 20 full days. The placement can be paid or unpaid, or supported by external funding (e.g. Erasmus), and can occur in a variety of relevant national or international settings (e.g. academic, commercial, cultural, heritage, statutory, NGO etc.). Students are required to identify a mentor within the workplace. Students will also participate in a briefing session where they can complete a skills analysis and determine which skills they need to develop and set goals while on the internship. On completion of the internship they will participate in a de-briefing session where they can reflect on the learning gained, update their CV accordingly and make further plans to move their PhD/career forward in a purposeful way. At the end of the placement, students will deliver a final reflective report on their experience to their supervisor, with a copy to the module co-ordinator(s).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Broaden their understanding of possible range of employment opportunities to aid career choice.
?Reflect on the experiential learning and personal development experienced on the placement and summarise in a reflective final report.
?Demonstrate how critical learning on the work placement/internship can inform their identification of further areas for skill development.
?Articulate a deepened knowledge of transferable skills and their applicability in both academic and workplace settings.

Assessment: final reflective written report of 3,000 words.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous assessment and participation in the work placement/internship (confirmed by a mentor's brief report).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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PG7040 Economy and Society Summer School

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 40hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology, Guest professors; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School delivered with staff at Waterford Institute of Technology and guest professors designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to classical and contemporary debates and theories on economy & society.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The Department of Sociology will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment are appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in theoretical paradigms, interpretive frameworks, methodologies and epistemologies that underpin areas of substantive inquiry on economy and society in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
?Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
? Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
?Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School
?Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories presented in Summer School.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: Attendance and participation; 1 x 2,500 words reflective learning journal.

Compulsory Elements: Participation and completion of asignment as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PG7041 Economy and Society Summer School 2

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 40hr(s) Directed Study; 100hr(s) Other (self directed research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Arpad Szakolczai, Department of Sociology, Guest Professors; Dr Colin Sumner, Department of Sociology; Dr Kieran Keohane, Department of Sociology.

Module Objective: To enhance doctoral education through a Summer School delivered with staff at Waterford Institute of Technology and guest professors designed to expose doctoral students across the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences to classical and contemporary debates and theories on economy & society.

Module Content: The content will vary from year to year. The Department of Sociology will provide oversight to ensure that the content, level and assessment are appropriate. The Summer School will reflect classical and contemporary scholarship in theoretical paradigms, interpretive frameworks, methodologies and epistemologies that underpin areas of substantive inquiry on economy and society in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the field of inquiry represented in the Summer School, outlining its historical development, scope and methodologies.
?Identify major theories and paradigms employed and define key concepts and ideas.
? Apply theories and concepts and relate them to particular problems, issues and phenomena addressed in the student's own research.
?Analyze aspects of the student's own field of inquiry and illustrate them in terms of theories and concepts presented in the Summer School
?Explain phenomena and formulate particular research problems in terms of general theories presented in Summer School.
?Criticize topics and evaluate issues and debates in terms of paradigms & theories presented in the Summer School.

Assessment: 1 x 2500 words reflective learning journal; Attendance and participation; 1 x 5,000 words seminar paper.

Compulsory Elements: Participation and completion of asignment as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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PG7048 PhD Generic and Transferable Skills Portfolio

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 1.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Self Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of History.

Module Objective: To allow a Doctoral student to achieve the professional training and development skills as outlined in the National Framework for Doctoral Education.

Module Content: During the course of their Doctoral Research a student may attend and participate in a number of learning opportunities that contribute to their gaining the key skills and attributes of their Doctoral programme as outlined in the IUA PhD Graduate Skills statement. These learning opportunities may include: external credit bearing courses of value less than 5 ECTS; completing courses for audit only; completing non-credit bearing online courses; attending and presenting at lectures, seminars, workshops, and conferences; lecturing, tutoring, and demonstrating; (Other College specific opportunities to be added). Each student will submit a portfolio of activities they have undertaken (including where appropriate evidence of completion and/or participation). In addition the student will present a reflective report identifying how these learning opportunities have contribute to them achieving the skills identified in the IUA PhD Graduate Skills statement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?identify which of the following of the PhD graduate skills they possess: Research Skills, Ethics and social understanding, communication skills, personnel effectiveness/development, team working and leadership, career management, entrepreneurship and innovation.

Assessment: Completion of portfolio and reflective report (1,500-2,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Participation and completion of assignment as above.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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