Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

LW1001 Legal Writing
LW1101 Legal Writing and Analysis
LW1104 Foundations of the Legal System
LW1106 Law of Torts I
LW1107 Law of Torts II
LW1108 Introduction to the Legal System
LW1109 Introduction to Business Law
LW1112 Constitutional and Institutional Law of the European Union
LW1113 Bystander Intervention
LW1153 Criminal Law
LW1154 Law of Contract
LW1156 Legal Research and Writing
LW1161 Constitutional Law: Fundamental Rights
LW1162 Constitutional Law: Institutions of Government
LW1163 Dli Bunreachtuil: Bunchearta
LW1164 Dli Bunreachtuil: Institiuidi an Rialtais
LW1168 Introduction to the Legal System for Criminology I
LW1169 Introduction to the Legal System for Criminology II
LW1316 Public Law
LW2001 Clinical Legal Skills - Group Work and Presentation
LW2002 Public Law II
LW2003 Elements of French Civil Law
LW2005 Legal Skills (Clinical)
LW2006 The Law of Evidence I
LW2007 The Law of Evidence II
LW2100 Constitutional and Institutional Law of the European Union
LW2102 Economic Law of the European Union
LW2202 Introduction to Human Rights Law
LW2204 Economic Law of the European Union
LW2205 Commercial Law: The Law of Sale and Agency
LW2206 Commercial Law: Intellectual Property Law and Finance
LW2207 International Human Rights Law
LW2208 Law of the European Convention on Human Rights
LW2211 Principles of Public International Law
LW2212 Public International Law: Application and Selected Issues
LW2213 Placement (International)
LW2249 Law of Property I
LW2250 Law of Property II
LW2254 Commercial Law
LW2261 Information Technology Law
LW2262 Clinical Legal Skills - Group Work and Presentation
LW2263 Law of Public Administration
LW2264 Administrative Law: Grounds of Judicial Review
LW2267 Social Inclusion and the Law
LW2275 Family Law: Child Law
LW2276 Family Law: Family Relationships
LW3222 Transferable Skills - Law - Work Placement
LW3223 Transferable Skills - Law - Research Project
LW3300 Company Law
LW3301 Employment Law: Contracts, Rights and Termination
LW3302 Employment Law: Employee Protection, Equality and Industrial Relations
LW3303 Law of Equity: Doctrines and Remedies
LW3305 Law of Equity: Trusts
LW3307 Moot Court (Law and Business)
LW3311 Company Law
LW3316 Financial Services: Law and Regulation
LW3317 Banking Law
LW3345 Company Law: Fundamental Concepts and Doctrines
LW3346 Company Law: Management, Finance and Insolvency
LW3347 Contemporary Issues in Corporate Law
LW3357 English Land Law
LW3360 Moot Court
LW3361 Essay
LW3363 Placement II Project
LW3365 Tionscnamh Taithi Oibre (Dli) I
LW3366 Advanced Legal Reasoning
LW3367 Jurisprudence
LW3368 Principles of Revenue Law
LW3369 Income Tax Law
LW3370 Sports Law
LW3371 Sources and Foundations of Environmental Law
LW3372 Environmental Law: Contemporary Issues in Governance, Regulation and Enforcement
LW3373 Sports Law Clinic
LW3375 Law Review Clinic
LW3401 Legal Studies
LW3404 Medical Law and Ethics
LW3405 Medical Law: Regulation of Healthcare
LW3407 Placement
LW3500 Placement I
LW3501 Placement II
LW3502 Placement Research Project 1
LW3503 Placement Research Project 2
LW3504 Placement Presentation 1
LW3505 Placement Presentation 2
LW4102 Juvenile Justice
LW4103 International Criminal Law
LW4106 Refugee Law
LW4107 Migration Law and Human Rights
LW4401 Legal Studies
LW6003 Social Work and the Law (The Rights of Vulnerable Persons)
LW6004 Research Methods in Law
LW6005 Social Work and the Law (Child Law)
LW6006 LLM (International Family Law) Dissertation
LW6007 International Perspectives of the Family
LW6008 Legal Research and Writing
LW6101 Introduction to Planning Law
LW6103 Legal Aspects of State Regulation
LW6104 Intellectual Property Law for High-Tech Entrepreneurs
LW6106 Legal Concepts for Heritage and the Environment
LW6107 Legal Aspects of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare
LW6108 Legal Aspects of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare (online)
LW6109 Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Law (online)
LW6502 LLB Dissertation
LW6503 Business Law
LW6507 Comparative Family Property Law
LW6508 Law of Cybercrime
LW6529 Information Rights Law
LW6530 Constitutional Law in Comparative Context
LW6536 Intellectual Property Law
LW6538 LLM (Taught) Dissertation
LW6541 Electronic Commerce Law
LW6544 Criminology
LW6545 Penology
LW6546 Juvenile Justice
LW6547 LLM (Criminal Justice) Dissertation
LW6549 International Children's Rights
LW6550 International Criminal Law
LW6560 Law of Cybercrime
LW6563 Child Law in Practice
LW6565 LLM (Practitioner) Dissertation
LW6566 Contemporary Issues in International Law
LW6567 Introduction to European Union Law
LW6568 The Family and the Law
LW6569 LLM (Child and Family Law) Dissertation
LW6571 LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Dissertation
LW6572 Contemporary Issues in International Law
LW6574 Intellectual Property and Internet Regulation
LW6575 LLM (Intellectual Property and e-Law) Dissertation
LW6578 Consumer Rights: Law and Policy
LW6579 Law of Secured Lending
LW6580 Environmental Law in Practice
LW6581 Method in Environmental Law
LW6584 International Refugee Law
LW6585 Migration Law and Human Rights
LW6586 Human Rights Law in Practice (Clinic)
LW6588 Enforcement and Sanctions in Antitrust Law
LW6589 Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Policy
LW6592 Mental Capacity Law
LW6594 LLM (Business Law) Dissertation
LW6595 Business Law in Practice
LW6603 Legal Regulation of Cohabitation and Emerging Family Forms
LW6605 European Corporate Restructuring, Insolvency and Rescue
LW6606 International Human Rights Law
LW6609 Mental Health Law
LW6612 IT Law Clinic
LW6614 Family Law Clinic
LW6615 Child Law Clinic
LW6616 Critical Perspectives on Mental Health Law
LW6617 International Biodiversity and Ecosystems Law and Policy
LW6618 Climate Change Law and Policy
LW6620 Introduction to the Law of the Sea
LW6621 Admiralty Law
LW6622 Sale, Insurance and Carriage of Goods at Sea
LW6623 Global Maritime Security
LW6624 Port Law
LW6625 Law of the Sea (Clinical)
LW6626 Law of Ship Finance
LW6627 International Environmental Law
LW6628 Marine Environmental Law
LW6629 Natural Resources Law
LW6630 LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) Dissertation
LW6631 LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) Dissertation

LW1001 Legal Writing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Compulsory); 2 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 3 x 1hr(s) Other (Library Tour, 1 x 2hr Electronic Resources Training).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To give students a basic education in legal research and writing.

Module Content: Analysis of case-law. Aspects of legal research, writing and analysis. Approach to written legal analysis of sample fictional scenarios.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the various components of a case
?Structure coherent legal arguments and/or analysis
?Evaluate case law in light of legal scholarly writing
?Describe how to analogise with and distinguish caselaw.

Assessment: One assignment (1,500 words) to be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement. All assignments must be passed to pass the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1101 Legal Writing and Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Compulsory).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to the skills involved in Legal Writing and Analysis, including Common Law and Civil Law methodologies.

Module Content: Exercises in Legal Writing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Distinguish between the common law and civil law systems
?Structure coherent legal arguments and analysis in both common and civil law
?Describe typical legal writing requirements in both civil and common law jurisdictions
?Evaluate case law and statutes in light of legal scholarly writing
?Conduct research for an assignment on a civil law topic and/or on a common law topic.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment.

Compulsory Elements: 2 x 1,000 word assignments (50 marks each).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit an alternative assessment, as specified by the School).

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LW1104 Foundations of the Legal System

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Colette O'Donovan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a foundation for further legal studies and to analyse the legal system from functional and critical perspectives.

Module Content: Sources of Irish Law; Precedent and the Development of Case Law; The Legislative Process and Statutory Interpretation; The Courts; Law Reform.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the sources of law and their relative positions of authority within the Irish Legal System;
?Criticise judicial decisions in light of the doctrine of precedent;
?Assess the importance of judicial independence;
?Describe techniques of statutory interpretation;
?Differentiate between the first instance and appellate functions of the courts;
?Evaluate the legislative process in Ireland;
?Engage with current political debates as they pertain to the above matters.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1106 Law of Torts I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW1107

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick O'Callaghan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Helen O'Connor, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the doctrine of the Law of Torts, with a particular emphasis on the Law of Negligence; to understand the operation of principle and policy in the Law of Torts; and to evaluate critically the development of Tort doctrine over time.

Module Content: Introduction to the Law of Torts; Functions of the Law of Torts; Trespass to the Person; Law of Negligence and related matters; Vicarious Liability; Remedies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the functions of the Law of Torts;
?Identify the different bases of liability in Tort;
?Identify the policy factors underlying the development of the Law of Torts;
?Extract the principles of the Law of Torts relating to the topics covered in this module from the relevant legislation and case law;
?Apply the principles of the Law of Torts relating to the topics covered in this module to given factual scenarios;
?Evaluate critically the development over time of the principles of the Law of Torts relating to the topics covered in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1107 Law of Torts II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW1106

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aine Ryall, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aine Ryall, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the principles of the Law of Torts relating to the topics covered in this module; to examine the policy underlying these principles; and to evaluate critically the development of these principles over time.

Module Content: Medical Negligence; Negligently Inflicted Psychiatric Injury; Nuisance; Rule in Rylands v Fletcher; Occupiers' Liability; Defamation Law

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Extract the principles of the Law of Torts relating to the topics covered in this module from the relevant legislation and case law;
?Identify the policy factors underlying the development of the principles governing the topics covered in this module;
?Apply the principles of the Law of Torts relating to the topics covered in this module to given factual scenarios;
?Evaluate critically the development over time of the principles of the Law of Torts relating to the topics covered in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1108 Introduction to the Legal System

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW1109

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To afford a foundation for further studies in the law affecting business activities.

Module Content: Introduction to Irish Legal System; Sources of Law (the Constitution, legislation, judicial decision-making and the EU); legal reasoning, and dispute resolution.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Research legal topics using the Law Library, including electronic resources
?Describe key features of the Irish Legal System
?Present information and arguments effectively and comprehensively
?Critically evaluate the operation of the Irish legal system in a business context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1109 Introduction to Business Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW1108

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to aspects of contract and tort law and to afford a foundation for further studies in the law affecting business activities.

Module Content: General Principles of Contract Law and Tort Law

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Research legal topics using the Law Library, including electronic resources.
?Describe core aspects of contract law and tort law.
?Present information and arguments effectively and comprehensively.
?Critically evaluate the operation of contract and tort law in a business context.
?Identify applicable legal rules and apply those rules in order to determine the likely outcome.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1112 Constitutional and Institutional Law of the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law; Dr Aine Ryall, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This module provides students with an introduction to the constitutional foundations of the European Union (EU) and the EU institutions and explores the relationship between national law and EU law. It aims to enable students to develop a critical understanding of the implementaiton of EU law and policy at national level and the mechanisms for enforcement of EU law.

Module Content: Introduction; Foundations and Basic Principles; The European Integration Project; Sources of EU law; The EU as an international actor; Contemporary challenges for the EU; Research tools, including on-line resources; Institutions and decision-making; Court of Justice of the European Union; Primacy of EU law; the relationship between EU law and national law; References for preliminary ruling; Enforcement of EU law against Member States; Enforcement of EU law at national level; Review of Legality.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Determine the sources of EU law
?Identify the policy factors shaping the development of EU law
?Extract the basic principles of EU law from the Treaties, legislation and case law
?Explore the interaction between EU law and national law
?Evaluate critically the development of EU law over time
?Assess the implementation of EU law in practice
?Assess the effectiveness of the enforcement of EU law in practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LW1113 Bystander Intervention

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law, and other University Staff.

Module Objective: University-based bystander programmes with a social norms component which are embedded in all students' timetables and supported by a visible institutional culture against violence and abuse, are likely to be maximally effective for violence prevention if they are comprehensive, of sufficient length and duration, are underpinned by theory, foster positive relationships, are evaluated for effectiveness (including monitoring for unintended backlash effects) and are administered by well-trained staff.

Module Content: This module represents a response to the need to develop a range of complementary and strategic responses to the issue of sexual misconduct and violence on our campus. It will comprise a 5-credit compulsory undergraduate module, delivered as a pilot to first year students in selected schools, which will introduce to the student conversation and understanding the issues of the social normalisation of abusive behaviour and the capacities of a bystander to intervene . The module presents an opportunity to contribute to the University's commitment to the delivery of strong student-focused support services, which address the physical, psychological, spiritual, social, cultural and welfare needs of students, by focusing on the students' transition into UCC, their time in UCC and their transition out of UCC. A key aspect of this framework is the development of a progressive and effective culture around the issues of sexual misconduct and sexual violence at university. This module will provide a dedicated education plan which will ultimately seek to provide mandatory formalised education and training for all undergraduate students. This module-based approach seeks to not only enhance knowledge and understanding, but also to lead to attitude and behavioural change across the university.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise that sexual and domestic violence are a serious problem in society and in student populations
?Learn bystander intervention theory
?Improve their knowledge and understanding about rape and sexual assault
?Accept that individuals can often be mistaken about others? beliefs and values (social norms theory)
?Recognise the links between sexist attitudes, discriminatory practices and gender based violence
?Be familiar with intervention strategies
?Know where to go for help and / or support in cases of rape, assault or abuse
?Be confident to use intervention strategies in everyday life
?Improve their communication and leadership skills for the future.

Assessment: Attendance and participation in scheduled workshops. The module will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance and participation in scheduled workshops.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Students who participate in at least 50% of their scheduled workshops will attain a pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail to attend at least 50% of their scheduled workshops are required to submit a 1 x 1,000 word assignment to be submitted prior to the Summer Examination Board. Students who fail to attend 50% of their scheduled workshops or submit the supplemental assignment will be required to attend repeat workshops in Autumn.

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LW1153 Criminal Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law; Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law; Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To familiarise students with the general principles of criminal liability and the substantive provision of Statutory and Common Law offences.

Module Content: The module examines and analyses the general principles of criminal liability, mens rea and actus reus, general defences, and considers both the content and context of substantive criminal offences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Classify elements of a crime as mens rea or actus reus
?Interpret statutory provisions and related case law
?Trace the development of criminal principles
?Apply criminal principles to factual scenarios
?Appraise the place of morality and policy in the criminal law
?Recommend reform proposals for the areas of law covered.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1154 Law of Contract

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Stephen William Hedley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Stephen William Hedley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a critical understanding of the legal principles as applied by Courts and Statutory Law to various Contracts/Agreements.

Module Content: Formation of Contracts is examined in detail. The doctrines of Mistake, Misrepresentation and Undue Influence are assessed. Capacity of Parties, Privity and Discharge are also considered. The consequences of Breach and the principle of Restitutions are examined. The public policy aspect of contract law is examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the basic principles of the law of contract in relation to formation of contract (agreement, consideration, contractual intent, form and evidence).
?Describe the basic principles of the law of contract in relation to contractual terms (express and implied terms, exemptions and consumer protection).
?Describe the basic principles of the law of contract in relation to doctrines limiting the ordinary effect of contract (mistake, misrepresentation, inequality of bargaining power and unlawful contracts).
?Describe the basic principles of the law of contract in relation to rights and remedies (privity, agency, discharge and remedies).
?Identify the main cases and legislation containing those basic principles.
?Extract and explain those basic principles from applicable case law.
?Critically evaluate the development of those basic principles.
?Apply those basic principles to give factual scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 1,500 word written assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. A pass mark in any element of Continuous Assessment is carried forward. Students failing essay(s) (which includes failing to submit) must submit another essay(s) on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, not later than the 1st Friday in August, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW1156 Legal Research and Writing

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 7 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other (Library Tour, 1 x 2hr Electronic Resources Training, Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Law.

Module Objective: To educate a student in legal research and legal and scholarly writing including the use of the law library and electronic resources.

Module Content: Two exercises, a law library tour and electronic resources training.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the various components of a case;
?Structure coherent legal arguments and/or analysis;
?Employ the legal analytical skills of analogising and distinguishing cases;
?Present a critical assessment of the law for a fictional client;
?Engage in statutory research.

Assessment: Two assignments to be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement. All assignments must be passed to pass the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1161 Constitutional Law: Fundamental Rights

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Conor O'Mahony, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Conor O'Mahony, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To impart knowledge of the fundamental rights provisions of the Irish Constitution, the tools that the courts use to interpret them and the remedies that can be granted to enforce them, and to assess the need for reform of those provisions.

Module Content: Articles 40-45 of the Irish Constitution; constitutional interpretation; personal unenumerated rights; the right to life of the unborn; family rights and the rights of children; educational rights; religious freedom; socio-economic rights; remedies for breaches of constitutional rights.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Interpret the fundamental rights provisions of the Irish Constitution in light of related case law;
?Identify the existence and scope of individual constitutional rights;
?Assess the legitimacy of legislative or executive measures that restrict the exercise of constitutional rights;
?Apply constitutional principles to factual scenarios;
?Evaluate the need for constitutional change in order to meet the changing trends in society;
?Engage with judicial and academic debate on points of constitutional law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay (30 marks) and 1 x 2,500 word project (60 marks); tutorial attendance and participation (10 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Where a student fails the module overall, marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward. Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (students failing either assignment (which includes failing to submit) must submit another assignment on a topic or topics set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law).

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LW1162 Constitutional Law: Institutions of Government

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To impart an appreciation of the historical and conceptual origins of the Constitution of Ireland 1937, the position and principal functions of each of the three main branches of government, and the role of the people in the process of constitutional amendment.

Module Content: The nature and purpose of constitutional law; the position of the people, the referendum process, the amendability of the Constitution; the function of the Legislature, judicial review of legislation, non-delegation of legislative function; the administration of justice, minor judicial functions; the traditional functions of the executive, the position of the executive in foreign relations; the inter-relationship between the Constitution and international law, including the European Convention on Human Rights and European law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a knowledge of the text of Bunreacht na hEireann;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the major cases in constitutional law in the area of institutions of government;
?Interpret key provisions of the Irish Constitution in light of relevant case law;
?Explain the importance of separation of powers with reference to instances where the Constitution and the courts promote this separation and conversely when they fail to do so;
?Articulate the basic purpose and position of each of the three main branches of government;
?Discuss the position of the people in the Constitution and evaluate the threats to that position;
?Engage rigorously with judicial debate on points of constitutional law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1163 Dli Bunreachtuil: Bunchearta

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): Ní hann do

Co-requisite(s): Ní hann do

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Gary Moloney, Department of Law.

Module Objective: Tuiscint a chur as fail ar an bhunchearta an duine agus a mea a dheanamh idir bunchearta agus leas an phobail, an sli go ndeanann na Cuirteanna ciall astu, na leighis ata ar fhail len iad a chur i bhfeidhm, agus an ga athchoiriu a dheanamh ar bhunchearta.

Module Content: Airteagal 40-45 Bunreacht na hEireann; ciall a bhaint as teacs an bhunreachta; cearta pearsanta neamh airithe; ceart an beo gan breith beatha; cearta teaglaigh agus cearta paisti; cearta oideachas; cearta reiligiuin; cearta socheacnamaiochta; leighis is gcas saru cearta bunreachtuil.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Teacs an Bhunreachta a leamh (as Gaeilge agus Bearla);
?Ciall a bhaint as foralacha de Bhunreacht na hEireann i gcomhtheacs na casanna cui;
?An gaol idir dli agus polasai a aithint;
?Ga chun leasu a dheanamh ar an mBunreacht a mheas le dul i ngleic le hathraithe sa tsochai;
?Prionsabail Bunreachtuil a chuir i bhfeidhm i suiomh fiorasach;
?Comhlionacht rialacha o reachtaiocht agus dli comonta a mheas i leith prionsabail an Bhunreachta;
?Dul i ngleic diospoireachtai breihiunach agus acadula as phointi Dli an Bhunreachta.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Aiste 2,000 focal (40 marc); 1 x Tionscnamh 3,000 focal (60 marc)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing the essay and/or the project (which includes failing to submit) must submit another essay and/or project on a topic or topics set for the Autumn supplemental Examination, not later than the first Friday in August, as prescribed by the School of Law.).

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LW1164 Dli Bunreachtuil: Institiuidi an Rialtais

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): Ní hann do

Co-requisite(s): Ní hann do

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: Tuiscint a chur as fail a institiuidi an rialtais agus ag gaol ata idir gach orgain; tuiscint a fhail ar conas mar a feidhmionn orgain an Stait le ceile agus an rol ata ag muintir na hEireann o thaobh ceannas de.

Module Content: Institiuidi an Rialtais; scar na gcumhacht; an reachtoir agus reachtaiocht; an rialtas agus feidhm; an Uachtaran; na cuirteanna agus feidhm breithiunach; ceannas na ndaoine; an reifreann agus leasu; dli idirnaisiunta agus an bunreacht; an Ghaeilge agus an bunreacht.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?An coras polaitiuil a thuiscint agus conas mar a chuireann an Bunreacht e i bhfeidhm no conas mar a theipeann air, msh riail an dli, roinnt cumhachta idir orgain an Stait, neamhspleachas v freagracht an Bhreithiuntacht;
?Ciall a bhaint as foralacha de Bhunreacht na hEireann i gcomhtheacs samplai agus o chasanna cui;
?An gaol idir dli agus polasai a aithint agus a thuiscint;
?Ga chun leasu a dheanamh ar an mBunreacht a mheas le dul i ngleic le hanraithe sa tsochai;
?Prionsabail Bunreachtuil a chuir i bhfeidhm i suiomh fiorasach;
?Comhlionacht rialacha o reachtaiocht agus dli comonta a mheas i leith prionsamail an Bunreachta;
?Dul i ngleic diospoireachtai breithiunach agus acadula ar phointi Dli an Bhunreachta.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x Aiste 2,000 focal).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (Scrudu scriofa dheireadh ne bliana agus an obair a dheanfai i gcaitheamh na bliana san aireamh sa Fhomhar) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1168 Introduction to the Legal System for Criminology I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW1169

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a foundation for further legal studies and to analyse the legal system from functional and critical perspectives.

Module Content: Sources of Irish Law; Precedent and the Development of Case Law; The Legislative Process and Statutory Interpretation; The Courts; Law Reform.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the sources of law and their relative positions of authority within the Irish Legal System;
?Criticise judicial decision in light of the doctrine of precedent;
?Describe techniques of statutory interpretation;
?Differentiate between the first instance and appellate functions of the courts;
?Evaluate the legislative process in Ireland;
?Employ legal reasoning technique.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing the essay (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.).

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LW1169 Introduction to the Legal System for Criminology II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW1168

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Faculty of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a foundation for legal studies focused on the criminal justice field.

Module Content: This module looks at the constitutional context in which the Irish legal system and the criminal justice system in partcular operates, and considers issues such as judicial independence, the jury system and the intersection of law and morality.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the functions of the Irish Constitution;
?Critically evaluate the rights provisions in the Irish Constitution;
?Explore the jury system;
?Assess the value of judicial independence;
?Appraise the role of morality in the criminalisation of offences.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW1316 Public Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Claire Jackson, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Claire Jackson, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To impart an understanding of the character of law, in particular constitutional law, and its impact on the substance and process of decision-making in the public arena.

Module Content: The Rule of Law, Introduction to Irish legal history, the Constitution and the three branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial), the role of the people in the Referendum Process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Contrast various approaches to the rule of law.
?Describe the history of the Irish legal system and the sources of law in Ireland.
?Appreciate the role of the Irish Constitution and the composition of its Articles.
?Critically evaluate the strength of parliamentary democracy in Ireland by reference to the process for the promulgation of legislation.
?Describe the jurisdictions of the various courts, the rules on appointment, remuneration and removal of judges, and the doctrine of precedent.
?Appraise the power of the executive branch, and its rule in external relations.
?Evaluate how well the role of the people in the Constitution is honoured through the referendum process.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (10 marks attendance, 30 marks 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2001 Clinical Legal Skills - Group Work and Presentation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop in students the skills necessary to work effectively in a group; to enhance communication and presentation skills; to encourage students to take ownership of their learning.

Module Content: Researching legal materials; compiling a legal presentation; presentation skills; group work; reflective learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conduct legal research using the various databases and research tools available;
?Contribute to the compilation and delivery of a legal presentation using resources such as powerpoint, handouts, prezi etc.;
?Work effectively in a group;
?Engage in reflective practice and experiential learning.

Assessment: Continuous assessments consisting of group work and presentation.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous assessments consisting of group work and presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement must be achieved in both assessments. For students not satisfying this requirement a Fail judgement overall will be returned for the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail one of the elements of the continuous assessment will be required to submit an alternative assessment/make a presentation as specified by the School of Law.

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LW2002 Public Law II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To explain how law regulates the organisation and the powers of public authorities and the restraints to which they are subject in the interests of citizens.

Module Content: Judicial review; constitutional justice; limitations on discretionary powers. Administrative Tribunals and inquiries, delegated legislation and other forms of administrative law-making.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically assess the merits and significance of administrative law as a source of law in Ireland.
?Understand and assess the role of judicial review as a remedy in the Irish legal system.
?Assess the importance and impact of the principles of Natural Justice on the administration of justice in Ireland.
?Evaluate the role of the Ombudsman as an alternative legal remedy for the people of Ireland.
?Examine the sufficiency and effectiveness of the legal provisions facilitating access to the records of Irish public bodies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Attendance 10 marks; Participation 30 marks; and Assignment 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward. Students failing an essay (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2003 Elements of French Civil Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to principles of French Law Public Law (Administrative and Constitutional) and of French Private Law.

Module Content: Elements of French Public Law, including Constitutional and Administrative Law; Introduction to French Private Law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Display knowledge of French legal terminology;
?Identify the sources of French law;
?Examine primary sources of French law in French;
?Outline the characteristics of the French legal system;
?Describe the functioning of the French judicial system;
?Assess the most important principles of various categories of French law (constitutional law, administrative law, criminal law, family law, contract law and tort law).

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 66 marks (one assignment of 2,000 words in French); Oral Assessment 34 marks (oral examination).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of are carried forward. Students failing an element(s), (which includes failure to submit/attend) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination and/or attend another oral examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2005 Legal Skills (Clinical)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To educate the student in the essential skills of legal research and to prepare students for work placements as part of the BCL (Clinical) Programme.

Module Content: Advanced legal research, development of work placement skills

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Research legal materials and be able to use a number of legal databases and websites;
?Apply research skills in order to research a legal problem and compile a short memorandum on the relevant law;
?Reflect on personal expectations of the forthcoming work placement, identify possible challenges and suggest possible strategies for meeting those challenges.

Assessment: A 2,500 word group project and a 1,000 word individual reflection, both assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment (both elements must be passed).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who fail at the Summer Examination may submit an alternative assessment as specified by the School of Law).

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LW2006 The Law of Evidence I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW2007

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading); 5hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Douglas Cubie, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Douglas Cubie, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of the detail and significance of the relevant aspects of the law of evidence as it applies to criminal and civil trials in Ireland.

Module Content: Evidence law comprises a series of exclusionary rules governing the admissibility and receivability of evidence in court. The scope and effect of these rules will be identified by reference to relevant case law, statutes, and critical texts. The module focuses in particular on fundamental principles of the law of evidence, for example, burden of proof, and core exclusionary rules such as those directed against improperly obtained evidence and hearsay.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain, in light of the exclusionary rules covered in this module, the type of evidence which is admissible in civil cases and criminal trials;
?Identify the rules which govern the relevant aspects of the law of evidence;
?Examine the extent to which such rules facilitate the proper administration of justice;
?Interpret those rules in relation to broader policy and strategy choices;
?Generalise about the relevant aspects of the Irish law of evidence from primary source legal materials.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word case note - 40 marks; 1 x 2,500 word written assignment - 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of continuous assessment are carried forward. Students failing an essay(s), (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2007 The Law of Evidence II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW2006

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading); 5hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Douglas Cubie, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Douglas Cubie, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of those aspects of the law of evidence related to practice and procedure in civil cases and criminal trials in Ireland.

Module Content: Evidence law comprises a series of exclusionary rules governing the admissability and receivability of evidence in court. The scope and effect of these rules will be identified by reference to relevant case law, statutes, and critical texts. This module focuses on aspects of the law of evidence related to practice and procedure in court, including the rules governing different categories of witnesses, the testimony of witnesses (including the accused) and various procedural safeguards (such as the rules regarding corroboration).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain, in light of the exclusionary rules covered in this module, the type of evidence which is admissable in civil cases and criminal trials;
?Identify the rules which govern the relevant aspects of the law of evidence;
?Examine the extent to which such rules facilitate the proper administration of justice;
?Interpret those rules in relation to broader policy and strategy choices;
?Generalise about the relevant aspects of the Irish law of evidence from primary source legal materials.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2100 Constitutional and Institutional Law of the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This module provides students with an introduction to the constitutional foundations of the European Union (EU) and the EU institutions and explores the relationship between national law and EU law. It aims to enable students to develop a critical understanding of the implementation of EU law and policy at national level and the mechanisms for enforcement of EU law.

Module Content: Introduction, Foundations and Basic Principles: The European integration project; sources of EU law; The EU as an international actor; Contemporary challenges for the EU; Research tools, including on-line resources; Institutions and decision-making; Court of Justice of the European Union; Primacy of EU law: the relationship between EU law and national law; References for preliminary ruling; Enforcement of EU law against Member States; Enforcement of EU law at national level; Review of Legality.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Determine the sources of EU law
?Identify the policy factors shaping the development of EU law
?Extract the basic principles of EU law from the Treaties, legislation and case law
?Explore the interaction between EU law and national law
?Evaluate critically the development of EU law over time
?Assess the implementation of EU law in practice
?Assess the effectiveness of the enforcement of EU law in practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of continuous assessment are carried forward. Students failing an essay(s), (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2102 Economic Law of the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This module provides students with an introduction to the primary economic laws of the European Union (EU). It considers the creation and evolution of rules governing economic rights within the EU. It aims to contextualise economic rights within the broader objectives and goals of the European Union.

Module Content: Introduction, Principles of EU Competition Policy: Enforcement and Sanctions in EU Competition Law: Cartels & Concerted Practices: Vertical Restraints: Abuse of a Dominant Position: State Aid: Freedom of Movement of Goods: Freedom to Provide Services: The Right of Establishment: Economic & Non Economic Mobility of Persons: Citizenship of the European Union.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the sources of EU economic rights
?Assess the policy factors shaping the development of EU competition law
?Identify the optimum enforcement methods in antitrust law
?Evaluate the evolution of free movement principle in EU law
?Distinguish the economic and non-economic rights of mobility
?Assess the evolution of EU Citizenship.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of continuous assessment are carried forward. Students failing the essay(s), (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2202 Introduction to Human Rights Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to international human rights law and the concepts and issues relevant to development and food security. Students will also have acquired a general understanding of public international law to the extent that it is relevant to international human rights law.

Module Content: Human Rights as Law and as International Law; International Law and Evolution of Human Rights; UN and the International Bill of Human Rights; Regional Human Rights Regimes; State Obligations; Prohibition of Torture; Women's Rights; Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity; Refugee Law; Hate Speech and Freedom of Expression; Right to Self-Determination; International Criminal Law; Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law; Human Rights and the Environment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the fundamental concepts of international human rights law.
?Analyse and discuss the content and jurisdictional scope of core treaties in the field of international human rights law and international humanitarian law.
?Critically examine and evaluate the means by which international human rights treaties are being enforced.
?Understand the key areas of concern within the fields of international human rights law and international humanitarian law.
?Examine the responsibilities of the United Nations and its member states in relation to crimes against humanity and other serious and widespread violations of human rights.
?Discuss how to address continuing lack of human security and non-compliance with human rights norms.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 3,500 word essay - 90 marks each; 1 x presentation (plus accompanying notes) - 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of continuous assessment are carried forward. Students failing an essay(s), (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2204 Economic Law of the European Union

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This module provides students with an introduction to the constitutional foundations of the European Union (EU) and the EU institutions and explores the relationship between national law and EU law. It aims to enable students to develop a critical understanding of the implementation of EU law and policy at national level and the mechanisms for enforcement of EU law.

Module Content: Introduction; Principles of EU Competition Policy; Enforcement and Sanctions in EU Competition Law; Cartels and Concerted Practices; Vertical Restraints; Abuse of a Dominant Position; State Aid; Freedom of Movement of Goods; Freedom to Provide Services; The Right of Establishment; Economic and Non-Economic Mobility of Persons; Citizenship of the European Union.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the sources of EU economic rights
?Assess the policy factors shaping the development of EU competition law
?Identify the optimum enforcement methods in antitrust law
?Evaluate the evolution of free movement principle in EU law
?Distinguish the economic and non-economic rights of mobility
?Assess the evolution of EU Citizenship.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of continuous assessment are carried forward. Students failing an essay(s), (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2205 Commercial Law: The Law of Sale and Agency

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): LW1108, LW1109 (or LW1100) or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To examine the legal basis of certain commercial transactions.

Module Content: Partnerships, agency, sale of goods and supply of services, consumer protection

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess the significance of commercial law in a business context
?Demonstrate an understanding of the central importance of consumer policy
?Determine the various sources of commercial law
?Demonstrate a comperhension of the significance of regulatory frameworks
?Analyse the divergent methods of enforcement
?Apply the principle of commercial law to practical examples.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2206 Commercial Law: Intellectual Property Law and Finance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): LW1108, LW1109 (or LW1100)

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Helen O'Connor, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To examine aspects of commercial law, with particular reference to intellectual property and finance.

Module Content: Overview of intellectual property law protections (copyright, trademarks, patents), banking, payment mechanisms and securities, principles of insurance law and commercial dispute resolution.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of further aspects of commercial law (intellectual property law and finance)
?Utilise legal skills to address fact-based problems relating to intellectual property and finance
?Identify the core principles of intellectual property law, banking law and insurance law
?Place the law relating to intellectual property and finance in a business context
?Differentiate between the competing rights and interests at stake.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2207 International Human Rights Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the study of International Human Rights Law.

Module Content: Topics covered include the meaning of Human Rights, Cultural Diversity and Universalism, UN systems and procedures for the protection of human rights, Civil and Political Rights, Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Selected issues are discussed each year, and may include: Prohibition of Torture; Racism, Gender and Sexuality in Human Rights Law; Rights of refugees, Right to Food.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the normative and historical origins of human rights law;
?Analyse the international human rights systems for the protection of human rights law;
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the human rights law applying to selected issues;
?Analyse human rights law in terms of its effectiveness, its impact, and its legitimacy;
?Critically examine and analyse the conceptual and practical challenges arising in human rights protection.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2208 Law of the European Convention on Human Rights

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the study of European Convention on Human Rights.

Module Content: Topics covered include the background to the development of the European Convention on Human Rights, the stucture and functioning of the European Court of Human Rights and consideration of the case law of the Court pertaining to certain articles of the Convention such as the right to life, freedom from torture, the right to respect for private life and the right to freedom of expression.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the normative and historical origins of European human rights law;
?Analyse the European Convention on Human Rights;
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the provisions of the Convention applying to selected issues;
?Analyse the European Convention on Human Rights in terms of its effectiveness, its impact, and its legitimacy;
?Critically examine and analyse the conceptual and practical challenges arising in the protection of human rights by means of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2211 Principles of Public International Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To enable students to apply key concepts and principles of public international law to selected global challenges and to provide students with the skills necessary to analyse the role and relevance of international institutions and international law.

Module Content: Historical Developments of International Law; Institutions of the International Legal System; Sources of International Law; Law of Treaties; International Legal Personality; Recognition of States and Governments; Right to Self-Determination; The Evolving Concept of Sovereignty; Introduction to the Law of the Sea.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the core principles of public international law.
?Assess the normative foundations and legitimacy of the international legal system, drawing on key challenges of international law.
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key concepts of international law by applying them to current international legal disputes.
?Analyse case law and treaties by applying legal reasoning.
?Understand the relationship between international law and international relations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2212 Public International Law: Application and Selected Issues

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW2211

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To enable the student to apply key concepts and principles of public international law to selected global challenges and to provide students with the skills necessary to analyse the role and relevance of international institutions and international law.

Module Content: International Law and Domestic Law; Principles of Jurisdiction and Jurisdictional Immunities, Diplomatic Immunity, the Law of Diplomacy; Peaceful Resolution of Disputes; Use of Force and Armed Conflict; International Criminal Law; Terrorism and the War on Terror; Collective Security and the UN System.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the core principles of public international law.
?Assess the normative foundations and legitimacy of the international legal system, drawing on key challenges of international law.
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key concepts of international law by applying them to current international legal disputes.
?Analyse case law and treaties by applying legal reasoning.
?Analyse and evaluate the UN system for the enforcement of international law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2213 Placement (International)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Murray, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire Murray, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To prepare students for study abroad placements as part of the BCL (International) programme.

Module Content: This module comprises a range of seminars regarding preparation for study abroad. These include detailed sessions in relation to study abroad opportunities and focussed sessions on student obligations when studying abroad. Students are provided with the grounding and support necessary to enable them to identify objectives, potential challenges and coping strategies for the study abroad period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the various study abroad opportunities available as part of the BCL (International) programme;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the obligations and responsibilities of students who study abroad as part of their degree programme;
?Provide detailed evidence of reflection on personal expectations of the forthcoming study abroad placement;
?Demonstrate the capacity to identify possible challenges and to suggest possible strategies for meeting those challenges.

Assessment: One Continuous Assessment which will be assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Minimum 50% attendance at seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Students who pass the continuous assessment and who attend at least 50% of their scheduled seminars will attain a Pass Judgement. For students not satisfying this requirement a Fail Judgement overall will be returned for the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail the Continuous Assessment may submit an alternative assessment as specified by the School of Law. Students who fail to attend at least 50% of their scheduled seminars will be required to attend repeat seminars as specified by the School of Law.

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LW2249 Law of Property I

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW2250 Law of Property II

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Mee, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof John Mee, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To give an understanding of the rules and principles underlying selected aspects of land law and succession.

Module Content: This module examines introductory and core principles of the law of property (primarily the law of real property), which may be regarded as falling under the broad heading of "Ownership and its Limits". It also covers the law of succession.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key principles underlying those aspects of property law and succession law covered in the module;
?Apply these principles to hypothetical fact situations, referring where appropriate to relevant case law and legislative provisions;
?Evaluate and critique the current legal rules in relation to the specific aspects of property law and succession covered in the module;
?Analyse the impact of the reform process in relation to those aspects of property law and succession law covered in the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2250 Law of Property II

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW2249 Law of Property I

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Mee, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof John Mee, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To give an understanding of the rules and principles underlying selected aspects of the law of real property.

Module Content: This module builds on LW2249 Law of Property I, examining aspects of law not covered in that module. It focuses on topics falling under the broad headings of Transmission of Ownership (including Priorities) and Rights in the Land of Others.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key principles underlying those aspects of land law covered in the module;
?Apply these principles to hypothetical fact situations, referring where appropriate to relevant case law and legislative provisions;
?Evaluate and critique the current legal rules in relation to the specific aspects of land law covered in the module;
?Analyse the impact of the reform process in relation to those aspects of land law covered in the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2254 Commercial Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices of commercial law, broadly defined.

Module Content: At the heart of commerce is buying and selling. In commercial law the main concern is with personal property - goods and intellectual property (patents, marks and copyright). Surrounding most commercial transactions is a web of relations and other transactions some of which are examined, including agency, and other marketing arrangements.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the principles and practices of commercial law, broadly defined;
?Assess the policies underlying the development of the law;
?Identify applicable legal rules and apply those rules in order to determine the likely outcome;
?Critically evaluate the different aspects of commercial law in light of developments in the economy and society;
?Present information and arguments effectively and comprehensively.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2261 Information Technology Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To explore legal issues arising from developments in Information Technology

Module Content: Legal issues arising from developments in Information Technology including Data Protection; Computer Crime; Encryption, Intellectual Property; Legal Problems associated with the Internet, Electronic Commerce.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Place the exploration of the law relating to information technology in an overall social, economic and political context;
?Interpret statutory provisions and apply case law;
?Identify the key areas of debate, from a legal perspective, in respect of the various aspects of information technology law studied;
?Form a view on the relevance and adequacy of law in advancing these debates, including the issue of enforcement;
?Assess the policies underlying the development of the law;
?Analyse the extent to which laws regulating information technology can have negative consequences for individuals and corporations and wider society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2262 Clinical Legal Skills - Group Work and Presentation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Murray, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire Murray, Department of Law; Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop in students the skills necessary to work effectively in a group; to enhance communication and presentation skills; to encourage students to take ownership of their learning.

Module Content: Researching legal materials; compiling a legal presentation; presentation skills; group work; reflective learning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Conduct legal research using the various databases and research tools available.
?Contribute to the compilation and delivery of a legal presentation using resources such as powerpoint, handouts, prezi etc.
?Work effectively in a group.
?Engage in reflective practice and experiential learning.
?Draft a concise written legal submission based on research conducted.

Assessment: Continuous assessments consisting of group work, presentation and written assignment.

Compulsory Elements: Three Continuous Assessments.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement in each assessment. For students not satisfying this requirement a Fail Judgement will be returned for the module overall.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail one of the elements of the continuous assessment will be required to submit an alternative assessment/make a presentation as specified by the School.

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LW2263 Law of Public Administration

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide the students with an understanding of the law relating to the structure, functions and capacity of bodies concerned with public administration and the controls upon them.

Module Content: Historical, political and administrative background. Structures of public administration and systems of accountability and control including: Central Government (the executive); the Civil Service; Local Government: Tribunals and Inquiries; the ombudsman; Freedom of information.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structures and functions of the principal organs of public administration;
?Analyse whether the organisations of public administration effectively meet their objectives;
?Appreciate the principles underlying accountability of public administration;
?Evaluate and critique the operation of systems of control and accountability over public administration.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500-word essay/case study - 40 marks; 1 x 2,000-word essay/case study - 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of continuous assessment are carried forward. Students failing an essay(s), (which includes failure to submit) must submit another essay on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2264 Administrative Law: Grounds of Judicial Review

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a critical understanding of the principles of administrative law, with a particular focus on judicial review.

Module Content: Judicial review background; Excess of jurisdiction; Errors of law and fact; Rules of Constitutional (Natural) Justice; Limitations upon discretionary powers; Legitimate expectations; Remedies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Comprehend the principles underlying judicial review of administrative action
?Analyse and critically appraise the current law relating to judicial control of administrative decision-making, including jurisdiction, constitutional justice and control of discretionary power
?Apply the law relating to grounds of judicial review to complex factual scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2267 Social Inclusion and the Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Claire Murray, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To explore the law and policy considerations aimed at improving the social inclusion of traditionally vulnerable groups in Irish society.

Module Content: Topics covered include: introduction to civil mental health law and policy; the law on supported decision-making; disability law and policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key provisions in Irish mental health law and disability law;
?Apply these principles to hypothetical fact situations, referring where appropriate to relevant case law and legislative provisions;
?Evaluate and critique current legal rules and structures through a variety of critical theoretical frameworks;
?Show an understanding, knowledge and critical analysis of public policy debates and strategic objectives relevant to these areas of law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay (80 marks); class participation (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Class Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail to attain 40% overall in the module will be required to submit an alternative assessment on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW2275 Family Law: Child Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To explore the key features and characteristics of Irish child law from a national and international perspective.

Module Content: Child Law in Ireland, as a vital component of the general area of Family Law, is one which has received increased attention and recognition from both a political and legal perspective in recent years. This module will examine, with a view to reform, Ireland's international legal commitments with regard to children which are set out under the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child 1989. The laws and policies, which currently exist in Ireland to protect children and children's rights, will be examined in detail in areas such as Child Participation and Representation in Family Law Proceedings, Guardianship, Custody and Access, Adoption Law and Practice, Child Protection and the Child Care Act 1991, Vetting and Soft Information, Mandatory Reporting, and Parental Child Abduction. Other areas, which will be examined from a family law perspective, include Bullying and Cyber-Bullying, Domestic Violence and Mediation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain and discuss, with a view to reform, the relevant child law provisions of the Irish Constitution, legislation and case law;
?Evaluate the policy and legal framework pertaining to child law in Ireland;
?Critically analyse the extent to which current child and family law in Ireland meets international legal standards;
?Identify the extent to which Ireland compares with other common law jurisdictions such as New Zealand and Australia concerning children's rights and child protection;
?Consider the need to reform of child and family law in order to adapt to changing societal beliefs and attitudes;
?Apply relevant child law to specific factual scenarios;
?Engage with judicial and academic debate on points of family.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW2276 Family Law: Family Relationships

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To critically examine the legislative and judicial regulation of family relationships under Irish Law.

Module Content: The core focus of this module is the regulation of family relationships under Irish law and it includes a critical examination of both traditional and non-traditional family formations. This includes an examination of the definition of the family and an exploration of the protections available to the different family forms, including the rights of the individual family members. Relationship breakdown will be examined with a particular emphasis upon the legal remedies of Nullity, Judicial Separation and Divorce. The regulation of the ancillary relief associated with marital breakdown is also critically considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the sources of law relevant to particular aspects of family life;
?Interpret the provisions of the Irish Constitution, legislation and case law relevant to family issues;
?Critically analyse the different regulatory protections and obligations rising from different family formations;
?Apply relevant family law to specific factual scenarios;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between law and policy;
?Evaluate the need for reform in family law in order to meet changing trends in society;
?Engage with judicial and academic debate on points of family law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3222 Transferable Skills - Law - Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (After Third University Examination - April to September. The placement research report is to be submitted before the end of September. See Placement Handbook for exact date.).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL Certification

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in business and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring Examination, students will go on placement from April to September. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in the external organisation. Students will be expected to keep learning logs at agreed intervals. See Placement Handbook for information on devising and submitting logs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the business, its organisational culture and purpose.
?Critique the practice of communication in an organisational context.
?Demonstrate ability to function independently and in a workplace team.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of the programme of study to the workplace.
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement.

Assessment: Placement Report to be submitted before the end of September which will be assessed on an Honours/Pass/Fail Basis (see Placement Handbook for exact date).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at work placement advisory sessions; participation at work placement in industry; submission of both placement report and learning logs.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Autumn Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

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LW3223 Transferable Skills - Law - Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. ( After Third University Examination - April to September. The research project is to be submitted before end of September. See Research Project Handbook for exact date.).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL certification

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 6month(s) Other (Research Project).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in business and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring Examination, students will start their research project, commencing April, for 6 months. The industry-based research project will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in the external organisation. The UCC-based research project will be monitored by a UCC academic mentor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the research culture.
?Demonstrate the process of research and enquiry.
?Prepare and present a research report.
?Demonstrate iniative and/or leadership skills whilst working alone and/or in teams.
?Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of research.
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the research placement.

Assessment: Research Report to be submitted before the end of September, which will be assessed on an Honours/Pass/Fail basis (see Placement Handbook for exact date).

Compulsory Elements: Attendance at research project advisory sessions; submission and presentation of Research Report.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Autumn Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

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LW3300 Company Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): LW1108 and LW1109

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Deirdre Madden, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Deirdre Madden, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To comprehend the legal structure and functioning of the company.

Module Content: Establishing a company, corporate capacity, capital provisions, ownership, control and management, borrowing money, liquidations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the nature of limited and unlimited liability companies;
?Describe the concept of separate corporate personality;
?Outline the law relating to corporate capacity;
?Distinguish between corporate and personal rights of shareholders and the enforcement mechanisms for both;
?Identify the main duties of directors and other company officers;
?Outline the ways in which share capital is raised and protected.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3301 Employment Law: Contracts, Rights and Termination

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading); Other (Online activities).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To critically assess the legal principles governing contracts of employment, employees' rights, dismissal and redundancies.

Module Content: Express and implied terms of employment contracts; Regulation of employees' rights: wages, holidays, working time, maternity and other leaves; Termination of the contract of employment including statutory regulation of dismissal and redundancy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify legal issues in employment relationships
?Describe key statutes and common law regulating employment contracts
?Interpret statutes which apply to employment law discussed in the module
?Apply their knowledge of these areas of employment law to hypothetical scenarios
?Evaluate the fairness, effectiveness and efficiency of employment law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Students must also pass Online Activities).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination. Students must also pass Online Activities.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must also pass Online Activities. The procedures governing Online Activities are set out in detail in the course outline for this module. This requirement applies also to the Supplemental Examination.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. A pass in Online Activities is carried forward. If Online Activities are failed, they must be repeated.

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LW3302 Employment Law: Employee Protection, Equality and Industrial Relations

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To critically assess the legal principles governing employee protection, employment equality law and aspects of industrial relations law.

Module Content: Employee protection: statutory regimes concerning part-time work, fixed term work and agency contracts; Employment equality legislation and case-law, including harassment and sexual harassment; Law governing trade union activity; The legal regulation of industrial relations, industrial disputes and conflict.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe key statutes and common law regulating employee protection, equality and industrial relations
?Interpret statutes which apply to the areas of employment law discussed in this module
?Apply their knowledge of these areas of employment law to hypothetical scenarios
?Evaluate the fairness, effectiveness and efficiency of these areas of employment law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x written assignment (4,000 words); students must also pass online activities.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Students must also pass Online Activities.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must also pass Online Activities. The procedures governing Online Activities are set out in detail in the course outline for this module. This requirement also applies to the Supplemental Examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (A pass in Online Activities is carried forward. If Online Activities are failed, they must be repeated.).

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LW3303 Law of Equity: Doctrines and Remedies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Mee, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof John Mee, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To gain an understanding of the rules and principles applicable to equitable doctrines and remedies.

Module Content: An examination of the following Equitable Doctrines and Remedies (although it is possible that not all topics will be considered in any given year): Injunctions; Specific Performance; Estoppel; Undue Influence and Unconscionable Transactions; Mistake; Tracing; Rectification; Miscellaneous Equitable Doctrines and Remedies

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key principles underlying equitable doctrines and remedies in Ireland
?Evaluate and critique the curent legal rules in relation to the specific equitable doctrines and remedies covered in the module
?Apply these principles and rules to hypothetical fact situations, referring where appropriate to relevant case law and legislative provisions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3305 Law of Equity: Trusts

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To gain an understanding of the rules and principles applicable to the law of trusts.

Module Content: An examination of the following aspects of the law of trusts (although it is possible that not all topics will be considered in any given year): Nature and Classification of Trusts, Three Certainties, Formalities, Constitution of Trusts, Secret Trusts, Resulting Trusts, Trust of the Family Home, Constructive Trusts, Charitable trusts, Powers and Duties of Trustees.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key principles of the law of trusts in Ireland
?Evaluate and critique the current legal rules in relation to the specific aspects of the law of trusts covered in the module
?Apply these rules and principles to hypothetical face situations, referring where appropriate to relevant case law and legislative provisions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3307 Moot Court (Law and Business)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law; Dr Claire Murray, Department of Law; Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This is a capstone module, which is designed to develop an ability to identify and isolate legal issues in a business context, and develop practice skills, in particular, presentation of legal argument in relation to a business dispute.

Module Content: Mooting skills; presenting and defending structured legal argument in a business law context.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the legal issues arising from a hypothetical business dispute;
?Research the law relevant to these legal issues;
?Formulate legal argument based on research of business law and practice;
?Apply the law accurately and persuasively;
?Distinguish any case law which runs contrary to the argument being made;
?Present this argument articulately and clearly in an oral format;
?Advocate an interpretation of the law which is favourable to a particular side of the argument;
?Respond to questioning based on the student's presentation observing the etiquette of the courtroom and professional ethical standards.

Assessment: Oral Presentation which is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Oral Presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer Examination will be required to repeat the oral presentation.

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LW3311 Company Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): LW1108 and LW1109

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Deirdre Madden, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Deirdre Madden, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To comprehend the legal structure and functioning of the company.

Module Content: Establishing a company, corporate capacity, capital provisions, ownership, control and management, borrowing money, liquidations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the nature of limited and unlimited liability companies;
?Describe the concept of separate corporate personality;
?Outline the law relating to corporate capacity;
?Distinguish between corporate and personal rights of shareholders and the enforcement mechanisms for both;
?Identify the main duties of directors and other company officers;
?Outline the ways in which share capital is raised and protected;
?Explain the means by which companies borrow money and give security for loans;
?Define the concept of examination of companies.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3316 Financial Services: Law and Regulation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the legal framework and the relevant policy issues relating to the regulation of the financial services industry in Ireland and internationally.

Module Content: An examination of the legal and regulatory framework in respect of the banking, insurance and investment industries at an Irish, European and international level, including consumer protection regulation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate the legal context within which the Irish, European and international financial services industry operates
?Identify the mechanisms for the regulation of financial services in Ireland, Europe and internationally
?Evaluate the role of regulation in the effective operation of the financial services industry
?Interpret and apply statutory provision in the context of regulation of a range of financial services, including banking, investment and insurance
?Identify the key areas of debate, from a legal perspective, in respect of the regulation of financial services
?Form a view on the relevance and adequacy of law in advancing these debates
?Assess the policies underlying the development of the law
?Place the law relating to financial services in a broader social, economic and political context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (One 3,000-word essay: 80 marks; class participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing essay(s) (which includes failing to submit) must submit another essay(s) on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination not later than the 3rd Friday in August as prescribed by the School of Law.).

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LW3317 Banking Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide the student with an in-depth understanding of banking law, policy and practice.

Module Content: An examination of the bank/customer relationship: banking operations, including accounts and payments and analysis of selected legal aspects of credit and security.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the core legal principles employed in the context of banking law;
?Interpret statutory provisions and apply case law in the banking law context;
?Analyse key legal issues in respect of the banker/customer relationship, banking operations and credit provision;
?Utilise legal skills to address fact-based problem scenarios in respect of banking law;
?Identify the key areas of policy concern, from a legal perspective, in respect of banking law;
?Evaluate the adequacy of law in advancing policy debates in banking law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3345 Company Law: Fundamental Concepts and Doctrines

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Irene Lynch Fannon, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Irene Lynch Fannon, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To give an understanding of the fundamental principles and concepts of Company Law including the theory of risk externalisation, limited liability, the doctrine of separate corporate personality, corporate capacity and the new approach under the proposed Companies Act. This will include a consideration of shareholders, their rights and expectations, and directors, their powers and duties.

Module Content: Introduction to Company Law. The creation of the limited liability company and the four fundamental principles of company law: limited liability, separate personality, transferability of ownership and delegated management. Corporate Personality. Corporate Capacity. The Constitution of the Company, Shareholders, shareholders' agreements, shareholders' meetings. Directors. Powers and Duties. Directors' Duties in Equity and the Common Law. Enforcement of Directors' Duties and Remedies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the concepts underlying the limited liability company;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the doctrines of corporate personality and the problem of corporate capacity;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the company's constitution and how powers are divided and delegated between shareholders and directors;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the role of shareholders as investors in the company;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the role of directors, their powers and duties;
?Extract the principles of Company Law relating to the topics covered in this module from the relevant legislation and case law;
?Apply the principles of Company Law relating to the topics covered in this module to given factual scenarios;
?Evaluate critically the development over time of the principles of Company Law relating to the topics covered in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3346 Company Law: Management, Finance and Insolvency

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW3345 Company Law: Fundamental Concepts and Doctrines

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Irene Lynch Fannon, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Irene Lynch Fannon, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To give an understanding of the laws relating to corporate finance, capital maintenance and the enforcement of the obligations of the company and its management to equity and debt investors through the life of the company and on insolvency. To evaluate critically the development of these principles over time.

Module Content: Shareholders as equity investors and residual claimants. Classes of shares. The payment of dividends, the shareholder as residual claimant. Capital maintenance rules, theory and reality. Convertible shares and other debt-equity hybrids. Debt and creditors. Secured and unsecured creditors. Involuntary and preferential creditors. The theory underlying the creation of company charges. Enforcement and payment of claims in insolvency. Corporate restructuring through reinvestment. Liability of directors and management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of equity and debt financing of limited liability companies;
?Demonstrate an understanding of insolvency processes and restructuring;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the principles regarding director and management liability;
?Extract the principles of Company Law and Corporate Insolvency Law relating to the topics covered in this module from the relevant legislation and case law;
?Apply the principles of Company Law and Corporate Insolvency Law relating to the topics covered in this module to given factual scenarios;
?Identify and critically evaluate the policy factors underlying the development of the principles governing the topics covered in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3347 Contemporary Issues in Corporate Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW3345 Company Law: Fundamental Concepts and Doctrines or equivalent basis undergraduate Company Law module.

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Irene Lynch Fannon, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Irene Lynch Fannon, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To give an understanding of the opportunities and problems presented by fundamenal doctrines of corporate law in a modern context, including the theory and principles affecting difficulties relating to liability in a global context for issues such as tax avoidance, human rights abuses and environmental degradation; to give an understanding of the theory of corporate liability in both civil and criminal law; to provide an understanding of the basic principles of corporate governance regarding shareholders, management and other stakeholders including the distinction between public and private enforcement mechanisms in company law. To provide material and skills to critically consider the development of company law.

Module Content: Challenges presented by fundamental doctrines of corporate law in imposing liability for corporate actions, including some examples such as tax avoidance, international environmental catastrophes, and human rights.The corporation as a public or private actor.
The liability of the corporation as a 'risk externalising machine'. The liability of management and the difference between public and private enforcement. The role of shareholders, management and other stakeholders. Criminal and civil liability of the corporation and its management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of Company Law and Corporate Law Theory relating to corporate liability in a comparative, modern context;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of Company Law and Corporate Law Theory in a comparative context as these relate to directorial and management liability; to shareholders and other stakeholders;
?Identify the policy factors underlying the development of the principles governing the topics covered in this module;
?Apply the law relating to the topics covered in this module to given factual scenarios;
?Evaluate critically, in a comparative context, the development over time of the principles of the law relating to the topics covered in this module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3357 English Land Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): LW2252 Law of Property

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To give an understanding of the rules and principles of English land law. The module is designed to meet the requirements of the English Law Society and should be taken by students intending to qualify as solicitors in England and Wales.

Module Content: Lectures will focus on a consideration of the fundamental features of English land and conveyancing law and on the similarities and differences between English and Irish law in this area.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate a knowledge of the rules and principles of English law governing ownership, use and transfer of real property
?Apply these rules and principles to hypothetical fact situations, referring where appropriate to the relevant case law and legislative provisions
?Evaluate and critique the current legal rules and principles in relation to the specific aspects of English land law covered in the module
?Show an understanding of the key differences between Irish and English systems of land law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3360 Moot Court

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 48 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop an ability to identify and isolate legal issues and develop legal practice skills, in particular, presentation of legal argument.

Module Content: Mooting skills; presenting and defending structured legal argument.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the legal issues arising from a hypothetical set of facts;
?Research the law relevant to these legal issues;
?Formulate legal argument based on this research;
?Apply the law accurately and persuasively;
?Distinguish any case law which runs contrary to the argument being made;
?Present this argument articulately and clearly in an oral format;
?Advocate an interpretation of the law which is favourable to a particular side of the argument;
?Respond to questioning by judges based on the student's presentation observing the etiquette of the courtroom and professional ethical standards.

Assessment: Oral Presentation which is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Oral Presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer Examination will be required to repeat the oral presentation.

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LW3361 Essay

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Self-directed Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To enable students to learn from the experience of researching and writing a substantial work on a legal topic.

Module Content: Students will draw upon the full resources of the Law Library in order to research independently an essay on an approved topic. The work must then be marshalled, written and presented, according to the standard legal conventions, regarding organisation and terminology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a research question
?Outline the way in which to answer the question
?Demonstrate good general knowledge of the chosen field
?Present arguments in a lucid, scholarly manner
?Organise information in a presentable, synthesised manner
?Generalise about the justice system from primary source legal materials.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 8,000 word essay, excluding reasonable footnotes, two copies to be submitted on a date to be specified by the School of Law at the beginning of Semester 1).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer must submit, not later than the 1st Friday in August, an essay topic originally agreed with the Department. A student may only change his or her essay topic with the permission of the Head of Department. Students should contact the School if in doubt as to which essay topic was originally agreed with the School.

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LW3363 Placement II Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (12 weeks).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To gain experience of legal aspects of the work associated with the Placement.

Module Content: Work-experience Placement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?State principles of confidentiality which apply in the legal workplace;
?Select a significant substantive legal issue which arises in their placement and is worthy of critical analysis;
?Compare legal analysis in textbooks and journals with the reality of legal practice;
?Write a research project on a topic related to their legal placement.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay on an aspect of the legal work associated with the placement, as agreed between student and academic supervisor).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. (1 x 2,500 word essay).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail the assessment or do not submit the assessment must submit an alternative assessment as specified by the School of Law.

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LW3365 Tionscnamh Taithi Oibre (Dli) I

Creidiúintí: 5

Seimeastar(í): Seimeastar 1 agus 2and Seimeastar 3.

Tréimhse Teagaisc: Seimeastar 1 agus 2and Seimeastar 3.

Líon na Mac Léinn:

Réamhriachtanas: Ní hann do

Comhriachtanas: Ní hann do

Modhanna Múinte: Treimhsi Taithi Oibre (12 seachtain).

Eagraí an Mhodúil: Dr Sean O Conaill, Roinn Na Dli.

Léachtóirí: Dr Sean O Conaill, Roinn Na Dli.

Aidhm an Mhodúil: Taithi a fhail ar obair dli an Ionaid Oibre

Ábhar an Mhodúil: Treimhse Taithi Oibre

Torthaí Foghlama: Nuair a bheidh an modul seo deanta ag na mic leinn beidh:
?Cur sios a dheanamh ar fheidhmiu agus struchtuir an ionaid oibre
?Leiriu a dheanamh ar scileanna taighde gur foghlaimiodh i rith ne treimhse taithi oibre
?Tuairisciu agus comhthathu a dheanamh ar na priomh dlithe gur bhain leis an dtreimhse thaithi oibre acu
?Tionscnamh taighde a scriobh ar abhar a bhaineann leis an ionad oibre dlithiuil, anailis leirmheastach as an dli san aireamh.

Marcáil: Marc ar fad 100: An obair a dheanfai i gcaitheamh na bliana 100 marc (1 x aiste 2,500 focal, as Gaeilge, ar ghne den obair dlithiuil gur bhain leis an ionad oibre, le haontu idir an mac leinn agus an feitheoir acadula.).

Eilimintí Riachtanacha: An obair a dheanfai i gcaitheamh na bliana. An aiste (2,500 focal, as Gaeilge) a thabhairt isteach roimh dheireadh na seachtaine staideir i dTreimhse Teagaisc II.

An obair a dhéanfaí i gcaitheamh na bliana á chur isteach go déanach: Naid (0) an marc a bhronnfar ar aon cheacht / aiste / tionscnamh a bheidh deanach (no neachtar acu tabharfar teip don mac / inion leinn sa mhodul mas modul 'Pas/Teipe' ata i gceist).

Marc an phais, agus riachtanais ar leithligh chun pas a bhaint amach sa mhodúl: 40%.

Scrúdú Scríofa Foirmiúil: Gan Scrudu Scriofa Foirmiuil.

Riachtanais um Scrúdú Breise: 1 x paipear 1.5 (h)uair(e) an chloig (Ni mhor do Mhic leinn a theipeann sa Scrudu Samhradh aiste a choiriu aris faoi mar a shocroidh Scoil an Dli.) le deanamh san Fomhar 2018.

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LW3366 Advanced Legal Reasoning

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a thorough and applied knowledge of the central themes, concepts and controversies that underpin legal reasoning and judicial decision-making.

Module Content: Judicial fallibility and judicial infallibility theses; approaches to and conceptions of legal reasoning; Judicial reasoning in the common law tradition of decision making; the arguable character of law in relationship with the rule of law; theories of interpretation, precedent and consequentialism; the use of proportionality, margin of appreciation and consensus; universal rules and 'hard cases'.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate critical awareness of various theoretical concepts used in legal reasoning.
?Assess, with theoretical awareness, the value of the tools of legal reasoning in judicial decision-making.
?Critically appraise the reasoning process that is utilised in specific judicial decisions
?Based on awareness of theoretical approaches to practical reasoning, formulate a rigorous, critical response to the reasoning process in a particular legal decision.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,500 word assignment: 70 marks, Participation: 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. (Written Assignment and In-Class Participation).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward. Students failing an assignment (which includes failure to submit) must submit another assignment on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW3367 Jurisprudence

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to questions about legal validity and the normativity of law and to critically examine the answers provided by various jurisprudential schools of thought.

Module Content: The Meaning of Justice; Natural Law; Positivism; Law and Rights; Dworkin's Legal Theory; Sceptical and Critical Approaches (e.g. Legal Realism and Critical Legal Studies).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline and trace developments in the intellectual history of general jurisprudence;
?Outline the major theories of justice;
?Analyse and evaluate the major theories about legal validity, law's normativity and interpretation;
?Identify the major critical and sceptical approaches to jurisprudence.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3368 Principles of Revenue Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of theoretical, legal and practical principles underlying the system of revenue imposition in Ireland.

Module Content: Theoretical basis of Taxation, Sources of Revenue Law, Constitutional and EU Implications on Taxation, the Tax System.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of legal theories of taxation and of their importance as foundations of a tax system;
?Determine the sources of Revenue Law and the relevant tools of statutory interpretation;
?Assess tax legislation in the light of constitutional rights and principles;
?Assess tax legislation in the light of EU law;
?Outline the functioning of the tax system in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Course/Project Work).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Course/Project Work 50 marks.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing course/project work (which includes failing to submit) must submit another course/project work on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, not later than the 1st Friday in August, as prescribed by the School of Law.).

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LW3369 Income Tax Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide a basis for understanding the legal principles behind the imposition and collection of tax in Ireland.

Module Content: The schedules of Income Tax; the administration of Income Tax; principles of tax planning; taxation of the family.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the principles of Income Tax in Ireland;
?Determine the correct understanding of the schedular principles of income tax;
?Identify factual situations as basis for the application of the relevant tax legislation;
?Formulate correct principles of tax planning.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Course/Project Work).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing course/project work (which includes failing to submit) must submit another course/project work on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, not later that the 1st Friday in August, as prescribed by the School of Law.).

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LW3370 Sports Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law; Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a critical understanding of the principles of all areas of Sports Law and how different areas of law react within the sphere of sport.

Module Content: Legality of Boxing and Other Fighting Sports; Sports and Children; Animals in Sport; Drug and Gender testing Sports; Gun Sports and Angling; International Court for Arbitration in Sport; Commercial Law and Sport; Free Movement of Workers and Sport; Governance of Sport and Sports Federations; State Regulation and Sports before the Courts; Football Hooligans and Criminology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically engage with how domestic and international law applies to selected areas of sport;
?Identify and critically discuss legal problems in the sports law context;
?Critically evaluate the law in this field on pragmatic, moral and/or other grounds;
?Identify areas where the law may be in need of reform in this field.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3371 Sources and Foundations of Environmental Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To impart a critical understanding of the principal sources of environmental rules and of their practical application in regulating harmful activities, remediating damage and resolving environmental disputes; to introduce key frameworks for environmental protection established under national, EU and international law and to outline the interaction between environmental rules at each level; and to reflect on the policy context shaping the formation and application of environmental rules.

Module Content: - The Constitution and Environmental Law: the Right to Property;
- The Resolution of Environmental Disputes under the Common Law: Toxic Torts, GMOs and
Historical Contamination;
- Environmental Licensing as a Regulatory Approach: Waste Management Act 1996;
- Civil Liability / Injunctive Relief under Statutory Frameworks: Waste Management Act 1996;
- History and Development of EU Environmental Law: EU Competence and Principles -
Environmental Integration;
- Limits to Environmental Decision-Making under EU Law: Proportionality and Environmental
Law;
- Nature Conservation Law: Challenges in Interpreting and Applying the 1992 Habitats Directive;
- Environmental Protection under International Law: Changing Patterns of International Law-
Making;
- Rights-Based Approaches to Environmental Protection: Human Right to Water and Sanitation;
- Bringing it all Together: Environmental Law as 'Global Administrative Law'
- The Constitution and Environmental Law: the Right to Property;

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the relevant rules and principles of environmental law applicable to given factual scenarios;
?Advise actors on the basis of the application of relevant rules and principles of environmental law;
?Critically assess the effective implementation of established rules of environmental law;
?Identify and analyse the policy context shaping the development of environmental law at the national, EU and international levels;
?Explain, where appropriate, the normative interaction between interrelated rules of national, EU and international environmental law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3372 Environmental Law: Contemporary Issues in Governance, Regulation and Enforcement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aine Ryall, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aine Ryall, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the principles of Environmental Law relating to the topics covered in this module; to examine the policy underlying these principles; and to evaluate critically the development of these principles over time.

Module Content: Modern Approaches to Environmental Governance & Regulation; Impact of International and European Union Law on National Environmental Law & Policy; Environmental Protection Agency: Challenges & Opportunities; Energy and Climate Law and Policy: An Irish Perspective; Enforcing Pollution Control Measures; Access to Environmental Information: Law and Practice; Planning Law & Environmental Protection: Environmental Assessment; Environmental Judicial Review.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Extract the principles relating to the topics covered in this module from the relevant legislation and case law;
?Identify the policy factors underlying the development of the principles governing the topics covered in this module;
?Apply the principles relating to the topics covered in this module to given factual scenarios;
?Explore the interaction between international, European Union and national environmental law;
?Evaluate critically the development of environmental law over time;
?Apply the basic principles of environmental law in practice;
?Assess the implementation of environmental law in practice;
?Assess the effectiveness of environmental law enforcement in practice;
?Contribute effectively to discussion concerning the role and effectiveness of modern environmental regulation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the School of Law).

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LW3373 Sports Law Clinic

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): LW3370 Sports Law

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 9 x 2hr(s) Workshops (and directed research); Other (self-directed study and reflection, recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law; Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To expose students to the operation of Sports Law in practice. This will involve students actively engaging with sports-related cases which will include questions concerning legal issues and governance. The Clinic will also engage in research-related activities on a regular basis which will include compiling amicus briefs for clients as well as delivering information sessions to club sports organisations and their volunteers.

Module Content: This module is essentially Sports Law in action. It is based on an active learning model and will provide students with a unique opportunity to work on sport-related cases as well as policy activities which will enhance their knowledge of Sports Law in practice. Students will develop specialised skills of sports-related legal issues such as doping, governance, and disciplinary proceedings in a wide range of sports including rugby, athletics, soccer, GAA and boxing. In particular, this module will address legal standards and professional ethics and will help raise awareness about minimum standards of regulation in the sports field. Students will work on actual cases and policy initiatives, and will benefit from guest seminars from a range of perspectives and disciplines.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the legal issues in Sports Law cases and present binding and persuasive legal authority on these issues;
?Conduct research for practical application in areas of Sports Law;
?Communicate results of Sports Law research effectively in writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Learning Journal/Reflective Log 50 marks; 1 x 2,000 word essay 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Minimum 80% attendance at seminars and workshops.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must have a minimum 80% attendance at seminars and workshops. The procedures governing the application of this rquirement are set out in detail in the course outline for this module. This requirement applies also to the Supplemental Examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Submit suitable alternative assessment/s as specified by the School. For students who have not satisfied the requirement of a minimum 80% attendance at seminars and workshops, this module must be repeated in a repeat year.

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LW3375 Law Review Clinic

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 12 (Students will be admitted based on application form and if necessary interview).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 110hr(s) Other (reviewing submissions and editing articles, recommended reading and reflection, independent research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To engage students in the process of journal editing, by facilitating their involvement in the process of review and selection of submissions as well as the process of editing and proofing selected articles.

Module Content: After an overview of the review process, the editing process, and the variation in house styles, students will be facilitated in taking responsibility for:
? Reviewing submissions prior to the external double-blind peer review process;
? Reading and reflecting in the clinic setting on the importance of structure, argument, defeasibility;
? Suggesting changes that would improve the quality of the arguments presented in the submission;
? Editing and proof-reading articles that have been selected for publication;
? Otherwise assisting with the administration of the journal (updating the website, seeking submissions, etc.)

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the strengths and weaknesses of a submission;
?Implement the changes necessary to bring a submission into line with house style;
?Analyse what changes would be necessary to raise a submission to publication standard;
?Reflect on the qualities of argumentation and structure necessary to present a defeasible position as a matter of law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Learning Journal/Reflective Log 50 marks; Portfolio 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance at seminars and workshops.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In respect of both the learning journal and portfolio, students must have a minimum 80% attendance at seminars and workshops. The procedures governing the application of this requirement are set out in detail in the course outline for this module. This requirement applies also to the Supplemental Examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Submit suitable alternative assessment/s as specified by the School of Law.

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LW3401 Legal Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Julie O'Leary, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to law and its relevance to social work.

Module Content: This module is designed to examine the legal framework within which social workers operate and to concentrate on those areas of the law which will most frequently be encountered in social work practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the general sources of law in Ireland (Constitutional, Legislative, common law and International Law) and identify statutes relevant to social work law.
?Explain the hierarchical structure of the courts in Ireland and the progression of court proceedings under specific statutes relevant to social work law in the court structure.
?Explain, compare and differentiate natural law and positive law and their impact on the family in Ireland.
?Critically analyse the tension between the authority of the constitutional family and the role of the social worker.
?Describe the impact of the Irish Constitution on the development of law relating to social work.
?Assess the effectiveness of the law in combating violence in the family setting.
?Evaluate the role of the social worker in the legal regime regulating mental health in Ireland.
?Examine and evaluate the legal regime regulating the protection of children.
?Critically assess the role of the social worker and its limitations in court/legal proceedings.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word project).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. To meet professional requirements, attendance at lectures and tutorials will be monitored by a class register. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students failing project (which includes failing to submit) must submit another project on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, not later than the 1st Friday in August, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW3404 Medical Law and Ethics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Deirdre Madden, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Deirdre Madden, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To examine a range of legal issues relating to medical law and ethics.

Module Content: Topics to be covered include an introduction to principles of healthcare law and ethics; autonomy and informed consent; the scope of the right to refuse treatment; healthcare decisions for children and young people; healthcare decision-making for adults with limited decision-making abilities; ethical and legal issues at the beginning of life, including assisted reproduction; ethical and legal decisions about the end of life.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the core legal and ethical principles employed in medical law and ethics;
?Interpret statutory provisions and apply case law to issues relating to medical law and ethics;
?Identify the key areas of debate, from a legal perspective, in respect of the areas of law studied;
?Form a view on the relevance and adequacy of law in advancing these debates;
?Assess the policies underlying the development of the law;
?Place the issues arising in a broader ethical and social context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3405 Medical Law: Regulation of Healthcare

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Deirdre Madden, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Deirdre Madden, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To examine a range of legal issues relating to the regulation of healthcare in Ireland.

Module Content: Topics to be covered include the State's role in the provision of healthcare services in Ireland; legal and constitutional rights to healthcare; regulation of medical professional practice; protection of personal health information; influence of EU health law and policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Examine the core legal principles employed;
?Interpret statutory provisions and apply case law in the context of issues relating to medical law;
?Identify the key areas of debate, from a legal perspective, in respect of the areas of law studied;
?Form a view on the relevance and adequacy of law in advancing these debates;
?Assess the policies underlying the development of the law;
?Place the issues arising in medical law in a broader ethical, social, economic and political context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW3407 Placement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 3. (After Third University Examination, from June to August - for four weeks minimum. The Learning Journal is to be submitted before the end of September.).

No. of Students: Min 0, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 4weeks(s) Placements (Clinical placement with appropriate legal or business organisation. One mentoring visit per placement.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law; Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law; Staff, Faculty of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching and learning with exposure to institutional work process in legal or business organisations.

Module Content: 1 x 4 weeks minimum placement with an appropriate legal or business organisation. The work placement will be monitored by the Director of the BCL (Law and Business) and the Clinical Education Coordinator. Students will be expected to keep and submit a learning journal for examination by the Director of the BCL (Law and Business) and the Clinical Education Coordinator.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the organisation, its culture and purpose;
?Apply legal and/or business knowledge to real-life situations in the workplace;
?Apply research, writing and analytical skills in the workplace;
?Demonstrate the acquiring of the attributes of professional responsibility, including the use of independent judgement, time and project management, communications and other enduring professional skills;
?Demonstrate an ability to function independently and in a workplace team;
?Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the workplace.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Learning Journal).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LW3500 Placement I

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 12weeks(s) Placements (Clinical placement with an appropriate legal body or organisation. One mentoring site visit per placement.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in legal services and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Students will undertake a 12 week work placement with an appropriate legal body or organisation during their third academic year. The work placement will be monitored by the Clinical Education Coordinator, Department of Law. Students will be expected to keep and submit a learning journal for examination by the Clinical Education Coordinator.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply legal knowledge to real-life situations in the workplace;
?Apply research, writing and analytical skills in the workplace;
?Demonstrate the acquiring of the attributes of professional responsibility, including the use of independent judgment, time and project management, communication and other enduring professional skills;
?Evaluate the role of the legal profession in light of the clinical placement.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Learning Journal).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Submission of Learning Journal to be submitted by the end of the study/review week - Semester 2.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer Examination may submit an alternative assessment as specified by the School of Law.

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LW3501 Placement II

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 12weeks(s) Placements (Clinical placement with an appropriate legal body or organisation. One mentoring site visit per placement.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in legal services and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Students will undertake a 12 week work placement with an appropriate legal body or organisation during their third academic year. The work placement will be monitored by the Clinical Education Coordinator, Department of Law. Students will be expected to keep and submit a learning journal for examination by the Clinical Education Coordinator.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply legal knowledge to real-life situations in the workplace;
?Apply research, writing and analytical skills in the workplace;
?Demonstrate the acquiring of the attributes of professional responsibility, including the use of independent judgement, time and project management, communication and other enduring professional skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Learning Journal).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Learning Journal to be submitted by the end of the study/review week - Semester 2.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer Examination may submit an alternative assessment as specified by the School of Law.

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LW3502 Placement Research Project 1

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 12weeks(s) Placements (Clinical placement with an appropriate legal body or organisation. One mentoring site visit per placement.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in legal services and other relevant organisations

Module Content: 1 x 4,000 words research project on an aspect of the legal work associated with the student's clinical placement as agreed between the student and the Clinical Education Co-ordinator

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Research legal materials at an advanced level;
?Apply legal knowledge and experience from the clinical placement to a theoretical issue;
?Demonstrate the use of advanced legal writing and analytical skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 X 4,000 word research project).

Compulsory Elements: 1 x 4,000 word research project to be submitted by the end of the study/review week - Semester 2.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer Examination may submit an alternative assessment as specified by the School of Law.

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LW3503 Placement Research Project 2

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 12weeks(s) Placements (Clinical placement with an appropriate legal body or organisation. One mentoring site visit per placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in legal services and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: 1 x 4,000 word research project on an aspect of the legal work associated with the clinical placement as agreed between the student and the Clinical Education Co-ordinator

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Research legal materials at an advanced level;
?Apply legal knowledge and experience from the clinical placment to a theoretical issue;
?Demonstrate the use of advanced legal writing and analytical skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word research project).

Compulsory Elements: 1 x 4,000 word research project to be submitted by the end of the study/review week - Semester 2.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer Examination may submit an alternative assessment as specified by the School of Law.

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LW3504 Placement Presentation 1

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 12weeks(s) Placements (Clinical placement with an appropriate legal body or organisation. One mentoring site visit per placement.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Sean O Conaill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in legal services and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: 1 x 15 minute oral presentation on the student's experience of his/her work placement and research project and the learning outcomes achieved thereby.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Communicate the experience of the clinical placement effectively;
?Give concrete examples of how the development of enduring professional skills has been realised e.g. time management, independent judgement etc.
?Demonstrate some of the learning outcomes achieved through successful completion of the clinical placment and the research project relating to the first placement.

Assessment: 1 x 15 minute oral presentation which is assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Oral presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer Examination will be required to repeat the oral presentation.

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LW3505 Placement Presentation 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 12weeks(s) Placements (Clinical placement with an appropriate legal body or organisation. One mentoring site visit per placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Dorothy Appelbe, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in legal services and other relevant organisations

Module Content: 1 x 15 minute oral presentation on the student's experience of his/her work placement and research project and the learning outcomes achieved thereby.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Communicate the experience of the clinical placement effectively;
?Give concrete examples of how the development of enduring professional skills has been realised e.g. time management, independent judgement etc.
?Demonstrate some of the learning outcomes acheived through the successful completion of the clinical placement and the research project relating to the second placement.

Assessment: 1 x 15 minute oral presentation which is assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Oral presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail at the Summer Examination will be required to repeat the oral presentation.

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LW4102 Juvenile Justice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to explore legal and other issues relating to children in conflict with the law.

Module Content: The module draws on a variety of legal sources in order to consider issues of youth justice and detention in Irish law, the law of other jurisdictions and in international law. Issues covered include the nature of youth crime and characteristics of young offenders, the Children Act 2001 as amended, the rights of young offenders, diversion and restorative justice, children in court, serious crime, the role of the media, noncustodial sanctions for children and the rights of children in custody.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of youth justice theories, identiying current research and trends;
?Identify international standards on youth justice including the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Beijing Rules;
?Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Irish legal framework for youth justice, including the Children Act 2001 as amended;
?Outline the core values and principles underlying youth justice in areas of diversion, restorative justice, court process, sentencing and concepts of 'welfare' and 'justice', criminal responsibility and custody.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 200 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW4103 International Criminal Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of key concepts and debates in international criminal justice.

Module Content: This course introduces students to the rapidly expanding area of international criminal law. The course examines the historical development of international criminal law, with a key focus on the establishment and work of the International Criminal Court. The basic principles of international criminal law will be covered as will the conceptual and practical difficulties that arise in international criminal justice. The course will also address the possibility of alternative responses to international crimes, such as amnesties and truth and reconciliation commissions. Topics to be covered include: The Nuremburg tribunal; the principle of individual criminal responsibility; the Ad-Hoc and Hybrid Tribunals (Yugoslavia; Rwanda; Sierra Leone; Timor-Leste); Universal Jurisdiction; Truth and Reconciliation Commissions; Selected Topcs (such as Child Soldiers; Genocide; Crimes of Sexual Violence; Transnational armed groups).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and analyse key concepts in international criminal law;
?Describe and analyse key institutions in international criminal justice;
?Analyse the historical evolution of international criminal justice institutions and international criminal law.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 200 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the Department.).

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LW4106 Refugee Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of key concepts of international, European and domestic refugee law from a human rights perspective.

Module Content: This course examines current issues in refugee law in an international and comparative perspective. The course combines an analysis of International, European and domestic law. It also builds on existing links between the Faculty of Law and refugee law agencies in Ireland. Topics to be covered include:
- The historical evolution of international refugee law
- European Asylum Law
- Problems of Definition and Qualification: Emerging case law
- The asylum process and determination procedures
- Current issues in refugee law and practice (for example, sexual orientation and gender dentity; climate change; exclusion clauses and counter-terrorism)
- Non-refoulement: risk, securitization and criminalisation

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline and analyse key concepts in asylum law in Ireland and the EU;
?Outline and analyse key concepts in international refugee law;
?Apply key concepts of refugee law to problem scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW4107 Migration Law and Human Rights

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of key concepts of international, European and domestic immigration law from a human rights perspective.

Module Content: This course examines current issues in immigration law with a particular focus on EU law developments. The course combines an analysis of International, European and domestic law. It also builds on existing links between the Faculty of Law and immigration law agencies in Ireland. Topics to be covered may include:

- The EU and Immigration Law / Freedom of Movement and evolving concepts
- Migration and Family Life - Rights to Family Reunification
- Migrant Workers and Human Rights
- Irregular Migration: Human Trafficking and Smuggling
- Citizenship and Nationality.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in EU immigration law;
?Apply key concepts of European human rights law to immigration problem scenarios;
?Critically evaluate and discuss immigration and citizenship laws and processes.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW4401 Legal Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Eamonn Carroll, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to criminal, welfare and labour law as it relates to social work practice

Module Content: This module is designed to examine criminal, welfare and labour law that is most frequently encountered in social work practice

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?identify the law relevant to a factual scenario arising in the context of professional social work practice
?apply the relevant law to the given facts in order to arrive at a resolution or course of action;
?identify potential criminal liability in the course of social work practice;
?outline the legal duties owed by the social worker in terms of practice under both the civil and criminal law;
?formulate a course of action consistent with the relevant legal principles when working with vulnerable clientele (i.e. those legally incapable, subjected to domestic violence, etc.)
?evaluate the legal provisions and protections made in relation to the broad-base of social work clientele (i.e. clients with disabilities, seeking asylum, children in conflict with the law, etc.0
?assess the nature of duties owed to and by the social worker in terms of their relationship with their employer.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word project).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. To meet professional requirements, attendance at lectures and tutorials will be monitored by a class register. Students must achieve a minimum of 80% attendance in order to pass this module.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students failing project (which includes failing to submit) must submit another project on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, not later than the 1st Friday in August, as prescribed by the School of Law.

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LW6003 Social Work and the Law (The Rights of Vulnerable Persons)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aisling Parkes, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Joanna Ralston, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This module identifies the vulnerable persons in society who need the care and support of the social work profession. In particular, the extent to which the law protects the rights of these people in society will be explored.

Module Content: Sources of Human Rights under national, European and international law. Vulnerable Adults - Disability and the law including equality law as well as the right to autonomy and the right to die, the rights of older people, aspects of mental health and mental capacity law, the travelling community and immigration, refugees, asylum seekers and child trafficking; Vulnerable children - including children in conflict with the law and the rights of children of incarcertated parents.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key human rights principles, as they pertain to vulnerable persons, their sources and law relevant for social workers;
?Outline the requirements of the main legislation governing areas of social work in key areas covered by the module;
?Discuss the role and responsibilities of social workers under those pieces of legislation where appropriate;
?Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between human rights principles, law and the role of social workers.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students must submit alternative assessments as prescribed by the School.

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LW6004 Research Methods in Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3day(s) Other (Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Conor O'Mahony, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Patrick O'Callaghan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: The module seeks to introduce students to a range of methodological approaches to the study of law and legal phenomena.

Module Content: A consideration of various research methods relevant to postgraduate research in law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline and critically analyse key legal research methodologies;
?Outline and identify relevant research methods for legal research;
?Prepare and evaluate legal research proposals;
?Employ relevant research methods and methodologies in their postgraduate research.

Assessment: Attendance/participation and a 2,500 word essay.

Compulsory Elements: Attendance and participation at seminars and 2,500 word essay.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement. This module is assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Alternative assessment as specified by the School.

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LW6005 Social Work and the Law (Child Law)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to: the Irish legal system, the Irish Courts System, sources of law, reporting for social workers

To provide an in-depth understanding of: Child Law in Ireland

To provide an opportunity for students to: develop analytical and oral communication skills

Module Content: This module will cover such topics as: Introduction to the Irish Legal System including the Irish courts and how they operate, rules of evidence in court; sources of law; the Irish Constitution and children; international law on the rights of children; guardianship, custody, access and children in family law cases; surrogacy; adoption law and practice; the Child Care Act 1991; placement and fostering of children; Guardian ad Litem; aftercare; children and domestic violence; child pornography, grooming, hard and soft information.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the essential elements of the Irish legal system, in particular the sources of law and the key features of the courts system;
?Describe and explain what happens in the hearing of child and family law cases in Ireland;
?Identify relevant rules of evidence for the hearing of child and family cases in an Irish court;
?Demonstrate understanding of the fundamental principles of child law covered in the module as they apply to social work practice;
?Apply the key principles of child law covered in the module to simple problem scenarios and draw defensible conclusions;
?Critically discuss the major areas of child law covered in the module;
?Construct a coherent, balanced written legal argument, supporting it by reference to appropriate sources;
?Employ basic legal research skills in preparing a written legal argument.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay (1 x 3,000 word essay)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students must submit alternative assessments as prescribed by the School.

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LW6006 LLM (International Family Law) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal research, writing and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentation sessions); 700hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students' capacities to undertake independent legal research in the international family law area, make a presentation on the subject and advance their legal writing skills to enable them to a write a Masters level dissertation.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies, and legal writing and referencing; to identify a research topic and make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the nature of legal research in international child and family law;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology for international child and family law and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to Master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. and 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by discussion.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6007 International Perspectives of the Family

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To examine, compare and critically evaluate the varying concepts and definitions attached to the family in the regulatory legal frameworks of multiple jurisdictions and to assess the legal and policy implications for the identified approaches.

Module Content: Topics covered include the extent to which social norms and expectations influence the legal definition of the family; the internationalisation of family law and the role and impact o cross-jurisdictional treaties; the broader issue of conflicts of laws, examined in the context of key child and family law issues, including surrogacy, child abduction, adoption, non-traditional family formations and cross border recognition and enforcement of orders.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Evaluate and critique the breadth of contrasting definitions of the family in identified jurisdictions;
?Identify the varying regulatory approaches to the family unit,
?Interpret governing provisions and case law in respect of issues relating to the family and its autonomous capacity for decision making;
?Identify the key areas of debate, from a legal perspective, in respect of international family law;
?Form a view on the relevance and adequacy of law in advancing these debates;
?Assess the policies underlying the development of national and international family law principles;
?Place the issues arising in a broader ethical and social context.
?Show an understanding, knowledge and critical analysis of public policy debates and strategic objectives relevant to Irish and international family law.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 2,000-word essay, 80 marks; 1 x 3,000 essay, 120 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing essay(s) (which includes failing to submit) must submit another essay(s) on a topic set for the Autumn Supplemental Examination, not later than the 3rd Friday in August, as prescribed by the School of Law.).

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LW6008 Legal Research and Writing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Compulsory); 2 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 3 x 1hr(s) Other (Library Tour, 1 x 2hr Electronic Resources Training).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick O'Callaghan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Julie O'Leary, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with an in-depth education in legal research and writing.

Module Content: Analysis of case-law. Aspects of legal research, writing and analysis. Approach to written legal analysis of sample fictional scenarios.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the various components of a case
?Structure coherent legal arguments and/or analysis
?Evaluate case law in light of legal scholarly writing
?Describe how to analogise with and distinguish caselaw.

Assessment: One assignment (1,500 words) to be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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LW6101 Introduction to Planning Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Tutorials; 75 x 1hr(s) Other (Self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of principal elements of the planning acts and regulations

Module Content: Introducion to key legal principles and concepts; The control of development; The Development Plan; Environmental protection; Compensation; Planning Appeals and Judicial Reviews; Planning procedures; Building and other relevant legal codes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the sources of planning law
?Identify the policy factors shaping the development of planning law
?Extract the basic principles of planning law from relevant legislation and case law
?Explore the interaction between EC environmental law and national planning law
?Apply the basic pronciples of planning law to given factual scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 67 marks; Continuous Assessment 33 marks (1 x 3,000 to 4,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. All elements are compulsory. In addition, participants are required to sign an attendance register at each class of the module. If a participant's attendance falls below 80% he / she will be debarred from entering the examination for the module and will be required to repeat the module in accordance with the repeat year requirements.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

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LW6103 Legal Aspects of State Regulation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Directed Study (Recommended Reading).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To explore law and policy relating to Law and Rights in Irish Society.

Module Content: Topics covered focus on regulation issues relating to the legal structure underpinning the functions of the Welfare State, Social Welfare under the Constitution, Income Maintenance, the role of the Welfare State, Fundamental Rights under the Constitution, Immigration Law and Policy, Aspects of Employment Law and Charities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and analyse the welfare state and social welfare under the Constitution.
?Evaluate the principles underlying fundamental rights in the Constitution and their elucidation in case law.
?Assess the basis for immigration law & policy
?Evaluate the relevant legislation and case law in relation to aspects of employment law and charities.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students must submit alternative assessments as prescribed by the Department.

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LW6104 Intellectual Property Law for High-Tech Entrepreneurs

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Directed Study (Recommended reading)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Ms Carole Deschamps, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to and understanding of the intellectual property issues arising in the protection and commercialisation of research.

Module Content: The intellectual property seminars will give students an opportunity to explore in detail this rapidly developing area of law. Topics covered will provide an opportunity for students to explore issues arising for the legal protection of research and innovation with specific focus upon copyright, patents and trademark law. Students will be afforded an opportunity, by way of weekly seminars, to explore and discuss topical issues, including copyright law in the digital age, the conflict between consumer and commercial interests in affording protection and exclusive use to trademark owners and the ongoing debate as to the patentability of computer programs and biotechnological inventions. Students will have an opportunity to develop an understanding of the legal framework surrounding the protection of inventive and original work and will do so with reference to their own research and development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and consider the legal issues arising in the legal protection of innovative research and original literary works;
?Analyse the fundamental principles of copyright, trademark and patent law;
?Evaluate the manner in which intellectual property law might protect inventive works and other novel developments within the Irish and international legal systems;
?Appraise the purpose of intellectual property law protections;
?Justify and differentiate between the conflicting rights of those being protected by intellectual property law measures;
?Demonstrate an understanding of, and critically assess, the impact of international laws and developments upon Irish domestic governance of intellectual property law;
?Participate effectively in class discussion.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School.).

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LW6106 Legal Concepts for Heritage and the Environment

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Tutorials; 75 x 1hr(s) Other (Self directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide the basis for a critical understanding advanced concepts and processes of planning and environmental law

Module Content: Property Interests, Planning Control and Environmental Protection (incl. e.g. Habitats, Conservation law etc.); Legal bases of Sustainability; Rights Discourse and Planning / Environmental Regulation; Guiding Principles of Planning & Environmental Law: from Assimilative Capacity Approach to Precautionary Action; Equity, Distributive Justice and Environmental / Ecological Interests; Proceduralisation of Planning & Environmental Law (incl. Access to Information, Access to Justice, Participation etc); and Alternative Dispute Resolution in the Planning Environmental arena.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explore the interaction between property rights and more diffuse environmental values/interests
?Evaluate critically the development of planning law over time
?Assess the implementation of planning law in practice
?Evaluate critically the role of the courts in determining planning disputes
?Assess the effectiveness of the enforcement of planning law in practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 67 marks; Continuous Assessment 33 marks ( 1 x 3,000 to 4,000 word essay 33 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. In addition, participants are required to sign an attendance register at each class of the module. If a participant's attendance falls below 80% he / she will be debarred from entering the examination for the module and will be required to repeat the module in accordance with the repeat year requirements.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

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LW6107 Legal Aspects of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2. (Year 1).

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: How to base decisions on legal requirements, ethics and scientific evidence; to introduce students to employment law and health and safety law.

Module Content: The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005 and regulations made thereunder.
The preparation of safety statements and the role of the Health and Safety Authority.
Legal case studies on harassment, bullying, sexual harassment and stress in the workplace.
Employment Law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the major legal principles relevant to health and safety and employment law and integrate these into broader legal frameworks
?Appraise employee/employer behaviour or conduct in the light of employment law principles
?Apply these principles in practical workplace settings
?Review human resources and health & safety policy documentation in light of these principles
?Incorporate law into health and safety management principles
?Apply principles of ethical decision making.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment as specified by the School.).

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LW6108 Legal Aspects of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare (online)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: How to base decisions on legal requirements, ethics and scientific evidence; to introduce students to employment law and health and safety law.

Module Content: The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005 and regulations made thereunder.
The preparation of safety statements and the role of the Health and Safety Authority.
Legal case studies on harassment, bullying, sexual harassment and stress in the workplace.
Employment Law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the major legal principles relevant to health and safety and employment law and integrate these into broader legal frameworks
?Appraise employee/employer behaviour or conduct in the light of employment law principles
?Apply these principles in practical workplace settings
?Review human resources and health & safety policy documentation in light of these principles
?Incorporate law into health and safety management principles
?Apply principles of ethical decision making.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment as specified by the School.).

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LW6109 Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Law (online)

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 90 x 1hr(s) Other (directed online learning); 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to legal reasoning and to the sources of law; to give students an understanding of the statutory framework governing health and safety at work in Ireland and of the European context to the development of the law in this area; to introduce students to aspects of employment law and the law of torts that relate to occupational health and safety; to give students an understanding of the principles of environmental law as it relates to occupational health, safety and welfare.

Module Content: Introduction to law and the sources of law. The development of health and safety law and the influence of Europe. The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005 and regulations made thereunder. The preparation of safety statements and the role of the Health and Safety Authority. Relevant aspects of the law of torts and employment law. International and comparative aspects of the law relating to occupational health, safety and welfare. Environmental law as it relates to occupational health, safety and welfare at work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of the major legal principles relevant to occupational health and safety and an ability to integrate these into broader legal frameworks.
?Apply these principles in practical workplace settings
?Review human resources and health and safety policy documentation in light of these principles
?Demonstrate an understanding of relevant aspects of employment law, the law of torts and environmental law as they apply to occupational health, safety and welfare.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 140 marks, Online Activities 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Online Activities.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment as specified by the School of Law.).

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LW6502 LLB Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Supervised research study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To enable students to learn from the experience of researching and writing a substantial work on a legal topic under supervision of staff in the Department of Law.

Module Content: Students will draw upon the full resources of the Law Library in order to research a dissertation on an approved topic under the supervision of an approved supervisor. The dissertation must be written and presented, according to the standard legal conventions, regarding organisation and terminology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify a research question;
?Outline the way in which to answer the question;
?Critically evaluate the law in a chosen field;
?Present arguments in a lucid, scholarly manner;
?Organise information in a presentable, synthesised manner;
?Generalize about the justice system from primary source legal materials.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 8,000 word dissertation excluding reasonable footnotes, two copies to be submitted on a date to be specified by the Department of Law at the beginning of Semester One.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The candidate may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Submit alternative assesment(s) as specified by the School).).

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LW6503 Business Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2. (Part 3, Year 2, MBA).

No. of Students: Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Workshops/Lectures).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: Glimpses of the Legal System and Laws pertaining to business are shown throughout the course. Consideration is given to how business administrators should handle legal affairs. The course is as much about managing lawyers and legal affairs as it is about law. Particular emphasis is given to handling legal disputes and managing legal costs, as well as to the general administration of legal affairs.

Module Content: Lectures on (1) General Introduction; (2) Irish and European Systems and Sources; (3) Commercial and Employment Contracts; (4) Torts relating to Business; (5) Properties: Real, Personal and Intellectual; (5) Business Entities: Partnerships and Company; (7) Mergers and Acquisitions; (8) Litigation and Dispute Resolution; and (9) Management of Legal Affairs and Costs; and Workshops on (10) Company Meetings; (11) Negotiation of Deal; and (12) Case Management of Dispute.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the sources of Irish law and their relative positions of authority within the legal system.
?Assess the role of law in the context of business administration and regulation.
?Evaluate the role of alternative approaches to dispute resolution.
?Identify applicable legal rules and apply those rules to determine the likely outcome of given factual scenarios.
?Extract the principles of law pertaining to business from relevant legislation and case law.
?Explore the interaction between the theory of law and law in practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 3,000 word projects, 50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6507 Comparative Family Property Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: For students to achieve a critical understanding of divergent regulatory approaches and underlying policy aims in the governance and regulation of family property arising in the context of relationship breakdown.

Module Content: This course presents an opportunity for students to gain a critical understanding of divergent regulatory approaches to the distribution of assets and wealth in the context of relationship breakdown. The module is structured to facilitate and encourage cross jurisdictional comparative analysis in respect of key legal and policy issues arising. The divergence in the national approaches considered, which are influenced and dictated by domestic legal, political and social preferences, facilitates an informative debate of the pertinent issues. The comparative based approach to this area of law facilitates a wide understanding of the fundamental principles as well as encouraging discussion of the ongoing need for reflection and reform. Students will be afforded an opportunity, by way of weekly seminars, to explore and discuss topical issues, including the concept of relationship property, the social and legal justification for inter-spousal financial obligations post the dissolution of marriage, the objectives of asset distribution regimes and the underlying policy aims in creating a model for division, where emphasis can be placed on regulation by strict legislative rule or conversely on discretionary based judicial law making. The structured seminars will give postgraduate students an opportunity to explore in detail, this rapidly developing and socially critical area of law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the objective and aims of state regulation of the family unit;
?Outline and trace the historical developments of the laws governing asset redistribution on relationship breakdown;
?Differentiate between the conflicting approaches of divergent jurisdictions and debate the policy ideals driving such differences;
?Interpret relevant Irish and international laws governing law and judgements;
?Critically assess the policy aims of the considered jurisdictions with a view to their impact and effect;
?Present independent ideas and analysis on pertinent issues and participate effectively in class discussion.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay); Oral Assessment 20 marks (In class presentation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School and/or retake the oral presentation.).

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LW6508 Law of Cybercrime

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law; Prof Stephen William Hedley, Department of Law; Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To critically assess key aspects of the law concerning cybercrime.

Module Content: This module discusses online crime, crimes committed using computer technology and liability for online defamation. Particular topics to be considered include: policing the web, data retention, crimes against computers, crimes committed using computers, cyberfraud, phishing, adult pornography, child pornography, hate speech, spam and defamation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the significant features of key aspects of cybercrime laws.
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case-law and academic literature concerning cybercrime;
?Formulate proposals for reform of the law concerning cybercrime;
?Conduct independent research on an aspect of cybercrime law.
?Apply their knowledge of cybercrime law to hypothetical case scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay 70 marks, 1 x 1,000 word case study 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6529 Information Rights Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To explore legal and policy issues arising in the context of government held information.

Module Content: This course explores law and policy relating to information focusing in particular on the issue of access to government held information. The course will commence by examining the international information policy framework including such issues as access to information as a human right, commercialisation of government information and the implications for access to information of public sector reform. An examination of freedom of information law will constitute a major part of the course.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key features of the following aspects of information law and policy: the justification for the introduction of access to information laws; access to information as a human right; commercialisation of public sector information; the impact on access of public sector restructuring;
?Identify and evaluate the benefits of access to information laws and the interests that legitimately compete with it;
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case law and academic literature concerning information law and policy;
?Conduct masters-level research on aspects of information law and policy;
?Apply their knowledge of freedom of information law to hypothetical case scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 100 marks, 1 x 3,000 word case study 80 marks, Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6530 Constitutional Law in Comparative Context

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Conor O'Mahony, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Conor O'Mahony, Department of Law; Dr Maria Cahill, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To gain a deeper appreciation of constitutional law by exploring the relationship between principles of constitutional theory and practical applications in constitutional cases from Ireland and other jurisdictions.

Module Content: This course will examine recent major developments in constitutional law in a number of jurisdictions, placing them in the context of the deeper jurisprudential questions that they raise, and considering both their broad significance in the field of constitutional theory and their likely practical consequences in Irish constitutional law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Engage with the concept and purpose of a constitution, and the relationship between constitutionalism and democracy;
?Reflect on the merits of divergent academic views in constitutional theory;
?Apply principles of constitutional theory to specific factual scenarios;
?Evaluate the extent to which a constitution can or should reflect changing trends in society;
?Re-assess common understandings of constitutional law in the light of deeper engagement with the theoretical issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 3,000 word essays 100 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6536 Intellectual Property Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Kevin O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: For students to achieve a critical understanding of intellectual property law rights and protection, enhanced by the comparatively based seminars.

Module Content: This course presents an opportunity for students to explore issues arising in the context of copyright, patents and trademark law. The international nature of intellectual property rights calls for an extensive and comparatively based study of the fundamental principles as well as the on-going developments in this area. Students will be afforded an opportunity, by way of weekly seminars, to explore and discuss topical issues, including copyright law in the digital age, the conflict between consumer and commercial interests in affording protection and exclusive use to trademark owners and the ongoing debate as to the patentability of computer programs and biotechnological inventions. The intellectual property seminars will give postgraduate students an opportunity to explore in detail this rapidly developing area of law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the purpose of intellectual property law protections;
?Outline and trace the attempts at the harmonisation of member states; IP laws;
?Differentiate between the conflicting rights of those being protected by Intellectual property law measures;
?Interpret relevant Irish and international caselaw and statutes;
?Critically assess the policy aims of Irish and EU legislative approach to IP law in terms of direction and impact;
?Participate effectively in class discussion.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 3,000 word essays, 100 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6538 LLM (Taught) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal writing and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentations sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training and Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students ability to identify a research topic, conduct research, make a presentation on their research and write a masters level dissertation on this topic.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies, and legal writing and referencing; to identify a research topic and make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the nature of legal research;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to Master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards.
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resources Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6541 Electronic Commerce Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law; Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law; Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a knowledge and understanding of legal framework and to the policy and regulatory issues which arise in the context of e-Commerce.

Module Content: This course examines the law concerning commercial transactions conducted electronically, mainly over the Internet. It includes discussion of contracting online, distance selling, electronic signatures, online financial services, electronic payments, online dispute resolution, online privacy, data protection and communications privacy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key features of the following aspects of eCommerce Law; contracting online, distance selling, electronic signatures, online financial services, electronic payments, online dispute resolution, online privacy, data protection and communications privacy;
?Evaluate the preparedness of Ireland for the legal issues arising from the development of eCommerce;
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case law and academic literature concerning eCommerce law;
?Conduct masters-level research on aspects of eCommerce law;
?Apply their knowledge of eCommerce law to hypothetical case scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay 140 marks, 1 x 2,000 word case study 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6544 Criminology

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To introduce students to various criminological theories and to examine contradictions/conflicts between them.

Module Content: The primary purpose of the module is to introduce students to the most fundamental aspects of modern criminology. The module is structured in a systematic way so as to enable an understanding of the various criminological theories in historically specific frameworks. In analysing specific theories, special attention will be devoted to their conditions of emergence, their reception and significance, and their general contribution to our knowledge of crime causation. Moreover, the theories will be employed - together with public perceptions, media representations and political discourses - to construct explanations for crime in Ireland.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline and trace changes in criminological theories over time;
?Link these changes to shifts in societal concerns over criminality;
?Assess the different theoretical approaches that seek to explain criminal behaviour;
?Identify commonalities in and disjuncture between the theories;
?Evaluate the applicability of criminological theories to high profile Irish cases;
?Question the objectivity of criminological theories.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay, 140 marks; 1 x viva, 40 marks; class participation, 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and class participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School and/or retake the viva. Where a student fails the particpation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6545 Penology

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fiona Donson, Department of Law.

Module Objective: The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of punishment, criminal justice and social regulation. In particular the aims of the module are as follows: to provide analyses of the primary penal disposals (both contemporary and historical) utilised in society; to highlight the various political, social, cultural and economic determinants that underpin the provision of penal dispositions; to encourage theorisation about punishment and penal responses; to determine how change is possible in the penal complex - in particular, how sanctions are modified or supplanted; to examine new 'logics' of punishment as they emerge; and, to provide a framework of understanding modern penal systems and the forms of social organisation in which they operate.

Module Content: The lectures examine key approaches to punishment including David Garland and The Culture of Control; Late Modernity and issues such as exclusion, governance, and expressive laws; Foucault and the disciplinary society; Emile Durkheim and social solidarity. In addition, key issues relating to prison and punishment will be examined from both International and local perspectives including prison conditions, prison reform and women in prison.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Differentiate between criminal law as paper rules and criminal law in action;
?Outline and trace some of the key changes in punishment over time;
?Identify the determinants which shape punishment in society globally;
?Examine the extent to which theories of punishment can explain punishment in today?s society, both globally and in Ireland;
?Connect changing values and sentiments in punishment with a changing emphasis on criminal law and procedure;
?Assess current criminal justice policies in terms of direction and impact (as it relates to accused, victims, agencies and politicians);
?Question the extent to which criminal law/punishment really is objective and value free in orientation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay, 150 marks, 1 x oral examination 40 marks, class participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed oral examination must be retaken. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6546 Juvenile Justice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to explore legal and other issues relating to children in conflict with the law.

Module Content: The module draws on a variety of legal sources in order to consider issues of youth justice and detention in Irish law, the law of other jurisdictions, including the US and New Zealand, and in international law. Subjects covered include: the nature of youth crime and characteristics of young offenders, the rights of young offenders, diversion and restorative justice, children in court, due process, serious crime, the role of the media, sentencing, noncustodial sanctions for children and detention.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Examine theories of youth justice, including current research and trends;
?Identify international standards on youth justice;
?Assess the Irish legal framework for youth justice, including the Children Act 2001 as amended;
?Contrast juvenile law in Ireland with other jurisdictions;
?Outline the core issues in youth justice including criminal responsibility, diversion,community measures, juvenile court and due process, sentencing and detention.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay, 200 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6547 LLM (Criminal Justice) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal writing and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentation Sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training and Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine O'Sullivan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students ability to identify a research topic in the Criminal Justice area, conduct research, make a presentation on their research and write a masters level dissertation on this topic.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies, and legal writing and referencing; to identify a research topic and make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the nature of legal research;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resources Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6549 International Children's Rights

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with a critical understanding of the law on children's rights.

Module Content: This module will involve the study of the law relating to children's rights. It will consider children's rights from an international perspective, with particular emphasis on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. The module will examine children's rights theory and the core principles of children's rights under the CRC. It will consider challenges in the implementation of children's rights in specific contexts and identify what remedies are available to enable children to vindicate their rights.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the principal sources of children's rights in Irish and International Law;
?Examine Children's Rights theory
?Assess the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and mechanisms for the protection of children's rights;
?Evaluate specific children's rights issues and challenges in a critical manner.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6550 International Criminal Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law; Dr Sean Butler, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of key concepts and debates in international criminal justice.

Module Content: This course introduces students to the rapidly expanding area of international criminal law. The course examines the historical development of international criminal law, with a key focus on the establishment and work of the International Criminal Court. The basic principles of international criminal law will be covered as will the conceptual and practical difficulties that arise in international criminal justice. The course will also address the possibility of alternative responses to international crimes, such as amnesties and truth and reconciliation commissions. Topics to be covered include: The Nuremburg tribunal; the principle of individual criminal responsibility; the Ad-Hoc and Hybrid Tribunals (Yugoslavia; Rwanda; Sierra Leone; Timor-Leste); Universal Jurisdiction; Truth and Reconciliation Commissions; Selected Topcs (such as Child Soldiers; Genocide; Crimes of Sexual Violence).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe and analyse in depth key concepts in international criminal law;
?Describe and analyse in depth key concepts in international criminal law;
?Critically evaluate international criminal justice responses to past human rights violations;
?Apply key concepts and debates in international criminal justice to problem scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay 200 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6560 Law of Cybercrime

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law; Prof Stephen William Hedley, Department of Law; Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To critically assess key aspects of the law concerning cybercrime.

Module Content: This course discusses online crime, crimes committed using computer technology and liability for online defamation. Particular topics to be considered include: policing the web, data retention, crimes against computers, crimes committed using computers, cyberfraud, phishing, adult pornography, child pornography, hate speech, spam and defamation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key features of the following aspects of cybercrime laws: criminal law concerning damaging of computers, criminal use of computers, computer evidence, policing the internet, data retention, pornography, child abuse images, hate speech, defamation and spam laws.
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case-law and academic literature concerning cybercrime;
?Formulate proposals for reform of the law concerning cybercrime;
?Conduct masters-level research on an aspect of cybercrime law;
?Apply their knowledge of cybercrime law to hypothetical case scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay 140 marks, 1 x 2,000 word case study 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6563 Child Law in Practice

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20 (Preference will be given to LLM (Child and Family Law) students, any remaining places will be allocated on a first come first serve basis to students on other LLM programmes.).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 220 hours directed research).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law; Dr Conor O'Mahony, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of child law in practice

Module Content: This module considers a number of precise issues of Irish child law and policy and considers their application in practice. It draws on a variety of legal sources ? including constitutional law, legislation, case law and international instruments/case law ? in order to promote an understanding of child law in practice and to assist in the identification of specific legal challenges in areas like family law, child protection, education and juvenile justice. Students will consider the elements of quality representation for children and will also discuss essential elements of legal practice including the use of strategic litigation. Students will work on theoretical or actual case studies and benefit from guest lectures from the legal profession to this end.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the principal sources of child law in Irish and International law
?Assess Irish child law and policy
?Analyse a precise legal issue
?Present quality legal argument using a range of persuasive legal sources
?Identify the practical considerations related to representation and litigation in children's cases
?Identify how international treaties have had an impact on child law in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6565 LLM (Practitioner) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal writing and presentation skills and IT electronic resources.); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentation Sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training and Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students ability to identify a research topic, conduct research, make a presentation on their research and write a masters level dissertation on this topic.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies, IT/electronic resources databases, and legal writing and referencing; to identify a research topic and make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the nature of legal research;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to Master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards.
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resources Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6566 Contemporary Issues in International Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 110 hours directed student learning (independent research; guided reading; guided project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with insights into the fundamental principles of public international law and deepen their understanding of the international legal dimensions of contemporary global challenges

Module Content: Histories and Theories of Public International Law; Sources of International Law, International Legal Personality; The Evolving Concept of Sovereignty; State Responsibility; Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes; Use of Force and Armed Conflict; International Law and Global Public Goods; International Rule of Law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?- demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the core principles of public international law;
?- analyse and discuss key concepts of international law in the context of selected case studies and problems;
?- analyse case law and treaties by applying legal reasoning;
?- understand the relationship between international law and international relations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the particpation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6567 Introduction to European Union Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Plus Directed study (recommended reading)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law; Dr Sean Butler, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To Introduce students to the components and workings of the legal system of the European Union, with references to the implementation of EU policies at community and national level.

Module Content: Origins, objectives and status of the EU; the legislative, executive and judicial institutions of the EU; Ireland's accession to the EU and related legal problems; the nature, form and function of EU legislation, the relationships between EU legislation and national legislation, the judicial review of EU legislation

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the sources of EU law;
?Identify the basic principles of EU law;
?Explore the interaction between EU law and national law;
?Apply the basic principles of EU law to given factual scenarios;
?Assess the implementation of EU law in practice;
?Assess the effectiveness of the enforcement of EU law in practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment as specified by the School).

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LW6568 The Family and the Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: For students to achieve a critical understanding of the impact of the law and policy on both the family unit and on its individual family members; with a view to recognising the unique interplay between the state and the family, and between the individual members of the family unit.

Module Content: This course presents an opportunity for students to gain a critical understanding of the concept of the family as both a legal and social construct, commencing with a series of seminars which seek to explore the family as an institution. This will require an examination of the various approaches to defining the family; from the traditional family based on marriage to more diverse national and international approaches to its composition and scope. In this context the course will also assess current levels of state interaction with families and consider the unique position of family law as both a private and public law concern. The rights afforded under law to individual members of the family will be assessed, with attention being paid to parents and children as well as rights of other interested parties. Finally the course will examine the interrelationship between the state and the family, considering the extent of the obligation on the state to act as 'parent'. The presentation of the module is structured in a manner to facilitate and encourage cross jurisdictional comparative analysis of the key areas for consideration. The divergence in national approaches, influenced and dictated by domestic legal, political and social differences will facilitate an informative and complex discussion of the relevant issues. The comparative based approach facilitates a wide understanding of the fundamental principles governing this area as well as encouraging debate on the need for developments and reform. The structured seminars will give postgraduate students an opportunity to explore in detail this rapidly developing and socially critical area of law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the objective and aims of state regulation of the family unit;
?Outline and trace the historical developments of the laws governing the definition of the family;
?Identify and assess the rights, if any, held by individual family members;
?Critically assess the nature and effect of state intervention in the family unit;
?Interpret relevant Irish and international laws governing law and judgments;
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case law and academic commentary concerning the legal regulation of the family and its individual rights holders;
?Critically assess the policy aims of the considered jurisdictions with a view to their impact and effect;
?Present independent ideas and analysis on pertinent issues and participate effectively in class discussion.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 3,000 word essays 80 marks each; Class Participation 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. and Class Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School of Law)).

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LW6569 LLM (Child and Family Law) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal research, writing and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentation Sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training and Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students' capacities to undertake independent legal research in the child and family law area, make a presentation on the subject and advance their legal writing skills to enable them to a write a masters level dissertation.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies, and legal writing and referencing; to identify a research topic and make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the nature of legal research in child and family law;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology for child and family law and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to Master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resource Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6571 LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal writing and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 1hr(s) Other (Presentation Sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training and Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Douglas Cubie, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Douglas Cubie, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students ability to identify a research topic in the area of International Human Rights Law and Public Policy, conduct research, make a presentation on their research and write a masters level dissertation in the field of human rights law and public policy.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies, and legal writing and referencing; to identify a research topic and make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the nature of legal research;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to Master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resources Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6572 Contemporary Issues in International Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 220 hours directed student learning (independent research; guided reading; guided project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with insights into the fundamental principles of public international law and deepen their understanding of the international legal dimensions of contemporary global challenges

Module Content: Histories and Theories of Public International Law; Sources of International Law, International Legal Personality; The Evolving Concept of Sovereignty; State Responsibility; Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes; Use of Force and Armed Conflict; International Law and Global Public Goods; International Rule of Law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?- demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the core principles of public international law;
?- analyse and discuss key concepts of international law in the context of selected case studies and problems;
?- analyse case law and treaties by applying legal reasoning;
?- understand the relationship between international law and international relations.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6574 Intellectual Property and Internet Regulation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus online material plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law; Prof Stephen William Hedley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To assess critically key intellectual property issues which require legal regulation arising from the development of the internet.

Module Content: This course involves the discussion of various intellectual property issues which require legal regulation arising from the development of the Internet. Areas explored include policy issues, copyright, database rights, search engines, trademarks, domain name disputes, administration of the Internet, social networking, legal protection of websites and patents. The majority of this module is delivered through online weekly release of electronic material; there are also three two-hour seminars for discussion and student presentations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key features of the following aspects of intellectual property and internet regulation: copyright, database rights,search engines, trademarks, domain name disputes, administration of the internet, social networking, legal protection of websites and patents;
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case-law and academic literature concerning intellectual property and internet regulation;
?Compare European and US perspectives on intellectual property and internet regulation, in light of academic debates concerning the regulability of the internet and regulability of code;
?Formulate proposals for reform of the law concerning intellectual property and internet regulation;
?Conduct masters-level research on aspects of intellectual property and internet regulation;
?Prepare and deliver an oral presentation on an aspect of intellectual property and internet regulation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 190 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 100 marks, 1 x 3,000 word essay 90 marks); Oral Assessment 10 marks (Oral Presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School and/or retake the oral presentation).

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LW6575 LLM (Intellectual Property and e-Law) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal research and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentation Sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training and Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students ability to identify a research topic in the area of intellectual property and/or e-law, conduct research, make a presentation on their research and write a masters level dissertation on this topic.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies, and legal writing and referencing; to identify a research topic and make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the nature of legal research;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Write clearly in an appropriate legal style in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by a discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resources Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6578 Consumer Rights: Law and Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law; Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To engage critically with the law and policy as it relates to consumers.

Module Content: This course explores a selection of issues around consumer legal regulation and policy, both from a domestic and a European perspective. Topics to be covered include sale of goods; product liability; consumer credit and access to justice. The course engages critically with these topics from a theoretical and an empirical basis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key issues which arise in respect of consumer law and policy;
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case-law and academic literature concerning consumer legal regulation;
?Formulate and justify proposals for reform concerning aspects of consumer law and policy;
?Conduct masters-level research on aspects of consumer law and policy;
?Apply their knowledge of consumer law to hypothetical case scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6579 Law of Secured Lending

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To engage critically with the practical and policy issues raised by secured lending.

Module Content: This course considers a range of practical and theoretical issues relating to secured lending, including the purpose of security; different forms of security and quasi-security; the implications of insolvency and bankruptcy for secured lenders and unsecured creditiors. The course focuses on the policy concerns relating to secured lending as well as the practical details relating to taking security.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key legal and policy issues which arise in respect of secured lending;
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case-law and academic literature concerning secured lending;
?Formulate and justify proposals for reform concerning aspects of the law relating to secured lending;
?Conduct masters-level research on aspects of secured lending;
?Apply their knowledge of the law of secured lending to hypothetical case scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word case-study).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6580 Environmental Law in Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aine Ryall, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aine Ryall, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of how environmental law operates in practice, with particular emphasis on access to environmental justice. It aims to equip students with the knowledge and understanding required to engage with relevant enforcement mechanisms and to critically evaluate the enforcement machinery through the use of selected case studies and direct interactions with legal practitioners, environmental non-governmental organizations and other relevant actors. Considerable emphasis is placed on civic engagement and the process of policy development.

Module Content: Introduction to Environmental Governance and Regulation; Nature of Environmental Rights and Obligations; Impact of International and European Union Law on National Environmental Law and Policy; Aarhus Convention: Structure, Impact and Compliance Mechanism; European Union Environmental Law: Enforcement Challenges; Access to Environmental Justice: Problems and Prospects.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate in depth knowledge and understanding of national, European Union and Aarhus Convention environmental compliance and enforcement mechanisms;
?Evaluate the challenges involved in securing effective implementation and enforcement of environmental law;
?Evaluate the role of the national courts, the Court of Justice of the European Union, the national regulatory authorities, the European Commission and the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee in delivering effective implementation and enforcement of environmental law;
?Evaluate the role of individuals and non-governmental organizations in environmental enforcement;
?Identify deficiencies in the current enforcement machinery and propose specific measures aimed at improving compliance and strengthening the effectiveness of the existing enforcement machinery.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6581 Method in Environmental Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of the continuing development of environmental law as it responds to a number of methodological challenges. Such challenges include: the speed and scale of legal and regulatory change; the multi-disciplinary nature of the environmental solutions sought; the heavy reliance on a diverse range of governance arrangements; and the multi-jurisdictional nature of these governance arrangements. It aims to equip students to evaluate critically each of the forms of governance arrangements commonly used in environmental regulation. Considerable emphasis is placed on examining such arrangements in a transnational, multi-layered and comparative context.

Module Content: Environmental Civil Liability under Common Law, Statute, European Union and International Law; Pollution Licensing as a Regulatory Device; Human Rights-Based Approaches to Environmental Protection and Natural Resources; Enclave Approaches to Nature Conservation (Habitats & Species); Regulatory Innovation in Environmental Law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate in-depth knowledge and understanding of the functioning and ongoing evolution of diverse environmental governance arrangements at the national, European Union and international levels;
?Evaluate the challenges involved in identifying and implementing a coherent suite of legal tools for effective environmental protection.
?Evaluate the role of the various institutional entities responsible for the development of environmental rules and standards, including: national and EU legislative and regulatory authorities; national, EU and international courts and tribunals.
?Evaluate the role of international institutions engaged in the processes of global environmental governance.
?Identify shortcomings and lacunae in the coverage and application of current environmental governance arrangements at the national, EU and global levels, and explore specific measures aimed at addressing such deficiencies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6584 International Refugee Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of key concepts of international, European and domestic refugee law from a human rights perspective.

Module Content: This course examines current issues in refugee law in an international and comparative perspective. The course combines an analysis of International, European and domestic law. It also builds on existing links between the Faculty of Law and refugee law agencies in Ireland. Topics to be covered include:
- The historical evolution of international refugee law
- The EU asylum Acquis
- Problems of Definition and Qualification: Emerging case law
- The asylum process and determination procedures
- The role of judicial review in asylum adjudication
- Gender and Sexual Orientation asylum law
- Climate justice, forced migration and international protection
- Separated Children in the asylum process
- Non-refoulement: risk, securitization and criminalisation
- Exclusion clauses / terrorism and political offences.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in asylum law in Ireland and the EU;
?Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in international refugee law;
?Apply key concepts of refugee law to problem scenarios;
?Critically evaluate and discuss asylum adjudication processes;
?Describe and analyse key human rights debates in European asylum law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 90 marks; Class participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6585 Migration Law and Human Rights

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To equip students with an understanding of key concepts of international, European and domestic immigration law from a human rights perspective.

Module Content: This course examines current issues in immigration law with a particular focus on EU law developments. The course combines an analysis of International, European and domestic law. It also builds on existing links between the Faculty of Law and immigration law agencies in Ireland. Topics to be covered include:

- The EU and Immigration Law / Freedom of Movement and evolving concepts
- Migration and Family Life - Rights to Family Reunification
- Migrant Workers and Human Rights
- Irregular Migration: Human Trafficking and Smuggling
- Citizenship and Nationality: International, European and domestic
- Enforcement: Detention: Deportation, Immigration offences / Returns

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in EU immigration law;
?Outline and analyse in depth key concepts in EU Freedom of Movement law;
?Apply key concepts of European human rights law to immigration problem scenarios;
?Critically evaluate and discuss immigration and citizenship laws and processes;
?Describe and analyse key debates on immigration, including on human trafficking, irregular migration and the rights of migrant workers.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 90 marks; Class participation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the Department. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the Department).

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LW6586 Human Rights Law in Practice (Clinic)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to provide students with a critical understanding of the practical operation of international and regional human rights bodies, with a particular focus on the UN and European Convention on Human Rights, institutions and enforcement procedures. The module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage with international human rights law, through selected case studies.

Module Content: Engaging with the UN Human Rights Treaty System; the UPR and the Human Rights Council; Regionalism vs Universalism; Regional Human Rights systems; ECHR and enforcement; the role of NGOs; Strategic litigation and the ECHR in domestic law; the role of NHRIs; Challenges for implementation of international human rights standards.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate in depth knowledge of international and regional human rights enforcement mechanisms;
?Evaluate the challenges faced in securing effective implementation of international human rights standards at domestic level;
?Apply international and European human rights standards to selected case studies;
?Demonstrate familiarity with procedures to enforce human rights standards in UN systems and in Europe;
?Evaluate the role of civil society in the promotion of human rights standards;
?Evaluate the role of NHRIs in the promotion of human rights standards;
?Prepare supporting documentation required to engage with selected UNI and European enforcement procedures.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 80 marks; class participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and class participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6588 Enforcement and Sanctions in Antitrust Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To understand the policy motivations behind the divergent forms of sanctions utilised in the enforcement of antitrust laws and in particular to analyse the respective merits of civil and criminal sanctions.

Module Content: This module considers the divergent approaches taken historically towards the enforcement of antitrust laws in various jurisdictions. It also considers the recent trend towards the utilisation of criminal sanctions against cartel participants and whether the criminalistation of antitrust law is either appropriate or effective.Topics covered will include the effectiveness of civil remedies, private party actions for damages, the increasing criminalistaion of antitrust law in Ireland and other jurisdictions and the use of various tools of enforcement such as immunity & leniency programmes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assess the implementation of EU competition law in practice.
?Explore the interaction between public and private enforcement.
?Evaluate the effectiveness of civil and criminal sanctions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6589 Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Mr Declan Walsh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To understand the policy and legislative basis of the competition laws of the European Union with reference to current developments.

Module Content: This module involves an examination of the major contemporary issues of competition law, as they arise in the European Union. The module examines policy developments relating to vertical arrangements, abuse of a dominant position, state aid and the control of mergers. The module draws heavily from contemporary developments during the year including policy statements, guidance notices and decisions of the Commission and judgments of the Court of Justice of the European Union and the General Court.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Extract the basic principles of EU Competition law from legislation and case law.
?Identify the policy factors shaping the development of EU competition law.
?Evaluate critically the development of EU competition policy over time.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6592 Mental Capacity Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Mary Donnelly, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To engage critically with legal, philosophical/ethical and policy issues arising in situations where individuals lack decision-making capacity.

Module Content: This course explores a range of issues which arise in situations where adults lack decision-making capacity. It aims to provide students with both theoretical and grounded practical exposure to the issues. Issues/areas explored include the philosophical/human rights context, including the impact of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the European Convention on Human Rights; the applicable tests for capacity in key areas including healthcare decision-making, marriage and sexual relationships, contract/testatmentary dispositions; the legislative framework; the role and operation of advance decision-making; and the interface between mental health and mental capacity law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key legal, philosophical/ethical and policy issues which arise in respect of decision-making capacity/incapacity;
?Interpret and critically analyse human rights instruments, legislation, case-law and academic literature concerning decision-making capacity/incapacity;
?Formulate and justify proposals for reform concerning aspects of the law in respect of mental capacity/incapacity;
?Conduct masters-level research on aspect of mental capacity law and policy;
?Connect changing societal/human rights values with resolutions of policy, ethical and legal issues in respect of capacity/incapacity.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6594 LLM (Business Law) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal research and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentation Sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training and Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students' ability to identify a research topic in the area of business law, conduct research, make a presentation on their research and write a masters level dissertation on this topic.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies and legal writing and referencing, to identify a research topic, to make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an appreciation of the nature of legal research;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to Master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by a discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resources Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6595 Business Law in Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma White, Department of Law.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of how issues in respect of business law, broadly defined, arise in practice and how these are dealt with by a range of different stakeholders.

Module Content: The module comprises a series of seminars / workshops from a range of stakeholders. These seminars will address a wide variety of topics relevant to business law (interpreted broadly to include business regulation) in practice. Topics covered will vary each year, with a particular focus on current issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the link between the student's doctrinal and theoretical study and business law in practice;
?Reflect on the nature of business law and its role in the economy and society;
?Critically evaluate the way in which business law, broadly defined, operates in this broad context.
?Engage with relevant stakeholders, including for example, business and commercial law professionals, regulators and members of judiciary;
?Communicate more effectively, in writing and orally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment 80 marks; class participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. and class participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6603 Legal Regulation of Cohabitation and Emerging Family Forms

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus 110 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Mee, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Claire Murray, Department of Law; Prof John Mee, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide students with an opportunity to explore the issues surrounding the legal regulation of cohabiting relationships and other 'non-traditional' family relationships which have become increasingly prominent in legal discourse.

Module Content: This module focuses on family relationships that fall outside the mainstream represented by marriage and parenthood. One important example of this kind of relationship is that between cohabiting couples. The module looks at statutory and non-statutory legal responses to the growing social phenomenon of cohabitation. It considers the history of legal regulation in this area, responses by the courts to property disputes between cohabitants, public (mis)understanding of the legal position of cohabitants, the statutory regime in Part 15 of the Civil Partnership and Certain Rights and Duties of Cohabitants Act 2010, the succession rights of cohabitants and, more broadly, the possibility of moving "beyond conjugality" so as to shift the focus away from cohabitation which resembles marriage. The other strand of the module looks at the increasing number of families in Ireland where adults other than the biological parents of a child are fulfilling a parental role in respect of that child, such as step-families and "grandfamilies" (where grandparents are raising children because the parents are unable or unwilling to do so), as well as situations where a family member is providing unpaid care. The module examines the difficulties that exist for non-traditional families under the current law and addresses the underlying policy issues in light of the approaches adopted in other jurisdictions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically assess modern judicial and statutory responses to the social phenomemon of cohabitation, in light of an understanding of the history of cohabitation and its legal regulation.
?Assess the defensibility of treating marriage and cohabitation differently in terms of the rights and obligations imposed by the law.
?Critically evaluate the shortcomings in current law and policy in Ireland in meeting the needs of non-traditional family units, and identify the consequences of this legal and policy vacuum for such families.
?Assess, with reference to comparative jurisdictions, the practical ways in which the law can support the increasing number of family units where step-parents or grandparents play a significant role in caring for children.
?Assess the adequacy of the law?s response to the challenge of unpaid care in the family.
?Present independent ideas and analysis on pertinent issues and participate effectively in class discussion.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 80 marks; class participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the particpation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6605 European Corporate Restructuring, Insolvency and Rescue

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): LW3345 Company Law: Fundamental Concepts and Doctrines and LW3346 Company Law: Finance, Management and Insolvency (or equivalent courses at undergraduate level)

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Irene Lynch Fannon, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Irene Lynch Fannon, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To engage critically with the practical and policy issues raised by the regulation of corporate insolvency and rescue. Aspects of the regulation of personal insolvency which interrelate with corporate insolvency will also be considered.

Module Content: This course considers a range of practical and theoretical issues relating to the regulation of corporate insolvency and the distribution of assets on insolvency. Aspects of the regulation of personal insolvency which interrelate with corporate insolvency will also be considered. It also considers the imperative towards corporate rescue present in recent legislative initiatives and considers the practical and theoretical issues relating to the current regulatory framework. The course focuses on the policy concerns relating to corporate insolvency and rescue. These issues will be considered in a comparative UK and EU context where relevant.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify key legal and policy issues which arise in respect of corporate insolvency and the corporate rescue imperative;
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case-law and academic literature on corporate insolvency and rescue;
?Formulate and justify proposals for reform concerning aspects of the law relating to corporate insolvency and rescue;
?Conduct masters-level research on aspects of corporate insolvency and rescue;
?Apply their knowledge of the law of corporate insolvency and rescue to hypothetical case scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 180 marks (1 x 2,500 word assigned case study 80 marks; 1 x 3,500 word essay assigned from a range of research topics 100 marks); Oral Assessment 20 marks (oral presentation on chosen research essay in class 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination. Attendance at seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attend a minimum of 8 out of 12 seminars. An attendance register will be taken in class.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School and/or retake the oral presentation. Where students do not satisfy the attendance requirement, they must complete suitable alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6606 International Human Rights Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 220 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Siobhan Mullally, Department of Law; Dr Douglas Cubie, Department of Law.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to provide students with a critical understanding of the institutions and processes of the UN and regional human rights systems.

Module Content: The UN and Human Rights: the UN Human Rights Treaty System; The UPR and the Human Rights Council; Regionalism vs Universalism; Regional Human Rights systems (African, Inter-American and European); ECHR and enforcement; Challenges for implementation and enforcement of international human rights standards.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate in depth knowledge of international and regional human rights enforcement mechanisms;
?Apply international and European human rights standards to selected case studies;
?Demonstrate familiarity with procedures to enforce human rights standards in UN systems and in Europe;
?Critically evaluate the role of UN and regional human rights enforcement systems.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay, 160 marks; class participation and group work, 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. class participation and group work.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation or group work he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6609 Mental Health Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 2 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Plus online material, plus 120 hours directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To critically assess mental health law.

Module Content: This module considers key aspects of mental health law, in light of human rights, constitutional rights, psychiatric and socio-legal perspectives. Topics discussed in seminars include principles of mental health law, legal criteria for involuntary admission, the Mental Health Act 2001 and Mental Health Tribunals.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key features of civil mental health law in Ireland, in the context of developments in other jurisdictions and socio-legal perspectives;
?Assess the differences between psychiatric and legal perspectives in mental health law;
?Assess the compatibility of Irish mental health law with the European Convention on Human Rights, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and other human rights instruments;
?Interpret and critically analyse legislation, case-law and academic literature concerning mental health law;
?Compare the different remedies, procedures and enforcement systems of mental health law;
?Evaluate existing proposals for reform of mental health law;
?Formulate their own proposals for reform of mental health law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,500 word essay 80 marks, online activities 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School).

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LW6612 IT Law Clinic

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 2hr(s) Workshops (and directed research); 110hr(s) Other (self directed study and reflection, recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law; Prof Maeve McDonagh, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To expose students to Information Technology law in practice by working on litigation and/or policy activities.

Module Content: This module provides students with the opportunity to work on legal cases and policy activities which will enhance knowledge of law in action and develop skills of legal research, writing and strategy. Students will work on legal issues such as copyright, data protection, e-commerce, information law and cybercrime. The module will address legal standards and ethics and will develop awareness about policy aspects. Students will work on theoretical or actual cases and policy initiatives and benefit from guest seminars from a range of perspectives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the legal issues in IT Law cases and present binding and persuasive legal authority on these issues
?Conduct research for practical application in areas of IT Law
?Communicate results of IT Law research effectively, both orally and in writing
?Reflect critically on the fairness and effectiveness of IT Law in practice
?Demonstrate awareness of key policy issues and reform proposals in IT Law.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Learning Journal/Reflective Log 30 marks; 1 x 2,000 word assignment 50 marks; Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Minimum 80% attendance at seminars and workshops.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% . Students must have a minimum 80% attendance at seminars and workshops. The procedures governing the application of this requirement are set out in detail in the course outline for this module. This requirement applies also to the Supplemental Examination.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Submit suitable alternative assessment/s as specified by the School. For students who have not satisfied the requirement of a minimum 80% attendance at seminars and workshops, this module must be repeated in a repeat year.

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LW6614 Family Law Clinic

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops (and directed research); 220hr(s) Other (self-directed study and reflection, recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Louise Crowley, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To expose students to the law relating to family formations and dispute resolution in practice by working on litigation and law reform activities.

Module Content: This module provides students with exposure to the determination of legal issues relating to family law relationships and disputes, both in the litigation and alternative dispute resolution environments. Additionally students will have the opportunity to contribute to law reform debates and activities; giving rise to an enhanced knowledge and understanding of law in action and to develop skills of legal research, writing and strategy. The module will examine regulatory approaches to the myriad of family formations in modern society and will present students with the opportunity to engage with topical issues arising in this context. Students will work on theoretical or actual cases and law reform initiatives and benefit from guest lectures from a range of related and relevant perspectives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the legal issues in a case presented on the facts and present binding and persuasive legal authority on these issues
?Identify and evaluate the skills necessary to ensure quality representation and advocacy in family law disputes
?Demonstrate an awareness of the workings of contemporary Irish regulatory frameworks for various family formations
?Demonstrate a critical understanding of the varying approaches to family law in other, identified jurisdictions
?Evaluate the need for law reform nationally or internationally in family law disputes and identify how such reforms might be achieved
?Reflect critically on the extent to which the state intervenes in the private relationship of two adults and the extent to which private autonomy needs to be protected.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Participation 40 marks; Learning Journal/Reflective Log 20 marks; 1 x 1,000 word assignment 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the Department. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the Department).

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LW6615 Child Law Clinic

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops (and directed research); 220hr(s) Other (self-directed study and reflection, recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Ursula Kilkelly, Department of Law; Dr Conor O'Mahony, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To expose students to child law and children's rights in practice by working on litigation and law reform activities.

Module Content: This module provides students with the opportunity to work on legal cases and law reform activities which will enhance knowledge of law in action and develop skills of legal research, writing and strategy. The module will examine remedies available to children including through use of international mechanisms. It will address legal standards and ethics and explore the challenges facing children and their legal representatives. It will develop awareness about the need for law reform. Students will work on theoretical or actual cases and law reform initiatives and benefit from guest lectures from a range of perspectives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the legal issues in a case presented on the facts and present binding and persuasive legal authority on these issues
?Identify and evaluate the skills necessary to ensure quality representation and advocacy in child law and children's rights
?Demonstrate an awareness of remedies for the breach of children's rights, including internationally
?Evaluate the need for law reform nationally or internationally in child law and children's rights and demonstrate how reform might be achieved
?Reflect critically on how the law treats children and the responsibility of representatives to address this.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Participation 25 marks; Learning Journal/Reflective Log 25 marks; 1 x 2,000 word essay, 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the participation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6616 Critical Perspectives on Mental Health Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 4hr(s) Seminars; 2 x 4hr(s) Other (student presentations); 72 x 1hr(s) Other (Self-Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Darius Whelan, Department of Law; Dr Robert King, School of Applied Psychology.

Module Objective: To develop a critical sense of law in relation to mental health and to explore questions of law and rights in relation to psychology.

Module Content: This module considers key aspects of mental health law, in light of human rights, psychological and socio-legal perspectives. Foundational issues of human responsibility and capacity will be addressed. Topics discussed in seminars may include principles of mental health law, legal criteria for involuntary admission, the Mental Health Act 2001, Mental Health Tribunals, legal capacity, criminal aspects of mental health law and practical considerations of viewing anti-social behaviours in the light of psychological understanding.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically reflect on the implications of mental health law in Ireland for service users and practitioners;
?Demonstrate advanced knowledge of areas of overlap between law and psychology;
?Critically engage with concepts of mental health within a legal framework;
?Present independent ideas and analysis on pertinent psycho-legal issues and participate effectively in class discussion and presentation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (individual in class presentation critically evaluating a peer reviewed article on a pertinent psycho-legal issue (50 marks) and a 1500 word reflective essay unpacking normative foundations of psycho-legal understandings (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% in Continuous Assessment. Students who fail to complete the in class presentation will fail the module overall.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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LW6617 International Biodiversity and Ecosystems Law and Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed student learning (independent research; guided reading; student presentation)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: The continuous loss of biodiversity is one of the most serious environmental challenges the world faces. The aim of this module is to explore the tension between the need to conserve biodiversity and protect ecosystems and ecosystem services on the one hand, and private property rights on the other by providing insights into the international legal framework which attempts to strike this delicate balance. Understanding the importance and methods for increasing interactions and cross-fertilization between different areas of international environmental law will also be explored.

Module Content: The Sources of International Biodiversity Law; Principles and Concepts of Biodiversity Law: Sustainable Use, Conservation, Equity, Ecosystem Approach, Ecosystem Services; Implementation, Enforcement and Non-compliance; Access and Benefit Sharing; International Law on Protection of Freshwater Ecosystems and Biodiversity; Marine Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction; Future Challenges to the International Biodiversity Regime.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the key international legal issues relating to biodiversity protection;
?analyse and discuss key concepts of international biodiversity law in the context of selected case studies;
?understand the importance of and methods for increasing interactions betweeen different areas of international environmental law and the relationship between international law and natural sciences/biodiversity research.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay - 80 marks; 1 x presentation (plus accompanying notes) - 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the presentation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6618 Climate Change Law and Policy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus 110 hours directed student learning (independent research; guided reading; student presentation)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Module Objective: The anthropogenic changes to the global climate system present one of the greatest challenges to confront humanity which requires a comprehensive response from the international community spanning multiple disciplines. The aim of this module is to provide students with insights into the key legal issues relating to climate change from an international and European perspective and deepen their understanding of the continuous development of this complex area of law and policy.

Module Content: Foundations and Sources of International Climate Law; Principles of International Climate Law; Common but Differentiated Responsibilities, Sustainable Development, Precautionary Principle, Pollutor Pays Principle; EU and Irish Climate Change Policy; Implementation, Enforcement and Non-compliance; Emissions Trading and the Global Carbon Market; Climate Change Litigation; The Future Legal Climate Change Regime.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the key legal issues relating to climate change;
?analyse and discuss key concepts of international and European climate law in the context of selected case studies;
?understand the relationship between international law and climate change negotiations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay - 80 marks; 1 x presentation (plus accompanying notes) - 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School. Where a student fails the presentation he/she will be required to attend for interview as prescribed by the School).

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LW6620 Introduction to the Law of the Sea

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered by means of 'block' teaching over several days by both Law School staff and external part-time lecturers.); 220 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To explore the law of the sea from international, EU and Irish perspectives employing student-oriented pedagogy, and to introduce students to the contemporary challenges in the regulation of the world's seas and oceans.

Module Content: History, Sources and Principles of the Law of the Sea; Freedom, Sovereignty and Common Heritage; Baselines and National Jurisdictional Zones; Zones of Sovereign Rights: Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf; Marine Spaces Beyond National Jurisdiction: High Seas and the Area; Settlement of Maritime Disputes; Development of Marine Resources and Protection of the Marine Environment; Case Studies: The EU and the Law of the Sea; The South China Sea Disputes; Irregular Migration by Sea; Polar Oceans and Climate Change.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the core principles of the law of the sea:
?analyse and discuss key concepts of the law of the sea in the context of selected complex case studies and problems;
?critically analyse the historical development of the law of the sea and the practical application of the principal legislative and conventional instruments;
?appraise the continuing evolution of the law of the sea and of the legal, political, economic and social context in which it is developing.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 4,000 word coursework essays - 100 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6621 Admiralty Law

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered in 'block' teaching over several weekends, mainly by experienced legal practitioners); 220 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (recommended reading, independent research and project work.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide a critical, in-depth overview of the Law of Admiralty along with real-world insight into modern legal practice concerning the management of shipping activities.

Module Content: Introduction to and history of Admiralty Law; Jurisdiction, forum shopping, arbitration, ADR; Ship arrest; Collisions; Salvage and towage; General average; Pilotage; Marine pollution; Safety

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply the key principles of Admiralty Law to complex and problematic ship management scenarios;
?Critically analyse the regulatory environment of ships;
?Appraise the law relating to the liability of ships;
?Develop problem-solving skills and will be able to aply the key rules and principles, arising under international, EU or Irish law, to complex factual scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 4,000 word coursework assignments: 100 marks for each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6622 Sale, Insurance and Carriage of Goods at Sea

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered in 'block' teaching over several days by both Law School staff and legal practitioners contributing on a part-time basis); 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide a critical introduction to the legal rules and principles applying to the international sale and carriage of goods by sea, along with insight into modern legal practice in this field.

Module Content: ? International sale of goods;
? Carriage of goods by sea and contracts, including bills of lading, charterparty, implied terms, Hague / Hague Visby Rules, Hamburg Rules, Rotterdam Rules;
? Liability; exceptions and limitation of liability;
? Dispute resolution in carriage of goods by sea.
? Introduction to marine insurance;
? Duty of good faith, material disclosure;
? Insured perils;
? Types of marine insurance: insurance of ships, cargoes and freight;
? Latent defects
? Standard contracts of insurance in the marine market;

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key rules and principles of law applicable to the international sale and carriage of goods by sea and to apply these norms to complex factual scenarios;
?Critically analyse the obligations arising out of the various contractual obligations in the sale and transport of goods by sea;
?Explain the liability issues relating to the sale and transport of goods by sea;
?Apraise the key legal issues arising relating to marine insurance and with the law and legal framework which address these issues;
?Develop problem-solving skills and will be able to apply the key rules and principles of marine insurance law to complex factual scenarios.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 coursework essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6623 Global Maritime Security

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered by means of 'block' teaching over several days by both Law School staff and external part-time lecturers.); 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide a critical in-depth account of legal responses to a variety of disparate challenges to maritime security.

Module Content: Public order of the oceans; EU maritime strategy and policy; Securing marine transportation; Maritime piracy and e-piracy; Maritime terrorism; Port and port facility security; Global action to counter narcotic trafficking; Migrant smuggling at sea; Irregular naval warfare and blockade.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Clarify the key challenges arising in relation to the marine security and with the principal legal frameworks which are relevant in addressing these challenges;
?Develop problem-solving skills and will be able to apply the key rules and principles, arising under international, EU or Irish law, to complex factual scenarios;
?Analyse critically the historical development of the key rules and principles and the practical application of the principal legislative and conventional instruments ? national, EU and international;
?Defineof the continuing evolution of the law of marine security and of the legal, political, economic and social context in which they are developing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word coursework essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6624 Port Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered by means of 'block' teaching over several days by both Law School staff and legal practitioners contributing on a part-time basis); 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To provide a critical, in-depth account of the legal issues facing port authorities and real-world insight into modern practice concerning the legal management of port-related activities.

Module Content: Legal forms of port entities; Regulatory functions of ports (towage, pilotage, collisions and salvage, navigation permits, etc); Land management and environmental protection in ports (procurement, competitive bidding); Ports and competition law; Port security; Port police, Customs, Revenue, Immigration; International jurisdictional issues involving shipping; Managing legal risk and liability of port authorities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key rules and principles relating to the regulatory function of ports;
?Critically analyse the obligations of ports under relevant rules of competition law;
?Apraise the salient role of ports in the complex framework of policing, customs, Revenue and immigration laws;
?Debate the applicable legal rules relating to land management in ports.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6625 Law of the Sea (Clinical)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): LW6620 Introduction to the Law of the Sea

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Other (Onboard experience and de-briefing. The Law of the Sea clinic will be operated in collaboration with the Irish Naval Service. It will include at least one trip on board a naval vessel.); 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To bring students to a practical understanding of how the Law of the Sea is applied by enforcement agencies in Ireland.

Module Content: Law Enforcement at sea in the field of fisheries protection, narcotics enforcement and/or maritime security;
Exposure of students to real practical issues of application of the Law of the Sea to current problems;
Simulated teaching and learning with experts, including access to the Naval Service and where possible visit on board a naval ship at Cork.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Examine the agencies are responsible for Law of the Sea enforcement in Ireland.
?Applying the relevant law to real-time critical issues at sea.
?Appraise the practical problems faced by Law of the Sea enforcement agencies in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6626 Law of Ship Finance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered by means of 'block' teaching over several days by both Law School staff and external part-time lecturers); 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To outline and examine critically the legal issues arising in respect of international trade finance and ship finance from international, EU and Irish perspectives.

Module Content: Financial instruments used in international trade; Flags and ship registration; Finance structures; Security and enforcement; Shipping and Tonnage Tax.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the key legal issues arising in relation to international trade finance and ship finance, and with the principal rules and principles which address these issues;
?Analyse critically the rules and principles of ship finance structures, including leasing and asset finance;
?Appraise issues of shipping and tonnage tax.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word coursework essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6627 International Environmental Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered by means of 'block' teaching over several days by Law School staff); 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law; Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To outline and examine critically the emergence and continuing development of a range of public international law regimes for the protection of the natural environment.

Module Content: Sources, forms and scope of international environmental law; Theories of implementation and compliance with international environmental law; Transboundary air pollution; Protection of biodiversity; Toxic and hazardous substances; Transboundary water pollution and depletion; Ozone depletion; International law and climate change; Participatory rights in international law: the Aarhus Convention; Environmental protection under other fields of international law; International environmental law and the transformation of international law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recognise the broad landscape of international environmental law and the key international legal frameworks relevant to the protection of the natural environment;
?Develop problem-solving skills and will be able to apply the key relevant rules and principles of international environmental law to complex factual scenarios;
?Analyse critically the historical development of the rules of international environmental law;
?Appraise the effectiveness of the primary rules and principles concerned with environmental protection at the global, regional and sectoral levels;
?Debate the continuing rapid evolution of international environmental law and its impact on the ongoing development of public international law more generally.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word coursework essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6628 Marine Environmental Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered by means of 'block' teaching over several days by both Law School staff and external part-time lecturers); 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Recommended reading, independent research and project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law; Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To outline and examine critically the diverse legal frameworks, established under international, EU and Irish law, relating to the protection of the marine environment.

Module Content: Marine environmental protection and the Law of the Sea framework; Marine environmental protection and the International Environmental Law framework; Aspects of planning and development law and marine spatial planning; Regulation of ship-source pollution; Regulation of land-based source pollution; Law and management of living natural resources; Climate change and the marine environment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the key legal frameworks relevant to the protection of the marine environment, and with the primary rules and principles which address selected issues;
?Appraise regulatory issues pertaining to marine environmental protection;
?Analyse the relevant legal issues relating to climate change and marine environmental protection.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word coursework essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6629 Natural Resources Law

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 110 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Recommended reading, independent research and project work); 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Seminars will be delivered by means of 'block' teaching over several days by both Law School staff and external part-time lecturers).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benedicte Sage-Fuller, Department of Law; Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law; Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law; Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To outline and examine critically the diverse legal frameworks, established under international , EU and Irish law, relating to the allocation, utilisation and protection of natural resources, with an emphasis on marine natural resources.

Module Content: Offshore renewable energy; Oil and gas exploration and extraction (including UGEE); Seabed mining; Biological resources and biodiversity conservation (including marine protected areas); Fisheries and aquaculture; Cultural heritage; Freshwater resources; Integrated coastal zone management and marine spatial planning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define the key legal frameworks relevant to the allocation, utilisation and protection of natural resources, and with the primary rules and principles which address selected issues;
?Develop problem-solving skills and will be able to apply the key relevant rules and principles to complex factual scenarios;
?Analyse critically the historical development and practical application of the primary rules and principles applying in the field of natural resources law at the international, EU and national levels;
?Appraise the legal approaches to natural resource management which are emerging in response to globalisation of the natural resources sector.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 4,000 word coursework essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessment(s) as specified by the School of Law).

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LW6630 LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal research and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentation Sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training andn Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bjorn-Oliver Magsig, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students' ability to identify a research topic in the area of marine and maritime law, conduct research, make a presentation on their research and write a masters level dissertation on this topic.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies and legal writing and referencing, to identify a research topic, to make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an appreciation of the nature of legal research;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to Master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resources Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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LW6631 LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on legal research and presentation skills); 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (on legal research); 2 x 2hr(s) Other (Presentation Sessions); 700 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Individually supervised directed study (recommended reading, independent research and project work)); 1 x 2hr(s) Seminars (on Library Training and Use of Electronic Legal Resources).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Owen McIntyre, Department of Law.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Law.

Module Objective: To develop students' ability to identify a research topic in the area of environmental and natural resources law, conduct research, make a presentation on their research and write a masters level dissertation on this topic.

Module Content: This course requires students to attend a series of seminars on legal research methodologies and legal writing and referencing, to identify a research topic, to make a presentation on their chosen topic and to complete a Masters-level dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an appreciation of the nature of legal research;
?Identify an appropriate research methodology and place this methodology within a broader legal research context;
?Use Information Technology appropriately for high-level legal research and writing;
?Develop the skills of legal writing and analysis to Master's level;
?Express complex legal and/or policy analysis in an appropriate legal style, in accordance with legal writing standards;
?Prepare and deliver a presentation on the subject matter of their project;
?Conduct Masters-level research on a chosen topic;
?Write a Masters level dissertation, including a comprehensive evaluation and discussion of the topic, with appropriate referencing and style.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (15,000 words excluding reasonable footnotes)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. 10 minute presentation on dissertation topic followed by discussion. Attendance at Library and Electronic Legal Resources Training.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% The student may be required to attend an oral examination on the subject of the dissertation.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students who fail (or fail to submit) the dissertation will be required to repeat the dissertation in the academic year immediately following.

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