Book of Modules 2013/2014

ESXXXX

Choose by Subject Category or Module Code:
ES1001 Introduction to Europe and the European Union
ES2012 Innovation, Technology and Economic Change in Europe
ES2022 The European Union and the International System
ES2024 Simulation Exercise
ES2027 Comparative European Politics I
ES2029 EU: Political & Institutional Development
ES2031 Methodologies, Data Analysis & Research
ES2032 Mediterranean Politics
ES4022 Research Dissertation
ES4024 Contemporary International Crises
ES4025 Ireland & International Relations: From independence to globalisation
ES6001 European Development: Different Meanings to Different Europeans
ES6002 Core-periphery Relationships in Europe
ES6007 Applied Skills in Data Management
ES6008 Research Strategies
ES6009 Assessing Cohesion within Europe: Case Study
ES6010 Research Dissertation in European Development Studies
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Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

International visiting students should consult the International Education Office regarding selection of modules.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

ES1001 Introduction to Europe and the European Union

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 Tutorials (per week).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Therese Kenna, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of History.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a wide range of European issues and how these can be analysed; introduction to the major institutions and policies of the EU and their impact on the human and physical landscapes.

Module Content: Examination of main issues and themes in European politics and history since 1945; analysis of origins and development of EU; appreciation of the diverse environmental qualities of Europe; patterns of economic development and demographic trends and the significance of regional planning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Assess the emergence of Europe as a global region
· Evaluate the impact of EU policies on industrial, rural and urban development
· Assess the transformation of European cities from the pre-industrial to post-modern periods
· Evaluate the origins and consequences of the Cold War on Europe
· Explain the organisation and functions of key EU institutions
· Analyse the development of European integration since 1945.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: End of Year Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (4 x 1,500 word essays, 80 marks. Tutorials, 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 2 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 2 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing continuous assessment must submit alternative assessments for evaluation by a specified date in August as prescribed by the Schools of History & Geography).

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ES2012 Innovation, Technology and Economic Change in Europe

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography; Dr Patrick Enright, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To review key processes that influence contemporary patterns of food supply systems and industrial development within Europe.

Module Content: Processes that shape the European food supply systems and implications for rural Europe. The interaction between technology, business organisation and labour markets in an evolving European economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the key drivers of change for the European food system.
· Reorganise the role of an evolving Common Agricultural policy on rural Europe and the European food supply system.
· Identify and evaluate tne roles of key actors in reshaping industrial development in Europe.
· Explain contemporary patterns of industrial activitaies within Europe.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014.

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ES2022 The European Union and the International System

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, Department of History.

Module Objective: To survey the international context of the European Union.

Module Content: This module will provide an introduction to the study of international relations with special reference to the role of Europe in world politics. A variety of international institutions and issues will be examined, including an in-depth study of EU foreign policy and the EU as an actor in the international system.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Debate the changing nature of international politics and security.
· Appraise key International Relations and integration theories.
· Explain the character of the international economy.
· Discuss the nature and effects of globalisation.
· Assess the relationship between regionalism and globalisation.
· Compare and contrast major international and regional organisations.
· Show how unique the EU is as an international actor.
· Evaluate the EU's foreign, security and defence policies.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (failed or non-submitted coursework as prescribed by the School, must be submitted by a date specified by the School).

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ES2024 Simulation Exercise

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 32.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals (1 x 2 day European Council Simulation Exercise).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Module Objective: To give students an opportunity to develop communication and negotiating skills by participating in a simulated European Council of Minister Summit Meeting over two days.

Module Content: Students will be divided into country groups representing members of the European Union, and each will take responsibility for a ministerial portfolio. The Simulation itself will take place over 2 days. Press communiqués will be prepared by press teams each day. On the final day of the exercise, there will be a press conference. A final written report of 2,000 words must be handed in.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Organise and participate in a simulated two-day European Council of Ministers Summit meeting.
· Articulate their country's policies on current European Union affairs and negotiate their positions in both small groups and plenary sesssions.
· Chair a meeting.
· Write a press communiqué.
· Prepare a 2,000 word written report on their participation in the Exercise.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2,000 word report on Simulation Exercise 30 marks; Participation in Simulation Exercise 70 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (1 x 2,000 word report on Simulation Exercise: 30 marks; and 5,000 word essay in lieu of participation in the Simulation Exercise, to be submitted on a date in August, as prescribed by the School.).

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ES2027 Comparative European Politics I

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Module Objective: To introduce the comparative political method and apply it to the study of European politics.

Module Content: This module introduces the vocabulary and tools used in comparative politics. Definitions of politics, political and socio-economic cleavages, political ideologies, political parties, electoral systems, governmental systems, political institutions, forms of political communication and political culture are all debated in a European context.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the key concepts, theories and issues involved in the study of competitive politics.
· Analyse the following topics in the context of post-war Western Europe: liberal democracy; political institutions; constitutions and political culture.
· Analyse the following topics in the context of post-war Western Europe: party systems; party families; political & socio-economic cleavages; electoral systems; and stages in the development of party political organisations.
· Reflect upon popular disenchantment with democratic politics and upon the challenges facing established parties.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,500 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (failed or non-submitted coursework must be submitted, as prescribed by the School, by a specified date in August.).

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ES2029 EU: Political & Institutional Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Module Objective: To analyse key developments in the evolution of European Integration from 1945 to the present day; to assess the workings of EU institutions and investigate the nature of EU policies.

Module Content: Examination of the main issues and themes in the development of the EU since 1945; appreciation of the unique nature of this polity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the unique nature of the EU polity.
· Evaluate the origins & developments of European integration since 1945.
· Explain the evolving role of key EU institutions.
· Outline the main features & objectives of key EU treaties.
· Discuss the challenges associated with the enlargement process.
· Engage in debates about Ireland's membership of the EU.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,500 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (failed or non-submitted coursework, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted by a specified date in August).

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ES2031 Methodologies, Data Analysis & Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures ((Seminar Presentation), Practicals (Computer technology and research skills)).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History; Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To guide students in the preparation of their Fourth Year Research Project by familiarising them with a variety of techniques to collect, analyse, interpret, represent data.

Module Content: Enables students to acquire practical and academic skills in the collection and evaluation of material as preparation for the writing of a 4,000 word report regarding the country of their major language. Students develop a proficiency in data gathering techniques, computer-based methods of data presentation, data analysis and research design.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Formulate a viable research question.
· Develop strategies for data collection, interpretation, analysis and presentation.
· Evaluate the problems and difficulties of interpreting and analysing the data and results obtained by qualitative and quantitative means.
· Identify and access biblographical resources, primary material, databases and other sources of relevant information.
· Employ the practical skills necessary to design, plan and present a written dissertation. This involves submitting a proposal for a significant piece of research.
· Write a 4,000 word report regarding the European country of their major language.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((1 x 4,000 word Report 50 marks; practical exercises 35 marks, Research proposal and seminar presentation 15 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment(s) in lieu of failed elements for evaluation by mid-August, as prescribed by the co-ordinating Departments). Marks in passed elements of Continuous Assessment are carried forward.).

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ES2032 Mediterranean Politics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Module Objective: To develop a detailed knowledge of the government and politics of certain Mediterranean member states of the European Union.

Module Content: The module examines democratic politics in the Mediterranean area of the EU. Its primary focus is on the national political systems of France, Spain and Italy. Some attention is also given to political developments in Portugal and Greece.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss key developments in the post-war government and politics of the following countries: France, Spain and Italy, in the main, and also Portugal and Greece.
· Analyse the constitutions in place.
· Describe the main features of these regimes.
· Investigate the electoral systems employed and the development of parties and party systems in the cases under consideration.
· Evaluate the relationship of these countries with the European Union.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay, to be submitted on a date specified by the School).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (failed or non-submitted coursework must be submitted by a certain date in August, prescribed by the School).

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ES4022 Research Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Directed Study (Independent supervised research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Brunt, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Ms Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Module Objective: The submission of a 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic.

Module Content: Students are required to submit a 10,000 word research dissertation on an approved topic. This dissertation will draw substantially on sources in their major continental language and will be supervised by a staff member. Submission of final draft by 31st January. Submission of dissertation by 1st May.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Carry out independent research, especially while studying abroad in Third Year
· Locate, analyse and synthesise a body of primary source material appropriate to the dissertation topic
· Integrate a range of secondary literature incorporating the appropriate depth and breadth of materials
· Write an extended dissertation of c.10,000 words to the appropriate standard
· Employ at least one half of references from foreign language sources and indicate these in a bibliography.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 10,000 word dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (revise and resubmit dissertation, as prescribed by the Department).

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ES4024 Contemporary International Crises

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Detmar Klein, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Detmar Klein, Department of History.

Module Objective: To study the history of the Middle East conflict as one of the most urgent contemporary international crises.

Module Content: Analysis of the origins of, development of, and prospective solutions to the Middle East conflict.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate the importance of Zionism and anti-Semitism for the birth of the state of Israel.
· Assess Arab responses to Jewish immigration into Palestine.
· Discern the attitudes and actions of the major foreign powers in the creation of Israel with respect to the first half of the 20th century.
· Assess the significance of the various wars and peace initiatives in the Middle East since 1948.
· Illustrate the attitudes of Israelis and Palestinians vis-a-vis Israel/Palestine.
· Explain the reasons why attainment of peace in this region is so difficult.
· Show competence in the analysis of relevant primary source documents.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1.500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (failed or non-submitted coursework must be submitted by mid-August, as prescribed by the Department).

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ES4025 Ireland & International Relations: From independence to globalisation

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, Department of History.

Lecturer(s): Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, Department of History.

Module Objective: To examine Ireland's place in the world.

Module Content: Irish foreign policy (political, diplomatic and economic); role of regional and international institutions; case studies; the relationship between values, interests, identity and foreign policy; foreign policy formulation; theoretical approaches.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Interpret, analyse and assess Ireland's place in the world.
· Examine the impact of European integration on Irish foreign and defence policy.
· Analyse Ireland's policies towards major inernational crises and events both past and present.
· Assess the role of international institutions, and global developments, on Ireland's place in the world.
· Identify, sift, select and analyse relevant forms of information (original documents, official publications, newspapers, books, articles & audiovisual sources).
· Present arguments effectively in a written and verbal form.
· Demonstrate the ability to work independently under the constraints imposed by the components of assessment, for example: word limit, time limit and deadlines.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay essay: 70 marks; 1 in-class presentation: 10 marks; 1 x 1,500 book review: 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed or non-submitted elements of continuous assessment, as prescribed by the School, must be submitted by the third Friday in August).

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ES6001 European Development: Different Meanings to Different Europeans

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To introduce a range of different perspectives as to what constitutes the spatial and cultural definition of European development. To appreciate that Europe is a multifaceted global realm that has changed through time and between people who have adopted different agendas for European development.

Module Content: Through a series of seminars, the module will explore some central issues that contribute to an understanding of the diverse nature of European development: cultural identities, rural versus urban Europe, the legal entity of Europe, the natural landscapes, economic reality and political aspiration. On completion of this module, students will have had a critical introduction to this complex global realm.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate developmental issues confronting Europe.
· Assess different interpretations of European development.
· Recognise a variety of thematic areas that impact on the develpment process.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 assignments 30 marks; 1 x 4,000 word essay due at end of Teaching Period I 70 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must revise and resubmit the essay, as prescribed by the Department).

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ES6002 Core-periphery Relationships in Europe

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To engage with the variety of different issues that relate to core-periphery dialectics within Europe. It will focus on the spatial and structural issues that result from convergence/divergence of the development process within Objective 1 and Objective 2 regions of the European Union.

Module Content: Through a series of seminars the module will explore the relationships between core and periphery within Europe and engage the policy agendas of the European Commission which are designed to reduce regional disparities of all kinds. The accession and proximity of many eastern European states to the European Union will pose many new challenges for harmonious development in Europe. Experts from outside UCC will participate in this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Criticise contemporary development trends in Europe.
· Assess core-periphery relationships that evolve within Europe.
· Evaluate the implications for Europe of enlargmeent and deepening of the European Union.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 assignments 30 marks; 1 x 4,000 word essay due at the end of Teaching Period I 70 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (Mark obtained for Seminar Attendance and Contribution), Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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ES6007 Applied Skills in Data Management

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 15 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 8 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Ms Helen Bradley, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To enable students to improve their skills in a number of critical areas: computer applications; bibliographic reserach; use of maps and representation of spatial data; effective communication (oral, visual and textual).

Module Content: Through seminars, computer-based practicals and library work, students will receive instruction and will be expected to achieve competence in a range of essential skills, In relation to IT this will include work processing spreadsheets and data base management, the use of the internt/web pages. Other skills include searching and managing bibliographic data bases, Geographical Systems; and the effective presentation of reserach results.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Gain proficiency in a number of software packages (MS Office Suite).
· Enhance their research and presentation skills.
· Utilise GIS software.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ( Computer practicals 60 marks; Bibliographic skills 20 marks; presentation skills 70 marks; academic writing skills 50).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students will be required to resit/resubmit computer practicals and demonstrate competence in bibliographic and presentation skills).

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ES6008 Research Strategies

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: Using the case study aproach, students will work in small groups to evaluate recent progress in cultural, social and economic cohesion within Europe.

Module Content: Through seminars/practicals the module begins by introducing the philosophical, ethical and legal dimensions of reserach. It then explores different quantitative methods for analysing data, including statistical modelling. Different qualitiative techniques of data analysis are then examined, including textual and discourse analysis, focus groups, life histories. Besides completing practical work, students are required to write an extended essay on the methodologies they propose to use in their dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate the principles of effective research design.
· Assess the advantages of diverse research techniques to access primary data.
· Formulate a comprehensive research proposal.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (6 practicals - 120 marks; 1 x 2,500 word essay 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing to complete the practical programme are required to represent the failed practicals. The essay must be revised and resubmitted, as prescribed by the Department).

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ES6009 Assessing Cohesion within Europe: Case Study

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 10 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 8 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 4 x 3hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: Using the case study approach, students will work in small groups to evaluate recent progress in cultural, social and economic cohesion within Europe.

Module Content: Once student groups of between 3-5 students have been determined and their topics and staff members assigned, orientation will be provided essentially through tutorials, while seminars will provide the forum for each group to present its findings. Suitable topics include:
urbanisation, telecommunications, the CAP and rural development, FDI and labour market changes, migration, environmental management and sustainable development, maritime resources. These topics can be approached from a variety of spatial scales e.g. regional national. The module will emphasise team work, the role of the individual and collective responsibility. Use will be made of skills acquired in related modules, including report writing to help students to better define their dissertation topics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Work effectively as a member of focussed team.
· Undertake in-depth analysis of a specified theme through case study approaches.
· Enhance communication skills via oral and written presentation of group report.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Seminar presentation 120 marks [individual contribution 70 marks, team effort 50 marks]; Final written report [10,000 words] 180 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revise and resubmit final report, as prescribed by the Department).

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ES6010 Research Dissertation in European Development Studies

Credit Weighting: 45

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3. (May - August).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (Independent Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Raymond O'Connor, Department of Geography.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics; Staff, Department of Food Business and Development; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: Students are required to explore some key research issues arriving from the developmental process operating in Europe. They must display a thorough knowledge of the relevant literature and skills in presenting a dissertation which reflects their personal research interests.

Module Content: Students select their own research topic after consultation and agreement with the relevant staff involved in the degree programme. Independent research will be carried out between May and August under the direction of a supervisor allocated to each student. The dissertation must be submitted as a hard bound manuscript with a maximum length of 25,000 words. The submission date for all students is 5th September and must be registered with the Secretary in the Department of Geography.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Undertake personal research.
· Operationalise a research strategy and methodology to address research aims.
· Use interpretive skills to assess fieldwork data.
· Produce a coherent, research-driven dissertation.

Assessment: Total Marks 900: Continuous Assessment 900 marks (Research Dissertation (25,000 words max)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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