Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

GR1001 Greek and Roman Civilisation
GR2007 The Rise and Fall of Athens
GR2018 Roman Imperial History: AD 14-68
GR2019 Greek Mythology
GR2029 Epic Literature
GR2030 The Roman Army, 753BC-AD410
GR2031 The Rise of Christianity
GR3007 Alexander the Great
GR3011 Late Roman History, AD284-395
GR3022 Byzantium and the Rise of Islam
GR3026 Extended Essay
GR3027 The Christian Gospels
GR3028 Greek Art and Architecture

GR1001 Greek and Roman Civilisation

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 72 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Michael Murphy, Department of Classics; Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To give students an overview of central aspects of Greco-Roman culture and its impact.

Module Content: Introduction to Greek and Roman history, literature, art, life and the effect of the Classical World on Western civilization to the present day.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Relate major events in the history of ancient Greece and Rome.
· Discuss the content and themes of important works of Greek and Roman literature.
· Identify, date and describe prominent works of Greek and Roman art and architecture.
· Describe aspects of Greek and Roman society and everyday life.
· Explain the impact of Greek and Roman culture on Western civilisation.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 150 marks; Continuous Assessment 150 marks (2 In-Class Tests).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or who failed to sit the two In-Class Test(s) will be required to sit a further 2hr In-Class Test in August).

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GR2007 The Rise and Fall of Athens

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Nikoletta Pavlidou, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To give students an understanding of the historical, political and cultural aspects of 6th and 5th century BC Athens.

Module Content: The development of the Athenian State in the 6th and 5th centuries BC, with emphasis on the use of literary sources for this period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe major events in the development of the Athenian state during the 6th and 5th centuries BC.
· Identify the causes of these events.
· Explain the impact that these events had on Athens and the rest of the Greek world.
· Analyse and interpret primary sources on 6th and 5th century Athenian history.
· Assess the accuracy, credibility and objectivity of primary sources.
· Select and synthesise material from the lectures as well as from recommended primary and secondary literature to use in oral and written discussion of set topics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks ( 1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR2018 Roman Imperial History: AD 14-68

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the major sources for and developments in Roman History for the period AD 14-68.

Module Content: A survey of the major political developments from death of Augustus in AD 14 until the death of Nero in AD 68, including a detailed analysis of the reliability of Tacitus and Suetonius as historical sources with special focus upon the reigns of Caligula (AD 37-41) and Nero (AD 54-68).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the major events in the political and military history of the Roman empire during AD14-68.
· Criticize the common characterization of Caligula and Nero as 'mad' emperors.
· Assess the accuracy, credibility and objectivity of Suetonius.
· Assess the accuracy, credibility and objectivity of Tacitus.
· Synthesise material from the lectures as well as from recommended primary and secondary literature to use in oral and written discussion of set topics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR2019 Greek Mythology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Michael Murphy, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the study of Greek mythology.

Module Content: An overview of principal themes and concerns of Greek mythology; man's relationship with the gods and with other men, the great deeds of heroes; the use made of Classical mythology in later literature and art.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and describe important myths familiar to Greeks of the Archaic and Classical periods.
· Classify the story elements contained in the myths and explain the classifications used.
· Assess the complex nature of a myth and interpret it in the light of others with related themes.
· Determine recurring themes in the myths treated and illustrate their relevance for the societies which developed them.
· Compare the use made of myth in the ancient world and its use today; evaluate and discuss modern approaches to myth.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x In-Class Tests, 40 marks; 1 x 1,500 word essay, 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR2029 Epic Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Michael Murphy, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the study of primary epic literature in the Classical era and the early Middle Ages.

Module Content: A detailed analysis of Homer's Odyssey and a survey of its points of comparison and contrast with the medieval primary epics, The Tain and Beowulf.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify important aspects of the Greek heroic age that are evident in the Odyssey.
· Understand the narrative structure of primary epic literature.
· Display a certain awareness of the cultural context and audience of primary epic.
· Analyse common themes in primary epic including: divine intervention, the presentaion of heroes, supernatural beings/magic, and the role of women.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR2030 The Roman Army, 753BC-AD410

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the history of the Roman army from the origin of Rome as a city-state to the sack of Rome in AD410.

Module Content: A survey of the major steps in the evolution of the Roman army, including the Roman navy and other specialized groups within the army more generally, with special attention to developments during the 1st and 4th centuries AD, including such topics as fortifications, artillery, tactics, and strategy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the major steps in the evolution of the Roman army.
· Assess the weakness and strengths of the Roman army at different critical periods.
· Describe the basic organization of the Roman army at different critical periods.
· Criticize the major sources for the history of the Roman army.
· Synthesize material from the lectures as well as from recommended primary and secondary literature to use in oral and written discussion of set topics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department.).

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GR2031 The Rise of Christianity

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Newman, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the origins and diversity of early Christianity and to explore the development of Christian thought, ritual and leadership until AD284.

Module Content: This module surveys late Second-Temple Judaism and the position of Jews in the Diaspora, the emergence of distinctive Christian communities, rituals and leadership patterns, the pax deorum and persecution of Christians, the development of diverse Christianities, the evolution of Christian thought and engagement with philosophy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognize the diversity of late Second-Temple Judaism in the Graeco-Roman world;
· Describe the emergence of Christian groups in major urban centers;
· Appreciate the ethical and religious preferences of Chrisitan groups;
· Identify and recognize development in Christian rituals: baptism, Eucharist, prayer;
· Appreciate the reason underlying Rome's policy towards Christians;
· Examine and evaluate the interaction of Christian thought and philosophical inquiry;
· Synthesise material from lectures and recommended primary and secondary literature to use in oral and written discussions of set topics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR3007 Alexander the Great

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Michael Murphy, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a key topic of Greek History.

Module Content: The career and legacy of Alexander the Great.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the life and career of Alexander the Great.
· Identify the reasons for Macedonian success.
· Assess the accuracy, credibility and objectivity of primary sources.
· Examine aspects of the iconography of Alexander the Great.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR3011 Late Roman History, AD284-395

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the major sources and developments of the period AD 284-395.

Module Content: A survey of the major political developments from the accession of Diocletian in AD 284 until the death of Theodosius I in AD 395, including a detailed analysis of the reliability of Ammianus Marcellinus as a historical source, with special focus upon the reigns of Constantine I (AD 306-37) and Julian the Apostate (AD 360-63).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the major events in the religious, political, and military history of the Roman empire during the 4th century AD.
· Identify the factors resulting in the Christianization of the Roman empire.
· Discuss the major controversies surrounding the life of Constantine the Great.
· Discuss the major controversies surrounding the life of Julian the Apostate.
· Assess the accuracy, credibility and objectivity of Ammianus Marcellinus.
· Synthesise material from the lectures as well as from recommended primary and secondary literature to use in oral and written discussion of set topics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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GR3022 Byzantium and the Rise of Islam

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the history of the Byzantine Empire in the period AD550-720, with dual emphasis on relations with Western Europe and on the conflict with the Islamic State.

Module Content: A survey of political and ecclesiastical developments from the reign of the emperor Phocas until the close of the Isaurian dynasty.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline major events and processes in the history of the Byzantine Empire during the period covered.
· Understand the course of the early Islamic conquests 633-56, and the subsequent struggle between the Islamic State and its Christian opponents in the Mediterreanean region to c. 750.
· Understand the divergence between the Eastern and Western branches of the Church during the period.
· Show basic awareness of the variety of sources for the period and the problems of using them.
· Synthesize material from the lectures as well as from recommended primary and secondary literature to use in oral and written discussion of set topics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (Essay 1,500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR3026 Extended Essay

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Guided research and preparation of essay).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To allow students to explore in depth a topic of Roman History as agreed with the Lecturer at the beginning of the academic year.

Module Content: Guided research and preparation of supervised extended essay.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· demonstrate an ability to conduct guided individual research at an appropriate level;
· discuss key ideas relating to chosen topics;
· demonstrate a knowledge of relevant secondary literature at appropriate level;
· communicate the above appropriately in written presentations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 5,000 word essay.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit alternative assessments, by the second Friday in August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR3027 The Christian Gospels

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Newman, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce student to the diversity of Christian gospels with emphasis on the canonical gospels of Mark, Matthew, Luke and John.

Module Content: This module introduces the origin and content of the Christian gospels paying equal attention to literary, historical and theological elements. The presentation of the person of Jesus is a focal concern in these studuies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the cultural and religious context of the gospels;
· Describe the main stylistic features of Christian gospels;
· Appreciate technical issues in gospel study;
· Outline the main historical and theological themes in the gospels;
· Be able to offer close-readings of particular gospel passages;
· Synthesise material from lectures and recommended primary and secondary literature to use in oral and written disdussions of set topics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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GR3028 Greek Art and Architecture

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr David Woods, Department of Classics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Nikoletta Pavlidou, Department of Classics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to key aspects of public art and architecture and its uses in the ancient Greek world by way of a critical engagement with the buildings and artworks in their social context.

Module Content: This module offers detailed explorations of key monuments of the ancient Greek world in relation to questions of patronage, function and audience. Through general outlines, and a sequence of specific case studies, students will explore fundamental issues of architectural interpretation, such as its visual impact, role in social display and cultural belonging, and the aims of its makers, both patrons, architects/artists, and users.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Account for key developments in the public art and architecture of the ancient Greek world;
· Critically assess the nature, function and impact of specific buildings and built environments;
· Combine close analysis of specific monuments and texts with broader theoretical modes of enquiry;
· Produce robust written responses to the material culture of the ancient Greek world, replete with full systems of referencing appropriate to academic standards.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 75 marks; Continuous Assessment 25 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students who have failed or not written the Continuous Assessment must submit a new piece of work by the 2nd week of August, as prescribed by the Department).

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