Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

EV1002 The Environment
EV2001 Practical Environmental Science
EV2002 The Environment and Human Health
EV3001 Environmental Science in the Field
EV3002 Environmental Science Literature Review
EV3012 Ecology and Hydrology of Wetland Systems
EV3013 Sustainable use of Freshwater
EV4001 Environmental Science Research Project
EV4002 Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
EV4010 Environmental Work Placement
EV4012 Environmental Impact Assessments
EV4013 Environmental Risk Assessment and Auditing

EV1002 The Environment

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 150.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science (ZEPS).

Lecturer(s): Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, Department of Geography; Staff, School of BEES; Staff, Department of Chemistry; Staff, Department of Physics.

Module Objective: To introduce the study of how humans interact with the environment.

Module Content: Introduction to the origins of our Solar system. Earth as a life sustaining entity. Resource exploitation and management by humans in terrestrial and aquatic environments is central to the module. Key issues to be covered will include sustainable development, food production, water resources management, human health, waste and pollution, noise, energy production, mineral extraction, climate change, urbanisation and environmental assessment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify links between human exploitation of natural resources and the consequences of that exploitation
Link human activities with specific environmental consequences
Identify aspects of the natural environment that have consequences for human populations
Suggest appropriate remediation or management approaches to address defined environmental issues
Interpret simple environmental measurements
Demonstrate an appreciation of the complexities of some important environmental debates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks (MCQ); Continuous Assessment 20 marks (two practicals (10 marks each)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EV2001 Practical Environmental Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1day(s) Fieldwork (non-residential).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES; Staff, Department of Geography; Staff, School of BEES; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the practical aspects of environmental science used for the investigation of human influences on the environment

Module Content: This module consists of a 3 day non-residential field course in which basic practical skills are introduced and implemented in small groups. Field exercises will be selected from ecological, geographical, geological, hydrological and chemical methods in aquatic and terrestrial environments.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Carry out basic sampling and measurement techniques in terrestrial and aquatic environments
Demonstrate ability to work effectively in small teams, including integrating information from several teams/individuals
Synthesise and interpret chemical, physical or biological measurements.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3 x field reports @ 33.33 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EV2002 The Environment and Human Health

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Workshops/Seminars/In-class Assessment).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To explore and critically appraise ways in which the environment impacts on human health.

Module Content: Overview of biological, chemical and physical health hazards and their impacts on human health including water and associated diseases, zoonoses, air pollution, trace elements and toxic compounds, radiation, noise, natural disasters. Sourcing and assessing environmental and human health data. Current and potential environmental health issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe possible health impacts arising from lack of access to uncontaminated drinking water and/or to adequate sanitation
Evaluate risks to human health from different aquatic and terrestrial habitats
Outline the impacts on health that may be caused by human activities in rural and urban environments, especially agriculture and transport
Describe, using examples, possible health impacts arising from natural occurrence or anthropogenic release of toxic substances
Outline the possible impacts on health arising from past and present industrial activities
Select and critically evaluate scientific evidence for environmental health issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (In-term MCQ 10 marks; Case study assignment 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (marks for MCQ carried forward whether passed or failed).

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EV3001 Environmental Science in the Field

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): EV3012

Teaching Method(s): 3day(s) Fieldwork; 3 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To enable students to gain experience in acquisition and interpretation of field data to inform environmental management of different habitats in response to human uses.

Module Content: Application of field techniques to understand interactions between human activities and aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Students will work in small groups to collect data using a range of techniques, including mapping, surveying, habitat assessment, and the monitoring of physical, chemical and biological parameters in rivers and lakes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Use a range of field instruments and interpret their output
Determine the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of a range of habitats using field techniques
Analyse, interpret and report monitoring data collected in different environments
Assess the past, present or potential future human impacts on different habitats.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Field report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EV3002 Environmental Science Literature Review

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 40 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Supervised literature research); 1 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars (Individual oral presentation of reviews).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Gavin Burnell, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES; Staff, Department of Geography; Staff, School of BEES; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To give training in literature search, review and presentation of results through individual investigation of an environmental topic.

Module Content: Literature-based research project on an environmental topic to be carried out individually by each student in conjunction with an appropriate department and departmental supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Source scientific literature on a given environmental topic
Compile relevant literature and write a critical review of the literature consulted
Summarise key points and issues from published scientific articles
Use and cite published literature appropriately in a written article
Compile an accurate bibliography to accompany the written review
Discriminate between scientifically credible articles and unsubstantiated information on the world wide web
Make a short and informative oral presentation of the literature reviewed.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project Report (5,000 words approx.) 90 marks; Oral Project Presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (Oral project presentation), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Resubmission of written report).

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EV3012 Ecology and Hydrology of Wetland Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals (to include field trips/site visits).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES; Dr Simon Harrison, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Module Objective: To explore the hydrology of wetland systems and their interaction with the ecology of rivers, lakes and transitional water bodies.

Module Content: Principles of hydrology in rivers, lakes and transitional waters. Hydrobiology of rivers and lacustrine systems. Influence of climate and human activities on freshwater ecosystems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the natural development and evolution of freshwater systems in a range of climatic conditions.
Describe the biological responses in rivers and lakes to environmental and climatic variations.
Demonstrate an ability to interpret physical, chemical and biological data from rivers and lakes.
Explain how current human activities are affecting the natural ecosystems of rivers and lakes worldwide.
Distinguish between natural variations in freshwater ecosystems and those induced by human activity.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 report @ 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EV3013 Sustainable use of Freshwater

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 3hr(s) Practicals (site visits).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To explore current approaches to management and sustainable use of freshwater resources.

Module Content: Domestic, industrial and agricultural use of freshwater resources. Principles of physical, chemical and biological treatment processes for source waters and wastewaters. Approaches to management and protection of freshwater resources, including the EU Water Framework Directive. Options for reducing domestic, industrial and agricultural water consumption.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe, with examples, domestic, agricultural, and industrial demands on water resources
Distinguish between appropriate treatment principles for water intended for potable use and wastewaters to be returned to the environment
Describe the physical, chemical and biological treatment processes for source waters and wastewaters
Give reasoned arguments for potential management regimes to maintain or improve the quality of water resources
Suggest possible approaches to improve efficiency of water use and reduce degradation of surface waters.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017.

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EV4001 Environmental Science Research Project

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): EV3002 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 120 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Supervised independent research); 2 x 3hr(s) Seminars (Individual oral presentations of results).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ruth Ramsay, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES; Staff, Department of Geography; Staff, School of BEES; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To provide training in research techniques and the relevant skills in the student's chosen environmental discipline through individual investigation of an environmental topic.

Module Content: Theoretical, practical or field-based investigation of an environmental topic to be carried out individually by each student in conjunction with appropriate academic supervisor(s).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Prepare a scientific hypothesis or research question in conjunction with the supervising staff member
Prepare project objectives and select appropriate methods to gather relevant data or information
Carry out a programme of data acquisition through field, laboratory or desk-based activities
Write a report of the work carried out, including appropriate analysis of results obtained and discuss them in relation to existing published literature
Deliver an oral presentation describing the research project and the results obtained.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Approx. 7,500 word project report 240 marks; Oral presentation 30 marks; Supervisors assessment of lab/field performance 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EV4002 Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 2hr(s) Fieldwork (Site visits); 2 x 1hr(s) Practicals (desk-based); Other ( 2x3hr(s) seminar; 2x1hr workshops; 16hr(s)group project work).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES; Staff, School of BEES; Staff, Department of Chemistry.

Module Objective: To introduce general principles of environmental monitoring and assessment for air, water, soil and sediments.

Module Content: Principles of monitoring and assessment. Policy legislation and practice. Techniques for physical and chemical analysis of water, air, soil and sediments. Biological monitoring methods: toxicity tests, bioassays, biochemical techniques, microbiological analyses. Principles of quality assurance and control. Data interpretation and reporting. Case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe and compare environmental monitoring as carried out by local authorities, national regulators, industry, and environmental consultants
Outline the principal steps of a monitoring programme and describe the associated quality assurance procedures
Evaluate the reliability and comparability of monitoring programmes, including quality control, data interpretation, and reporting
Describe different approaches taken to monitoring air, soil and sediments, and water quality using field and laboratory techniques
Describe biological monitoring methods and evaluate their suitability for different scenarios
Select monitoring methods and sampling sites and design monitoring programmes for a range of different environmental scenarios
Critically evaluate existing environmental monitoring programmes
Prepare an environmental assessment report.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (2 reports (20 marks each); 1 Environmental assessment report (40 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (2 reports), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Resubmission of Environmental Assessment Report).

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EV4010 Environmental Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1. (Summer after the Third University Examination).

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 x 6weeks(s) Placements (Work Placement); 1 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Gavin Burnell, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Gavin Burnell, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To develop professional and transferable skills and experience by working in the environmental sector.

Module Content: This module will provide students with exposure to, and experience in, an environmental work place. Students will be required to work in a placement as directed by the enterprise manager and the academic supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Operate in a structured working environment
Demonstrate teamwork
Assess and critique a work organisation
Communicate the work experience to academic staff and student peers.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Placement Report 50 marks; Seminar 15 marks; Placement Logbook 35 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EV4012 Environmental Impact Assessments

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Other (Project Work); 1 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Fidelma Butler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Fidelma Butler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To introduce the purpose and methodology of environmental impact assessments.

Module Content: Definition of EIA. Purpose and limitations. Legal background and Statutory requirements. Approaches and methods. Standardisation and quality control. Preparation of EIA reports and recommendations. Preparation of environmental impact statements. Case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Describe the legal framework for EIA
Describe the process and sequence of steps involved in Environmental Impact Assessment with particular reference to current practices in Europe and Ireland;
Explain the implementation of Conservation Evaluation techniques and their relationship with current EIA best practice;
Critically review key case histories of EIA in Ireland and the rest of Europe;
Integrate directed reading, case histories and lecture material to develop a contemporary general overview of EIA as practiced in Ireland and the rest of the European Union.
Prepare a scoping or appropriate assessment report based on a field site evaluation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 2,500 word project report).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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EV4013 Environmental Risk Assessment and Auditing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 3 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Deborah Chapman, School of BEES; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To explore the techniques used in environmental risk assessment and auditing.

Module Content: Environmental and health risk assessment: background, techniques and case studies. Integrated risk assessment. Definition and purpose of environmental audits. Procedures for undertaking an audit.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Produce a flow chart of the principal steps involved in environmental risk assessments and describe the key activities associated with each step
Describe, with reference to case studies, health risk assessment and ecological risk assessment methods
Critically evaluate the use and application of risk assessment in a range of scenarios from given case studies
Using a named example, describe the evaluation and management of risks in an industrial setting
Outline the procedures for an environmental audit and describe an example of its use.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Case study report, 20 marks; oral presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (marks for oral presentation carried forward whether passed or failed).

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