Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

NE1001 Introduction to Energy Engineering
NE3001 Primary Energy Engineering
NE3002 Energy in Buildings
NE3003 Sustainable Energy
NE3021 Energy Engineering in the Commercial World and Work Placement
NE3903 Sustainable Energy
NE3904 Transportation and Energy
NE4001 Energy Systems Modelling
NE4002 Wind Energy
NE4003 Ocean Energy
NE4005 Biomass Energy
NE4006 Energy Systems in Buildings
NE4007 Computer Aided Design VII (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning)
NE4008 Photovoltaic Systems
NE4020 Research Project
NE6003 Wind Energy
NE6004 Biomass Energy
NE6005 Ocean Energy
NE6006 Solar and Geothermal Energy
NE6007 Energy Systems Modelling
NE6008 Preliminary Research Project in Sustainable Energy
NE6009 Dissertation in Sustainable Energy
NE6010 Advanced Topics in Marine Renewable Energy
NE6020 Marine Renewable Energy Project
NE6901 Control Systems (NUIM - EE612)
NE6902 Maintenance and Reliability (CIT - MANU8003)
NE6906 Tidal Energy [QUBCIV7012]

NE1001 Introduction to Energy Engineering

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100 (resources permitting).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Guest Lectures from Energy Engineers).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce the discipline and profession of energy engineering. To explore the challenges facing, and solutions found by, energy engineers. To introduce students to energy efficiency and renewable energy resources and how to develop a sustainable energy plan.
.

Module Content: Definition of energy engineering. Energy consumption and energy supply. Energy use in transport, in buildings, for manufacturing and for appliances. trends and impacts. Energy available from renewable sources. Better transport, smarter heating, efficienct electricity usage. Energy plans for Ireland. Insights into the energy engineering profession - what makes a good energy engineer?

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand scope of energy engineering as a discipline and career path
· Quantify typical energy consumption in transport, in buildings and for appliances
· Quantify how much energy is available from renewable sources
· Understand how deep energy efficiency improvements may be achieved
· Build and energy plan based on consumption and supply.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Coursework Assignments 30 marks; Project plus Presentation 20 marks. A detailed description of the Continuous Assessment will be provided to the students at the beginning of the Semester.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE3001 Primary Energy Engineering

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70 (resources permitting).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Staff of School of Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce the range of primary energy souces and the technologies used to utilise them.

Module Content: Definition of primary and useful energy. Fossil fuels, renewable energy and nuclear energy. Electrical, transport and thermal energy use. Boilers, engines and turbines. Energy from oil, gas and coal. Ocean energy. Biomass energy. Wind energy. Solar energy. Geothermal energy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand primary and final energy.
· Understand how fossil fuels are used to generate useful energy.
· Understand how renewable energy is harnessed.
· Understand how electricity is generated from nuclear energy.
· Describe how primary energy is transformed into final energy.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks (Written Exam); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Coursework Assignments).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE3002 Energy in Buildings

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): CE2008 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dominic O'Sullivan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Dominic O'Sullivan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To explain the fundamental theory and application of energy systems relating to buildings.

Module Content: Identification of energy exchanges between buildings and their internal and external environments. Definition of prescribed internal and external design conditions for buildings. Definition of best-practice building envelopes that include heat transmission coefficients and air change rates. Identification and quantification of the heat transfer modes in buildings including passive solar. Psychometrics of energy exchange in buildings. Development of numerical models representing energy exchange in buildings. Introduction to and analysis of a range of HVAC systems for buildings using off-the-shelf industrial HVAC software systems. Models for energy procurement. Environmental and economic impact of energy systems in buildings.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the building physics that underpin energy transfer in buildings. Quantify the possible modes of heat and mass transfer in buildings. Identify the operating design conditions for a range of building types and function.
· Quantify the possible modes of heat and mass transfer in buildings.
· Identify the operating design conditions for a range of building types and function
· Calculate the thermal transmission of the building envelope.
· Calculate the ventilation loads associated with infiltration and exfiltration.
· Determine building heating and cooling loads.
· Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of psychometrics and the utilization of the psychometric chart.
· Analyse and design HVAC distribution and generation equipment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Practicals and Reports (20 Marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE3003 Sustainable Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce the concept of sustainable energy and the interaction between cost competitiveness, security of supply and environmental responsibility. To make students aware of the link between energy and the environment, with a particular focus on climate change. To provide students with the basic tools to assess energy trends and their policy implications. Introduce the topics of energy policy and economics. Introduce renewable energy sources and technologies.

Module Content: Definition of sustainable energy. Global and regional energy trends in terms of fuel supply and sectoral consumption. Electrical, transport and thermal energy consumption. Energy end use. Pillars of sustainable energy policy. Environmental impacts of energy. Climate Change. Transboundary gas emissions. Security of energy supply. Cost competitiveness. Policy instruments. Energy efficiency indicators. Socio-economic assessment of energy supply systems. Renewable energy market development. Fuel cells and the hydrogen economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse energy supply and consumption trends.
· Understand impact of policy decisions on energy trends.
· Understand energy related environmental impacts, focussing on climate change.
· Apply knowledge of energy to quantify impacts on energy trends.
· Compare renewable energy environmental impacts with fossil fuels.
· Understand differnt facets of security of energy supply.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Coursework Assignments (20)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE3021 Energy Engineering in the Commercial World and Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1 and 3. (Semester 1and Placement in Semester 3 of Year 3 and completion in Semester 1 of Year 4).

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Lectures; Seminars; Workshops; Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Hayes, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Staff, Faculty of Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the world of commerce and broaden their engineering experience by (i) assisting students in obtaining a work placement in a commercial organisation or research institute (ii) developing career planning and transferrable skills, and (iii) developing a business understanding, with lectures, readings, and workshops on current business leaders and practices.

Module Content: Developing job search and transferable skills. Internship or placement in an enterprise relevant to Energy Engineering. Commercialisation of engineering ideas and exposure to current business issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop transferable skills, such as report writing and seminar presentation.
· Research job and careers options
· Work experience by placement in an enterprise relevant to Energy Engineering.
· Appreciate Commercialization of engineering ideas and current business issues.

· Work effectively in a commercial organisation or research institute.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (based on assessment of written assignments (50%) and student seminars (50%)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Work Placement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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NE3903 Sustainable Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70 (resources permitting).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce the concept of sustainable energy and the interaction between cost competitiveness, security of supply and environmental responsibility. To make students aware of the link between energy and the environment, with a particular focus on climate change. To provide students with the basic tools to assess energy trends and their policy implications. Introduce the topics of energy policy and economics. Introduce renewable energy sources and technologies.

Module Content: Definition of sustainable energy. Global and regional energy trends in terms of fuel supply and sectoral consumption. Electrical, transport and thermal energy consumption. Energy end use. Pillars of sustainable energy policy. Environmental impacts of energy. Climate Change. Transboundary gas emissions. Security of energy supply. Cost competitiveness. Policy instruments. Energy efficiency indicators. Socio-economic assessment of energy supply systems. Renewable energy market development. Fuel cells and the hydrogen economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse energy supply and consumption trends.
· Understand impact of policy decisions on energy trends.
· Understand energy related environmental impacts, focussing on climate change.
· Apply knowledge of energy to quantify impacts on energy trends.
· Compare renewable energy environmental impacts with fossil fuels.
· Understand differnt facets of security of energy supply.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks (Written Exam); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Coursework Assignments (20 Marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE3904 Transportation and Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Prof Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To give a detailed understanding of sustainable transportation policies, including energy minimization in transportation through the use of public transport (trains, metros, light rail and buses), biofuels and electric vehicles.

Module Content: Technological and economic characteristics of air, road, rail, sea and continuous flow modes. Traffic signal systems. Intelligent transport systems. Transportation and land use planning. Urban simulation models. Urban traffic study.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Assess transportation policies.
· Describe the technological and economic characteristics of the different modes of travel and understand their appropriate roles in the transportation system.
· Differentiate between different rail systems (trains, metros, light rail).
· Analyse the transport requirements for a specific situation and select appropriate modes (train or metro or light rail or bus or guided bus or car or bicycle)
· Generate the energy production per km per passenger for various transportation systems.
· Distunguish between different biofuel systems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 85 marks; Continuous Assessment 15 marks (Reports on practicals (15)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE4001 Energy Systems Modelling

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30 (Resources Permitting).

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach students about energy systems and how to model them. To introduce software packages for energy systems modelling.

Module Content: Technical, economic and market modelling of energy systems. Modelling national energy demand and supply. Macro-economic top-down modelling and techno-economic bottom up modelling. Partial equilibrium and general equilibrium modelling. Modelling renewable energy systems. Introduction to MATLAB Simulink, LEAP, RETScreen, MARKAL - TIMES and PLEXOS modelling tools.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Model a country's energy demand and supply using the LEAP model
· Model wind turbine control using a computer software simulation tool
· Determine the viability of a renewable energy project using RETScreen software
· Demonstrate an understanding of the key steps undertaken by Eirgrid to model generation adequacy
· Model electricity dispatch with a given demand and generation portfolio using PLEXOS
· Explain the key features of macro-economic and techno-economic energy forecasting models
· Generate energy forecasts using simple modelling based on energy intensity.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Lab Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE4002 Wind Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30 (Resources Permitting).

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eamon McKeogh, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: Introduce students to wind energy theory and technology, resource assessment and wind farm site development.

Module Content: Wind characteristics and resources. Measurement and instrumentation. Data analysis and energy production estimates. Weibull distribution. Log and power laws. Aerodynamics of wind turbines. Characteristics of airfoils. Momentum theory ? Betz Limit. Wind turbine rotor dynamics. Wind turbine design and components. Blade pitch and stall control. Principles of wind farm design and micro-siting. Introduction to wind farm design software tools. Civil works for wind farms. Wind energy variability. Wind energy storage technologies. Requirements for and approaches to wind energy forecasting. Offshore wind energy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the origin of global, geostrophic and surface winds
· Explain the impact of surface roughness and orography on wind speed profiles
· Calculate wind speed at a given height using the log law and power law
· Derive the Betz equation for wind power extraction using an idealized wind turbine
· Discuss different approaches to wind power forecasting and the relative benefits and limitations of each
· Demonstrate an understanding of passive and active wind turbine stall control
· Prepare a site visit report for a wind farm
· Model wind farm energy production using appropriate wind farm software tools.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Site Visit / Lab Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE4003 Ocean Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 70 (70 with resources permitting).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 30 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator:

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce ocean energy and its utilisation.

Module Content: Introduction to ocean energy, Wave Theory, Tidal Theory, Wave and Tidal Energy resource- measurement and calculations, wave energy convertors, tidal energy convertors, practical systems modelling and design, output calculation methods, power take-offs and system integration issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand wave and tide energy
· Understand how wave energy convertors function

· Understand how tidal stream generators function
· Understand the modelling and design process for system
· Calculate resource and potential outputs for particular ocean energy systems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Practical assignments).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE4005 Biomass Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30 (Resources Permitting).

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Prof Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: Introduce students to the diverse sources, technologies ands applications of energy from biomass for electricity generation, heat generation and as transport fuel.

Module Content: Biomass origins and its role as a renewable resources. The carbon cycle. Solid biomass. Liquid biofuels. Biogas. Energy crops. Bioenergy and waste management. Incineration.
Municipal and industrial waste. Agricultural and forestry residues. Short rotation coppicing. Biomass energy conversion technologies. Electricity, thermal and transport energy from biomass. Thermal and biological processes. Direct and advanced combustion. Gasification. Pyrolysis. Anaerobic digestion. Case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Generate the stoichiometric equation of a biomass feedstock (from an ultimate analysis) and thus ascertain the heating value of the feedstock.
· Describe the various routes of energy production from a biomass.
· Generate the electrical production and heat production from combustion or gasification of a biomass.
· Calculate the potential biogas production from an organic feedstock.
· Derive the sustainability of a biofuel system.
· Undertake technical, economic and environmental analysis of a Bioenergy system.
· Compare and contrast different systems which may be used to generate energy from biomass.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Report on Site Visit).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE4006 Energy Systems in Buildings

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): CE3010

Co-requisite(s): CE 4022 or equivalent

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 7 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dominic O'Sullivan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Dominic O'Sullivan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To develop knowledge of energy engineering elements and systems in buildings

Module Content: Advanced or applied thermodynamics considering refrigeration systems and heating systems. Introduction to a range of HVAC systems in buildings. Analysis and design of advanced HVAC systems including renewable energy systems. Analysis and design of natural ventilation systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Calculate the thermal heating and cooling loads in buildings.
· Describe the advantages and disadvantages of different heating and cooling systems.
· Determine the energy performance of heating and cooling systems.
· Analyse and Design HVAC systems including natural ventilation.
· Determine appropriate HVAC systems for given buildings.
· Analyse the control of a range of HVAC systems for air conditioning.
· Calculate thermal comfort indices that include PMV and PPD thermal indices.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Practicals and Reports (20 Marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE4007 Computer Aided Design VII (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): NE3002 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): NE4006 or equivalent

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Dominic O'Sullivan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Dominic O'Sullivan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To undertake a Design Project in environmental services in buildings.

Module Content: Design of HVAC systems for a range of building types. This includes heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. Lighting design, acoustics and energy recovery and efficiency.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appraise buildings service requirements.
· Execute a conceptual design of HVAC systems by considering alternative solutions.
· Detail the preliminary design of HVAC systems.
· Calculate the preliminary estimation of electrical loads.
· Determine the sizing of services risers and plantrooms.
· Demonstrate an understanding of the key services related design issues.
· Appreciate the importance of Services Design Requirements at an early stage.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Design Project - Assignments - 10 marks, Presentation - 20 marks, Design Project - 35 marks, Oral Examination - 35 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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NE4008 Photovoltaic Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Morrison, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To introduce the fundamentals of photovoltaic energy conversion from the design and operation of individual cells to the implementation of utility-scale grid-connected photovoltaic systems.

Module Content: The solar resource; solar cell properties and design; photovoltaic (PV) modules; stand-alone PV System design; PV System compontents; grid-connected PV Systems; specific purpose PV applications; concentrator photovoltaics; solar tracking; monitoring and characterization; energy storage and recovery.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and explain the operation of a variety of solar cell types;
· Design a solar cell module;
· Design a suitably sized PV system for a specific application;
· Characterize the performance of a solar cell;
· Analyse the performance of a PV system;
· Select and design a battery storage system for a specific application;
· Explain the concepts of photovoltaic energy conversion.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (2 x design assignments).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE4020 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Final Year Project).

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Project Work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge to a substantial energy engineering problem requiring analytical and/or design and/or experimental effort.

Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Plan an engineering project with resource and time constraints
· Conduct research into an engineering problem including the use of printed and computer-based literature
· Apply technical knowledge and skills to solving an engineering problem as part of a project team
· Manage an engineering project with respect to a plan incorporating intermediate and final goals
· Communicate the results of an engineering project by means of an oral presentation, by means of written reports and by means of an open-day (poster, and where relevant, practial) demonstration of the project outcomes.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Seminar 30 marks, Performance/Logbook 30 marks, Preliminary Report 20 marks, Final Report 100 marks (Oral if required) Open day poster presentation 20 marks:).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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NE6003 Wind Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eamon McKeogh, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: Introduce students to wind energy theory and technology, resource assessment and wind farm site development.

Module Content: Wind characteristics and resources. Measurement and instrumentation. Data analysis and energy production estimates. Weibull distribution. Log and power laws. Aerodynamics of wind turbines. Characteristics of airfoils. Momentum theory ? Betz Limit. Wind turbine rotor dynamics. Wind turbine design and components. Blade pitch and stall control. Principles of wind farm design and micro-siting. Introduction to wind farm design software tools. Civil works for wind farms. Wind energy variability. Wind energy storage technologies. Requirements for and approaches to wind energy forecasting. Offshore wind energy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the origin of global, geostrophic and surface winds
· Explain the impact of surface roughness and orography on wind speed profiles
· Calculate wind speed at a given height using the log law and power law
· Derive the Betz equation for wind power extraction using an idealized wind turbine
· Discuss different approaches to wind power forecasting and the relative benefits and limitations of each
· Demonstrate an understanding of passive and active wind turbine stall control
· Prepare a site visit report for a wind farm
· Model wind farm energy production using appropriate wind farm software tools.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (20 Site Visit / Lab Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE6004 Biomass Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Prof Jeremiah D.G. Murphy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: Introduce students to the diverse sources, technologies ands applications of energy from biomass for electricity generation, heat generation and as transport fuel.

Module Content: Biomass origins and its role as a renewable resources. The carbon cycle. Solid biomass. Liquid biofuels. Biogas. Energy crops. Bioenergy and waste management. Incineration.
Municipal and industrial waste. Agricultural and forestry residues. Short rotation coppicing. Biomass energy conversion technologies. Electricity, thermal and transport energy from biomass. Thermal and biological processes. Direct and advanced combustion. Gasification. Pyrolysis. Anaerobic digestion. Case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Generate the stoichiometric equation of a biomass feedstock (from an ultimate analysis) and thus ascertain the heating value of the feedstock.
· Describe the various routes of energy production from a biomass.
· Generate the electrical production and heat production from combustion or gasification of a biomass.
· Calculate the potential biogas production from an organic feedstock.
· Derive the sustainability of a biofuel system.
· Undertake technical, economic and environmental analysis of a Bioenergy system.
· Compare and contrast different systems which may be used to generate energy from biomass.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Report on Site Visit (20)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE6005 Ocean Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eamon McKeogh, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach students about the theory, technology and engineering associated with hydro-power and ocean energy.

Module Content: Hydrological cycle. Global resources. Resource assessment. Hydrological studies. Site surveys. Environmental impacts. Turbine design and energy conversion principles. Hydropower
system design. Intake details. Pipeline design and construction. Power station design and operation. Reservoir and run of river schemes. High head and low head case studies of small hydro power developments. Global ocean energy resources. Hydrodynamics. Wave energy conversion to pneumatic and mechanical energy. On shore devices. Oscillating water column. Near and off-shore devices. Tidal power. Marine current energy capture. Status of wave and marine current energy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Calculate the nett head and pressure losses in pipes and open channels connected to hydroelectric turbines using standard formula and design techniques.
· Analyze basic unsteady flow through pipes.
· Describe the energy transfer principles in turbines and the detail of how turbines work.
· Explain the importance and design relevance of the performance characteristics of turbines.
· Carry out a preliminary feasibility study for a green field small hydro electric power station and carry out preliminary power station design.
· Calculate the kinematics and dynamics of ocean waves and astronomical tides.
· Assess the resource in waves or tides at any location.
· Describe the various components and principles for wave and tidal energy conversion.
· Calculate the dynamics of floating ocean energy conversion systems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Site Visit / Lab Practicals (20)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE6006 Solar and Geothermal Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Staff, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach students about solar energy and geothermal energy and how these sources are used to generate heat and electricity.

Module Content: Harnessing solar energy. Passive solar energy techniques. Building design and orientation. Shading. Heat gains and losses through glass. Active solar energy. Heat transfer mechanisms. Flat plate solar collectors. Evacuated tube solar collectors. Solar thermal water heating systems. Photovoltaic energy conversion. Solar radiation and solar cell response. Solar cell IV
performance. Types of solar cells and materials used. PV modules and array systems. Stand alone and grid connected system design. Geothermal energy resources. Geothermal heat and electricity. Heat pump technology and system design. Case studies and future market prospects.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the process for determining the mounting angle for solar collectors
· Develop an equation for the overall energy output from a solar thermal collector
· Outline the experimental method of producing the I-V curve for a photovoltaic cell
· Describe the elements of a geothermal system, the classification of geothermal resources and the concept behind hot dry rock system exploitation
· Discuss the concept and operation of geothermal heat pumps and the different heat collector systems for low grade heat
· Outline the deciding factors for selecting the heat pump type for different house designs
· Explain the operation of Combined Heating and Cooling (CHC) heat pump systems
· Calculate the C02 saving in kg/year which can be achieved when using this heat pump compared with an oil boiler
· Outline the advantages of Building Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) over other options, in terms of initial capital costs and operational efficiencies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Site Visit / Lab Practicals (20)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE6007 Energy Systems Modelling

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To teach students about energy systems and how to model them. To introduce software packages for energy systems modelling.

Module Content: Technical, economic and market modelling of energy systems. Modelling national energy demand and supply. Macro-economic top-down modelling and techno-economic bottom up modelling. Partial equilibrium and general equilibrium modelling. Modelling renewable energy systems. Introduction to MATLAB Simulink, LEAP, RETScreen, MARKAL - TIMES and PLEXOS modelling tools.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Model a country's energy demand and supply using the LEAP model
· Model wind turbine control using a computer software simulation tool
· Determine the viability of a renewable energy project using RETScreen software
· Demonstrate an understanding of the key steps undertaken by Eirgrid to model generation adequacy
· Model electricity dispatch with a given demand and generation portfolio using PLEXOS
· Explain the key features of macro-economic and techno-economic energy forecasting models
· Generate energy forecasts using simple modelling based on energy intensity.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Lab Practicals (40) (4 assignments at 10 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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NE6008 Preliminary Research Project in Sustainable Energy

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other ((Project Work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To Provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their aptitude for research in the field of sustainable energy.

Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with supervisor

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Carry out a focused literature review
· Acquire and anlayze relevant data for an energy research topic
· Demonstrate investigative research skills in sustainable energy
· Undertake a preliminary research project in sustainable energy
· Prepare and deliver a structured research report in a timely manner
· Prepare and deliver a research seminar presentation
· Discuss and defend research approach, results and limitations.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written Report 170 marks; Seminar Assessment 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Seminar.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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NE6009 Dissertation in Sustainable Energy

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 3. (Summer Months after Period 2).

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): -CE6001

Teaching Method(s): Other (Project Work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian O Gallachoir, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge to a substantial sustainable energy research project requiring analytical and/or design and/or experimental effort.

Module Content: Topic chosen in consultation with supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Carry out a sustainable energy research project
· Acquire and analyze relevant energy data for research topic
· Demonstrate investigative research skills
· Undertake a detailed research project in sustainable energy
· Prepare and deliver a dissertation in sustainable energy
· Prepare and deliver a research seminar presentation
· Discuss and defend research approach, results and limitations.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation Report 525 marks; Seminar Assessment 75 marks .).

Compulsory Elements: Oral presentation to defend the thesis.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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NE6010 Advanced Topics in Marine Renewable Energy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 3hr(s) Seminars (Delivered at University College Cork / online.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Staff, Partner Institutions.

Module Objective: To gain understanding of advanced engineering and non-engineering issues relevant to marine renewable energy device design, operations, finance, economics and governance.

Module Content: 1. Control engineering for marine renewable energy devices
2. Wind and wave loading of offshore structures
3. Marine operations and robotics
4. Ocean Energy device modelling using CFD techniques
5. Design, manufacture, durability and test of materials for marine renewable energy devices
6. Economics of marine renewable energy
7. Environmental impacts of marine renewable energy with specific reference to tidal energy systems
8. Marine governance and the regulatory regime

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand how the offshore environment influences the design, operation, and integration of energy systems.
· Describe recent scientific and engineering developments relevant to marine renewable energy generation.
· Understand the economic and regulatory environment pertaining to marine renewable energy projects.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (40 marks (class tests; seminar topics 1-8); 60 marks (3 assignments)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

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NE6020 Marine Renewable Energy Project

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30 (Resources Permitting).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Project Work. This module is offered in one of two modes, (i) a research project hosted in industry or (ii) a research project hosted in an academic research lab.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Students will be supervised day-to-day by a staff member of the host institute or company. For students taking mode (i), an academic supervisor from one of the partner academic institutions will be responsible for academic direction of the project.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge to a marine renewable energy research and/or development project requiring analytical and/or design and/or experimental effort.

Module Content: A research project hosted either in industry or in an academic research lab. The project topic is chosen by the student in consultation with supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Acquire and analyse relevant data and scientific/technical literature for research topic.
· Carry out a marine renewable energy research and/or development and/or design project.
· Demonstrate investigative research skills.
· Prepare and deliver a research seminar presentation.
· Discuss and defend research approach, results and limitations.
· Interact with a multidisciplinary research team or development team.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Research methods/induction 60 marks; Project planning and development 60 marks; Project final results seminar 60 marks; Performance assessment 120 marks; Final project report 300 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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NE6901 Control Systems (NUIM - EE612)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): Basic knowledge of dynamical systems and linear algebra.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures; 12hr(s) Tutorials; 44hr(s) Other (Independent study. Plus assignments 40 hours (4 x 10 hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (NUIM Module Co-ordinator; Dr. Paul Mc Namara, Department of Electronic Engineering.).

Lecturer(s): Staff, National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

Module Objective: Control theory is an interdisciplinary branch of applied mathematics and engineering that is concerned with influencing the behaviour of dynamical systems. This course introduces students to techniques from classical, digital and optimal control.

Module Content: Preliminary Concepts
· Control theory terminology.
· State-space modelling of physical systems; differential equations; discrete-time equations.
· Laplace transforms; transfer functions.
· Simulation algorithms.
Classical control
· Stability, eigenvalue analysis.
· PID control basics, Simple tuning techniques.
Discrete-time Control basics
· Sampling
· Discrete-time transfer functions
· Stability in the discrete domain
· Converting continuous to discrete time controllers
State-space control
· Observability, Controllability
· Observer and control canonical forms.
· State space control design methods-SISO, MIMO, continuous, discrete
· Observer design & state estimation
Model Predictive Control
· State-space prediction, infinite horizon control.
· Optimisation framework.
· Hard/soft constraints, feasibility.
· Stability unconstrained, constrained MPC
· Distributed MPC
Examples
· Magnetic suspension systems, load frequency control, motors, etc.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· model simple dynamical systems in continuous, discrete-time, and state-space methods;
· design control systems using classical, digital, and optimal control techniques;
· identify stability as a desired property for a control system;
· identify optimality as a desired property in many control problems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Assignments (4 x 25 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% students are not required to pass components separately - an overall pass mark of 40% is acceptable.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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NE6902 Maintenance and Reliability (CIT - MANU8003)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30 (Resources permitting.).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Lectures (4 hours per week. Independent & Directed Learning (Non-contact), Self Directed Study 3 hours per week.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Cork Institute of Technology.

Module Objective: This module will afford the student an understanding of Reliability and Maintenance Management.

Module Content: Reliability of Components, Processes and Systems:
Probability Concepts and Probability Distributions. Reliability Data Analysis and Probability Plotting.
Reliability Testing and Growth Models (Duane).Confidence Limits for Continuous Variables and Discrete Data. Systems Reliability, Block Diagrams, Cut and Tie Sets, Reliability Testing, Accelerated Test Procedures.
Reliability in Design:
FMEA, FMECA and FTA. The Human Element. Human Reliability, Ergonomic Considerations. Experiment Design (Box, Taguchi), Robust Design and Process Optimisation. Maintainability, Availability, Active and Passive Redundancy. Fail Safe, H&S Considerations.
Maintenance Management:
Life Cycle Cost Analysis. Preventive Maintenance. Predictive Maintenance, Condition Monitoring. Reliability Centered Maintenance. Total Productive Maintenance. Spares Inventory Management. Optimum Parts Replacement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Deduce system reliability from component reliability data.
· Critically analyse system(s) for reliability.
· Analyse the human factors affecting reliability.
· Recommend a maintenance management system for specified equipment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Short Answer Questions Class Test 1,2,3; Project Take home assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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NE6906 Tidal Energy [QUBCIV7012]

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2. (Duration 4 1/2 days. Arrival Sunday night, departure Friday afternoon.).

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 1weeks(s) Fieldwork (1-week block of classroom and field instruction).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Paul Leahy, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (and Dr. Bjoern Elsaesser, School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering Queen's University Belfast.).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Queens University Belfast, Queens Marine Laboratory & School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering.

Module Objective: To gain understanding of the tidal energy resource characteristics, measurement campaigns and how the resource may be harnessed in a tidal energy system.

Module Content: Monday morning:
Basics of ocean and coastal currents & water levels Measurement & analysis of tidal currents and elevation Principles of tidal prediction
+ Monday afternoon:
Basics Theory of current hydrodynamics,
Ocean tides, coastal tides,
global and local currents and their drivers Practical session: Design of tidal measurements programme

+ Tuesday morning:
Principles of tidal energy,
Tidal stream devices and tidal barrages
Types of devices
Performance estimates using Betz limit & Blade Element Moment Theory

+ Tuesday afternoon:
Tidal stream devices and CFD
Wake effects, turbulent boundary layers and shear flows Wave current interaction.
Practical session: Testing of tidal stream turbine in Portaferry wave basin.

+ Wednesday:
Marine Ecology interactions with marine renewable energy, in particular tidal stream power. All day including practical session.

+ Thursday:
Modelling tidal resources and interaction of tidal turbine. This will be largely a practical session where students will set up a basic tidal model of a typical estuary using a commercial software package, place some tidal turbines in it and explore the output.
+ Friday:
Field work, ADCP monitoring around SeaGen, retrieval of data from ADCP deployed earlier in week or previous week, distribution of essay etc

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the principles underlying extraction of energy from tidal power.
· Understand the drivers for tidal and ocean currents.
· Carry out an assessment of tidal resource.
· Appreciate the environmental implications of harnessing tidal power.
· Use numerical tools to predict performance of tidal energy devices.
· Carry out measurement and analysis in a tidal stream environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (One essay (2000 words) on a topic chosen from list of options: 60 marks. One marked exercise analysis of tidal data: 20 marks. Short class test (90 minutes): 20 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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