Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

EN1002 Literature and Society: Medieval to Renaissance
EN1003 Introduction to Modern Literature: Romantics to Contemporary
EN1004 Theories: Literature, Film, Drama and Theatre Studies
EN1101 Contexts : the Production and Reception of Literature and Film
EN1103 Problems in Literature and Film
EN2005 Writing and Communication
EN2006 Critical Skills Seminar I
EN2007 Critical Skills Seminar II
EN2008 Critical Skills Seminar III
EN2009 Critical Skills Seminar IV
EN2011 Chaucer The Canterbury Tales and Related Texts
EN2012 Old English Language
EN2021 Seventeenth Century Literature
EN2023 Eighteenth Century Literature
EN2036 American Cinema to 1960
EN2043 Romance and Realism
EN2046 Nineteenth-Century American Literature
EN2066 Drama: Medieval to Renaissance
EN2071 Women and Literature
EN2073 Introduction to Shakespearean Drama
EN2077 Inventing Modern Drama
EN2078 Colony and Nation: Irish Literature before 1900
EN2101 Creative Writing 1
EN3006 Special Studies Seminar I
EN3007 Special Studies Seminar II
EN3008 Special Studies Seminar III
EN3009 Special Studies Seminar IV
EN3015 Of Monsters and Men: Old & Early English Literature
EN3037 European Cinema
EN3048 20th Century American Literature
EN3051 Critical Theory
EN3065 Romance: Medieval to Renaissance
EN3072 Romantic Literature
EN3073 Victorian Literature
EN3075 Contemporary Irish Writing
EN3076 Contemporary Literature and Culture
EN3077 The Irish Literary Revival & Irish Modernism
EN3078 Contemporary Theatre
EN3107 Studies in Shakespeare
EN3108 Modernism
EN3109 Creative Writing 2
EN3110 Dissertation
EN6000 Modern Aesthetics in English Literature and Culture
EN6002 Dissertation in Comparative Aesthetics and the Arts
EN6009 Contemporary Research: Skills, Methods and Strategies
EN6017 Dissertation in English
EN6025 Literary and Cultural Modernisms
EN6026 Postmodernism in Literature and Film
EN6027 Romanticism and Modernity
EN6028 Theories of Modernity
EN6029 American Modernities
EN6031 Poetry 1
EN6032 Fiction Workshop
EN6033 Writing the Self: Fiction and non-Fiction
EN6034 The Business of Writing
EN6035 Writing and Experiment
EN6037 Food Writing
EN6038 Writing for Radio
EN6040 Dissertation in Creative Writing
EN6042 Workshop with Writer-in-Residence
EN6043 Poetry 2
EN6044 Craft and Technique of Fiction (1): The Short Story
EN6047 Irish Culture: Colonial, Postcolonial Transnational
EN6048 Gender and Sexuality
EN6050 Space and Place in Irish Writing and Film
EN6051 Middle English Literature, 1200-1550
EN6052 New Histories of the Book: Theories and Practices of Earlier Writing
EN6053 Old English Literature to c. 1200
EN6054 Renaissance Literature, c. 1500-1700
EN6055 Texts and Transformations: Medieval to Renaissance
EN6057 Writing for the Media

EN1002 Literature and Society: Medieval to Renaissance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 200, Max 450.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): EN1003; EN1004

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (and related tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English; Dr Andrew King, School of English; Dr Edel Semple, School of English; Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the generic, thematic, and historicised variety of English literature from the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Module Content: The module will help students to build a sense of the traditions and innovations in English literature throughout a 1000 year 'period'. Students would encounter major and influential writers and texts, as well as some previously marginalised voices. Lectures would introduce students to important contexts of cultural production as well as offering some opportunity to interrogate the traditional sense of the medieval and Renaissance as two distinct periods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse medieval and Renaissance texts with a sense of their historical and cultural contexts
Develop a sense of some of the generic and formal traditions running through medieval and Renaissance literature, and how writers responded to them.
Write well structured and effectively analytical essays on a range of topics relating to medieval and Renaissance English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 85 marks; Continuous Assessment 15 marks (1x 1000 word essay [15 marks]).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (plus 30 minutes reading time) to be taken in Winter 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (plus 30 minutes reading time) to be taken in Autumn 2016. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN1003 Introduction to Modern Literature: Romantics to Contemporary

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 200, Max 450 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): EN1002; EN1004

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Graham Allen, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: The module offers a foundation in the study of English literature from the late eighteenth century to the present. It is designed to equip students with the skills needed for advanced study and to give you an overview of the subject that will enable you to make informed choices from the modules available in Year 2 and final Year. The module also focuses, through tutorial work, on essay writing and composition.

Module Content: The module covers the development of English literature from the Romantic period, through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and into the present day, via a range of representative texts. Texts studied are drawn from English, Irish, American and post-colonial cultures. The course also reflects the connections between literature and film, art, music, history, and popular culture, and draws upon these related areas

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
a basic understanding of how literary styles and forms have emerged and developed across from the Romantic period to the present day.
a basic understanding of structural, formal and technical elements of literary texts.
a basic ability to discuss how literary form generates meaning
a basic ability to discuss how literary form relates to its historical and cultural contexts
the ability to write a clearly structured essay in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 85 marks; Continuous Assessment 15 marks (1 x 1000 word essay [15 marks]).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (plus 30 minutes reading time) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (plus 30 minutes reading time) to be taken in Autumn 2016. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN1004 Theories: Literature, Film, Drama and Theatre Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 200, Max 450.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): EN1002; EN1003

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide strong foundations for the analysis of literature, film, drama and theatre studies at university level and to prepare students for advanced critical thinking.

Module Content: This module, which runs throughout the first year, introduces students to the study of English at university level. The lectures track key debates in literature, film, drama and theatre studies and ask students to advance their understanding of the processes by which texts acquire meaning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify some of the key debates in the criticism of literature, film, drama and theatre
Interrogate the processes whereby texts from literature, film, drama and theatre acquire meaning
Participate in debates regarding the role of literature and film in culture, politics and society
Write a clearly-structured response to critical and cultural texts in writing which is effective and correct.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,500 word assessment exercises (85 marks) 1 x 1000 word essay [15 marks]).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN1101 Contexts : the Production and Reception of Literature and Film

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): EN1103; EN1002; EN1003; EN1004

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To prepare students to understand the importance of contexts of literary production and reception in relation to literature, film and digital media across of range of periods and genres.

Module Content: In focusing on ideas of literary and film production and reception, the module will make students aware of how such contexts shape our understanding of narratives and their meaning. The module will consider a range of contexts for literary production and reception. These will include medieval and later manuscript culture, the relationship between theatre and audience in the early modern period, the impact of print and the rise of a mass market from the eighteenth century onwards, and the impact of new technologies, such as film and digital media.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Explain the meaning of context in relation to literature and film
Analyse texts in the context of their production and reception
Identify some of the ways in which production and reception shape the meanings of texts
Identify some of the ways in which production and reception have changed over time
Discuss context using appropriate critical terms and concepts
Articulate their responses to texts in essays which are properly referenced and argued
Write correct and effective English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN1103 Problems in Literature and Film

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): EN1101; EN1002; EN1003; EN1004

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Seminars (to include student presentations ; 4 x 1 hr library visits; 30 hours work on group projects, to be assessed via presentations and recorded via reading journals.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edel Semple, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' skills in critical analysis via enquiry-based methods; to develop good research practices through individual and group work on a range of literary texts; and to help students to become independent and confident learners at university level.

Module Content: Through enquiry-based learning, this module equips students with the skills needed to study literature and film at an advanced level. Students will engage in self-directed research on defined literary problems that examine literature and film in a variety of forms and from a range of genres and periods. In this module, students will have the opportunity to develop presentation and information-retrieval skills, to apply their knowledge to form practical solutions, and to produce creative individual and collaborative work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse a range of texts.
Work as self-directed, independent learners
Work efficiently as part of a team.
Use and evaluate resources essential to the study of literature and film.
Identify key periods, literary traditions, terms and genres.
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to literary texts
Prepare and deliver effective presentations.
Participate in class discussions
Write cogent, clearly-structured prose in correct English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (A group project presentation (oral and written), 100 marks; individual reading journal, containing a record of all the work for the project, 100 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance and Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% If a student misses one-third of scheduled seminars,without supplying relevant documentation to the module coordinator, s/he automatically fails the module.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN2005 Writing and Communication

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Valerie Coogan, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Ms Valerie Coogan, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To teach students the importance of presentation in oral and written business communication.

Module Content: This module is primarily concerned with the following three areas: Business Formats (report writing; press releases; business letters; memoranda); English Writing Skills (structure of written work; clarity in style; paragraph planning; punctuation); Oral Communication (public speaking; interviews; business meetings).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Structure clear and concise business writing assignments in correct Standard English.
Deliver effective and succinct informative and persuasive presentations.
Write in a style which is relevant, logical and coherent.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (9 x assignments 90 marks; Tutorial Attendance and Contribution 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of Continuous Assessment) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN2006 Critical Skills Seminar I

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6 (approximately 15 students per seminar group).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus associated tutorials and practical classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of English; Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' skills in reading, writing and critical practice through closely-directed study and discussion of a range of selected texts.

Module Content: Students must choose one from the wide range of topics offered by the staff of the Department of English for completion in Semester 1. The range of topics will cover a variety of forms, genres and periods, including poetry, fiction, drama and/or film.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read/view the set texts
Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterization
Relate the set texts to one another
Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts
Work and learn with others
Participate in class discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written Assignments (totalling approximately 5,000 words) 140 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 30 marks; Participation 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance and Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% If a student misses one-third of scheduled classes, without supplying relevant documentation to the seminar coordinator, they automatically fail the seminar.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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EN2007 Critical Skills Seminar II

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (approximately 15 students per seminar group).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus associated tutorials and practical classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edel Semple, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' skills in reading, writing and critical practice through closely-directed study and discussion of a range of selected texts.

Module Content: Students must choose one from the wide range of topics offered by the staff of the Department of English for completion in Semester 2. The range of topics will cover a variety of forms, genres and periods, including poetry, fiction, drama and/or film.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read/view the set texts
Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterization
Relate the set texts to one another
Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts
Work and learn with others
Participate in class discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written Assignments (totalling approximately 5,000 words) 140 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 30 marks; Participation 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance and Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% If a student misses 1/3 of scheduled classes, without supplying relevant documentation to the seminar co-ordinator, they automatically fail the seminar.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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EN2008 Critical Skills Seminar III

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (approximately 15 students per seminar group).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars (plus associated tutorials and practical classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of English; Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' skills in reading, writing and critical practice through closely-directed study and discussion of a range of selected texts.

Module Content: Students must choose one from the wide range of topics offered by the staff of the Department of English. The range of topics will cover a variety of forms, genres and periods, including poetry, fiction, drama and/or film.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read/view the set texts
Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterization
Relate the set texts to one another
Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts
Work and learn with others
Participate in class discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written Assignments (totalling approximately 5,000 words) 140 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 30 marks; Participation 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance and Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% If a student misses 1/3 of scheduled classes, without supplying relevant documentation to the seminar co-ordinator, they automatically fail the seminar.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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EN2009 Critical Skills Seminar IV

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (Approximately 15 students per seminar group.).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Seminars (plus associated tutorials and practical classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of English; Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' skills in reading, writing and critical practice through closely-directed study and discussion of a range of selected texts in the context of tutorials and practical classes.

Module Content: Students must choose two from the wide range of topics offered by the staff of the Department of English. The range of topics will cover a variety of forms, genres and periods, including poetry, fiction, drama and/or film. The topics will be addressed via discussion in small groups.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read/view the set texts
Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterization
Relate the set texts to one another
Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts
Work and learn with others
Participate in class discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Written Assignments (totalling approximately 10,000 words) 280 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 60 marks; Participation 60 marks. Note: Each of the two seminars will be separately assessed out of 200 [Written Assignments 140 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 30 marks; Participation 30 marks]. Each seminar must be passed separately. Compensation between seminars is not permitted.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance and Participation. Students must pass both seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Each seminar must be passed separately. Compensation between seminars is not permitted.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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EN2011 Chaucer The Canterbury Tales and Related Texts

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the generic and thematic variety of Chaucer's story-collection.

Module Content: This module consists of a detailed study of selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, a late fourteenth-century story collection. Students will read a number of the tales, exploring Chaucer's handling of themes such as authorial and narrative identity, the nature of literature and literary endeavour, sexual politics, and religion. Emphasis will be given to the thematic and dramatic links between tales, establishing the cohesiveness and variety of the work as a story-collection.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss the origin and concept of The Canterbury Tales
Assess the implications of its generic, formal, and narrative variety
Identify key themes in The Canterbury Tales, such as, gender relationships, authorship, and literary achievement
Discuss a number of individual texts from the collection in the context of the story collection as a whole
Locate their discussion of The Canterbury Tales in wider, appropriate literary and cultural contexts of the Middle Ages, such as attitudes to literature, society and religion.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN2012 Old English Language

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Directed Study (76hrs Private Study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To give students a basic reading knowledge of Old English

Module Content: The first part of this module gives students a basic knowledge of Old English grammar and a limited Old English vocabulary. Students practise translating both from and into Old English. The second part of the module consolidates this knowledge with the reading of simple Old English texts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Develop an understading of where English came from, its origins and its development
Acquire a thorough knowledge of English grammar and basic linguistics
Cultivate the ability to translate passages of Old English and, with the aid of a dictionary, be able to handle any piece of early English literature
Have an increased understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture and the literature that it produced
Develop improved linguistic skills that can be applied to any language.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( 2 in-class tests [70 marks]; 1 take home essay [30 marks]).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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EN2021 Seventeenth Century Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Claire Connolly, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cian O'Mahony, School of English; Prof Claire Connolly, School of English; Dr Andrew King, School of English.

Module Objective: To study two great English writers, Milton and Marvell, in their cultural and historical context, using contemporary perspectives on early modern literature.

Module Content: The module consists of:
- an introductory section outlining key historical and cultural themes 1628-1667, focusing on the English Revolution and Civil Wars
- a study of Milton's earlier work, then lyrical and political poetry by Marvell, and finally Milton's Paradise Lost

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Situate Marvell's and Milton's work in its cultural, historical and ideological contexts
Analyse the main themes and genres of selected poems within these contexts
Write informed interpretations of selected poems by both poets
Draw on recent critical perspectives to explain current understandings of Milton and Marvell in English literary tradition.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written work totalling approximately 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN2023 Eighteenth Century Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Graham Allen, School of English; Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop students' understanding of the relationship between literature and society in the eighteenth century

Module Content: The texts included will be drawn from different periods in the eighteenth century. Special attention is given to the rise of the novel form, and changes in notions of literature, authorship, and literary meaning. The course may also focus on questions of class, gender, ideology and nation in relation to literary texts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse a selection of texts from the eighteenth century.
Relate the set texts to each other and to other examples of eighteenth-century literature.
Discuss the cultural and historical background which both shape and are shaped by these texts.
Identify key social, cultural, and political events and concepts in this period and their emergence in/influence on the set texts.
Write clear, concise essays and/or exam answers that demonstrate a critical engagement with the course texts as well as the issues discussed in lectures.
Formulate essays and/or exam answers according to standard rules and guidelines of grammar, editing, and (in the case of take-home essays), bibliographic citation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written work totalling 3000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN2036 American Cinema to 1960

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Gwenda Young, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Gwenda Young, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the area of Film Studies, with particular reference to American cinema.

Module Content: This module examines the development of American cinema to 1960. It offers a detailed survey of American films, with particular reference made to the films of a number of key directors. These films are placed within socio-historical, cultural and cinematic contexts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss key ideas and stylistic features of prescribed films.
Explain the relationship of prescribed films to each other and their cultural, productive, artistic and historical contexts.
Write clearly-structured essays/examination answers in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN2043 Romance and Realism

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Graham Allen, School of English; Prof Alex Davis, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the main narrative features of the novel tradition by concentrating on generic and formal approaches to reading novels.

Module Content: This module looks at novels from the late eighteenth century onwards and focuses on their generic form. The main objective of the module is to demonstrate the importance of narrative form in critical engagements with novels. Theoretical and historical study of the two dominant narrative forms in the novel tradition - Romance and Realism - is thus emphasised and students are encouraged to look at their approach to the novel with these theoretical perspectives in mind.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Distinguish between romance and realist elements of the literary texts on the course
Understand the importance of generic features in 18thC and 19thC fiction
Improved written, critical and analytical skills, developed through close analysis of some of the set novels.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN2046 Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English; Prof Lee Jenkins, School of English.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to introduce students to a range of nineteenth-century American texts in various genres.

Module Content: This module offers an introduction to the literature of the United States from the American Renaissance of the 1850s to the end of the century. Reading a range of texts in several genres drawn from the relevant period, students will explore themes of nation building, race and gender, slavery and the South, focusing on the role of literature in the formation of American national identity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read the set texts
Analyse the set texts in the cultural context of nineteenth-century America
Relate the set texts to one another and to other examples of American literature
Discuss the literary and aesthetic traditions from which the texts studied emerge
Write clearly-structured close readings of the texts in essays/examination, using correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN2066 Drama: Medieval to Renaissance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew King, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English; Dr Andrew King, School of English; Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of dramatic forms and genres from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance.

Module Content: This module divides equally between the drama of the Middle Ages and of the Renaissance. The medieval plays will be considered from the point of view of their ongoing interest as an imaginative, dramatic and literary product. The Renaissance plays studied will represent the variety of dramatic forms in the Early Modern period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Illustrate a fairly detailed knowledge of the texts studied.
Analyse key themes and matters of literary interest in the texts studied.
Consider the plays studied in terms of their contemporary performance conditions and their dramaturgical interest.
Differentiate between the performance conditions and thematic interest of medieval and early modern drama.
Understand a range of dramatic modes: tragedy, comedy, and irony.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN2071 Women and Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Heather Laird, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Heather Laird, School of English.

Module Objective: To examine literature as a gendered institution in society and analyse the principal ways in which this gendering functions.

Module Content: The module has two sections. Section 1 identifies the fundamental aims of studying literature from a feminist viewpoint, outlines the principal forms which feminist critique of the institutions of literature has taken, and briefly traces the development of feminist literary criticism, focusing especially on the contemporary period. Section 2, which may address English, American, Irish or other writings in English, makes case-studies of specific writers, brief periods and/or genres.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Identify the fundamental aims of studying literature from a feminist perspective
Outline the principal forms that feminist criticism has taken and broadly trace its development
Define terms and concepts central to feminist criticism
Critically read and analyse the theoretical readings contained in the coursebook, working with these terms and concepts
Develop readings of the literary texts in the light of the perspectives encountered in 2071.1
Participate when practicable in class discussions
Write clearly-structured essays/examination answers in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN2073 Introduction to Shakespearean Drama

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to key concepts and approaches in the detailed textual study of Shakespearean drama.

Module Content: This module will involve an introduction to some of the key concepts in Shakespearean studies; exploration of the question of genre within Shakespeare's drama; close study of representative examples of two or more dramatic genres; and detailed textual study of one of the major tragedies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Read and analyse a selection of Shakespearean plays, including examples of comedy, tragedy, history and romance.
Discuss the shifting social and cultural conditions which these plays both reflect and help to shape.
Apply a range of key critical concepts to the texts they are studying.
Write critical essay/s at an advanced undergraduate level in response to set questions on the material studied.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written work totalling approximately 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN2077 Inventing Modern Drama

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anne Etienne, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jools Gilson, School of English; Dr Anne Etienne, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to works which transformed drama at the end of the 19th century and inaugurated modern theatre.

Module Content: The module will study work by European playwrights such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Wedekind and Shaw who dominated and revitalized theatre from the 1870s to the1910s, leading experiments in naturalist, expressionist and social-problem drama. These dramatists inaugurated major shifts in theatrical and literary meaning and forms at the threshold of modernity. The module will locate selected plays in the cultural contexts of late19th-century Northern European societies, and explore their shared and differentiated ideological and aesthetic purposes. The precise focus of the module and the dramatists studied may vary from year to year.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Recognize and discuss the major shifts in themes and forms characterising the innovative drama of the late nineteenth century
Identify the broad outlines of the naturalist, expressionist, symbolist or problem drama of this period as appropriate
Situate the texts studied in their broadly shared social and ideological contexts in the period
Discuss plays by selected dramatists, identifying their most significant features of theme and dramatic style.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written work totalling approximately 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN2078 Colony and Nation: Irish Literature before 1900

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English; Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Module Objective: to outline the context for the emergence of Irish literature in English and to enable students to explore this literature through the introduction of key concepts and major authors.

Module Content: This module focuses on the emergence of Irish literature in English, a literature that had its roots in conquest and colonization, but which proved to be highly dynamic, giving voice to diverse views and developing distinctive forms. The texts included give students an opportunity to explore literary expressions of Anglo-Irish identity, as well as critiques of the colonial process and early examples of hybrid texts that combine Anglo-Irish and Gaelic elements. Authors may include Swift, Edgeworth, Burke, Owenson and Somerville and Ross.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss the development of English writing in Ireland in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the political and social circumstances that shaped it;
Read and analyse a selection of exemplary texts from the period;
Write critical essays on the themes and materials studied.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written work totalling approximately 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN2101 Creative Writing 1

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15 (This module is only available to students taking BA English (CK109)).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (with associated independent writing and research).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to the fundamentals of creative writing - exploring voice, manipulating language, creative structure and form.

Module Content: Students will read a variety of literary works, engage in discussion of issues relating to writers and writing, and hone their writing and editing skills. In addition to developing their own writing, students will learn to deliver informed critical feedback on each others' work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Construct pieces in short fiction and poetic form.
Engage in discussion of issues relating to writers and writing.
Develop critical skills in assessing literary work.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio of creative work 140 marks; contribution and participation 60 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Attendance and participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN3006 Special Studies Seminar I

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6 (approximately 15 students per seminar group).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus associated tutorials and practical classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Valerie Coogan, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' knowledge and critical skills to an advanced undergraduate level through close study of a range of selected texts and critical practices.

Module Content: Students must choose one from the range of seminar courses offered by the staff of the Department of English in Semester 1. Seminars will combine close reading, directed study, individual research, group discussion and/or presentations. The topics offered may be organised in terms of genre, theme, period or critical approach and will cover a variety of literary forms, genres and periods, including drama, fiction, poetry and/or film.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read/view the set texts
Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterization
Relate the set texts to one another
Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts
Work and learn with others
Participate in class discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written Assignments (totalling approximately 5,000 words) 140 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 30 marks; Participation 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance and Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% If a student misses 1/3 of scheduled classes, without supplying relevant documentation to the seminar co-ordinator, they automatically fail the seminar.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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EN3007 Special Studies Seminar II

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (approximately 15 students per seminar group).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus associated tutorials and practical classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Valerie Coogan, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' knowledge and critical skills to an advanced undergraduate level through close study of a range of selected texts and critical practices.

Module Content: Students mush choose one from the range of seminar courses offered by the staff of the Department of English in Semester 2. Seminars will combine close reading, directed study, individual research, group discussion and/or presentations. The topics offered may be organised in terms of genre, theme, period or critical approach and will cover a variety of literary forms, genres and periods, including drama, fiction, poetry and/or film.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read/view the set texts
Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterization
Relate the set texts to one another
Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts
Work and learn with others
Participate in class discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written Assignments (totalling approximately 5,000 words) 140 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 30 marks; Participation 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance and Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% If a student misses 1/3 of scheduled classes, without supplying relevant documentation to the seminar co-ordinator, they automatically fail the seminar.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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EN3008 Special Studies Seminar III

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (approximately 15 students per seminar group).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (plus associated tutorials and practical classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Valerie Coogan, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' knowledge and critical skills to an advanced undergraduate level through close study of a range of selected texts and critical practices.

Module Content: Students mush choose one from the range of seminar courses offered by the staff of the Department of English. Seminars will combine close reading, directed study, individual research, group discussion and/or presentations. The topics offered may be organised in terms of genre, theme, period or critical approach and will cover a variety of literary forms, genres and periods, including drama, fiction, poetry and/or film.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read/view the set texts
Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterization
Relate the set texts to one another
Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts
Work and learn with others
Participate in class discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Written Assignments (totalling approximately 5,000 words) 140 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 30 marks; Participation 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance and Participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% If a student misses 1/3 of scheduled classes, without supplying relevant documentation to the seminar co-ordinator, they automatically fail the seminar.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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EN3009 Special Studies Seminar IV

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6 (approximately 15 students per seminar group. This module is available to students taking Single Honours English [50 credits]).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Seminars (plus associated tutorials and practical classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Valerie Coogan, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' knowledge and critical skills to an advanced undergraduate level through close study of a range of selected texts and critical practices.

Module Content: Students must choose two from the range of seminar courses offered by the staff of the Department of English. Seminars will combine close reading, directed study, individual research, group discussion and/or presentations. The topics offered may be organised in terms of genre, theme, period or critical approach and will cover a variety of literary forms, genres and periods, including drama, fiction, poetry and/or film.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read/view the set texts
Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterization
Relate the set texts to one another
Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period
Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts
Work and learn with others
Participate in class discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Written Assignments (totalling approximately 10,000 words) 280 marks; Oral Presentation (or equivalent) 60 marks; Participation 60 marks). Note: Each of the two seminars will be separately assessed out of 200 [Written Assignments 140 marks; Oral presentation (or equivalent) 30 marks; Participation 30 marks]. Each seminar must be passed separately. Compensation between seminars is not permitted.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance and Participation. Students must pass both seminars.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Each seminar must be passed separately. Compensation between seminars is not permitted.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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EN3015 Of Monsters and Men: Old & Early English Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English.

Module Objective: To provide students with an advanced appreciation of early English literature by examining a variety of texts and their contexts.

Module Content: Old and Early Middle English literature reveals that horror is by no means a modern phenomenon. This course analyses heroes, monsters and monstrous human behaviour as cultural constructions which reveal a society's values and fears. By examining a range of texts from both the prose and poetic corpus, we will analyse the role and function of the hero and `the other' within cultural identity. Dragons, monsters, saints, soldiers and women - we will ask where authors draw the line between the monster and the man?

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Acquire knowledge and understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture
Develop the ability to discuss texts in their literary and historical contexts
Cultivate the skills that allow them to relate texts to contemporary ideals, revealed elsewhere in art and literature, in the textual and material culture of Anglo-Saxon England
Engage in close analysis of the set poems and prose and thereby improve written, critical and analytical skills.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written work totalling approximately 3000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN3037 European Cinema

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barry Monahan, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barry Monahan, School of English; Dr Gwenda Young, School of English.

Module Objective: This module examines a number of major film movements in European cinemas up to 1970

Module Content: Representative films from each movement will be examined in detail, with particular reference being made to the roles played by the director, editor and cinematographer in the formation of film style and meaning. The selected film movements will be placed within socio-historical, cinematic, political and theoretical contexts. Film movements studied may include: German Expressionism; Post-War British Cinema; French Nouvelle Vague; Italian Neorealism; Soviet Montage Cinema

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss key ideas and stylistic features of prescribed films.
Explain the relationship of prescribed films to each other and their cultural, productive, artistic and historical contexts.
Write clearly-structured essays/examination answers in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written work totalling approxi,ately 3000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN3048 20th Century American Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Lee Jenkins, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English; Prof Lee Jenkins, School of English.

Module Objective: To provide a survey of Twentieth-Century American Literature, its background and contexts.

Module Content: This module will study a range of Twentieth-Century American texts in fiction and poetry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read the set texts, paying particular attention to the cultural context of twentieth-century America
Analyse the set texts in the contexts of the literary, historical and ethnic traditions from which the texts studied emerged
Participate where practicable in class discussion
Write clearly-structured essays/examination answers.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN3051 Critical Theory

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Graham Allen, School of English; Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of twentieth century theories of literature and culture.

Module Content: This module discusses theoretical perspectives on literature and culture, selected from among the following: Russian Formalist, Marxist, structuralist, feminist, New Historicist, post-colonialist, psychoanalytic and post-structuralist.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read the set theoretical texts, paying particular attention to their relevance for the study of literary and cultural texts
Relate the theories presented in the module to one another
Write clearly-structured and theoretically-coherent essays/examination answers in coherent Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN3065 Romance: Medieval to Renaissance

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cian O'Mahony, School of English; Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English; Dr Andrew King, School of English.

Module Objective: To explore the diversified nature of romance writing from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Module Content: This module explores the nature of romance as a certain kind of literary mode or experience through close thematic study of some representative texts of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Texts generally include some Arthurian romance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss the concept of romance as a certain kind of literary genre and mode.
Identify the key themes and characteristics of romance texts.
Critically read and analyse the set texts.
Locate their discussion of romance texts in relevant contemporary cultural and historical contexts in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, such as considerations of chivalry, religion, politics, and textual transmission.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written work totalling 3000 approximately 3000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN3072 Romantic Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Graham Allen, School of English; Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' understanding and experience of literature in English from the Romantic period (1770-1830).

Module Content: This module covers a selection of literary texts from the Romantic period. Students are exposed to conflicting definitions of Romanticism and encouraged to critically analyse the selected texts in the light of these theoretical descriptions. Special emphasis is placed on the role of poetry and prose fiction, and to the gendered nature of writing in the period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read the set texts, placing them within some of their historical contexts
Define and use in written form, the following concepts: Romantic literature, Romantic culture, Romantic aesthetic theory
Write clearly-structured and interpretively-coherent essays/examination answers in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written work totalling approximately 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the department).

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EN3073 Victorian Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Heather Laird, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Heather Laird, School of English; Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to literature in English from the Victorian period.

Module Content: This module covers a selection of literary texts from the Victorian period. Students are exposed to various approaches towards Victorian culture and literature. Emphasis is placed on the realist and romance novel, the representation of urban spaces, class and gender division, questions of Nation and Empire.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse the set texts
Relate the set texts to one another and to other examples of Victorian literature
Discuss the cultural and historical background which framed the emergence and development of writing from the Victorian period
Analyse the set texts in the context of relevant social, economic and political transformations
Define terms and concepts central to an analysis of Victorian literature and apply these terms and concepts to the set texts
Participate when practicable in class discussions
Write clearly-structured essays/examination answers in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN3075 Contemporary Irish Writing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 24hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alex Davis, School of English; Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Module Objective: To explore a range of contemporary Irish writing and film in the context of recent Irish culture, history and society.

Module Content: The module will discuss a range of work in various genres (fiction, poetry, drama and/or film) from the 1960s to the present.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Read and analyse a selection of Irish works - novels, poetry, plays and/or films from the 1960s on;
Discuss the shifting social and cultural conditions which these works both reflect and help to shape;
Apply a range of key critical concepts to the works studied;
Write critical essay/s at an advanced undergraduate level in response to set questions on the module material.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Written work totalling approximately 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment as prescribed by the Department ).

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EN3076 Contemporary Literature and Culture

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Heather Laird, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Heather Laird, School of English; Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a selection of literary and cultural works from the 1980s onwards.

Module Content: This module introduces students to a selection of post-1980s British, American and postcolonial literary works. The course will examine these writings in relation to such topics as innovations in narrative form, empire and the decline of empire, and transformations in racial, gender and class politics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read the set texts, paying particular attention to the relationship between form and content
Define the following terms and apply them to contemporary literature and culture: Postcolonial, Postmodern, Historiographic Metafiction, Black Britain, Magic Realism, Counterfactual, Jewish American.
Relate the set texts to one another and to other examples of contemporary literature and culture
Analyse the set texts in the context of relevant social, economic and political transformations
Participate when practicable in class discussions
Write clearly-structured essays/examination answers in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN3077 The Irish Literary Revival & Irish Modernism

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alex Davis, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alex Davis, School of English; Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English; Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Module Objective: To give students a foundation in Irish writing and film, Irish cultural history and Irish literary cricicism in the modernist period.

Module Content: This course will explore a range of texts drawn from various forms (fiction, poetry, drama and/or film) from the late nineteenth century up to the 1960s

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Read and analyse a selection of works - novels, poetry, plays and/or films - from Ireland in the first half of the Twentieth Century;
Discuss the shifting social and cultural conditions which these texts both reflect and help to shape;
Apply a range of key critical concepts to the texts studied;
Write critical essay/s at an advanced undergraduate level in response to set questions on the material studied.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (written work totalling approximately 3,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit alternative assessment, as prescribed by the department).

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EN3078 Contemporary Theatre

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Anne Etienne, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Anne Etienne, School of English; Dr Jools Gilson, School of English; Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to plays at the crossroads of modernism and postmodernism which initiated and developed contemporary forms of drama and theatre since the post-WW2 period

Module Content: The module offers an analysis of plays by British, Irish and North American authors as varied as Samuel Beckett, Arnold Wesker, Caryl Churchill, Tom Murphy, Marina Carr, Suzan-Lori Parks or Debbie Tucker Green, who are responsible for the renaissance of drama and transformation of its language and form from the 1950s onwards. The double revolution of content and aesthetics, as led simultaneously by John Osborne and Beckett in the late 1950s, led to further experiments and developments in political drama and in the shape and construction of theatre works. Most of the dramatists under scrutiny are still writing and using a multitude of theatrical and literary idioms to examine and reflect upon their and our environment.
The module will locate selected plays in the cultural contexts of British, Irish and American societies from the 1960s and into the very contemporary period. It will explore the variations to be found in aesthetic modes and possible common moral and political values, as well as look at the relationship between form and meaning. Through the most contemporary plays studied, we will examine the role of voice, image, sound, bodies, film and digital media in theatre and performance, including an examination of liveness and performativity, through critical texts and performance examples.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Recognize the major shifts in themes and forms characterising contemporary drama and theatre;
Identify the broad outlines of the concerns and aesthetics of the precursors and the developments carried out by the experiments of the following generation;
Situate the texts studied in their social and ideological contexts in the different periods;
Discuss plays by selected dramatists, identifying their most significant features and their place in the contemporary British, Irish and American canons;
Engage with theatre aesthetics and practice from the dramatic to the post-dramatic model.
Understand how play texts function as blueprints for performance;
Integrate terms and concepts central to theatre, performance, performativity and liveness into written work;
Establish points of intersection and connection between various playwrights, theorists and practitioners
? Analyse the relationship between form and meaning in play texts and writing for performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN3107 Studies in Shakespeare

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Cian O'Mahony, School of English; Dr Edel Semple, School of English; Dr Andrew King, School of English.

Module Objective: To develop students' familiarity with a range of Shakespearean drama and to enhance their abilities to understand and analyse Shakespeare at an advanced level.

Module Content: This module will involve advanced study of a number of texts representative of the range of Shakespeare's dramatic works. The choice of texts and approaches will alter from year to year but will invariably include a combination of close textual study and consideration of important critical issues in the analysis and reception of Shakespeare.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand the concepts of dramatic genre as applied to a range of Shakespearean plays;
Discuss the plays studied in terms of their contemporary performance conditions and their dramaturgical interest;
Illustrate a detailed knowledge of the plays studied;
Analyse key themes and identify matters of literary interest in the plays studied;
Locate the plays within a contextual knowledge of early modern literary and dramatic traditions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN3108 Modernism

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 230.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Lee Jenkins, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Lee Jenkins, School of English; Prof Alex Davis, School of English.

Module Objective: To introduce students to a range of modernist texts.

Module Content: This module considers experimental literature and film from the early to mid twentieth century

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read the set texts, paying particular attention to the historical contexts and formal innovations of modernist poetry and fiction
Analyse the set texts in the context of critical and theoretical debates surrounding this literary period
Participate where practicable in class discussions
Write clearly-structured essay/examination answers.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2016.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2016.

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EN3109 Creative Writing 2

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15 (This module is only available to students taking BA English (CK109).).

Pre-requisite(s): EN2101

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (with associated independent writing and research.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: This module focuses on developing competence in specific genres of writing - short fiction, life writing and poetry.

Module Content: Students will produce sustained pieces of work in a workshop setting where their work will be reviewed by their peers. They will also keep a writing journal charting their writing process and literary development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Construct a range of short pieces from a representative range of genres: fiction; poetry; life-writing.
Make informed choices about genre, style and forms of self-expression
Engage in advanced discussion of issues relating to writers and writing
Demonstrate, in critical prose, an awareness of their own writing processes, addressing issues of style, craft, and the student`s own process of literary development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio of creative work of c. 5000 words, including writing journal, 140 marks. Contribution and participation, 60 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN3110 Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 20

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 60 (This module is only available to students taking BA English (CK 109)).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (The emphasis of this module is on independent learning and self-directed study.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew King, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Andrew King, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: The purpose of the Dissertation module is to give students the opportunity to write at length and in detail on a topic of their own choosing within the subject area of English Literature, and of extending their knowledge and ideas through research and self-directed reading. Dissertations, which should be typed or word-processed, must have a bibliography and include a statement that the work submitted is the result of independent study. The dissertation must not duplicate materials used elsewhere in other modules.

Module Content: The module leader will lead timetabled sessions, on topic selection, essay approaches and strategies for research and writing. Students will select and develop a research topic of their choosing in consultation with the module tutor and allocated supervisor(s). Dissertations will normally be 8,000 words long.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Select an appropriate topic for independent research
Locate that topic in its scholarly context using a range of appropriate critical literature
Arrange, develop and present a clear argument about the chosen topic
Build a controlled argument across a longer piece of work, in a coherent manner.
Write in correct Standard English, using relevant critical terms and concepts.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (Dissertation of 8,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Independent research and participation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN6000 Modern Aesthetics in English Literature and Culture

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Semesters 1 and/or 2).

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Seminars; Directed Study (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alex Davis, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: The module introduces students to advanced level study of three key movements in literature and culture since the 1790s - Romanticism, Modernism, Post-modernism. In particular, the module examines connections between ideas and aesthetic techniques traditionally associated with those movements.

Module Content: Students of the module will be exposed to sophisticated, historically-informed, and theoretically-rigorous approaches to the key areas of modern literature, and will be introduced to some of the most influential contemporary critical and theoretical models currently being applied to the notion of modernity. Texts will include work from major authors of the Romantic and Modernist movements. Students will be trained in Post-Modernist theoretical practices and will choose between the study of a selection of Romantic, Modernist or Post-Modernist texts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss key aspects of theories of Modernity and Post-Modernity
Analyse some aspects of the relations between Romanticism and Modernity
Write critically and analytically on subjects within the fields of literary and cultural theory and either Romantic literature and art or Modernist literature and art or Post-Modernist literature and art.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x 2000 word assignments.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN6002 Dissertation in Comparative Aesthetics and the Arts

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Individual Supervision).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To analyse and critically discuss an approved topic in detail.

Module Content: A dissertation written under the supervision of a staff member on an approved topic.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Engage in original research;
Develop individual research strategies and produce critical bibliographies;
Identify and utilise major interpretive and argumentative strategies;
Analyse and criticise relevant positions and approaches on an academic level appropriate to postgraduate research;
Demonstrate ability to write critically, logically and systematically, using proper citation in keeping with standards of postgraduate research;
Argue for an original position on an advanced level of critical reflection.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Dissertation (max 15,000 words) to be submitted by the first Friday in October).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EN6009 Contemporary Research: Skills, Methods and Strategies

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 54.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus Consultation, Presentation and attendance at Departmental Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English; Staff, School of English; Staff, Library.

Module Objective: This collaborative module equips MA students with the skills necessary for the development and implementation of research, through the acquisition of a range of skills, methods and strategies. It is designed to prepare students to present academic research in a variety of forms to a professional standard.

Module Content: By means of team-teaching and self-paced interactive work, the module will familiarise students with appropriate bibliographic styles, research techniques, research methodologies, and information resources skills. It will enable students to develop further their existing skills in formulating and communicating research ideas in the contemporary networked scholarly environment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Produce correct and effective academic writing at MA level, suitable for print and digital formats
Apply knowledge of appropriate scholarly citation systems
Create, collate, manage and share bibliographical data
Engage constructively with the research of others
Prepare and deliver verbal presentations at MA standard
Demonstrate digital literacy to an appropriate level
Develop and maintain a research blog
Outline and defend a viable dissertation topic.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Online Research Journal (3,000 words, developed from student blog), 60 marks; Literature and IT Review (1000 words), 20 marks; in-class assignments, 50 marks; Research Presentation (1,500 words) 60 marks; Preparation, Attendance, and Participation, 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Research presentation must be repeated as prescribed by the department. Marks for preparation, attendance and contribution are carried forward).

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EN6017 Dissertation in English

Credit Weighting: 40

Semester(s): Semester 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 48.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to conduct extended research and to present the results of that research in a dissertation.

Module Content: A dissertation of 15,000-17,000 words on an approved topic, written under the direction of an appropriate member of staff.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Write about a specific field of study in a coherent and well-structured way.
Utilize advanced critical, theoretical and methodological concepts in the presentation of their research
Contribute to existing critical, theoretical and methodological debates within a specified field of study.

Assessment: Total Marks 800: Continuous Assessment 800 marks (Dissertation of 15,000-17,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EN6025 Literary and Cultural Modernisms

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alex Davis, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alex Davis, School of English; Prof Lee Jenkins, School of English; Dr Heather Laird, School of English; Dr Anne Etienne, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to a range of European and American artworks and relevant theoretical texts. The module pays close attention to the ways in which these artworks reflect debates about the nature of both Modernity, as a philosophical and cultural concept, and the more period specific notion of High Modernism. Attention is also given to Modernist artists' and critics' positioning of such artworks within a larger historical framework.

Module Content: What is High Modernism? What is the relationship between Modernism and the traditions which it sought to transcend? What relation do cultural events like the Harlem Renaissance have to our understanding of the Modernist movements and traditions? Students will be introduced to canonical and non-canonical Modernist texts, in this way allowing for a broader and more sophisticated understanding of the plurality of Modernist art produced in the first decades of the twentieth-century. These Modernisms will be discussed and understood in relation to wider debates over European notions of Modernity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of the basic arguments concerning the nature of literary and cultural Modernism
Analyse and critically discuss selected literary and cultural texts in relation to their place within traditions of High Modernism and/or its others
Advance informed positions on the relationship between the idea of Modernity and various literary and cultural examples of literary Modernism
Engage critically and constructively with the views of other scholars and students, and with various modes of scholarship
Deliver effective presentations
Formulate an independent argument about Modernism demonstrating an understanding of its literary and cultural traditions
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6026 Postmodernism in Literature and Film

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alex Davis, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alex Davis, School of English; Dr Alan Gibbs, School of English; Dr Barry Monahan, School of English; Dr Jools Gilson, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to a series of examples of Postmodernist art. It compares and contrasts Postmodernist literary and cinematic texts, drawing out theoretical arguments about the utility and the limitations of notions of Postmodernism and Postmodernity. Returning to key theoretical debates about the nature of Postmodernity, the module encourages students to read these texts in terms of recurrent categories and concepts such as parody and pastische, intertextuality and hybridity, the collapse of the authorial and auteurial self.

Module Content: What is a Postmodernist text? Are there versions of Postmodernism? Is Postmodernism an empty signifier as a conceptual classification for contemporary art and culture? In this module students are introduced to the study of a series of Postmodernist texts from the fields of literature and film. Employing a number of key theoretical propositions about the Postmodern, students are encouraged in an interpretation and appreciation of texts which have been critically assessed in terms of Postmodernist aesthetics. The module enables students to negotiate their way around texts which, as Postmodernist examples, deny any stable critical positioning.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of the basic arguments concerning the nature of literary, cinematic and cultural Postmodernism
Analyse and critically discuss selected literary and cultural texts in relation to their place within traditions of Postmodernism and its critique
Advance informed positions on the relationship between the idea of Postmodernism and theoretical and cultural notions of Modernity
Engage critically and constructively with the views of other scholars and students, and with various modes of scholarship
Deliver effective presentations
Formulate an independent argument about Postmodernism demonstrating an understanding of its literary and cultural traditions
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6027 Romanticism and Modernity

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Graham Allen, School of English; Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to literary and theoretical texts produced during the Romantic period. The module looks at the manner in which Romantic texts engage with notions of Modernity and history. It introduces students to the manner in which texts by women writers contributed to the debates and controversies of the period.

Module Content: What is the relationship between that literature called "Romantic" and the eighteenth-century idea of Modernity? Is Romanticism a continuation or a questioning of the project of Modernity? How do women writers fit into the debates which characterize Romantic culture and society. Students in this module are encouraged to engage with texts from a range of canonical and non-canonical Romantic writers, and to learn how to interpret and appreciate Romantic literature in terms of its contribution to the history of Modernity and its on-going critique.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of the basic arguments concerning the relationship between Romanticism and Modernity
Analyse and critically discuss selected literary and cultural texts in relation to their place within traditions and theories of Romanticism
Advance informed positions on the relationship between Romanticism, tradition and the idea of modern society and culture
Engage critically and constructively with the views of other scholars and students, and with various modes of scholarship
Deliver effective presentations
Formulate an independent argument about Romanticism and Modernity demonstrating an understanding of the impact of literary and cultural traditions from the late eighteenth-century to the present day
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6028 Theories of Modernity

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Graham Allen, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Graham Allen, School of English; Prof Alex Davis, School of English; Dr Cliona O Gallchoir, School of English; Dr Barry Monahan, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to major concepts and theories of modernity and postmodernity. It helps students understand the relevance of these concepts and theories to a study of Romantic, modernist and postmodernist literature, drama, and film. The module provides students with major theoretical and historical concepts required for understanding and studying modern literature and culture.

Module Content: What is Modernism and what is Postmodernism? This module introduces students to some of the most important theoretical answers to these questions. Crucial texts by theorists such as Jurgen Habermas, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Jean Baudrillard and Frederic Jameson open the debate to students, who are then introduced to some of the canonical questioners of Modernity, including Nietzsche, Freud, and Jacques Derrida. By the conclusion of the module students are able to locate standard theoretical positions within the debate over Modernity and to begin to make their own theoretical and critical discriminations in terms of literary and cultural practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of the basic arguments concerning the relationship between Modernity and Postmodernity
Analyse and critically discuss selected literary and cultural texts in relation to their place within traditions of Modernism and/or Postmodernism
Advance informed positions on the relationship between Modernity, literary and cultural Modernism and Postmodernism
Engage critically and constructively with the views of other scholars and students, and with various modes of scholarship
Deliver effective presentations
Formulate an independent argument about Modernity and Postmodernity demonstrating an understanding of the impact of literary and cultural traditions from the late eighteenth-century to the present day
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6029 American Modernities

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Lee Jenkins, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Lee Jenkins, School of English.

Module Objective: This module provides an advanced introduction to American literature, film, and drama from the Age of Immigration to the post 9/11 US.

Module Content: Students will explore the relationship between American modernity and modernist and avant-garde literature, film and drama from the turn of the century to the present day. Topics may include: the Harlem Renaissance; fiction and film in the Jazz Age; modernist poetry; avant-garde cinema; postmodernist film and fiction; American drama from Miller to Mamet.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of the cultural, historical and ideological contexts from which the set texts emerge
Analyse and critically discuss selected texts in different genres (film, literature, drama) in the context of theories of American modernism, postmodernity and ethnicity
Formulate an independent argument about American modernities, in dialogue with existing criticism and theoretical models
Actively participate in class discussions and defend critical judgements against the informed opinions of others
Deliver effective oral and Powerpoint presentations
Write clearly-structured, critical essays in correct standard English, within the fields of American Literature and Film.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6031 Poetry 1

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 4 hours; Associated Reading, 4 hours; Research 8 hours; Consultation 2 hours.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Claire Connolly, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Claire Connolly, School of English, Writer-in-Residence; Visiting Writers; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: The module introduces students to advanced methods in the writing of poetry across a range of forms. The workshop examines connections between aesthetic techniques and practice and provides an intensive examination of the processes by which poetry is created.

Module Content: Students of the module will be exposed to historically-informed and theoretically-rigorous approaches to the area of poetry, and will be introduced to some of the most influential contemporary critical and practical models currently being applied to the writing of poetry. Texts studied will include work from major poets. Current creative theory and practice will also figure significantly in the module content. The module will focus on developing the student's own creative practice in the field of poetry and will include self-reflective essays on the developing process of their own writing and an awareness of the structural challenges and the requirements of particular forms. Research methods appropriate to the forms of writing taught are addressed as part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss key aspects of the theories of poetry
Analyse some aspects of the relations between their own writing practice and these theories
Write critically and analytically on subjects within the field of poetry
Produce a portfolio of poetry, developed through clear and recordable processes of enquiry and selection.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (portfolio with agreement with programme co-ordinator, 160 marks; preparation, 10 marks; contribution 10 marks; and prepared presentation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6032 Fiction Workshop

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): EN6044 or EN6056

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 3hr(s) Workshops (Directed Study, 4 hours; Associated Reading, 4 hours; Research 8 hours; Consultation 2 hours.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English (School of English).

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English, School of English.

Module Objective: The module develops the skills acquired in Craft and Technique of Fiction 1 & 2and allows students to apply their knowledge to their own writing in the genres of short fiction and the novel. The workshop represents an applied application of aesthetic techniques in the writing of fiction and an intensive examination of the process of creative writing in these genres

Module Content: The module will focus on developing the student's own creative practice in the field of fiction writing. The student will also hone critical and analytical skills in the workshop process through the peer reviewing of work-in-progress.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss key aspects of the theories of fiction writing
Express an awareness of the relations between their own writing practice and these theories
Write critically and analytically on the creative process through the practice of peer review.
Pursue a substantial piece of creative writing developed through clear and recordable processes of enquiry and selection.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio with agreement of programme co-ordinator,160 marks; contribution and participation, 20 marks; and peer review critiques 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6033 Writing the Self: Fiction and non-Fiction

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 3hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 4 hours; Associated Reading, 4 hours; Research 8 hours; Consultation 2 hours.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Module Objective: The module introduces students to advanced level study of theories and practice around the writing of biography and memoir, by locating key examples in literature and culture from writers such Wilde, Proust, McGahern, Bowen, Trollope, Sage, O'Faolain and others. Overall the workshop examines connections between ideas and aesthetic techniques associated with this genre

Module Content: Students of the module will consider historically-informed, and theoretically-rigorous approaches to the key areas of memoir and life writing and will be introduced to some of the most influential contemporary critical and theoretical models currently being applied to the notion of autobiography. Texts will include works from major authors and the vital relationship between theory and practice will also figure significantly in the module content. The students will be assigned creative practice around their own use of memoir and memory recall in the creative process. Issues around the validity and use of memory as a vital component within all genres of the creative process will be addressed and this module will link in with the aesthetic and practical elements within the genres of poetry, fiction and other forms of creative writing. Research methods appropriate to the forms of writing taught are addressed as part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss key aspects of theories of Life Writing, Biography and memoir.
Analyse some aspects of the creative relations between these genres.
Write critically and analytically on subjects within the fields of life writing, memoir, biography and autobiography
Pursue a research topic, developed through clear and recordable processes of enquiry and selection and the research and composition of a substantial piece of autobiographical writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio with agreement with programme co-ordinator, 160 marks; preparation, 10 marks; contribution 10 marks; and prepared presentation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6034 The Business of Writing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 2 hours; Associated Reading, 2 hours; Research 4 hours; Consultation 1 hour.); Placements (1-2 week).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English; Staff, School of English, Guest lecturers and industry professionals.

Module Objective: This core module promotes an awareness of the business and commercial aspects of the writing and introduces students to the advanced study of life as a professional writer. The module also provides students with experience of working in creative or cultural organisations, in a context in which they can draw on the academic debates explored in other modules, and develop key transferable skills



Module Content: Students of the module will explore the professional elements within the working life of the creative writer and consider key business elements in the creative writing industry. As part of this work, they will create and develop their own profiles, employing a range of contemporary digital media, to establish a solid professional presence. This module will include lectures and seminars on crucial elements within the publishing industry, including seminars on the role of the literary agent, and will access current best practice in approaching funding bodies needed to sustain a life in writing, literary journals and publishers. The module enables the student to access relevant financial, technological and legal support and prepares them for a life in writing. Additionally, students identify and undertake a placement with a statutory or voluntary body working in a relevant creative or cultural organization. Placements must be approved by the module co-ordinator. A list of potential bodies will be provided (including Glucksman Gallery, Cork University Press and the Munster Literature Centre) but students may also propose their own placements.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss key aspects of the business of writing and the challenges for the contemporary writer
Analyse some aspects of the relations between their own writing practice and their sense of working as professional writers
Understand the challenges faced by creative and cultural institutions ?
Interact and engage with creative and cultural institutions


Utilise a range of practical and interpersonal skills
Enhance their chances of obtaining employment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1,500 word assignment, 80 marks; preparation, 5 marks; contribution 5 marks; and prepared presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6035 Writing and Experiment

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 3hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 4 hours; Associated Reading, 4 hours; Research 8 hours; Consultation 2 hours.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jools Gilson, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jools Gilson, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: This core module investigates and explores the terrain of each students' writing practice through focused writing exercises which encourage the development of experimental and self-aware styles.

Module Content: This module will introduce participants to writers and artists working with writing and the visual; writing and the digital; writing and the body; and writing and sound. The module will examine the writerly in different arts disciplines, and use visual, digital, corporeal and sonic stimuli for writing exercises. Students will be introduced to visual / concrete poetry through writers such as e.e. Cummings, Marinetti and Apollinaire, and to visual artists who use writing such as Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Sophie Calle, and the Guerilla Girls. The module will look at writers who use online / digital technologies to make work. The module will look at writing and embodiment and examine writing about embodiment and embodies writing practices such as dance theatre, physical theatre and Ecriture Feminine. Writing and sound includes work on writing and voice. Practical writing workshops are focused on students developing a portfolio of writing / project work related to each section of the course. Research methods appropriate to the forms of writing taught are addressed as part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand the relationship between writing and the other arts.
Analyse the role of the writerly within a range of arts disciplines.
Develop or elaborate an ability to experiment formally with their writing practice.
Develop a portfolio of writing which deals with experiment and form.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Portfolio with agreement with programme co-ordinator, 160 marks; preparation, 10 marks; contribution 10 marks; and prepared presentation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6037 Food Writing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Intensive three-day course including on-site learning with leading food writers, plus additional hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Regina Sexton, Centre for Adult Continuing Education.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jools Gilson, School of English; Ms Regina Sexton, Centre for Adult Continuing Education, Visiting lecturers.

Module Objective: Students will develop their ability to write about food, food history and food culture in a context of expert professional practice at such world-leading institutions as Ballymaloe Cookery School (Shanagarry, East Cork), and Cafe Paradiso (Cork City).

Module Content: This module will give students an introduction to the history of food writing through examples from a range of periods and genres. Students will debate the status of food writing as literary or otherwise, partly through an examination of different forms such as the book, blogging, print media, radio and television. Students will be introduced to the writing practices of food writers such as Darina Allen and Denis Cotter as well as other invited food writers. Research methods appropriate to the forms of writing taught are addressed as part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand the relationship between food and food writing.
Have a broad knowledge of the history of food writing.
Analyse and understand the different genres of food writing.
Develop a portfolio of food writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1500 word assignments, 80 marks; preparation, 5 marks; contribution 5 marks; and prepared presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6038 Writing for Radio

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Intensive 3-day Course including on-site learning with UCC Campus radio, plus additional hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Jools Gilson, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jools Gilson, School of English, visiting lecturers.

Module Objective: This practice-based introduction to the techniques and strategies used in writing for radio will teach basic recording and editing while encouraging students to experiment with the range of forms of radio writing (from creative non-fiction, to documentary, to drama).

Module Content: Students will be introduced to the history of writing for radio, through listening to important radio writers, and examining the difference between written writing and heard writing. Students will be introduced to writing for radio by professionals in the field and will learn basic recording and editing. Students will visit local radio stations and develop their own writing for radio project. Particular focus will be placed on the critical use of voice, location, and structure. Research methods appropriate to the forms of writing taught are addressed as part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
express an understanding of contemporary field of radio broadcasting
Communicate effectively via this medium
Understand the differences between forms of radio writing.
Do basic recording and editing for radio.
Develop a writing project for radio.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1500 word assignments, 80 marks; preparation, 5 marks; contribution 5 marks; and prepared presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6040 Dissertation in Creative Writing

Credit Weighting: 40

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: To provide students with the opportunity to undertake an extended writing project.

Module Content: A substantial piece of creative work which shows how the student has engaged with the creative process. The dissertation is the capstone of the learning experience on the MA and is written under the direction of an appropriate member of staff. The length of the work will depend on the chosen genre, but should be no longer that 15,000 words in total. Research methods appropriate to the forms of writing taught are addressed as part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Write in their chosen genre in a coherent, well-crafted and well-structured way
Produce a substantial portfolio of writing in their chosen genre, developed through clear and recordable processes of enquiry and selection.
Think about writing as research
Locate their work in context of other writers and the literary tradition more generally
Edit, organise and present their writing in a professional way.

Assessment: Total Marks 800: Continuous Assessment 800 marks (Dissertation of c.15,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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EN6042 Workshop with Writer-in-Residence

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eibhear Walshe, School of English; Staff, School of English, Writer-in-Residence; Visiting Writers.

Module Objective: The module offers a flexible space within which to encounter advanced writing methods in a range of genres and allows for an intensive and self-aware examination of the process of creating imaginative writing.

Module Content: Students of the module will benefit from the close supervision and direction of the College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Science / Arts Council Writer-in-Residence. Participants will produce a portfolio of writing in their chosen genre, not longer than 3000 words, for regular review at the workshops. These will be reviewed using structured review guidelines and participants will submit final versions of the portfolio alongside a short critical commentary in which they reflect upon the process. Research methods appropriate to the forms of writing taught are addressed as part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss key aspects of the theories of writing
Analyse some aspects of the relations between their own writing practice and these theories
Develop a substantial portfolio of creative writing developed through clear and recordable processes of enquiry and selection.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Critical commentary, 20 marks; Final version of portfolio, 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN6043 Poetry 2

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): EN6031

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 4 hours; Associated Reading, 4 hours; Research 8 hours; Consultation 2 hours.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Claire Connolly, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Prof Claire Connolly, School of English; Staff, School of English, Writer in Residence, Visiting Writers.

Module Objective: The module develops the skills acquired in Writing Poetry Module 1 and allows students to advance their writing in the genre of poetry across a range of forms, in part by developing a poetry collection. The module draws on the continued study of connections between aesthetic techniques and the practice for the writing of poetry.

Module Content: The module will focus on developing the student's own creative practice in the field of poetry writing, elaborated by the study of advanced contemporary critical and practical models. Particular focus will be given to supporting students in the development of a poetry collection, though the study of relevant major poets, and their collections.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss and put into practice key aspects of the theories of poetry writing
Express an awareness of the relations between their own writing practice and these theories
Express an awareness of the structural challenges and the requirements of particular poetic genres.
Pursue a substantial portfolio of poetry, developed through clear and recordable processes of enquiry and selection.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio with agreement with programme co-ordinator, 80 marks; preparation, 5 marks; contribution 5 marks; and prepared presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN6044 Craft and Technique of Fiction (1): The Short Story

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): -

Co-requisite(s): -

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1.5hr(s) Workshops; Other (Directed Study, 2 hours; Associated Reading, 2 hours; Research 4 hours; Consultation 2 hours.).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces the student to key aspects of fiction writing through: (a) close reading and formal analysis of short fiction; (b) application of literary techniques in guided, craft-based writing practice.

Module Content: The module will focus on developing the reading skills of students using detailed and formal analysis of set fiction texts. Students will also hone writing skills with a series of craft-based writing assignments that will cover fundamental concepts of fiction, such as use of language, character development, plot, point-of-view, dialogue, pacing, tone etc.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Analyse a fictional text with a view to its form and literary technique.
Identify and reproduce key techniques of fictional craft through practie-based assignments;
Apply analytic and craft-based skills to their own writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio with agreement of programme co-ordinator, 80 marks; contribution and participation, 20marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. via portfolio.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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EN6047 Irish Culture: Colonial, Postcolonial Transnational

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Heather Laird, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Heather Laird, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to the "colonial" as a critical category for reading the interaction of cultural politics and literary production in Ireland.

Module Content: Edward Said has argued that "one of the main strengths of postcolonial analysis is that it widens, instead of narrows, the interpretive perspective". This module introduces students to the "colonial" as a critical category for reading the interaction of cultural politics and literary production in Ireland. Students will study the work of such seminal anti-colonial scholars and activists as Frantz Fanon, in particular writings that explore the relationship between culture and colonialism, as well as examples of Irish postcolonial criticism. With regard to primary texts, students will consider work written from a number of imperial/colonial positions, beginning with early texts by the colonial administrators, Edmund Spenser and Sir John Davies, through nineteenth- and twentieth-century essays, poems, drama, and novels, written from both sides of the colonial and sectarian divide, up to contemporary Northern Irish 'Troubles' fiction.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse a selection of writings/films written/directed from a number of imperial/colonial positions
Relate the set texts to one another and to other examples of Irish writing and film
Discuss the cultural and historical background which framed the emergence of these set texts
Engage critically and constructively with the views of a selection of anti-colonial/postcolonial critics
Define terms and concepts central to anti-colonial/postcolonial criticism
Participate in class and group discussions
Deliver effective presentations
Formulate an independent argument about the relationship between culture and colonialism in Ireland, drawing on and contributing to existing scholarship
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6048 Gender and Sexuality

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.

Module Objective: This module examines the relationship between gender, sexuality, culture, and nation and the queering of those categories into the twenty-first century.

Module Content: 'All nationalities are gendered; all are invented; and all are dangerous', Anne McClintock argues, 'dangerous ...in the sense that they represent relations to political power and to the technologies of violence'. Gender and sexuality mark a critical juncture of history, politics, the body, the individual, and the state in Irish culture, a nexus of anxiety and interest in the ongoing project of defining 'Irishness'. Historically Ireland has been figured as female, both in colonial discourse and nationalist iconography, while in the twentieth century, on both sides of the border after partition, strict sexual norms based on religious values came to be associated with national character. The chosen texts will be analysed in the context of questions drawn from a number of theoretical approaches, including feminist theory, gender theory, and queer theory.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate an in-depth critical awareness of the relationship between Irish artistic production, including writing and film, and the history of gendered and sexed readings of Irish identity
Analyse and critically discuss selected Irish texts in different genres (fiction, drama and poetry) in the context of theories of gender and sexuality
Advance complex and developed readings of course readings, based on detailed reading of the texts and a sound understanding of their historical and cultural contexts
Engage critically and constructively with the views of other scholars and students, and with various modes of scholarship
Deliver effective presentations
Formulate an independent argument about gender and sexuality in Irish writing and film, drawing on and contributing to existing criticism and interpretation in the field of study
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English, within the fields of Irish writing and film.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6050 Space and Place in Irish Writing and Film

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Lectures (Associated Reading, Research and Consultation Hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maureen O'Connor, School of English.

Module Objective: The module will introduce students to a variety of analytical and theoretical methods used in the criticism of Irish culture and equip students to explore the relationship between space and place in Irish writing and film.

Module Content: What is the relationship between space and place in Irish writing and film? What role do abstract spatial co-ordinates (the West, the city, the North) play in Irish culture and how do these become realized as particular places within literature and film? This module addresses the richly complex representation of space and place in Irish writing and film via the close analysis of three case studies, which also serve to address related issues of history, politics and genre. The first of these concerns the period of Irish romanticism; the second the region of Munster; and the third the landscapes of Irish film. The chosen texts will be analysed in the context of theoretical questions drawn from ecocriticism, psychogeography, cultural geography, urban studies and cartography.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of space and place and their role in Irish writing and film
Analyse and critically discuss selected Irish texts in different genres (film, fiction, poetry and memoir) in the context of theories of space and place
Advance complex and developed readings of course readings, based on detailed reading of the texts and a sound understanding of their historical and cultural contexts
Engage critically and constructively with the views of other scholars and students, and with various modes of scholarship
Deliver effective presentations
Formulate an independent argument about space and place in Irish writing and film, drawing on and contributing to existing criticism and interpretation in the field of study
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in correct standard English, within the fields of Irish writing and film.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000 word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and Participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6051 Middle English Literature, 1200-1550

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus directed study (associated reading and consultation hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: This module examines Middle English writing in its social, political, and literary contexts, with particular emphasis on questions of form, audience, and textual transmission.

Module Content: This course explores a fascinating period of change linguistic, cultural, and literary - in English writing in England, Scotland, and Ireland. The course explores the generic and stylistic richness of the period, covering the development and diffusion of lyric poetry, romance, visionary texts, satire, drama, and writing for women, with close attention to how this writing engages with problems of society, power, identity, and belief in the later Middle Ages.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse a range of primary texts in Middle English, experiencing both 'canonical' and marginal works as well as both traditionally literary and non-literary writings.
Relate, in both classroom discussion and essay work, primary texts to existing debates and scholarship concerning these texts, their cultural milieu, and the historical understanding of the period
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in the defined subject area of the course.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000- word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6052 New Histories of the Book: Theories and Practices of Earlier Writing

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus directed study (associated reading and consultation hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew King, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Kenneth Rooney, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces students to how books were made and how texts were written and disseminated in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Module Content: The class will gain experience of reading from manuscripts and from early printed books using facsimiles and electronic resources, and will explore the literary implications of reading medieval texts in their original textual environment. The course will also explore earlier theories of writing, authorship, and audience.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Discuss important features of medieval and early modern book culture.
Read medieval and Renaissance book hands.
Identify the processes used in the making of earlier books.
Situate earlier texts in their manuscript contexts.
Identify important themes in earlier theoretical writing on literature.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000- word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6053 Old English Literature to c. 1200

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus directed study (associated reading and consultation hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of English; Dr Thomas Birkett, School of English.

Module Objective: This module examines Old English poetry and prose in its literary, material and cultural context, placing canonical texts such as Beowulf and The Wanderer in dialogue with less-studied works.

Module Content: The course will consider issues in Old English writing such as authorship and authority, manuscript compilation and genre, and the political and gendered inflection of heroic culture in Anglo-Saxon England. It will explore the contexts of literary production in insular and continental environments in this period, and the legacy and influence of Anglo-Saxon literature in later traditions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse a range of primary texts in Old English, experiencing both 'canonical' and marginal works as well as both traditionally literary and non-literary writings.
Relate primary texts to existing debates and scholarship concerning these texts, their cultural milieu, and the historical understanding of the period
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in the defined subject area of the course.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000- word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6054 Renaissance Literature, c. 1500-1700

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus directed study (associated reading and consultation hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Semple, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edel Semple, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: This module examines the thematic, generic, and formal features of English Literature in the Renaissance in Britain and Ireland in its historical, material, and social contexts.

Module Content: This module explores a range of texts in different forms - epic, satire, drama, romance and others - as well as stimulating cultural contexts. The ability of the period's writers to reinvent and vivify older textual traditions is a central, though not exclusive, interest. Overall, the module reveals the extraordinary richness of the cultural production of the early modern period in both England and Ireland.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse a range of primary texts in the Early Modern period, experiencing both 'canonical' and marginal works as well as both traditionally literary and non-literary writings.
Relate, in both classroom discussion and essay work, primary texts to existing debates and scholarship concerning these texts, their cultural milieu, and the historical understanding of the period.
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in the defined subject area of the course.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000- word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6055 Texts and Transformations: Medieval to Renaissance

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 2hr(s) Seminars (plus directed study (associated reading and consultation hours)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Andrew King, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edel Semple, School of English; Staff, School of English.

Module Objective: This module will interrogate the traditional division between the Middle Ages and Renaissance, by examining the development of a literary, textual, and generic tradition over the two periods.

Module Content: The course will examine a set of case studies which bridge the traditional division of medieval and renaissance, and which can vary from year to year. These topics may include: the post-reformation reception of the Piers Plowman tradition; the appropriation of medieval chronicle writing and romance in Renaissance drama; and classical traditions in English writing from the Middle Ages to Renaissance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Critically read and analyse a range of primary texts in Middle and Early Modern English, experiencing both 'canonical' and marginal works as well as both traditionally literary and non-literary writings.
Relate, in both classroom discussion and essay work, primary texts to existing debates and scholarship concerning these texts, their cultural milieu, and the historical understanding of these periods
Write clearly-structured, critical and analytical essays in the defined subject area of the course.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 3,000- word assignment 180 marks; Preparation, Attendance and participation 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Marks for Preparation, Attendance and Participation are carried forward).

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EN6057 Writing for the Media

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Directed Study, 2 hours; Associated Reading, 2 hours; Research 4 hours; Consultation 1 hour).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.

Lecturer(s): Ms Mary Morrissy, School of English.

Module Objective: This module introduces the student to various forms of journalistic writing that bear a close relationship to fiction practice - feature writing, reviewing, blog-posting and essay-writing - through reading and craft-based practice.

Module Content: The module will use the work of leading journalists and essayists to familiarise students with various strands of journalistic writing and will involve a series of practice-based writing assignments, which will include learning to pitch for prospective publications, either print or on-line.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Be familiar with a number of journalistic forms of writing
Be able to produce sustained writing in one or more of the forms studied.
Know how to pitch and tailor writing to a target market.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio with agreement of programme co-ordinator, 80 marks; pitch and placement, 10 marks; participation and contribution, 10 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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