Book of Modules 2013/2014

ECXXXX

Choose by Subject Category or Module Code:
EC1104 The World of Economics
EC1105 The World of Economics
EC1151 Markets and Governments An Introduction to Economics
EC1152 Markets, Governments and the Economics of Social Issues
EC1201 The Market Economy
EC1202 Business Economics I
EC1203 Business Economics II
EC1204 Economic Data Collection and Analysis
EC1205 Quantitative Techniques for Economics
EC1206 Principles of Economic Analysis
EC1212 Economics of Business I
EC1501 Economic Analysis for Food Business
EC1906 Environmental Economics
EC2000 Economic Journey through Life Decisions
EC2002 The Changing Economy
EC2004 Empirical Research Methods
EC2005 Reasoning, Problem Solving and Communication in Economics
EC2101 Microeconomics: Behaviour, Organisations and Institutions
EC2102 Macroeconomics: Business Cycles, Growth and Development
EC2103 Skills for Economic Interpretation
EC2105 Developing Skills for Economic Analysis
EC2107 Reasoning and Persuasion in Economics
EC2151 Economics of Social Policy I
EC2201 Economics of Enterprise
EC2202 Microeconomics for Business
EC2203 Resourcing Organisation and Competitive Capability
EC2204 Business Microeconomics I
EC2205 Business Microeconomics II
EC2206 Business Econometrics and Forecasting
EC2207 The Macroeconomic Environment
EC2217 Business and the Macroeconomy
EC2701 The Market Economy
EC2901 Economics of Enterprise
EC2903 Economics for Enterprise
EC3001 Survey Methods
EC3101 Corporate Strategy
EC3103 Financial Markets and Institutions
EC3104 Human Resource Economics
EC3110 Health Economics
EC3112 Health Economics
EC3113 Public Expenditure and Finance
EC3115 Innovation, Competitiveness and Economic Growth
EC3121 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics
EC3122 Quantitative Methods: Survey Methods
EC3125 Economics Principles of Insurance
EC3130 Honours Dissertation
EC3131 The Wealth and Poverty of Nations
EC3132 Fostering the Creative Mind: The Economics of Innovation and Creativity
EC3133 Research Methods for Economic Investigation
EC3151 Economics of Social Policy II
EC3202 International Money and Finance
EC3203 Economics of Corporate Strategy
EC3205 Economics of Information
EC3207 Finance and Capital Markets
EC3208 Economic Consulting
EC3209 Time Series Analysis
EC3210 Principles of Insurance for Finance
EC3211 Advanced Data Analysis for Finance
EC3222 Transferable Skills-Economics -Work Placement
EC3223 Transferable Skills - Economics - Research Project
EC3409 Strategic Interaction and Decision Making
EC3414 Criticial Reasoning and Thinking for Business
EC3701 Economics of Financial Strategy
EC3901 Market Economy 3
EC3902 The Business Organisation
EC3903 Economic Readings Workshop
EC3904 Market Economy Accounting and Measurement
EC3905 Economic, Business and Financial Data Collection and Analysis
EC3906 Economic, Financial and Business Decision-Making
EC3910 Environmental Economics
EC4000 Economic Foundations 1
EC4001 Economic Foundations II
EC4171 Economic Integration in Europe
EC4201 Industry Structure and Competition
EC4202 Government and Business
EC4203 Economics of Human Resources
EC4204 Innovation, Technology and Strategy
EC4208 Law and Economics of Competition
EC4221 Business Econometrics
EC4222 Financial Economics
EC4223 Corporate Strategy Economics
EC4301 Economics of Health Organisations
EC4302 Health Economics
EC4402 Economic Research Project
EC4403 Economic Consulting
EC4404 Scenario Forecasting and Future Analysis
EC4405 Enterprise and Growth of Firms
EC4406 Economic Consulting
EC4901 Market Economy 4
EC4902 Prosperity, Productivity and Competitiveness in the Global Economy
EC4903 Economics in Practice: Showcase Business Event
EC5211 Enhancing Economic Skills Through Case Studies
EC5212 Reading Workshop in Economics
EC6000 Quantitative Techniques and Analysis
EC6001 Macroeconomics for Financial Markets
EC6002 Financial Institutions and Money Markets
EC6003 International Finance
EC6004 Regulation and Compliance in Capital Markets
EC6005 Derivatives Securities
EC6006 Treasury Risk Management
EC6007 Portfolio Management
EC6008 Asset Returns and Valuation
EC6009 Research Methods
EC6010 Dissertation in Financial Economics
EC6012 Applied Econometrics
EC6020 Dissertation in Health Economics
EC6021 Health Care Systems and Organisation
EC6022 Health Care Economic Evaluation
EC6023 Health, Economy and Society
EC6024 Applied Health Survey Methods
EC6025 Applied Health Econometrics
EC6030 Health Economics in Practice
EC6031 Health Services Resourcing
EC6032 Research Skills and Methods for Health Economics
EC6033 Evaluating Health Outcomes
EC6034 Innovation in Health Practice
EC6035 Economic Decision Making in Health
EC6036 Health Care Markets
EC6050 Business Development and the Competitive Environment
EC6051 Growth and Change
EC6052 Innovation and Creativity
EC6053 Research Methods
EC6054 Econometrics for Research
EC6057 Dissertation in Economics
EC6058 Career Development Workshop
EC6059 Economic Data Analysis for Research
EC6061 Scenario Analysis for Creative Thinking
EC6113 Industry, Market and Strategic Analysis
EC6114 Field Work in Business Economics
EC6115 Economic Survey Techniques for Business Research
EC6116 Innovation in the Market Economy
EC6117 Reflective Journaling
EC6118 Practice Laboratory in Business
EC6119 Resourcing for Entrepreneurship and Innovation
EC6120 Business Practice and Live Case Analysis
EC6301 The Third Sector Economy
EC6503 Economics of Organisation and Business Development
EC6504 Economic Foundations for Strategic Thinking
EC6611 Economics of Business Strategy
EC6612 Analysing General Business Conditions
EC6613 Financial Economics and Business Strategy
EC6614 Scenario Planning for Strategic Decision-making
EC6615 Research Methods for Business Economics
EC6616 Business Survey Methods
EC6617 Research Workshops and Professional Development
EC6618 Business Economics Report
EC6661 Advanced Microeconomics
EC6662 Advanced Macroeconomics
EC6663 Econometrics: Theory and Applications
EC6664 Current Research Seminars
EC6665 Quantitative Techniques for Economic Research
EC6666 Research Methods and Professional Development
EC6667 Dissertation in Economics
EC7000 Developmental Approaches for Practitioner-Researchers
EC7001 Current Issues in Business Economics
EC7002 Research Design and Methods in Business Economics
EC7003 Research Design and Methods for Practitioner Researchers
EC7004 Research Analysis and Evaluation
EC7005 Research Presentation, Analysis and Evaluation for Practitioner Researchers
Back to Home page

Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

International visiting students should consult the International Education Office regarding selection of modules.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

EC1104 The World of Economics

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 600.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 30 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Frank Crowley, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics; Dr Aileen Murphy, Department of Economics; Mr Frank Crowley, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the Economic method of thinking and analysis through practical and application of key ideas and theories. To explain how the interaction of decisions by consumers, firms and government affect the employment and allocation of resources and the distribution of income and goods within the economic system. To develop the understanding of and practice the skills required to use a coherent economic accounting framework in decision making, by households, business and the public sector.

Module Content: The Market Economy: Households, Business and Government:
Introducing the economic system and the market economy as a discovery process; analysing how markets work, including the demand and supply framework by household, business and the public sector; consumer decision making; firm decision making; impact of government policies on decision making by consumers and firms.
Public Policy in the Economic System:
The role and impact of public policies in relation to: macroeconomics stability, economic development and income/prosperity distribution and the primary instruments and agencies by which fiscal, monetary and business related policies are implemented in the European and global economy context.
Economic Decision Making:
The individual decision-making process: happiness economies; risk and uncertainty; the rational individual and utility-maximisers; behavioural economics; Information and markets.
The business decision-making process; risk and uncertainty, the classical approach; game theory; evolutionary economics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain how the market economy works as a discovery process in the search for efficient allocation of resources.
· Describe economic relationships and identify what effects them.
· Evaluate, debate and think about critical issues ( such as minimum wages, rent controls, carbon taxes) in a rigorous way, using economic concepts.
· Distinguish between fiscal and monetary policy and evaluate the effect of specific measures on economic activity.
· Critically evaluate and assess economic arguments presented in public media.
· Apply the skills of economic thinking to analyse contemporary issues.
· Describe and distinguish between the main economic accounts and indicators.
· Explain the processes of economic decision making for individuals and business.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: End of Year Written Examination 170 marks; Continuous Assessment 130 marks (3 x Course/Project Work (2 x 40 marks; 1 x 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1105 The World of Economics

Credit Weighting: 20

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Seminars (& Workshops, Directed Study; Reflective Practice, Consultation).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the Economic method of thinking and analysis through practical application of key ideas and theories. To develop the participant's ability to communicate economic arguments and to reflect on their learning.

Module Content: Participants will learn how to think about individual decision making, co-operation and the changing economy through an examination of the following types of questions: Why do individuals have to make decisions? What is meant by the problem of scarcity? What is the role of incentives in the market economy? What information do prices reveal? Why is it better to co-operate? How do we correct economic failures? What causes booms and recessions? Can Government's tackle unemployment?

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain how the market economy works as a discovery process in the search for efficient allocation of resources
· Explain the processes of economic decision making for individuals
· Distinguish between fiscal and monetary policy and evaluate the effect of specific measures on economic activity and employment
· Describe economic relationships and identify what affects them
· Evaluate, debate and think about critical issues in a rigorous way, using economic concepts
· Critically evaluate and assess economic arguments presented in public media
· Research and use data to answer questions
· Communicate economic arguments to different audiences
· Prepare a reflective report on their own learning and performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 400: Continuous Assessment 400 marks (3 x Projects, 100 marks each; Self-Reflective Exercises, 50 marks; Presentations, 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1151 Markets and Governments An Introduction to Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Connell Fanning, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The basic principles of economic analysis are introduced, with particular reference to their use in understanding social issues.

Module Content: Unemployment, poverty, discrimination, growth and the standard of living. The role of markets and government in achieving social goals and public policy objectives is examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Use supply-demand analysis to interpret how markets respond to changing conditions.
· Distinguish different types of government policy and use supply-demand analysis to investigate how they affect activity levels in particular markets and identify who gains and who loses from the policies.
· Identify the main conditions under which markets do not function efficiently and analyse the policy measures available to government and how they remedy the deficiencies.
· Describe, illustrate and measure the extent of income inequality in Ireland and other countries.
· Distinguish the mains types of poverty and how they are measured and describe who is affected by poverty in Ireland and compare poverty levels in Ireland and other countries.
· Identify the main economic costs and benefits of education and distinguish, calculate and interpret the private, state and societal rates of return from investments in education.
· Describe the main statistical measures of macroeconomic activity in Ireland and show how they are related.
· Construct a model of a macro-economy, perform calculations on it to establish what determines the level of national income and well-being and how they respond to changes in government policies.
· Identify how trade policies in developed countries affect living stands in developing countries.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1152 Markets, Governments and the Economics of Social Issues

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Connell Fanning, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The basic principles of economic analysis are introduced with particular reference to their use in understanding social issues.

Module Content: Unemployment, poverty, discrimination, growth and the standard of living. The role of markets and government in achieving social goals and public policy objectives is examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse economic behaviour using supply and demand.
· Distinguish how economic and political systems impact on the provision of social care.
· Evaluate current social issues, such as the minimum wage/rent controls, from an economic perspective.
· Distinguish between monetary and fiscal policy and assess the stance of government fiscal policy.
· Identify the main stages of economic development., explain and illustrate the population poverty trap and outline the main reasons why poor countries remain poor.
· Define money, describe its functions and explain the role of banks in creating money.
· Distinguish between the main indicators of poverty based on the EU Survey of Income and Living Conditions (SILC).
· Calculate equivalent household size/income using OECD definitions and interpret Gini coefficient values.
· Describe the main causes and consequences of inflation and differentiate between the various measures of unemployment.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 150 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (2 x In-class Tests 25 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1201 The Market Economy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the methods of economic reasoning in the business context.

Module Content: Theory and applied theory of relative prices and the distribution of resources and product under different types of market structures and firm behaviour. Theory and applied theory of production, employment and income in the monetary economy, including money, the interest rate, the exchange rate, balance of payments, inflation and unemployment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply economic theory of relative prices and the distribution of resources and product under different market structures and firm behaviour;
· Describe the origins of macroeconomics and the problems it deals with;
· Describe the long-term trends and short-term fluctuations in economic growth, unemployment, inflation, and government;
· Explain why economic growth, unemployment, and inflation matter;
· Identify the macroeconomic policy challenges and describe the tools available in meeting them.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class tests 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1202 Business Economics I

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr David Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr David Butler, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the methods of economic reasoning in a business context.

Module Content: Theory and applied theory of relative prices and distribution of product under different types of market structure. An examination of the economic system including the role of the firm and the role of government.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate the importance of market structure for economic outcomes.
· Analyse the implications of business and government decisions.
· Apply economic frameworks to specific economic cases.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class Test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1203 Business Economics II

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Walsh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lisa Noonan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the methods of economic reasoning in the macroeconomic business environment.

Module Content: Theory and applied theory of production, employment and income in the monetary economy. The role of money, interest rates, exchange rates, inflation and the financial markets in business decision making is examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· measure the economic performance of countries.
· evaluate the importance of institutional structure for country performance.
· analyse the implications of government decisions for the business environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class Test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1204 Economic Data Collection and Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Lisa Noonan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lisa Noonan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To acquire the data collection and analysis skills and techniques required for economic analysis and examining economic theory.

Module Content: Types of economic data and their uses. Collection, organisation and storage of economic data for research, business decision-making and public policy. Approaches to presenting and analysing economic data. Place and application of basic data analysis techniques and related computer software which are standard in economic analysis. Critical evaluation of the quality and usefulness of the main sources and types of economic data.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise the issues involved in the collection and interpretation of primary and secondary economic data.
· Apply statistical tools to investigate economic problems.
· Describe economic and financial indicators in Ireland, how these indicators are constructed and the uses and limitations thereof.
· Estimate and interpret the relationship between economic variables.
· Recognise the inequalities which exist in our society today and how through the collection and analysis of economic data, evidence of these inequalities may be seen.
· Interpret the work carried out by the Central Statistics Office.
· Perform economic calculations on computer packages and present these economic calculations in report-like form.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests 10 marks each; 2 x Course/Project Work 10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

EC1205 Quantitative Techniques for Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bernadette Power, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jane Bourke, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the mathematical and econometric techniques used in economic analysis using appropriate applications.

Module Content: Introduction to Mathematical Economics: Place and application of mathematical techniques in economic analysis of e.g. the consumer, the firm, the distribution of income and the modelling of the economy as a whole. Introduction to Econometrics: Nature of econometrics. Basic methods. Applications to the analysis of e.g. demand and supply models, consumption functions, demand for money.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Comprehend the rules of differentiation and apply them to optimising economic functions
· Apply some of the various tools in financial economics for calculating monies received or repaid in the future
· Apply matrix arithmetic and use it in applications which involve the solution of simultaneous linear equations, such as in equilibrium, break-even, etc.
· Describe data using numerical measures
· Apply the rules for finding probabilities
· Recognise several important types of discrete random variables and continuous random variables and use their associated probability models
· Define and compute point estimates and confidence intervals for various population parameters
· Conduct tests of hypothesis about various population parameters.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Test 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

EC1206 Principles of Economic Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the methods of economic reasoning in the business context.

Module Content: Theory and applied theory of relative prices and the distribution of resources and product under different types of market structures and firm behaviour. Theory and applied theory of production, employment and income in the monetary economy, including money, the interest rate, the exchange rate, balance of payments, inflation and unemployment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and describe the core concepts and theories of both micro and macro economics, such as demand, supply, inflation and measuring economic activity.
· Explain economic models and their assumptions.
· Describe and distinguish between the main economic indicators.
· Produce and interpret economic tools of analysis, such as graphs.
· Perform economic calculations, which enable the learner to appreciate economic concepts with greater clarity.
· Critically evaluate economics related scenarios reported in the media and assess the inpact such scenarios can have on everyday life.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

EC1212 Economics of Business I

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Richard O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Richard O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop the learners understanding of economic theory and methodology corporate business, and to facilitate the application of economic reasoning in analysing contemporary business issues.

Module Content: Theory and applied theory of the firm under different types of market structure. Method, logic and inquiry as tools in analysing how business firms strategise, price and compete.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· critically assess the nature and concept of a business firm
· evaluate the importance of market structure for economic outcomes
· analyse the implications of firm strategy and conduct in business
· apply economic theory to specific economic cases.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class Test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1501 Economic Analysis for Food Business

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Considine, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the methods of economic reasoning and the concepts and issues relevant to food business.

Module Content: The market economy; entrepreneurship; the competitive process and technological change; determination of relative prices of goods and factors of production under various types of market structure; production; employment and income determination in a monetary economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· evaluate the importance of market structure for economic outcomes for food business.
· analyse the implications of business and government decisions for food business.
· apply economic frameworks to specific economic cases in food business.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 MCQs 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC1906 Environmental Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2. (Period 1 or 2).

No. of Students: Min 12, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Evening); 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (Evening).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To examine the role of economics in environmental issues.

Module Content: Economic Methodology. The role of markets and government. Applications to economic issues for environmental protection. Carbon taxes. Fishing rights. Methods of valuing environmental costs and benefits. Sustainable development.

Learning Outcomes:

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (In-class Test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2000 Economic Journey through Life Decisions

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Seminars ( Workshops, Coaching; Directed Study; Reflective Practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bernadette Power, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Frank Crowley, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Participants will be enabled to develop mental models of human action to investigate human action from individual and group perspectives.

Module Content: Participants will learn how to think about individual choice and decision making through an examination of each of the following questions: What types of incentives do individuals and firms act and react to? What is the impact on the incentives of individuals and groups of the design of market and non-market institutions and of the organisation of the firm as a social institution? The skills developed in EC2004 and EC2005 will be incorporated to address these questions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Think about the role of incentives in decision making and in explaining behaviour
· Analyse the different types of coordination and cooperation problems that society and organisations face
· Assess the role of prices in the coordination of resource allocation in modern economies
· Describe the basic concepts and tools of strategic interaction and be able to use these in examining choices
· Use concepts such as consumer surplus
· Recognise key concepts and their causal links to explore the evolution of the organisation of production
· Formulate policies and strategies for addressing complex economic problems of organisation in selected case studies
· Communicate policies and strategies for addressing complex economic problems of organisation in a scientific manner
· Prepare a reflective report on their own learning and performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x project, 180 marks, 2 x In-Class Exams, 90 marks, Attendance 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2002 The Changing Economy

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Workshops, Coaching; Directed Study; Reflective Practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Participants will be able to think through issues and questions about the macroeconomy using theory and economic data.

Module Content: Participants will explore the workings and the causes of change in the economy through a series of questions, such as: What causes business fluctuations? Why are some nations more prosperous than others? What determines a country's competitiveness? What drives wage and price inflation? How can economic institutions affect growth and prosperity? What are the consequences of government and central bank actions for our economic well being? The skills developed in EC2004 and EC2005 will be incorporated to address these questions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate their understanding of key macroeconomic models
· Use the models to think through important questions about the Irish and international economy
· Research and use data to answer the questions
· Describe and evaluate a country's economic performance
· Evaluate the usefulness of macroeconomic data sources for economic analysis
· Specify macroeconomic problems, alternative proposals for resolution and debate options
· Interpret macroeconomic issues in the media and use such coverage as information for analysis
· Present ideas with clarity and structure
· Prepare a reflective report on their own learning and performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x project, 180 marks, 2 x In-Class Exams, 90 marks, Attendance 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2004 Empirical Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Workshops, Coaching; Directed Study; Reflective Practice); 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Participants are introduced to a range of techniques for conducting empirical research using the theories learnt in the thematic modules - EC2000 and EC2002.

Module Content: Participants will develop techniques for economic inquiry and research. Examples include: How can changes in key variables of the economy, business, households and government be operationally defined, measured and compared? How can quantitative techniques such as elasticities, multipliers, discounting, compounding, trend analysis be used for economic analysis? How can scientific hypotheses be formulated using theories and tested using various types of empirical techniques?

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Summarise and interpret the characteristics of a specific variable using a number of descriptive and graphical techniques
· Apply forecasting techniques to a specific variable
· Calculate and explain elasticities and multipliers
· Apply some of the various tools in economics for calculating monies received or repaid in the future
· Specify and conduct statistical hypotheses designed to test a research question
· Analyse and report on the relationship between economic variables using correlation and regression techniques
· Display proficiency in the use of Excel to the application of a technique studied in this module
· Communicate the results arising out of an application of a technique studied in this module to non-experts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x project (2000 words) 80 marks; 2 x In-Class Exams, 100 marks; Attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2005 Reasoning, Problem Solving and Communication in Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Workshops, Coaching; Directed Study, Reflective Practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aileen Murphy, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Daniel Blackshields, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Participants develop understanding of the methods of problem solving and their communication skills through the presentation of a proficiency portfolio.

Module Content: The nature, components and processes of reasoning and persuasion skills for problem solving are explored. The following questions are addressed: What knowledge, skills are needed to embark on the process of understanding your own problem solving skills? How can participants reflect on and manage their own development in reasoning effectively with Economic theories and data? How can mental models of Economics help to understand social phenomena? Learners will also engage in problem solving with economics exercises of their own choice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise and formulate appropriate questions amenable to economic analysis
· Identify and interpret evidence relating to questions
· Justify an answer to questions
· Communicate solutions to problems
· Analyse economic arguments using the skills of argumentation and language analysis
· Prepare judgements on the merits of economic arguments in the news and media
· Communicate judgements on the merits of economic arguments
· Propose solutions to complex problems of the learner's choice
· Present a reflective journal entry on the learner's problem-solving proficiency.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x written consultation paper 70 marks; 1 x briefing memorandum 35 marks; 1 x newspaper article 35 marks; 1 x reflective journal 40 marks; Attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2101 Microeconomics: Behaviour, Organisations and Institutions

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics; Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand and practise the use of microeconomics in the context of business and public policy.

Module Content: Consumer and producer behaviour at the level of individual units under different market structures. Risk, uncertainty, time and information in decision-making. Factor markets. Trade, tariffs and industry location. General equilibrium and welfare economics. Market and corporate boundaries. Corporate control and performance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse the theoretical background to predictions of consumer, firm and government behaviour and decision-making.
· Appreciate the issues involved in the different types of coordination and cooperation problems that a society faces.
· Assess the role of prices in resource allocation in modern economies.
· Be familiar with the basic concepts of game theory.
· Define the concept of consumer surplus and to demonstrate its importance in economic analysis.
· Demonstrate how choice under uncertainty and information asymmetry leads to issues of moral hazard and adverse selection in markets.
· Provide analysis to explain how and why markets fail to achieve competitive outcomes, assess any distributional and ethical issues that may arise and evaluate policy responses by governments which might help 'correct' these various types of market failure.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2102 Macroeconomics: Business Cycles, Growth and Development

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics; Mr Justin Doran, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand the relationship between business, government and the macroeconomic environment.

Module Content: Determination of the level and growth of aggregate income, demand, output and employment. Components of aggregate demand (e.g. consumption, investment) and aggregate supply. Fiscal, monetary and exchange rate policies. Money and other financial assets in the economic system. Implications of European Monetary Union.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Measure macroeconomic performance using key indicators such as consumer price index and labour statistics.
· Differentiate between monetary and fiscal policy.
· Evaluate the impact of fiscal and monetary policy decisions by the government and central bank.
· Describe the development of modern economies.
· Construct and interpret economic growth diagrams.
· Calculate and compare growth rates for international economies.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2103 Skills for Economic Interpretation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Rosemary Kelleher, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Rosemary Kelleher, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce and practise the data collection and analysis skills used in economic analysis.

Module Content: Types of economic data and their uses. Collection, organisation, storage and presentation of economic data for research, business decision-making and public policy. Basic survey techniques. Approaches to presenting and analysing economic data. Principles and uses of descriptive statistics, including basic regression techniques. Application of data analysis techniques and computer programmes which are standard in economic analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise the issues involved in the collection and interpretation of primary and secondary data.
· Apply statistical tools to investigate economic problems.
· Identify and explain the construction of economic and finanical indicators in Ireland.
· Evaluate the usefulness of Irish economic and financial indicators.
· Estimate and interpret relationships between economic variables.
· Construct measures of inequality.
· Interpret the data released by the Irish Central Statistics Office.
· Use computer packages to perform economic calculations and organise and present these economic calculations in report-like form.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests 10 marks each; 2 x Project Work 10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2105 Developing Skills for Economic Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics; Dr Brendan McElroy, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the techniques and application of basic mathematical methods and econometrics for microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Module Content: Differential calculus. Constrained and unconstrained optimisation. Presentation and illustration of the basic theory and practice of statistical investigation in economics with particular attention to testing economic hypothesis and interpretation of results.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define what is meant by a derivative and explain its application in economics.
· Apply the rules of differentiation to the analysis of economic models, e.g. utility, production, revenue, costs, profits, elasticity, consumption etc.
· Optimise economic functions with one or more independent variable(s).
· Apply some of the various tools in financial economics for calculating monies received or repaid in the future.
· Describe the relationship between probability and statistical inference.
· Explain the importance of the Central Limit Theorem to statistical inference.
· Compute point estimates and confidence intervals for various polulation parameters.
· Conduct tests of hypothesis about various population parameters.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (In-class tests 2 x 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2107 Reasoning and Persuasion in Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Noirin McCarthy, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Aimee Fox, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop skills in reasoning and critical thinking in Economics.

Module Content: The Lecturer will introduce methods of critical reasoning and explore their application in economic issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise and formulate appropriate questions that are amendable to economic analysis.
· Analyse economic arguments using the skills of argumentation and language analysis.
· Prepare judgements on the merits of economic arguments of the popular press.
· Communicate judgements on the merits of economic arguments effectively to non-experts.
· Reflect on the learner's problem-solving proficiencies with Economics.
· Reflect on the learner's Personal Development Progress (PDP) File in problem-solving.
· Present a reflective journal entry on the learner's problem-solving proficiency and a PDP.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (4 x 2,000 word essays, 40 marks each; Self -Reflective Exercises 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2151 Economics of Social Policy I

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): EC1151

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Connell Fanning, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand the role of the market and government in social issues.

Module Content: Labour force participation and employment. Ageing and pensions. Economics of health care and housing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Comprehend key issues and concepts in social policy
· Apply economic theory in examining issues in social policy
· Employ the skills and techniques required for the evaluation of social policy.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Course/Project Work).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2201 Economics of Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: How microeconomic theory can be used as a methodology for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business environment.

Module Content: Functions of the competitive market process, nature of the firm, and role of the firm in the market process are examined. The business plan and firms budget. Risk and uncertainty. Demand and revenue functions. Production and cost analysis. Product and resource markets. Market and corporate boundaries. Corporate control and performance. Industry structure and competition analysis. The role of public policy in business.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe how economic theory can be used as a methodology for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business environment;
· Describe and illustrate the decision making process, distinguish between various definitions of profit, calculate and interpret various elasticities, and apply the income and substitution effects to consumer behaviour;
· Forecast using both regression and time-series analysis;
· Describe the role of public policy in business, evaluate a project or policy using Cost Benefit Analysis;
· Optimize economic functions;
· Distinguish between technical and economic efficiency;
· Distinguish between various market structures, measure market power using concentration ratios, and outline strategies in sustaining competitive advantage.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2202 Microeconomics for Business

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr David Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr David Butler, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To examine the competitive market process, nature of the firm, and role of the firm in the market process.

Module Content: The competitive market process. Entrepreneurship and the firm. The business plan and the firm's budgets. Risk and uncertainty in decision-making. Concepts of demand, supply and equilibrium. Demand and revenue functions. Production, technology and cost analysis. The profit motive. Market structures and the functioning of product markets and resource markets. Markets and corporate boundaries. Corporate control and corporate performance. Industry structure and competition analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop the fundamentals of microeconomic theory in business decision-making.
· Describe how theory can be used as a methodology for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business environment.
· Explain and predict the behaviour of consumers, firms, employers and resource owners and the effects of change in income, input prices and other factors on the demand and supply of goods.
· Identify how managers can structure organisations so as to motivate individuals to make economic choices that will enhance the firm's value.
· Solve microeconomic issues using analytical reasoning based on microeconomic analysis.
· Critically appraise the approach taken to economic issues and policies.
· Express their analyses and appraisals of economic issues and policies in written form.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2203 Resourcing Organisation and Competitive Capability

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Walsh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edel Walsh, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explain how resources are utilised to create organisational capabilities for competing in diverse and changing markets.

Module Content: Principles of, and issues in, organisation. Resource-based Theory of the Firm. Market Structures and Competitive Strategies. Architecture, Decision-Rights and Incentives. Stakeholding, Culture and Strategy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and analyse significant economic issues regarding the role of organisational resources in performance and competitiveness
· Describe solutions to such issues using economic reasoning and tools of analysis
· Describe the role of organisational architecture within a firm
· Analyse behaviour in organisations and outline how to make effective managerial decisions using microeconomic theory
· Apply this knowledge to a number of organisational situations, given that business issues increasingly span across traditional functional areas.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC2204 Business Microeconomics I

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Considine, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of how intermediate microeconomic theory can be used as a methodology for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business environment.

Module Content: Functions of the competitive market process, nature of the firm, and role of the firm in the market process are examined. The business plan and firms budget. Risk and uncertainty. Demand and revenue functions. Production and cost analysis. Product and resource markets.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· evaluate the risk involved in business decisions.
· calculate revenue and costs functions for the firm.
· appreciate the differences in market structures.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class Test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2205 Business Microeconomics II

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 10 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aileen Murphy, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of how intermediate microeconomic theory can be used as a methodology for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business environment.

Module Content: Functions of the competitive market process, nature of the firm, and role of the firm in the market process are examined. Market and corporate boundaries. Corporate control and performance. Industry structure and competition analysis. The role of public policy in business.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· investigate the role of the firm in the market process.
· apply competition analysis to case studies of market structures.
· identify the role of public policy in shaping the business environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class Test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2206 Business Econometrics and Forecasting

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): EC1205 (for BScFin programme only) or equivalent for other programmes.

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Practicals; Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Siobhan Lucey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Siobhan Lucey, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The use of economic theory and econometric methods to understand and evaluate the economic environment of business.

Module Content: Cross section and time series techniques are used to estimate relationships between economic variables and to test economic models using data from the real world.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and explain the theory underlying the technique of regression analysis
· Develop and estimate a simple econometric model
· Interpret the results from a regression
· Analyse the suitability of the regression results by constructing and interpreting confidence intervals and performing hypothesis tests
· Demonstrate the ability to implement econometric techniques using econometric packages and software
· Develop an appreciation of the usefulness of econometric packages through hands-on experience.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (40 marks divided up into relevant parts).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2207 The Macroeconomic Environment

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lee Ann Burke, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Lee Ann Burke, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To discover the impact of government policy on the macroeconomic business environment.

Module Content: Analysis of the national and international economic framework in which business functions. Money, financial markets, interest rates and exchange rates. Impact of government on business conditions and overall economic activity. Macroeconomic determinants of industrial competitiveness and national competitive advantage.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and describe macroeconomic performance indicators.
· Describe the current Irish and global macroeconomic environment.
· Describe, explain and differentiate between different models of the macro-economy.
· Describe and explain how monetary, fiscal and exchange rate policy is set in an economy.
· Analyse the causes of economic fluctuations and industrial competitiveness in national economies.
· Analyse the impact of government, monetary and exchange rate policies on the national and international economic environment.
· Evaluate the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy for business conditions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2217 Business and the Macroeconomy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To discover the impact of government policy on the macroeconomic business environment.

Module Content: Analysis of the national and international economic framework in which business functions. Money, financial markets, interest rates and exchange rates. Impact of government on business conditions and overall economic activity. Macroeconomic determinants of industrial competitiveness and national competitive advantage.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse the roles (using appropriate frameworks) played by governments and central banks, the banking sector, firms and households in causing and propagating recessions and booms;
· Evaluate the governmental fiscal and monetary policies and their consequences;
· Interpret a short run and long run macroeconomic equilibrium;
· Identify whether there is a role for credit, oil prices and other factors in driving booms and recessions;
· Analyse the consequences of a boom for price inflation and competitiveness;
· Describe the factors that drive economic growth using a framework known as the Solow growth model using key issues such as investment, technology, innovation and knowledge.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2701 The Market Economy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (Tutorial (distance education)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide students with a grounding in the principles of economic analysis.

Module Content: The principles of the economic way of thinking are introduced with applications to non-profit and social organisations, the organisation and operation of small enterprises and networks, and the environment in which they operate.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define economics and describe how you can use economic knowledge in individual decision-making.
· Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of a free market system.
· Determine how changes in supply and demand affect market prices and quantities produced and purchased.
· Identify the concept of market failure and what effect governments can have on the provision and pricing of goods and services.
· Apply concepts related to economic growth and opportunity costs based on production possibilities curve analysis.
· Evaluate which economic factors lead to maximum gross domestic product and a nation's greatest wealth.
· Identify the main source of long term inflation and evaluate government policies related to inflation.
· Critically analyze the validity of economic information found in newspapers, journals, magazines, and other media.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (Assignments).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2901 Economics of Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Considine, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: How microeconomic theory can be used as a methodology for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business environment.

Module Content: Functions of the competitive market process, nature of the firm, and role of the firm in the market process are examined. The business plan and firms budget. Risk and uncertainty. Demand and revenue functions. Production and cost analysis. Product and resource markets. Market and corporate boundaries. Corporate control and performance. Industry structure and competition analysis. The role of public policy in business.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand individual consumer choice in order to gain an insight into both individual and market demand decisions
· Utilise economic tools to examine the problem of choice in society
· Identify how changes in the objectives of the firm may affect the behaviour of rival firms
· Identify, understand and utilise the economic tools which determines the criteria for free eligibility to certain services in society.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC2903 Economics for Enterprise

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To work through microeconomic theory (including applied examples) to show its power for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business environment.

Module Content: Functions of the competitive market process, nature of the firm, and role of the firm in the market process are examined. The business plan and firm's budget. Risk and uncertainty. Demand and revenue functions. Production and cost analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain consumer choice theory and how it offers insight into both individual and market demand decisions
· Develop the fundamentals of microeconomic theory in business decision-making
· Describe how theory can be used as a methodology for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business environment
· Explain and predict the behaviour of consumers, firms, employers and resource owners and the effects of change in income, input prices and other factors on the demand and supply of goods.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x In-class Tests).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2013.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3001 Survey Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2. (Students are separated into 2 groups to facilitate work placement and one group is taught in each teaching period.).

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand and apply research and data analysis skills required in conducting business economic and financial surveys.

Module Content: Examines theoretical principles and practice of survey research methods in finance. Areas addressed include the development, design and implementation of financial economic surveys including research design, survey sampling, questionnaire design, data collection, statistical techniques for data analysis, survey reporting and survey errors and ethics. Focus will be on providing a practical grounding in the preparation, conduct and reporting of surveys for business purposes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop theoretical frameworks and hypotheses in order to investigate a research problem.
· Apply the different sampling techniques used in economic survey design.
· Describe and distinguish between the different modes of data collection.
· Evaluate survey questionnaires in terms of layout, question sequence and question and response format.
· Construct your own survey instrument.
· Describe and present economic data.
· Discuss the character of the relationship between two or more variables, calculating the necessary statistics to determine association and significance.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Project 50 marks each, 1 x In-class test 150 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3101 Corporate Strategy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Rosemary Kelleher, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Rosemary Kelleher, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To analyse and understand the role of economic theory in business strategy.

Module Content: The theory and applied theory of pricing, production, investment and finance considered from the perspective of the firm. Time, risk, uncertainty and information in decision-making. Strategic investment decision-making and evaluation of growth options. Business objectives and corporate organisation. Principals and agents. Economies of scale and scope. Markets, managerial hierarchies and corporate control. Strategic behaviour and strategic interaction under different market structures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the role of decision making within firms.
· Examine the strategic behaviour of firms and strategic interaction under different market structures.
· Formulate competitive strategies.
· Evaluate strategic investment decisions.
· Explain how risk and uncertainty influences firm decisions.
· Examine how government affects the business environment the firm faces and influences the strategic behaviour of firms.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay 40 marks and 1 x 1,000 word essay 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3103 Financial Markets and Institutions

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics; Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To examine the operation of the financial markets and institutions and the implications for business.

Module Content: Capital (money, equity, and bond) markets are analysed in terms of the principles of portfolio construction and institutional fund management. International diversification and hedging techniques. Modern business portfolio theory. Principles for cash flow management to maximise the advantages of foreign exchange and interest rate differentials. Credit markets and institutions. Foreign exchange and interest risk management strategies. The evolution of markets, the innovation of new instruments and institutions, and the changing regulatory framework are analysed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define finance in terms of the investment process and decision making in financial markets.
· Explain the meaning and role of valuation models.
· Apply the concepts of the time value of money to making financial decisions.
· Analyse how risk affects financial decision making.
· Construct a quantitative model of the trade off between risk and reward.
· Assess what kind of useful information can be inferred from the relationship among spot and forward prices.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3104 Human Resource Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Noirin McCarthy, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Noirin McCarthy, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To analyse the use of economic theory in the field of human resources.

Module Content: Labour market. Supply of labour and human capital investment. Demand for labour, training and personal development. Employment policies, efficiency wages and insider-outsider theories. Corporate government and employee participation. Resources, capabilities and competitive advantage.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recall relevant human resource and labour market theories and frameworks.
· Explain the importance of human resources for organisational competitive advantage.
· Investigate human resource issues and practices using appropriate theory and evidence.
· Develop a more comprehensive understanding of the Irish labour market from a business perspective.
· Assess Government labour market policy and its impact on business.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3110 Health Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Rosemary Kelleher, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Michele Barry, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the methods for understanding resource allocation, critically interpreting evaluation studies and assessing public policy proposals in terms of equity, efficiency and strategic effectiveness.

Module Content: Quality of life and public policy. Economic philosophies: foundations for concepts of quality of life. The rational choice paradigm: exposition and critique. Economic scarcity, opportunity costs and resource allocation. Measurement and evaluation criteria. The public policy process including moral hazard, the principal-agentproblem and market/government failure.

Learning Outcomes:

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (in-class test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3112 Health Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ann Kirby, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ann Kirby, Department of Economics; Dr Lee Ann Burke, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand the role of public policy in relation to health care.

Module Content: The application of economic theory to the demand for and supply of healthcare to the healthcare sector in Ireland. The demand for health care. The provision of health care. Principal-Agent relationships. Funding and organisational issues in health care. Regulation and equivalence scales. The Irish health care sector.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the contribution of economics to health.
· Apply a cross section of economic theory including public choice, labour economics, industrial organisation and economic accounting and measurement to issues in health.
· Analyse and provide solutions to problems that have significant economic consequences, both for the health care industry and society at large.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3113 Public Expenditure and Finance

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Considine, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Considine, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To analyse the relationship between public expenditure and finance and private sector behaviour.

Module Content: Analysis of government expenditure and the methods by which it is financed from both a traditional public finance perspective and a public choice perspective. The economic evaluation methods for public expenditure are examined using examples from sports capital expenditure and the National Lottery. The use of taxation to encourage investment, discourage drinking and smoking, and to combat crime is discussed. Ireland's fiscal relation with Europe is presented.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· List the important case law on taxation and criminality in Ireland.
· Collect and present public finance data from both electronic and traditional sources.
· Construct diagrams that illustrate an understanding of public finance theory.
· Calculate economic value of a project from data collected.
· Analyse public finance data on taxation, public expenditure, budget deficits and public debt.
· Design the framework for the economic evaluation of a project.
· Compare and contrast the self-interested behaviour in real and fictional public servants.
· Choose the appropriate grant and tax instruments to achieve public policy objectives.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3115 Innovation, Competitiveness and Economic Growth

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics; Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explore models and sources of business innovation as a driver of business competitiveness and, in turn, regional and national economic growth performance.

Module Content: The role of knowledge and innovation in the market process. Theory and applied theory of economic growth. Economic convergence, European integration and polical union. The economics of business innovation. Sources of knowledge for innovation. Regional and national competitivness and its sources. Clusters and competitiveness

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an awareness of the complexity of the forces at work in the long run performance of economies.
· Demonstrate an understanding of the usefulness of key growth theories for explaining the growth performance of countries.
· Interpret data on the growth and innovation in countries.
· Evaluate the cogency of arguments proposed about the growth and innovation performance of countries and regions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3121 Quantitative Methods: Econometrics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): EC2105 - for BA Programme only

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 20 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edel Walsh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand and apply the theory of econometrics in both the business and public policy environment.

Module Content: Cross section and time series techniques are used to examine the effectiveness of government policy and business decisions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· List the steps in applied regression analysis for conducting economic research.
· Explain the properties of Ordinary Least Square estimators.
· Select and employ techniques for analysis economic theory.
· Identify and solve for problems in regression analysis.
· Build a model that can be used for econometric research.
· Choose an econometric model by applying certain specification criteria.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x project 20 marks; 2 x In-class Tests 10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3122 Quantitative Methods: Survey Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ann Kirby, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ann Kirby, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop and use the skills required for conducting economic surveys.

Module Content: Development, implementation and data analysis of economic surveys. Strategies for minimising non-response and sampling techniques. Survey errors and survey ethics. Reporting and presentation skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the various aspects involved in the creation and implementation of a quantitative economic survey.
· Evaluate the usefulness of survey data.
· Conduct your own high quality survey.
· Solve the problems of survey research, such as questionnaire validity and reliability, and non-response.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (2 x Projects 30 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3125 Economics Principles of Insurance

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the fundamental concepts in risk, uncertainty and insurance with applications to the demand and supply of health care.

Module Content: Risk and insurance. Role of information asymmetry. Adverse selection and moral hazard. Role of insurance in health care systems. Comparison of international systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify risk faced by individuals and businesses and choose appropriate risk management techniques for these risks
· Calculate risks given certain criteria and demonstrate how these risks can be reduced through diversification and/or risk pooling
· Explain how insurers price insurance contracts
· Distinguish issues that reduce the insurability of risk and discuss how insurers can counteract these issues via contractual provisions
· Show how health insurance can contribute to the financing of healthcare systems
· Apply insurance principles to the assessment of the private health insurance market in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3130 Honours Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Workshops (Guided Research and self directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to develop writing, presentation, communication and research skills. Students are to be enabled to develop the skills, attitudes and experience necessary to engage in competent research.

Module Content: Research Questions are chosen in the following research areas: Business, Finance, Health and China in consultation with a research advisor. Theories, concepts, empirical research methods and skills will be used to answer these research questions. Participants will be given the opportunity to reflect on and develop their scholarly, professional and personal capabilities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Design, prepare and present a research dissertation
· Design a viable research question for the development of a dissertation
· Identify, collect and assess the relevant data for answering a research question
· Identify and use appropriate methods and techniques for answering the research question
· Use economic theories and concepts to think about a research question in Economics
· Communicate the research to their peers, an academic audience and to a non-expert audience
· Develop their self awareness and reflect on their scholarly, professional and personal development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 750 word Research Proposal, 20 marks; 1 x 2000 word Preliminary Research Review, 40 marks; 1 x 6,000 word dissertation to be submitted on a date specified by the Department ; 98 marks; 1 x end of year presentation: 42 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3131 The Wealth and Poverty of Nations

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Workshops, Coaching, Directed Study; Reflective Practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Students will be able to think through and formulate arguments on the determinants of the wealth and poverty of nations.

Module Content: Students will explore the causes of how prosperity is generated through questions such as: Why are rich countries rich? Why are poor countries poor? What stimulates development? How do investors decide in a world of uncertainty? Are there gains from international economic and monetary cooperation? Students will incorporate professional skills to address these questions. Students will be given the opportunity to reflect on and develop their scholarly, professional and personal capabilities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate their understanding of relevant economic theories and models
· Use theoretical and empirical reasoning to think through important questions about Irish and global economic development
· Discuss and evaluate the contributions of different schools of economic thought to our understanding of the determination of prosperity and poverty across nations
· Formulate economic arguments on the role of the financial system in economic development and economic crisis
· Use concepts such as strategic interaction to analyse economic cooperation
· Research and use data to answer economic questions
· Present ideas with clarity and coherence
· Develop their self awareness and reflect on their scholarly, professional and personal development.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x project (7000 words) 150 marks, 2 x presentations 30 marks, 2 x In-Class Exams 90 marks, Attendance 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC3132 Fostering the Creative Mind: The Economics of Innovation and Creativity

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Workshops, Coaching, Directed Study, Reflective Practice).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Daniel Blackshields, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Frank Crowley, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Students develop their understanding of the cognitive drivers of innovative and creative performance across industries and in their professional lives.

Module Content: Students will explore the nature, components, processes driving the innovative and creative capacity of individuals, business and economies through the following questions: What incentivises creativity? How important are entrepreneurs for innovation? What drives businesses to innovate? Do creative spaces and culture encourage innovation? Is innovation necessary for national prosperity? How should innovation be funded? Students will incorporate professional skills to address these questions. Students will be given the opportunity to reflect on and develop their scholarly, professional and personal capabilities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify personal and professional evidence of the cognitive drivers of creative and innovative performance
· Analyse the mental models enabling and restricting creative and innovative performance
· Present arguments for the economic antecedents of innovative and creative performance
· Critically assess arguments such as: the links between economy and culture, intellectual property rights
· Consider the role for government in innovation policy
· Prepare judgements on the economic arguments for the national factors governing creative and innovative performance
· Research and use data to answer economic questions
· Develop their self awareness and reflect on their scholarly, professional and personal development.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x project (7000 words) 150 marks, 2 x presentations 30 marks, 2 x In-Class Exams 90 marks, Attendance 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3133 Research Methods for Economic Investigation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Seminars (Workshops, Coaching, Directed Study, Reflective Practice); 20 x 1hr(s) Practicals (Computer Practical's).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ann Kirby, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Justin Doran, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Develop the student's range of research skills by introducing more advanced techniques for conducting empirical research using the theories learnt in the thematic modules - EC3131 & EC3132.

Module Content: Students will apply more advanced methods and techniques to primary and secondary data in order to test a hypothesis and communicate the results. Examples of questions explored in the module include: How is a research survey created and implemented? How does question design influence the reliability, and validity of the questionnaire? How can scientific hypotheses be formulated using theories and tested using various types of empirical techniques? Students will be given the opportunity to reflect on and develop their scholarly, professional and personal capabilities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Create and implement a research survey to test a research question
· Summarise and interpret the characteristics of the data collected using a number of descriptive and graphical techniques
· Outline the rationale for the use of regression analysis in Economics
· Develop an econometric model to analyse a research question
· Estimate an econometric model, interpret and evaluate the results
· Display proficiency in the use of statistical software programs in the application of a technique studied in this module
· Communicate the results arising out of an application of a technique studied in this module to experts and non-experts
· Be aware of and reflect on their scholarly, professional and personal development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x projects (1000 words) 40 marks, 2 x In-Class Exams 60 marks, 1 x project (2000 words) 80 marks attendance 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment and Attendance.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3151 Economics of Social Policy II

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): EC1151; EC2151

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Connell Fanning, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand the role of the market and government in social issues.

Module Content: Further application of economic analysis to social issues such as unemployment, income maintenance, pensions, social welfare, social insurance, health and education. The concept, principles and functioning of the 'Welfare State' will be examined and issues for future development will be identified and considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Comprehend and apply economic analysis to social issues such as poverty, inequality, education, health and old age.
· Examine and discuss the aforementioned social issues from both a national and international perspective.
· Examine the measurement of social issues, for example identify measures of poverty, measures of inequality etc.
· Collect and assess data on social issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Course/Project Work).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3202 International Money and Finance

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Stephanie Sweeney, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To use economic theory to examine aspects of the international monetary and financial system.

Module Content: Exchange rates and foreign exchange management. International interest rates. The Eurodollar market. Governmental and non-governmental financial institutions and organisations. Monetary union and monetary policy co-ordination. Implications of Balance of Payments adjustment, government policy, banking and financial regulation. The micro- and macro economic fundamentals of the commerical property market, property as an asset class, property in investment portfolios.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise that arbitrage keeps spot, forward and interest rates quotes aligned
· Calculate the range of no-arbitrage bid-offer quotes for a given transaction cost for a variety of assets
· Differentiate between various economic models of exchange rates based on the variability of assumptions
· Apply theoretical underpinnings to key events in international finance
· Establish the salient factors that heighten the risk of international financial crisis
· Critically evaluate central bank decisions against ultimate objectives
· Express an informed opinion on topical issues in international finance
· Demonstrate an appreciation of the link between international asset prices, the real economy and international capital flows.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3203 Economics of Corporate Strategy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Bernadette Power, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Jane Power, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Formulation of strategic business decisions using economic theory and business cases.

Module Content: The theory and applied theory of pricing, production and finance considered from the perspective of the firm. Risk and uncertainty in decision-making. Strategic investment decision-making and evaluation of growth options. Business objectives and corporate organisations. Principals and agents. Demand, supply and economies of scale and scope. Markets, managerial hierarchies and corporate control. Economics of business culture - game theory, transaction costs and economic performance. Strategic behaviour by firms and strategic interaction under different market structures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· To provide you with the ability to use economic theory, concepts and analysis to:
· Explain the role of decision making within firms.
· Examine the strategic behaviour of firms and strategic interaction under different market structures.
· Formulate competitive strategies.
· Evaluate strategic investment decisions.
· Analyse how risk and uncertainty influence firm decisions.
· Examine how government affects the business environment the firm faces and influences the strategic behaviour of firms.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3205 Economics of Information

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Considine, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To examine the role of economic information in business decision-making systems.

Module Content: Transaction costs, contracts, firm boundaries, vertical and horizontal integration; Incomplete and asymmetric information, moral hazard, agent-principle issues and governance; Risk, uncertainty and insurance; Signalling, screening and adverse selection; Innovation, patenting, liability, cost-benefits evaluation; Game theory, pricing strategies and network pricing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Compute the costs and benefits in economic decisions with a cost-benefit analysis framework.
· Evaluate the strategic decisions of economic agents.
· Determine the implications of incomplete or asymmetric information.
· Design and apply pricing strategies.
· Identify the transaction costs involved in economic decisions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC3207 Finance and Capital Markets

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To further develop concepts and frameworks in the study of financial markets.

Module Content: The theory and practice of portfolio management and treasury management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise the importance of financial markets for a modern economy.
· Demonstate a comprehension of the fundamentals of market efficiency.
· Demonstrate a comprehension the portfolio decision problem & comprehend its implications for asset returns in competitive markets.
· Analyse the implications of financial markets for business.
· Analyse the pricing of equities.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks ((In-Class Exam)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3208 Economic Consulting

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2. (Period 1 or 2).

No. of Students: Max 120.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop and practice the knowledge and skills required for using economic and financial analysis in carrying out consultancy projects.

Module Content: This module describes the consultancy process and the stages involved in conducting a consultancy project. It examines the skills required in managing a consultant/client relationship. Topics covered include acquiring consultancy projects, briefs and contracts; researching the client business areas; constructing consultancy reports; managing client relationships and a portfolio of clients; professional practice and personal values; ethical principles, dilemmas and conflicts of interest. Case Studies will be used extensively to provide practical experience of the issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Prepare and deliver a presentation in a professional manner.
· Explain how ethical decisions are made and apply ethical decision-making theories and models to their own actions.
· Assess the quality of arguments, identifying rhetoric and fallacies in arguments.
· Write a professional consultancy proposal document.
· Explain the knowledge and skills required for using economic and financial analysis in consultancy projects.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,000 word essays 40 marks each; Presentations 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3209 Time Series Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2. (Students are separated into 2 groups to facilitate work placement and one group is taught in each teaching period.).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): EC2206: Business Econometrics and Forecasting

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 9 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To study modern techniques used to examine trends in, and between, financial time series data. Such techniques are commonly used in both risk management and forecasting in Finance.

Module Content: ARIMA Modelling and Forecasting; Introduction to Unit Root Testing and Cointegration; Volatility Modelling: ARCH, GARCH and EGARCH models; Introduction to Technical Analysis

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have an increased understanding of econometric methodology
· Recognise the importance of econometrics as an analysis technique
· Differentiate between data types
· Have an increased ability to implement econometric techniques using econometric packages and software.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x assignment 25 marks, 1 x In-class test 75 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3210 Principles of Insurance for Finance

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2. (Students are seperated into two groups to faciliate work placement and one group is taught in each teaching period).

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the fundamental concepts in risk, uncertainty and insurance with applications to financial markets.

Module Content: Risk and insurance. Role of information asymmetry. Adverse selection and moral hazard. Risk management in financial markets.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify risk faced by individuals and businesses and choose appropriate risk management techniques for these risks
· Calculate risks given certain criteria and demonstrate how these risks can be reduced through diversification and/or risk pooling
· Distinguish issues that reduce the insurability of risk and discuss how insurers can counteract these issues via contractual provisions
· Apply risk management principles to financial markets.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Coursework Individual 1 X Essay 3000 words 20 marks, 1 X Inclass Test 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3211 Advanced Data Analysis for Finance

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals (computer practicals).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Rosemary Kelleher, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand and apply research and data analysis skills required in conducting business economic and financial surveys.

Module Content: Examines techniques for research problem formulation in business, economic and financial research (e.g. literature searching, building conceptual models). Explores different research designs (survey methods, experimental economics, case studies and interviews) and the reliability and validity of variables in business, economic and financial datasets. Data processing and data entry. Introduces students to non-parametric tests and to the estimation nonparametric regression models using SPSS.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Clearly formulate a framework to investigate a business finance research problem.
· Discern the quality of data from secondary data sources gathered using different research designs.
· Code, enter, clean and transform data in SPSS.
· Use nonparametric tests and contrast these with standard parametric statistical tests in SPSS.
· Understand and estimate nonparametric regression models in SPSS.
· To describe and present financial economic data to a professional standard.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x in-class test 80 marks; 1 x assignment/project 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3222 Transferable Skills-Economics -Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3. (After the Third University Examination-April to September. The Placement Report is to be submitted before the end of September. See Placement handbook for exact date).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL Course

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 6month(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in business and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring Examination, students will go on placement from April to September. The work programme will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in the external organisation. Students will be expected to keep learning logs at agreed intervals. See Placement Handbook for information on devising and submitting logs.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the business, its organisational culture and purpose.
· Critique the practice of communication in an organisational context.
· Demonstrate ability to function independently and in a workplace team.
· Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of the programme of study to the workplace.
· Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement.

Assessment: Placement Report to be submitted before the end of September which will be assessed on a Honours/Pass/Fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Work placement in industry, placement report and learning logs.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass judgement.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Autumn Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

[Top of page]

EC3223 Transferable Skills - Economics - Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3. (After the Third University Examination-April to September. The Research Project is to be submitted before the end of September. See Research Project Handbook for exact date.).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): ECDL

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 6month(s) Other (Research Project based either in industry or in UCC).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Daniel Blackshields, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To complement classroom teaching with exposure to institutional work processes in business and other relevant organisations.

Module Content: Following the Third Year Spring Examination, students will start their reseach project, commencing April, for 6 months. The industry-based research project will be jointly monitored by a UCC academic mentor and a business mentor in the external organisation. The UCC-based research project will be monitored by a UCC academic mentor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the research culture.
· Demonstrate the process of research and enquiry.
· Prepare and present a research report.
· Demonstrate initiative and/or leadership skills whilst working alone and/or in teams.
· Demonstrate the application of the knowledge, skills and competencies of research.
· Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the research placement.

Assessment: Submission of research project and a presentation thereon before the end of September which will be assessed on a honours/pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements: Research Project and Presentation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass judgement.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Autumn Supplemental Examination. There is no provision for repeating this module in the Autumn or in a Repeat Year. Students failing this module will not be eligible for the award of an honours degree in the final year.

[Top of page]

EC3409 Strategic Interaction and Decision Making

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand and apply the concepts of mathematical economics to the fields of business economics.

Module Content: Strategic and Extensive Forms of a Game, Information Sets, Two Person Games, Mixed Strategies, Mixed Strategy Equilibrium, Dynamic Games, Non Co-operative Games.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and explain the principles of game theory.
· Construct and analyse game trees and pay-off matrices.
· Solve simultaneous and sequential games, one-off and repeated games, games with single and mixed strategies.
· Explain what is meant by a credible threat and show how it can be used effectively in a game.
· Assess the importance of information in game theory.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1x 1,000 word project 40 marks, 1 x in-class presentation 10 marks, 1 x in-class test 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3414 Criticial Reasoning and Thinking for Business

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Aimee Fox, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop skills in reasoning and critical thinking in Economics.

Module Content: The Lecturer will introduce methods of critical reasoning and explore their application in economic issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise and formulate appropriate questions that are amendable to economic analysis.
· Analyse economic arguments using the skills of argumentation and language analysis.
· Prepare judgements on the merits of economic arguments of the popular press.
· Propose solutions to complex economic problems in the creative industries.
· Propose solutions to complex problems of the learner's choice.
· Communicate judgements on the merits of economic arguments effectively to non-experts.
· Reflect on the learner's problem-solving proficiencies with Economics.
· Reflect on the learner's Personal Development Progress (PDP) File in problem-solving.
· Present a reflective journal entry on the learner's problem-solving proficiency and a PDP.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3 x 2,000 word essays, 55 marks each; 2 x 1,000 words max, Self-Reflective Exercises 10 marks each; 1 x 1,000 Self-Reflective Exercise 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by the Module co-ordinator).

[Top of page]

EC3701 Economics of Financial Strategy

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 0.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): AC3722

Teaching Methods: Other (Distance Education Module, Assignment and Workshop).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide a grounding in the principles of financial economics.

Module Content: Functions and operations of capital markets, analysis of consumption - investment decisions of investors, diversification and portfolio selection, pricing of risky assets, performance measurement, theory of efficient markets, and introduction to derivatives.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recognise the importance of financial markets for a modern economy.
· Understand the fundamentals of market efficiency.
· Comprehend the portfolio decision problem & its implications for asset returns in competitive markets.
· Analyse the pricing of equities and fixed income securities.
· Appreciate the significance of the developments of newer instruments and markets.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3901 Market Economy 3

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop and practise the theoretical and empirical economic method of reasoning as applied to the market economy.

Module Content: Alternative market systems and the main theories and related empirical research on the functioning of the market economy, the competitive process as a discovery process, the structure and operation of key units (e.g. business firms, sectors and institutions) and the role of government are presented and used

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain how a market economy system allocates resources and distributes output/income.
· Describe how the dynamic nature of competitive markets and competition as a discovery process generates innovation, growth and prosperity.
· Describe how the price mechanism acts as a transmission and signalling system and results in co-ordination within an economy.
· Analyse the processes, organisations and institutions that operate in the markets for capital and labour.
· Assess the appropriate role of government in a market economy.
· Identify circumstances in which the market system may be unable to allocate resources efficiently and identify and evaluate possible solutions to these issues.
· Read and analyse business, finance and economic issues in the media.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x In class tests 30 marks each; Assignment 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised essays to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3902 The Business Organisation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (none).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Lisa Noonan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop and practise the theoretical and empirical economic method of reasoning as applied to organisation for business.

Module Content: The 'firm' as a social institution for coping with uncertainty is explored through various conceptual and analytical models, with the emphasis on the economics of strategy for competitive advantage in domestic and international markets, and the economic incentives and disincentives of, for example, different organisational structures, alternative modes of business governance and resource allocation mechanisms, especially capital auctioning and capital rationing, are explored..

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recall and explain the modules conceptual frameworks and theories.
· Explain how firms deal with uncertainty.
· Investigate important business organisational issues such as: how do firms attract and retain desired workers? How do institutions decide which payment systems to employ? How much and what type of training is most likely to benefit the firm?
· Use economic theory and analysis to examine human resource and labour market questions.
· Explain, compare and contrast business practices in the areas addressed.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3 x In-class Tests 50 marks each; Written Assignment 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised essays to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3903 Economic Readings Workshop (Last updated 12/11/2013)

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Aimee Fox, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide students with the tools for reading, analysing and critiquing leading economic and business writers on market economies. Students will learn how to critically read economic literature and construct economic arguments through English.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the leading Western economic and business writers on the market economy, through guided reading workshops. Students will assess the readings and critically analyse the important ideas and arguments in an interactive environment.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate how economic and business concepts such as inbound logistics, inventory management, and sales and marketing interact with each other to generate a business' sustained competitive advantage.
· Work better in teams, apply organisational and decision making skills to address business issues and describe the entrepreneurial and leadership capabilities required for successful business.
· Apply economic and financial tools of analysis to describe and evaluate business operations and performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Individual Projects 160 marks; Self-Reflective Exercises 40 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised essays to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3904 Market Economy Accounting and Measurement

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Marie O'Connor, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the importance of resources in both business and financial markets from a macroeconomic perspective.

Module Content: Measurement of economic activity, theories of economic growth, the role of monetary policy and the factors that influence money demand, and business cycle theory.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain how national income is measured.
· Explain different theories of economic growth and their applicability to economies today.
· Analyse the role of monetary policy in the economy.
· Explain the factors that influence money demand.
· Discuss business cycle theory and how it can be used to explain macroeconomic fluctuations.
· Explore potential solutions to business cycle volatility.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((2 x In-class Tests 30 marks each; Project 40 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised essays to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3905 Economic, Business and Financial Data Collection and Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Jane Bourke, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To acquire the skills and techniques for data collection and analysis required for economic analysis of business organisations and financial institutions.

Module Content: This module will provide instruction in the main quantitative and qualitative techniques used in Business and Financial Economics. It will provide an opportunity for students to reflect on the practical problems encountered in the research process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the main quantitative and qualitative techniques used in Business and Financial Economics.
· Formulate strategies to identify and overcome the practical problems encountered in the research process.
· Apply statistical tools to solve economic problems.
· Use computer software to present, organize and analyse economic data.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individual Project 50 marks; Written Assignment 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised essays to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3906 Economic, Financial and Business Decision-Making

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (none).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Huiyuan Yao, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To study and analyse the concepts and empirical methods for evaluating business and/or financial performance at the unit, sector, regional and national level.

Module Content: The principles and construction of input and output measures at various levels, from the microeconomic to the macroeconomic level, are examined and related to decision-making in business and finance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the nature of risk and uncertainty.
· Explain the motivations behind personal and business decision-making.
· Explain the economic concept of rationality and why people and firms may not act rationally.
· Identify and evaluate desired outcomes of the firm and the process of how the firm achieves these objectives when faced with risks and uncertainty.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x In-class Tests 50 marks each; Individual Project 50 marks; Written Assignment 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC3910 Environmental Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures (evening); 8 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (evening).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To examine the role of economics in environmental issues.

Module Content: Economic Methodology. The role of markets and government. Applications to economic issues for environmental protection. Carbon taxes. Fishing rights. Methods of valuing environmental costs and benefits. Sustainable development.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the economics approach to conceptualising the environment and environmental problems.
· Illustrate the concepts of market failure and government failure in the context of an environmental issue.
· Explain the methodology underlying cost benefit analysis for valuing an environmental resource.
· Describe some market-based policy instruments to mitigate against environmental problems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks ((In-class Test)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4000 Economic Foundations 1

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 5 x 1day(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aileen Murphy, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the economic method of thinking and analysis through practical application of key ideas and theories.

Module Content: - Introduction to market economy
- Market analysis: demand & supply
- Demand analysis: Consumers and customers
- Supply analysis: cost structure
- Prices and quality rationing
- Organisation in the economic system

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain how the market economy works as a discovery process in the search for efficient allocation of resources in the health care.
· Examine the processes of economic decision making for individuals and business.
· Assess the role of government in the market economy.
· Describe and distinguish between the main economic accounts and indicators.
· Identify economic relationships between economic actors and factors governing them.
· Critically evaluate and assess economic arguments about critical issues.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 120 marks (1 x 5000 word assignment); Oral Assessment 80 marks (40 marks class participation and contribution, 40 marks presentation of assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC4001 Economic Foundations II

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 5 x 1day(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Aileen Murphy, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explain how the interaction of decisons by consumers, firms and government affect the employment and allocation of resources and the distribution of income and goods within the economic system.

Module Content: - Criteria and process for individual decision making
- Business and organisational decision making
- Interaction of businesses in the market system
- Government in the market economy
- Market failure and government failure

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse the theoretical background to predictions of consumer, firm and government behaviour and decision-making.
· Recognise the issues involved in the different types of coordination and cooperation problems that a society faces.
· Assess the role of prices in resource allocation in modern economies.
· Demonstrate the implications of choice under uncertainty and information asymmetry.
· Analyse how and why markets fail to achieve competitive outcomes.
· Evaluate policy responses by governments in response to market failure.
· Demonstrate a capacity to consider value and appreciate the role of critical thinking in economics.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 120 marks (1 x 5,000 word assignment); Oral Assessment 80 marks (40 marks class participation and contribution, 40 marks presentation of assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment; Oral Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC4171 Economic Integration in Europe

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Daniel Blackshields, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To use economic theory to aid understanding of European Integration.

Module Content: Rationale for progressive integration since the Treaty of Rome. Examination of the effect of European integration on monetary policy including the European Central Bank. Structural funds and Regional Aid. Environmental policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the nature of economic integration.
· Apply the principles of economic integration to European integration.
· Describe the European internal market.
· Show how the European internal market developed.
· Evaluate the evolution of Common Policies in the EU.
· Assess the importance and consequences of intergovernmental co-operation and expansion.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (1 x Project).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4201 Industry Structure and Competition

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To analyse issues of industrial and economic organisation emphasising the organisation of various kinds of firms.

Module Content: Existence and organisation of the firm. Technology and economies of scale and scope. Relationships between market/industry structure and firm performance.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Use microeconomic principles to examine the pricing and supply decisions firms with market power;
· Analyse the provision of high-quality and differentiated products and the introduction of new products and processes;
· Describe the difference between different concepts of competition such as neo-classical vs Austrian vs Chicago;
· Outline the basic principles of competition policy and how these are used to analyse markets;
· Appreciate the impact of external and internal economic factors on the competitive performance of the business as a whole;
· Recognise that there are different industry structures and forms of business and appreciate the impact this may have on competitiveness.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4202 Government and Business

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To examine the relationships between government actions and business decisions.

Module Content: Inter-relationships between government and business. Influence of the government on the economic determinants of competitive advantage of a country or region as a location for business. The public policy process and the formulation of policy towards business.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the role of government and other bodies in the regulation of the economy at both micro and macro level;
· Analyse the interdependencies between economic performance and government decisions and examine the relationships between government actions and business decisions;
· Outline how the government influences the economy of Ireland from a number of perspectives and in a number of key sectors including health and education;
· Analyse the role of government in solving market failures, for example, the problem of asymmetric information in the market for health care;
· Analyse the impact of sales and corporation taxes on market outcomes and business decisions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x 2,000 word project).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4203 Economics of Human Resources

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To analyse the use of economic theory in the field of human resources.

Module Content: Labour market. Supply of labour and human capital investment. Compensation and remuneration schemes. Demand for labour, training and personal development. The impact of asymmetric information in the labour market. Employment policies, efficiency wages and insider-outsider theories. Corporate government and employee participation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop a practical and theoretical insight into current practices and contemporary developments in human resource economics;
· Identify and analyse key human resource issues, including the recruitment and selection of staff, their training and development, and the manner in which their work performance can be assessed and rewarded in the context of both large and small organisations;
· Describe the basic theoretical models of labour economics and how these can be applied to policy issues;
· Manipulate these models, and be able to analytically solve problems relating to labour markets;
· Apply the models to important policy areas whilst being aware of the limitations of the theory.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x 2,000 word project).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4204 Innovation, Technology and Strategy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr David Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr David Butler, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explore key issues in using technological innovation to achieve competitive advantage and strategic goals.

Module Content: Competition and the role of innovation. Innovation capabilities and processes. Knowledge and leverage processes. Technological development, productivity growth, Added Value and Competitive Advantage. Strategic Options. Vertical Integration and Outsourcing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· determine the sources of innovation.
· explore the role of innovation in economic development.
· identify the key technological developments influencing economic growth.
· evaluate the capabilities and processes of economic entities that produce added value.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 2,000 word assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4208 Law and Economics of Competition

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Considine, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr John Considine, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To examine competition law from a legal and economic perspective.

Module Content: The policy, business context law, institutions, techniques and efficiency of Irish and EU competition law.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the relative efficiency of alternative market structures
· Calculate tests for the relevant market and for market power
· Apply the more important Articles of the EC Treaty for Competition Law
· Collect economic data relating to Competition Law
· Locate Competition Law with other EU policies such as cultural policy
· Compare and contrast alternative economic views on competition.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x 2,000 word project).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4221 Business Econometrics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 20 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 20 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Donal O'Brien, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Donal O'Brien, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The use of economic theory and econometric methods to understand and evaluate the economic environment of business.

Module Content: Cross section and time series techniques are used to determine: the profitability and competitiveness of firms; the operation of the financial markets; and the significance of government policy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Formulate, estimate, test and interpret suitable models for the empirical study of economic phenomena;
· Recognise why empirical analysis of economic relationships requires specific methods and why an econometrician needs a far larger tool-box than classical regression analysis;
· Have acquired the ability to evaluate the performance of alternative econometric models through the appropriate use of tests;
· Demonstrate an ability to apply regression techniques using econometric software and be able to program simple estimation routines;
· Display confidence about reading and interpreting applied economic journal articles.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x In-class Tests, 10 marks each; 1 x Project, 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4222 Financial Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 200.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of the financial environment for production and investment.

Module Content: The theory and applied theory of money and capital markets are used to provide an understanding of the financial environment for production and investment in relation to corporate strategy and the finance and treasury functions of firms. Structure of financial markets and operation of financial institutions are also examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the role of the most fundamental markets and institutions that constitute a modern financial system and be familiar with the theory of an empirical evidence on efficient markets;
· Describe stochastic models for security prices, option pricing and hedging techniques and the term structure of interest rates;
· Outline various theories of risk-factor pricing, such as the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and the Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT);
· Derive efficient frontiers and find optimal portfolios with the mean-variance portfolio and derive equilibrium relationships for expected rates of return;
· Evaluate from the perspective of investors and other stakeholders the effects of corporate decisions on expansion, consolidation, contraction and termination of the enterprise;
· Use utility theory for making optimal investment decisions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x 3,000 word portfolio).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4223 Corporate Strategy Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Formulation of strategic business decisions using economic theory and business cases.

Module Content: The theory and applied theory of pricing, production and finance considered from the perspective of the firm. Risk and uncertainty in decision-making. Strategic investment decision making and evaluation of growth options. Business objectives and corporate organisations. Principals and agents. Demand, supply and economies of scale and scope. Markets, managerial hierarchies and corporate control. Economics of business culture - game theory, transaction costs and economic performance. Strategic behaviour by firms and strategic interaction under different market structures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define strategy at various levels and identify strategic issues by evaluating strategic options and developing plans of action, and explain and apply tools for analysis of environment, market and firm;
· Understand the key elements of the external environment in which the organisation operates, involving customers, competitors, industry and wider economic and political environmental influences;
· Analyse the organisation's internal resources and capabilities, and how this relates to competitive advantage;
· Assess and evaluate strategic options likely to result in the best fit between the external environment and internal resources, in a manner which will lead to sustainable competitive advantage;
· Analyse the nature and development of diverse market environments on business strategy.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x 2,000 word project).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4301 Economics of Health Organisations

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other (16 Groupwork/Presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Michele Barry, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Brendan McElroy, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of the methods of economic reasoning in a health care context.

Module Content: Demand and Supply method of analysis. Economic factors affecting health status, funding mechanisms and social/private insurance schemes, organisation of health care provision will be considered. Cultural and Stakeholders analysis. The nurse and midwife as a resource manager.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an understanding of the methodology used in economic reasoning
· Use economic theory to explain the relationship between demand, supply and markets
· Outline the role of incentives on the economics of health care organisatons
· Evaluate a variety of health care funding and delivery mechanisms
· Compare and contrast public and private insurance schemes
· Discuss the economics of health care organisations
· Evaluate the economic dimension of hospitals
· Conduct a simple stakeholder analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Essay x 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4302 Health Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Michele Barry, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Michele Barry, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the methods for understanding resource allocation, critically interpreting evaluation studies and assessing public policy proposals in terms of equity, efficiency and strategic effectiveness.

Module Content: Quality of life and public policy. Economic philosophies: foundations for concepts of quality of life. The rational choice paradigm: exposition and critique. Economic scarcity, opportunity costs and resource allocation. Measurement and evaluation criteria. The public policy process including moral hazard, the principal-agent problem and market/government failure.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply key elements of economic theory to health and health care
· Analyse the bahviour of doctors, patients and hospitals using economic theory
· Apply analytical techniques to analyse resource allocation decisions in health care
· Describe the key differences between alternative institutional and organisational arrangements for the provision and delivery of health care products and services
· Evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of health care systems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (In Class Test).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4402 Economic Research Project

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 10 x 1hr(s) Workshops (Guided research and self directed study); Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Justin Doran, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Justin Doran, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To prepare and present a research study using economic theory and techniques.

Module Content: Independent work on a research and/or development project.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify specific economics related issues which would be useful to research.
· Develop a research question.
· Locate and discuss recent literature in the thesis area including theory, methodology and empirical evidence, discussing the main issues surrounding the research question.
· Identify data sources.
· Process, summarise and describe the data relevant to the thesis question.
· Carry out appropriate analysis to address the research question.
· Present, describe and interpret findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (1 x 2,000 word Research Proposal, 60 marks; 2 x Presentations, 15 marks each; 1 x 10,000 word Research Project, 210 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC4403 Economic Consulting

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop and practice the knowledge and skills required for using economic and financial analysis in carrying out consultancy projects.

Module Content: This module describes the consultancy process and the stages involved in conducting a consultancy project. It examines the skills required in managing a consultant/client relationship. Topics covered include acquiring consultancy projects, briefs and contracts; researching the client business areas; constructing consultancy reports; managing client relationships and a portfolio of clients; professional practice and personal values; ethical principles, dilemmas and conflicts of interest. Case Studies will be used extensively to provide practical experience of the issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Prepare and deliver a presentation in a professional manner.
· Explain how ethical decisions are made and apply ethical decision-making theories and models to their own actions.
· Assess the quality of arguments, identifying rhetoric and fallacies in arguments.
· Write a professional consultancy proposal document.
· Explain the knowledge and skills required for using economic and financial analysis in consultancy projects.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 1,000 word essays 40 marks each; Presentations 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director on or before the Student Consultation days).

[Top of page]

EC4404 Scenario Forecasting and Future Analysis

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: A critical analysis of the qualitative and quantitative forecasting techniques commonly used in business.

Module Content: A range of forecasting techniques will be discussed which include expert judgement; scenario planning and statistical models (e.g. time series analysis, moving averages, and smoothing methods). Evaluation criteria used to measure and compare forecasts are also studied.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify influencing factors.
· Rate influencing factors.
· Create alternative scenarios.
· Combine scenarios into a combined scenario matrix.
· Identify, interpret, and evaluate future trend in the business organisation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (2 x 1,000 Word Projects, 20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by Module Coordinator).

[Top of page]

EC4405 Enterprise and Growth of Firms

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Introducing key theory and concepts for examining processes of enterprise growth and its central their role for a competitive economy.

Module Content: Explores the firm in theory, the productive opportunity of the firm and the Entrepreneur, expansion with/without merger, inherited resources and the direction of expansion, the economies of size and growth, the economics of diversification, the growth of firms through time, the position of large and small firms in a growing economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop a coherent argument/theory of firm growth as outlined by a key thinker in the area, Edith Penrose.
· Identify alternative growth sources and potential for existing firms including via organic growth, merger, and acquisition.
· Critique the function of entrepreneurship for business development within the firm.
· Provide a detailed account of the role of inherited resources and managerial resources for enterprise growth.
· Examine the specificities of small and large firms in the context of economic growth.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 160 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x essay).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by Module Coordinator).

[Top of page]

EC4406 Economic Consulting

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Develops the skills required to deliver economic analysis in a professional consultancy environment.

Module Content: This module describes the consultancy process and the stages involved in conducting a consultancy project. It examines the skills required in managing a consultant/client relationship. Topics covered include acquiring consultancy projects, briefs and contracts; researching the client business areas; constructing consultancy reports; managing client relationships and a portfolio of clients; professional practice and personal values; ethical principles, dilemmas and conflicts of interest. Case studies will be used extensively to provide practical experience of the issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Prepare and deliver a presentation in a professional manner.
· Explain how ethical decisions are made and apply ethical decision-making theories and models to their own actions.
· Assess the quality of arguments, identifying rhetoric and fallacies in arguments.
· Write a professional consultancy proposal document.
· Explain the knowledge and skills required for using economic and financial analysis in consultancy projects.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x group project, 40 marks; 1 x group presentation, 10 marks; 1 x report, 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as specified by Module Coordinator).

[Top of page]

EC4901 Market Economy 4

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr David Butler, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To apply theoretical framework/theories in a participant-centred learning environment to develop a practical understanding of the nature, role and operation of business and financial markets and organisations.

Module Content: The theory and practice of market structures and institutions; reform cycles in socialist/communist societies and transition economies and the development of conceptual and theoretical apparatus for analysing the emerging structure and functioning of the Chinese economy and business system in the global economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recall and explain the conceptual frameworks and theories developed in EC3901 and critique them in the context of reform in socialist/communist societies and the transition of the Chinese economy.
· Identify and explain conceptual and theoretical frameworks used to analyse the emerging structure of the Chinese economy and business system.
· Explain the implications of Chinese economic reform and development for the global economic system.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class Test 40 marks; Written Assignment 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised essays to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4902 Prosperity, Productivity and Competitiveness in the Global Economy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Marie O'Connor, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explore the sources of prosperity, productivity and competitiveness at business, regional and national levels in the context of increasing international trade and knowledge transfer.

Module Content: Industrialisation and development debates on China's trajectory from a contemporary and prospective perspective. Emergence of market-based business systems in socialist/communist economies. Theoretical and empirical methods for analysing the impact of the business environment on competitiveness, profitability and standards of living. Productivity, growth, government intervention and business cycles are examined using case studies and applied project work. The concepts are used in the context of the increasing internationalisation of business.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and evaluate alternative frameworks and theories of economic growth and development.
· Describe the impact of business environment on national and regional competitiveness, performance and standards of living.
· Describe and evaluate competing explanations of the causes and impacts of business cycles.
· Explain and critique the emergence of market-based business systems in socialist/communist and transition economies.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In class exam 40 marks; Written Assignment 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised essays to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC4903 Economics in Practice: Showcase Business Event

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): EC3905 Economic, Business and Financial Data Collection and Analysis

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Declan Jordan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Aileen Murphy, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop interpretative, written communication, presentation, team-working and leadership skills.

Module Content: Building on research undertaken in EC3905 this module is a performance of understanding by means of a research project and business event presentation. Students will demonstrate their ability to apply concepts and theories of the programme to analyse issues relevant to Irish and/or Chinese businesses. Through the business event preparation each class will experience aspects of business in practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate management skills by participating in a conference on doing business in China.
· Complete a business research report on a business issue of concern to businesses operating in the Chinese market to a high professional standard.
· Present their own research to the business conference.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3 x Written Reports 50 marks each, Presentation 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Revised essays to be submitted as prescribed by the Department0.).

[Top of page]

EC5211 Enhancing Economic Skills Through Case Studies

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48hr(s) Lectures (and Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop micro and macro economic skills through applied case study analysis.

Module Content: Micro and Macro economic theory and empirical frameworks employed in the study of business and public policy issues. Discussion and critical assessment of economic theories on business and policy issues through case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply economic concepts and tools to issues in competition, governance and society.
· Analyse the meaning of competition and the resultant market forces as they apply to businesses decision-making in organisations.
· Have a greater comprehension of the implications of governance issues as they apply to organisations.
· Master the skills required to explore, critique and assess a key text in Economic literature
· Analyse economic arguments using the skills of argumentation, language and documentation analysis.
· Prepare judgements on the merits of an economic argument.
· Demonstrate enhanced team skills based on the workshop approach to this course
· Communicate an understanding of your critical and creative thinking effectively to a peer/academic audience.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (2 x 5,000 word essays).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC5212 Reading Workshop in Economics

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Edward Shinnick, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop economic skills through reading a key economic book in a workshop format.

Module Content: A critical and analysis of key economic issues as they relate to the business and public policy environments through reading a classic book in economics. Discussions will be held via a workshop format.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Construct an argument using economic theory and data
· Master the problem-solving skills required to explore, assess and propose solutions to practical business problems using the principles of expert problem solving in a case study context.
· Apply economic concepts and tools to the issue of globalisation.
· Design, develop and present material on practical business problems in 'creative industries' to non Economics-literate audience
· Demonstrate enhanced communication and presentation skills
· Demonstrate a capacity to consider, value and appreciate the role of critical and creative thinking in Economics.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks ((Two 5,000 word essays).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6000 Quantitative Techniques and Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 30 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48hr(s) Lectures (& Computer laboratory sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Ann Kirby, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop and apply the participants quantitative and analytical skills. Methods for data analysis including bivariate analysis, multivariate analysis and factor analysis will be studied, and applied using SPSS for Windows.

Module Content: 1. Introduction - Quantitative Techniques and Analysis
2. Introduction to SPSS for Windows
3. Descriptive statistcis and graphs in SPSS
4. Index numbers
5. Time Series Analysis
6. Non-Parametric Statistics
7. Statistical techniques to explore relationships among variables
8. Correlation
9. Partial Correlation
10.Multiple Regression
11.Factor analysis

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Interpret and employ different quantitative techniques: in terms of problem definition as a means of solving existing relationships; and use as an exploratory tool.
· Identify the relationship between problem definition and the modelling process.
· Apply the statistical tools of analysis using SPSS.
· Report and analyse the results generated from the data.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x projects worth 50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6001 Macroeconomics for Financial Markets

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module is designed to focus on the key macroeconomic issues facing institutions that participate in and regulate financial markets.

Module Content: A selection of key macroeconomics theories, models and techniques with particular relevance to financial markets. Topics include business cycles and economic growth, uncertainty, monetary policy, inflation and the labour market.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· describe the movement of economic and financial variables during a business cycle.
· ascertain the phase of the business cycle an economy is in.
· apply different models to explain the macroeconomic performance of particular economies.
· contrast the monetary policy actions of various Central Banks, using appropriate models.
· analyse the interconnections between asset, money, credit markets and the real economy.
· assess the effect of government, monetary and exchange rates policies on individual countries, the global economy and financial markets.
· determine the causes of economic fluctuations and economic growth.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6002 Financial Institutions and Money Markets

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Ella Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to study the role of money in the economy, the behaviour of interest rates and the challenges facing banks and other financial intermediaries.

Module Content: This course examines the role of money markets and banks in the economy. It explores the rationale for banks as financial institutions, their functions and the challenges facing banks in all aspects of their business. It focuses on understanding the types of risk facing banks and the management of this risk.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the rationale for the existence of banks (commercial and investment).
· Evaluate the explanations for the transformation of banking business.
· Measure banking performance.
· Debate policymaker's response to banking crises.
· Compare and contrast the principle money market instruments.
· Determine the reasons for variations in money market interest rates.
· Explain Central Bank intervention in the Money Market.
· Explain how banks measure and manage their Credit and Liquidity Risk.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6003 International Finance

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Don Walshe, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module will extend and deepen students' understanding of key issues relating to international finance in open economy contexts.

Module Content: This module studies arbitrage relationships in FOREX markets including CIP, UIP and PPP and looks at fundamental models of exchange rate determination.Building on open economy macroeconomic and asset-pricing models, this module is also focused on how economic policy and the behaviour of financial market participants impacts international capital flows, exchange rates and global investment returns.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Present an informed opinion on a range of topics in international finance
· Discuss open economy macroeconomic and international asset-pricing models
· Critically assess international economic policy and the behaviour of financial market participants
· Recognise the linkages between international capital flows, exchange rates and global investment returns.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6004 Regulation and Compliance in Capital Markets

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module introduces the key techniques and principles of best practice in effective regulation and compliance management.

Module Content: This module meets a growing interest by regulators and fraud prevention authorities in the use of economics to analyse, detect and deter white collar crime. It covers the guiding principles behind financial regulation and the main differences between the roles and key legal aspects of different regulatory institutions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· explain the economic arguments for and against regulation.
· evaluate the importance of financial regulation.
· develop and express views about regulatory systems.
· demonstrate a critical appreciation of key issues in European and International regulatory initiatives and the challenges facing regulators of global financial firms and markets.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6005 Derivatives Securities

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Michael Mortell, School of Mathematical Sciences.

Module Objective: This module offers advanced training in derivatives markets and the valuation of derivatives.

Module Content: This course introduces the concepts and mathematical techniques in pricing derivatives including options, swaps, forwards and futures on underlying assets such as stocks, stock indices, currencies, debt instruments and commodities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss futures markets and the use of futures for hedging
· Describe trading strategies involving options
· Explain the concept of risk-neutral valuation
· Describe the properties of stock option prices
· Derive and apply models of derivatives pricing including options, swaps and futures.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6006 Treasury Risk Management

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module studies treasury risk management strategies.

Module Content: The focus themes in this module are the measurement and management of risks facing banks and corporations arising from volatility in financial markets, in particular in currency and interest rate markets. The module looks at the identification and quantification of risk and at strategies of risk management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· employ techniques to efficiently manage a company's cash flows
· identify and quantify interest rate and exchange rate risk
· explain the workings of risk management derivatives
· structure interest rate and exchange rate risk management strategies around an economic outlook.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: End of Year Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6007 Portfolio Management

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module presents the theory and practice of portfolio management and performance measurement.

Module Content: This module studies portfolio theory including portfolio selection and optimisation as well as strategic and tactical asset allocation. It introduces and applies linear factor models in evaluating portfolio performance in stock selection, market timing and persistence. This module also examines risk metrics including value at risk.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· explain the return versus risk trade off in portfolio construction
· derive optimal portfolios
· evaluate risk adjusted portfolio performance
· critically appraise various return measures
· interpret the economic as well as statistical significance of performance findings
· calculate various risk metrics.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x assignment).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6008 Asset Returns and Valuation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Geraldine Ryan, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop knowledge of the functioning of financial markets as they apply to the principles of finance and investment. To introduce techniques of empirical research in finance.

Module Content: This course examines the valuation of financial assets including equities, bonds and other financial securities and studies the economic influences governing changes in the prices of these assets. It also deals with issues in behavioural finance, stock price predictability and volatility, the efficient market hypothesis and time varying risk premia.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· apply stock selection criteria.
· summarise the function of strategic, tactical, and cyclical asset allocation in portfolio management and discuss their role in specifying and controlling the investor's exposures to systematic risk.
· discuss the strengths and limitations of the asset allocations modules.
· evaluate the stock market efficiency and predictability arguments
· apply different ways of bond pricing and distinguish the different market conventions.
· understand complex bond structures.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (1 x In-Class Test (20 marks): 1 x Individual Project (10 marks); 1 x Group Project (30 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6009 Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module provides the necessary skills to enable students to design, conduct and present research in a chosen topic.

Module Content: This module includes (i) a report writing/economic consulting element, (ii) visiting speaker seminar series, (iii) research methods training and (iv) workshops on recent developments in financial research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· identify research questions in financial economics
· locate and discuss recent literature in the research area including theory, methodology and empirical evidence, discussing the main issues surrounding the research question
· identify data sources and process, summarise and describe the data relevant to the thesis question.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x assignment).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: as prescribed by the Programme Director.

[Top of page]

EC6010 Dissertation in Financial Economics

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2. (The dissertation is completed over the summer period and marks are submitted to the Winter board.).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods:

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Application of skills and knowledge acquired in the MSc Financial Economics modules to minor research project

Module Content: max 8,000 word dissertation on a research topic in financial economics

Learning Outcomes:

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (1 x 8,000 word dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC6012 Applied Econometrics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Niall O'Sullivan, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Dr Meadhbh Sherman, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This course has two key objectives. First, it presents a comprehensive and accessible background to current econometric methods. Second, it introduces applied econometrics, that is, the application of these methods in economic research, by providing experience of analysing data sets.

Module Content: This module is an applied treatment of econometrics in financial economics research. Techniques covered can include: OLS, Maximum Likelihood Estimation, Generalised Least Squares, SURE, Panel Data Analysis, Time Series Analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· derive various optimal estimators of cross-sectional and time series models and describe any assumptions underlying their derivation
· discuss consequences if assumptions don't hold and explain alternative estimation techniques
· model relationships between variables in financial economics
· estimate and interpret relevant parameters and tests statistics and carry out diagnostic tests.
· use econometrics software to apply the above techniques to data sets in financial economics.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 140 marks (End of Year Examination); Continuous Assessment 60 marks (2x 30 Marks In-Class Exams).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6020 Dissertation in Health Economics

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods:

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module aims to allow students to apply the skills and knowledge acquired in the MSc Health Economics modules to a research project. The ability to perform independent research on either primary or secondary data is a key learning outcome of the programme as a whole.

Module Content: Max 8,000 word dissertation on a research topic in health economics

Learning Outcomes:

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks ((1 x 8,000 word dissertation)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC6021 Health Care Systems and Organisation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (none).

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module, at the core of the programme, provides the conceptual, theoretical and empirical analysis for understanding health care systems and their performance including, for example, resourcing and financing of health care, decision-making criteria and processes relating to health, the structure of the health sector and the role of interest groups. The aim of this module is to apply economic principles and concepts to the analysis of health and health care decisions by consumers, firms and government. This module will explore the key economic issues currently confronting health systems in a comparative framework.

Module Content: This module uses health economic theory to examine the distinction between public, private and non-profit provision, and the financing of health care systems. It will analyse the demand for health and health services; production and cost of health services; medical insurance; equity, access and need; and the role of government . Current health care issues at a national and international level will be used to allow students to apply health economic theory.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the nature of health as both a consumption and investment good, that is from the perspective of individuals' enjoyment of their health and investment in their future health.
· Distinguish between the supply of health care services and the financing of those services.
· Explain the features of medical insurance, including adverse selection, moral hazard, risk adjustment and risk selection.
· Describe the structure and operation of health care systems and compare the performance of health systems in different countries.
· Analyse the equity of different systems of health care provision and utilisation.
· Discuss and appraise the main policy debates on funding and provision of care.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word research proposal (60 marks), 2 x 1,500 word assignments (20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6022 Health Care Economic Evaluation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module provides an understanding of economic appraisal techniques and the methodological issues encountered in health care economic evaluation. The module provides the context for the application of the estimation techniques included in EC6025.

Module Content: This module focuses on health care economic evaluation techniques. These techniques will be applied to health technologies, such as pharmaceuticals, diagnostic and surgical procedures. Methods examined include the framework for economic evaluation consisting of Cost-Minimisation Analysis, Cost-Utility Analysis, Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Cost-Benefit Analysis. Health-related quality of life will be measured and valued. Other evaluation techniques, such as Markov Chain Modelling, will be studied. Current methodological and policy issues in economic evaluation of health care will be examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and explain the framework for economic evaluations.
· Describe approaches to economic costing and outcome measurement.
· Analyse the normative issues involved in prioritising health care resources.
· Perform decision tree analysis and other economic modeling techniques on health and cost data.
· Apply the framework for economic evaluations to a health care issue.
· Critically appraise economic evaluations published in the health care literature.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (4 x 500 word assignments (20 marks each), 1 x presentation (20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6023 Health, Economy and Society

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module shows how economic analysis can assist policy formulation through the identification of different options for consumers and providers and the consequences for major stakeholders. This module will provide practical problems for the survey techniques included in EC6024.

Module Content: The focus of this module will be on analysing health policy choices and the basis for those choices. The themes will explore the trade-offs and dilemmas facing the participants and stakeholders in health care. These themes may include efficiency, equity, interest groups, insurance and financing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate substantive knowledge of a range of key issues and problems currently confronting health care systems
· Propose potential solutions to these problems
· Evaluate the economic issues of establishing health priorities in the face of limited resources
· Relate theoretical interpretations to 'practice', such that the specific policy developments can be placed in their theoretical context.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,500 word assignments, (50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6024 Applied Health Survey Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module focuses on the practical application of the survey approach to the design of research projects and the collection of original data in relation to topics covered in the programme.

Module Content: Sampling techniques, survey instrument design and implementation, coding and processing in SPSS, and report preparation and presentation are covered. The data will be analysed using univariate, bivariate and multivariate techniques, with the research content related to the issues in EC6023.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop theoretical frameworks and hypotheses in order to investigate a research problem.
· Apply the different sampling techniques used in economic survey design.
· Evaluate survey questionnaires in terms of layout, question sequence and question and response format.
· Construct a survey instrument.
· Describe and present economic data.
· Discuss the character of the relationship between two or more variables, calculating the necessary statistics to determine association and significance.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 3,000 word assignments (50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6025 Applied Health Econometrics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 100 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Seamus Coffey, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module focuses on the practical application of the econometric approach to the design of research projects and the estimation and interpretation of key relationships in health economics as one technique for empirical research for the minor thesis.

Module Content: Maximum-likelihood techniques, generalized least square and limited dependent variables, random and fixed-effect models and panel data methods are covered. The methods are examined using datasets and the appropriate statistical software. The approach taken is applied with a focus on understanding techniques and interpreting results in quantitative economic research.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the different statistical models and econometric techniques that can be used in health economics.
· Choose the appropriate method based on the research question to be considered and the available data.
· Specify statistical hypotheses, perform analysis by using statistical software and
· Evaluate the results and be able to present them in a style suitable for use in reports and articles.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,000 word assignments, 40 marks each, 1 x in-class exam, 20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6030 Health Economics in Practice

Credit Weighting: 60

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3. (Students will go on work placement from July to December & Write Report January to March).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 6month(s) Placements; 1 x 3month(s) Other (Report Writing).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Apply interpersonal, communication and critical reasoning skills to enhance personal and professional development, through a work placement.

Module Content: 6 month internship; learning logs; research report writing skills; presentation skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply interpersonal, communication and critical reasoning skills to enhance personal and professional development, through the work placement programme.
· Identify problems and issues in the health care sector in a working environment.
· Evaluate alternative solutions to these problems and issues and make recommendations thereon.
· Demonstrate written and oral communication skills through the completion of a report and presentation thereof.
· Reflect on and analyse the learning experience from the work placement.

Assessment: Total Marks 1200: Continuous Assessment 1200 marks (8,000 word report (960 marks), Learning Logs (120 marks) Presentation of Report (120 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC6031 Health Services Resourcing

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Conceptual and empirical methods for evaluating alternative systems for resourcing and distributing health services.

Module Content: - Alternative funding methods for health care systems - tax, social, private, out of pocket.
- Risk
- Insurance

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe alternative funding methods for health care systems
· Analyse the role of incentives and risk in the behaviour of health care providers, payers and "patients".
· Appraise the impact of alternative funding methods on health care delivery
· Examine the role of insurance under different health care financing regimes.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x Essay 3,000 word assignments (80 marks each) and 2 x Presentations (20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6032 Research Skills and Methods for Health Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Formulation of a targeted health research question; to research published sources of information; to develop, use and apply the skills required for conducting health economic research; collect and analyse original data; write up a report.

Module Content: Development of a research question; literature review techniques; data collection techniques; data analysis techniques; Report writing skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse and critique health economic research
· Formulate clear research questions
· Identify where the research question lies in the context of existing literature
· Employ appropriate data collection and data analyis techniques for the research question
· Write a research report
· Communicate the findings of a research question orally and in writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x Essay 3,000 word assignments (80 marks each) and 2 x Presentations (20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6033 Evaluating Health Outcomes

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Examination of the issues and theoretical methods in measuring health outcomes and in the economic evaluations of delivery of strategic goals and health care performance.

Module Content: Framework for economic evaluations. Different approaches to economic costing and outcome measurement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the framework for economic evaluations
· Describe approaches to economic costing and outcome measurement
· Critically interpret economic evaluations to enhance decision making.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x Essay 3,000 word assignments (80 marks each) and 2 x Presentations (20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6034 Innovation in Health Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Analysis of changes in health care practices, products and systems.

Module Content: Frameworks for analysing innovation in health care products, practices and systems; Schumpeter; Drucker,

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Distinguish between types of health care innovations
· Identify stages in innovation process
· Analyse the impact of health care innovation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Essay 3,000 word assignment (80 marks) and 1 x presentation (20 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6035 Economic Decision Making in Health

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 72 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Economic principles for decision making in the financing, resource allocation, distribution and delivery of health care.

Module Content: - Theory of decision making under uncertainty
- Expected utility theory
- Ways in which people diverge from expected utility theory.
- Self interest
- Role of values and ethics in decision making.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify tools and techniques for economic decision making
· Describe how these tools and techniques are employed to make economic decisions.
· Apply economic decision making processes to issues in health economic practice.
· Propose solutions to problems and issues in the health care sector using the framework of economic based decision making
· Evaluate alternative solutions to problems and issues in the health care sector and mak recommendations thereon.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (3 x Essay 3,000 word assignments (80 marks each) and 3 x presentations (20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6036 Health Care Markets

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Brian Turner, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Comparative analysis of how resources are allocated in health care.

Module Content: - Resource allocation in a free market.
- Resource allocation in a taxation based health care system.
- Alternative priority setting techniques, e.g. rationing
- Supplier induced demand
- Information asymmetries

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse alternative organisational and market structures for the financing and delivery of health care
· Evaluate alternative resource allocation mechanisms and their impac ton health care
· Examine the rationing process under different health care systems
· Identify how information asymmetries can alter demand for and supply of health care.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 x Essay 3,000 word assignments (80 marks each) and 2 x presentations (20 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised Assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6050 Business Development and the Competitive Environment

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 8 x 2hr(s) Other ((Research Supervision)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explore and use concepts and theories to define and explain facets of business competitiveness within theories of economic development: to apply concepts and theories to case examples and use them in designing and conducting a research project posed by a problem sponsor.

Module Content: Microeconomics of Competitiveness incorporating analysis of Firms and Industries: Competition, Strategy and Location; Analysis of the Business Environment; Economic Strategy: Nations and Regions; Role of the Cluster Concept in within Economic Development. The module uses materials developed by the Institute of Strategy and Competitiveness at Harvard Business School (Director: Professor Michael Porter) and incorporates customised Irish research prepared by staff, Dept. of Economics affiliated with the Institute of Strategy and Competitiveness, Harvard Business School.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Offer detailed description of the key concepts and ideas to guide strategy and policy in business and policy contexts
· Use a solid grounding in key concepts and practical tools in the arena of competitiveness to sustain thinking and analysis
· Critique the cluster as a concept for thinking about competitiveness and as a policy tool for business development
· Anchor the practical tools applied in this programme within an understanding of the process of economic development in the knowledge economy
· Present research project to the problem sponsor - involving topic selection, developing a research-plan, implementing the plan, using theory to reach valid conclusions, reporting on research methods and outlining results to problem sponsor.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x assignment 20 marks, 1 x assignment 130 marks, 1 x presentation 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).).

[Top of page]

EC6051 Growth and Change

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 8 x 2hr(s) Other ((Research Supervision)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explore concepts and theories of growth and change; to use theory and skills to conduct an applied economic research project posed by a problem sponsor.

Module Content: Short and long-term analysis, including forecasting, of price, output, - income, consumption, investment; government, imports and exports at the national, regional, industry and market levels; using key theories of growth and change to formulate hypotheses;

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Offer detailed explanation of the key concepts, theories and skills to enlighten policymakers on the implications of economic change
· Use a solid grounding in the key concepts and practical tools in the area of growth and change to advise businesses on how to cope with and take advantage of change.
· Anchor the quantitative and qualitative research methodologies used within an understanding of growth and change in the modern economy
· Self-direct research in the area of growth and change to facilitate continuing professional development
· Present a research project to the problem sponsor - involving topic selection, developing and implementing a research-plan, using theory to reach valid conclusions, reporting on research methods and outlining results to the problem sponsor.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x assignment 20 marks, 1 x assignment 130 marks, 1 x presentation 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

EC6052 Innovation and Creativity

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 8 x 2hr(s) Other ((Research supervision)).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explore, evaluate and use concepts and theories to analyse and explain business innovation and creativity in the context of the market process; to apply concepts and theories in undertaking and presenting professional-standard research on a topic related to business innovation posed by a problem sponsor.

Module Content: Economics of Knowledge Creation and Innovation; Definitions of Innovation; Measuring Innovation; Models of Business Innovation - Linear Model, Chain-Link Model; Agglomeration Economies; Localised Knowledge Spillovers; Innovation Systems; Analyse how Place-based policies influence the Creative Process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the role of innovation as a source of change in a market economy
· Describe the process by which businesses develop product and process innovation
· Explain and assess the determinants of business-level innovation, both internal and external, and the links between innovation and competitiveness
· Describe the role of 'place' as a factor influencing business innovation, including urbanisation and localisation economies.
· Use appropriate theoretical concepts and frameworks and empirical evidence to critique regional, national and European policy on innovation
· Present professional standard research - involving topic selection, developing a research-plan, implementing the plan, using theory to reach valid conclusions, reporting on research methods and outlining results to problem sponsor.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x assignment 20 marks, 1 x assignment 130 marks, 1 x presentation 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department)).

[Top of page]

EC6053 Research Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Exploration of aspects of economic research and research writing. Includes the preparation of a research proposal and preliminary report on a selected topic.

Module Content: Approaching research, argument analysis, writing skills, doing a research proposal, organizing research, accessing and preparing data, the methodology of research, journal club and research showcase; preparing for the research article

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop research proposals and literature reviews for research projects
· Develop a focussed research question
· Critically evaluate theories and methods used in empirical research
· Explain and justify the appropriate methodology for addressing specific research questions
· Write a research project to a high professional standard
· Describe the process of economic research and construct a research plan to answer a specific research question.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x contribution 15 marks, 1 x presentation 15 marks, 1 x assignment (2,000 words) 20 marks, 1 x assignment (5,000 words) 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department)).

[Top of page]

EC6054 Econometrics for Research (Last updated 23/10/2013)

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Workshops; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To develop student's research skills which are required for the execution of group and individual projects. To introduce the research technique of econometrics. The module is both theoretical and applied is so far as effective interpretation of results is impossible without an understanding of the underlying theory. The over-riding emphasis is on developing the skills needed to apply econometric techniques, understanding the issues that arise and taking appropriate action.

Module Content: Exploring a single variable over time - Data Presentation, Real versus nominal time series data, Levels versus growth rates, Average annual percentage change, Logs and growth rates, Moving Averages, Estimating Linear Trends using Regression. Exploring the relationship between two or more variables; interpreting estimates, modifying the model, correlation and causation, advanced techniques including panel and time series regression, regression with binary dependent variables.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explore the movements in a single variable over time
· Develop and estimate econometric models arising in group or individual projects
· Interpret econometric estimates
· Modify an econometric model where necessary
· Use more advanced further econometric techniques including panel and time series regression and regression with binary dependent variables.
· Display proficiency in the use of STATA as tool for applying econometric techniques into practice.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x contribution 20 marks, 3 x assignments 60 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribe by the Department)).

[Top of page]

EC6057 Dissertation in Economics

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3. ((the research dissertation is completed over the summer period and marks are submitted to the Winter Board).).

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Directed Study (Independent Supervised Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To apply the skills and knowledge developed in Part 1 of the programme to complete a substantial research article.

Module Content: Max 10,000 word dissertation on a research topic in the area of economic change.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Complete a substantial research article
· Self-direct individual research
· Use concepts and theories developed in the programme to reach valid conclusions
· Employ economic data and techniques of analysis to investigate a research question
· Present research findings to a professional standard, both orally and in writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (1 x dissertation 450 marks, 1 x presentation 150 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC6058 Career Development Workshop

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; Other (Seminars, Workshops, Presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Exploration of aspects of adult and career development in order to enhance employability of graduates.

Module Content: Models of personal and professional adult development; Career development through portfolio of skills used by economists, including self-management, team working and communication skills. Development of reflective learning logs on personal and team development; Construction of career portfolios, including resume's and social media profiles; Practical skills of organizing and delivering presentations for a business/policy audience.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Self-reflect to facilitate on-going personal and professional mental development;
· Engage in career planning;
· Participate successfully in teams;
· Organise and deliver a professional presentations to academic, policy and business audiences.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Contribution 20 marks; Reflective learning reports 40 marks; Career Portfolio Presentation 40 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6059 Economic Data Analysis for Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 8, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (& Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To describe and present economic data to a high standard. To evaluate the nature and uses of different approaches to collecting quantitative and qualitative data, primary and secondary data, questionnaire and interview design. To describe data using tables, graphs and written commentaries for both written and oral presentations. To present data in a professional manner.

Module Content: Provides practical skills required for group and individual projects including understanding the key guiding concepts for data on competitiveness and innovation: Sourcing and descriptive statistical analysis of secondary data, such as National Accounts and the Global Competitiveness Report. Grounding in the preparation, conduct and reporting of interview and survey data, problems of survey data, problems such as questionnaire validity and reliability, and non-response, the sources of sampling and non-sampling error. Descriptive statistical analysis of primary and secondary data, including the generation and description of tables, figures and graphs for both written and oral presentations.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and present primary and secondary data to a high professional standard.
· Understand the key sources used for the study of competitiveness and innovation.
· Explain the sources of sampling and non-sampling error in data;
· Organise professional presentations of data for businesses, policymakers and academic audiences.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Contribution 10 marks , 3 x 2,000 word assignments, 30 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribe by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6061 Scenario Analysis for Creative Thinking

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eoin O'Leary, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To explore the epistemological foundations of scenario analysis with a view to understanding how economists develop scenarios about the future.

Module Content: Explores how individuals form expectations about the future and examine the roles of knowledge, beliefs, visions and images. Investigates risk and uncertainty. Scenario planning as technique to develop an open mind and to stimulate creative thinking. Organization of effective teams for scenario planning. Develop scenarios that integrate trends and uncertainties into alternative futures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand how individuals form expectations of the future
· Understand the boundaries of Knowledge
· Explain the nature of risk and uncertainty
· Develop scenarios in the areas of policy and/or business
· Understand the influence of strategic conversation, team dialogue and exploration in scenario planning.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (3 x assignment at 30 marks each, 1 x contribution 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Revised assignment to be submitted as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6113 Industry, Market and Strategic Analysis

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Introduce the core theory and concepts/framework, setting the conceptual foundations for the programme.

Module Content: Theory and empirical frameworks employed in the analysis of firms, their operation and the market/industry context.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Recall the programmes conceptual framework/theory
· Explain, using examples, the key theories and frameworks
· Relate the conceptual framework and theories to other programme modules
· Investigate business issues and practices
· Assess business strategy, operation, activities, and environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 x 2,000 word assignments).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6114 Field Work in Business Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other ((Guided Practitioners' Colloquay; Video Media; Site-Visits)).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To bring participants in direct contact with the operation of businesses and to explore with practitioners their issues and practices through an applied economics perspective.

Module Content: Participant-centered discovery of business issues and linking of theory to practice.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Prepare for meetings with business people.
· Assess and evaluate practitioner's ideas and issues.
· Explain the activities of various businesses, grounded in theory.
· Discuss practices and strategy with the business community.
· Develop a more comprehensive understanding of how business operates.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Individual Attendance, Preparation and Participation/Contribution; Team Presentation to Plenary Forum).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6115 Economic Survey Techniques for Business Research

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 43 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Noirin McCarthy, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To complement EC5007 Fieldwork in Business Economics by using and applying the skills required for conducting economic surveys in business.

Module Content: This is a practical fieldwork course focused on data collection and analysis based in the survey method, including survey design, implementation, processing, report preparation and presentation, with the research content related to the fieldwork in EC5007.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Distinguish between data, information and knowledge in an economic context.
· Explain why businesses gather knowledge about themselves and their markets.
· Identify and explain common decision-making traps.
· Collect information/data essential for business decisions.
· Design, construct and implement a business economic survey.
· Analyse and interpret, in a practical way, business survey data using SPSS.
· Explain how businesses market and sell their products and services.
· Explain the role of marketing and sales within the business as a value chain of activities.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ((1 x Group Project 160 marks, Presentation, 40 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6116 Innovation in the Market Economy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (The module will be delivered by an experienced practitioner in business, through a series of presentations, seminars and workshops.).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Owen O'Brien, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce participants to the activity of business in the market economy and the realities of business practice.

Module Content: A practice-orientated module in which participants will be guided through the issues and decision processes of business creation from product conception to market delivery by an established entrepreneur. The economics perspective will be used to examine practical examples of product conception and positioning, profitability and margin assessment, and channels to market in the context of contemporary economic and business thinking.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the importance of innovation for the creation of business value
· Recognise the factors which contribute to innovation
· Use practical tools to assess innovation goals and outcomes
· Describe the importance and function of business in the world economy
· Think entrepreneurially, as a discipline
· Partake in the real business world.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Innovation Project (Team), 100 marks; Series of structured assignments relating to business practice (Individual), 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6117 Reflective Journaling

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Prof Connell Fanning, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To facilitate personal development through a series of reflective writing exercises relating to programme content.

Module Content: Participants use the programme organising framework and a designated reading as a foil to reflect on, integrate and deepen personal learning for all programme modules.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· 'See' how their own thinking is progressing over time, and how they are making their own contributions to what they think about issues
· Change their way of personal thinking
· Reflect on their work and continue in their personal and professional development and transformation
· Communicate personal development through a reflective process.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((Personal Reflective essay/diary/log).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6118 Practice Laboratory in Business

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Directed Study ((Guided independent study and directed practice workshops to facilitate systematic observation and integrative analysis of the operation of firms in the context of industry/market environment and competitive strategy).).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide students with a framework for enhancing independent, observational, analytical and integrative skills, through individual and team-work, evaluating the organisation of business activities and the implementation of competitive strategies.

Module Content: On the basis of an underlying integrative framework for the programme, applied learning is conducted through (1) A critical reading-writing project based on a designated reading assignment (Individual) and (2) Conducting a Business Simulation exercise (Teamwork with an individual component).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Measure business performance using key indicators such as cash flow, asset accumulation and current liabilities.
· Differentiate between successful and unsuccessful business strategies in a competitive environment.
· Experiment with the organisation of business activities.
· Identify the activities of the value chain in the running of a business.
· Justify the decision-making they undertake.
· Relate the difficulties of running a simulated business with real world enterprises.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ((Individual Project, 100 marks; Simulation Exercises, 100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6119 Resourcing for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Other (Lectures Presentations, Case Study Workshops and Practitioner).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Ms Marie O'Connor, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To enable participants to identify the most effective and efficient modes of resourcing new, growing and established ventures for entrepreneurial and innovative processes.

Module Content: The Resource Based Theory of the Firm is used as a framework in which the relationship between resource markets and strategic resource needs are examined. Event analysis will be used to explore dynamic issues and the consequences of changing market environments.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Construct a realistic budget for a business.
· Understand the role of financial statements in a business.
· Construct and interpret the various economic accounts used by organisations.
· Distinguish between profitability and cash flow and their contribution to an organisation's survival.
· Explain how national income is calculated and interpreted.
· Examine the time value of money and its implications for companies.
· Evaluate the various investment appraisal techniques used by firms.
· Measure the performance of a firm using both financial and non-financial methods.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 100 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks ((Series of Practical Tools and Project)).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6120 Business Practice and Live Case Analysis

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2. (Students will go on placement/work experience from July to December).

No. of Students: Max 25 (max).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: Placements (Work placement/work experience from July to December, and Workshops (4 x 3hrs).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Robert Butler, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module aims to enable participants to develop a more comprehensive understanding of how business operates through live research study.

Module Content: 'Live Case' analysis will occur via 6 months work placement/work experience. Company problem based research is supported through a series of research workshops developing reflective learning log, writing skills, presentation skills and research report writing skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Assess and evaluate practitioner's ideas and issues.
· Explain the activities of business, grounded in theory.
· Discuss practices and strategy with the business community.
· Apply business strategy and activities to a particular environment.
· Reflect on their work and continue in their personal development.
· Begin professional career development.
· Prepare for meetings with business people.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Portfolio consisting of (1) Live Case Study Report based on work placement/work experience, 5,000 word max (300 marks), (2) Professional Development Learning Log (100 marks) and (3) Presentation to Plenary Forum - including placement company representatives - based on 'live case' (200 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous assessment and satisfactory completion of 6 months work placement/work experience.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must achieve at least 40% in the Live Case Study Report. For students who do not satisfy this requirement a 'Fail Special Requirement' judgement will be returned along with the mark achieved.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC6301 The Third Sector Economy

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 15, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Seminars; 6 x 1hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Connell Fanning, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To examine the economic underpinnings, role, and outcomes of the social voluntary/not-for-profit sector.

Module Content: The applied theory of the third sector is developed and used to explore the operation of the third sector in relation to the business and government sectors of the economy including it's particular contribution to economic prosperity, social well being and the quality of society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· To understand the increasing importance of NGOs as a social force and their financial importance. This will include the definitions, critical examinations of legal aspects include tax free designations, restrictions on their activities by governments, including analysis of changing attitudes
· Contd., towards them. Are they becoming too powerful, and are their activities entering areas beyond their original remit.?
· These are the area we will be critically examining to establish a balanced analysis and reach an informed opinion.
· Participants will be able to apply key concepts and theories to explain the structure, operation and performance of the third sector as an integral element of the economics system.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Group Research Project - 2500 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (by means of individual essay as prescribed by the Programme Director - approx 1,500 words).

[Top of page]

EC6503 Economics of Organisation and Business Development

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 2. (Semester 3, Year 2, MBA).

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Lectures, Seminars, 'Workshops, Presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Connell Fanning, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module complements the first two modules by examining aspects of the internal organization and evolution of the firm as sources for creating strategic opportunities for growth.

Module Content: The theory of the growth of the firm as developed by Edith Penrose provides the framework for exploring how firms are organized and seek to achieve internal efficiencies and competitive advantage through e.g. knowledge, incentives and contracts, as a basis for coping with uncertainties and change.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of theory and concepts
· Enhance effectiveness in using theoretical economic analysis
· Practice in applying theoretical understandings for strategic thinking
· Researching and writing a project report and preparation of a presentation for a business executive panel.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (End of Year Team Project: presentation-50 marks/ written-50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

[Top of page]

EC6504 Economic Foundations for Strategic Thinking

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1. (Semester 4, Year 2, MBA).

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Other (Lectures, Seminars, Workshops, Presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Connell Fanning, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module integrates the work of the first three modules and extends the analysis to the fundamental level of decision-making in business.

Module Content: The foundations in Economics to the analysis and practice of business strategy are explored and used to explore the nature of the economic business system, especially the market process and competition, as the setting for business decision-making.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· An integrated view of the business economy
· A coherent approach to thinking about the strategic issues in business.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essays Individual Professional Reflection Essay).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Resubmit Essay as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6611 Economics of Business Strategy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module introduces the core theories and frameworks and acts as the intergrating module for the overall programme.

Module Content: The economic foundations of the main frameworks used in strategic formulation and analysis are explored as a basis for learning how to use these frameworks most effectively. These include, the analysis of value creation within organisations, competitive advantage and business performance, and the importance of strategic interaction among firms. Frameworks for understanding small firm performance are also explored and issues such as survival, growth and financing are investigated.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· explain various approaches to understanding competitive advantage and business performance and evaluate the relative merits of each for identifying the sources of business success and failure
· assess the importance of game theory for understanding strategic interactive decision-making
· explain the value of firm flexibility in conditions of uncertainty
· outline factors which influence small firm survival and growth and discuss issues facing small firms.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks.

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment (2 x Assignments).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) (as prescribed by the Department) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6612 Analysing General Business Conditions

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module provides the opportunity to acquire an understanding of the macroeconomic environment and other methods for analysing business conditions that impact on firm profitability, competitiveness, and attractiveness of locations (regions/countries).

Module Content: Specific issues examined in this module include productivity, innovation, growth, and competitiveness through a combination of case studies and applied project work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· identify and assess factors that can contribute to sustainable economic growth
· use economic analysis of competiteveness to inform decision making at the individual and business level
· develop and apply the core concepts of innovation
· critically evaluate innovation policy at a regional, national and international level.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (2 Assignments, 40 Marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6613 Financial Economics and Business Strategy

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module examines the links between financial markets and business strategy where the former is an important consideration in the latter. The objective is to introduce techniques relevant for analysing business performance and formulating business strategies.

Module Content: Techniques are employed which enable firms to choose efficiently between alternative investment opportunities. A strong emphasis is also placed on effectively measuring and managing the risks facing corporate planners arising from technical market volatility, in particular, in currency and interest rate markets.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· employ techniques to efficiently manage a business's cash flows
· identify and quantify interest and exchange rate risk
· explain the workings of risk managment derivatives
· apply techniques of investment appraisal
· discuss the financing of corporate investment.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (2 Assignmnets, 40 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6614 Scenario Planning for Strategic Decision-making

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Period 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars (Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The module aims to develop a portfolio of techniques for students as decision-makers and to act as an enabling device for them to reflect on how they might use such techniques for the development of strategic and tactical conversations of individuals, teams and organisations.

Module Content: This module focuses on the development of humans' cognitive mechanisms for representing and making inferences about decisions that they must make. It explores how an entrepreneurial decison-maker can engage with the process of developing imaginative mental models that can instruct and advance decision-making to deal with strategic surprises. It focuses both on the use of scenario planning as a metacognitive tool to enable decision-makers to anticipate, recognise and prepare their mindsets to engage with worlds of complexity and volatility.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and specify appropriate techniques for the development of mental models for strategic and tactical decisions and actions
· Reflect on the appropriateness of specific techniques for the development of mental models for strategic and tactical decisions and actions
· Identify and interpret data using appropriate techniques for the development of mental models for strategic and tactical decisions and action
· Communicate the results of such analysis to a non-expert audience
· Reflect on the potential uses of various techniques for the development of mental models for students' Business Economics Report.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment (1 Group project, 50 marks; 1 individual assessment, 20 marks; reflective journals, 20 marks, 1 individual presentation, 10 marks).

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6615 Research Methods for Business Economics

Credit Weighting: 5

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 or 2. (Period 1 and/or Period 2).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24hr(s) Lectures (and Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Research skills are developed to enable students to design, conduct and present research in a chosen topic.

Module Content: The module analyses the main elements of the research process including:
the nature of the research questions; the need for an underlying economic theory or framework; data collection and analysis; and the preparation and delivery of preliminary research reports.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and formulate research questions
· Locate and discuss recent literature in the research area
· Identify data sources and process, summarise and describe the data relevant to the research question
· Discuss and explain the use of various techniques in research.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2 Assignments at 50 marks each (both assignments are individual assignments. The first assignment is the research proposal and the second assignment is the literature review and methodology)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6616 Business Survey Methods

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures (and Workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module aims to develop participants' understanding of a broad range of issues in survey data collection and analysis addressing the potential, limitations and practicalities of business survey research methods. The module also provides participants with the necessary knowledge and analytical skills to design and conduct their own small-scale surveys and present the findings of their research.

Module Content: The focus of the module is on the application of techniques in survey design to gather economic data on business enterprises and in survey data analysis to inform business decision makers of the significance of this data based on statistical tests.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop frameworks and hypotheses in order to investigate a business research problem
· Apply the different sampling techniques used in business survey design
· Evaluate survey questionnaires in terms of layout, question sequence and question and response format
· Describe and present economic data to a professional standard
· Design and analyse small-scale surveys.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 Group Assignment, 120 marks; 2 Individual assignments, 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated as prescribed by the Programme Director.

[Top of page]

EC6617 Research Workshops and Professional Development

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Workshops and Seninars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The aim of this module is to support the research process of participants and enhance participants' professional development. Workshops are organised by the Programme Director at appropriate stages of the participants' research and writing cycle.

Module Content: Specific workshops that deal with particular aspects of the research/writing process include: theory and ideas; essential business writing skills; data presentation and analysis; econometrics; other empirical methods; writing executive summaries; ethics and judgement.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Undertake and complete the research element of the programme to the required standard and meet the submission deadline.
· Feel confident about conducting and presenting research for an individual business or groups of businesses
· Reflect on and manage their on-going professional development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 Assignments, 100 Marks each. The first assignment is an individual assignment of approx. 2000 words and must be submitted in Term 1. The second assignment is a group assignment of approx 3,500 words and is submitted in Term 2.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

[Top of page]

EC6618 Business Economics Report

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2. (The BER is completed over the summer period and marks are submitted to the Winter Board.).

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods:

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Catherine Kavanagh, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: This module aims to provide experience of applied research focused on supporting business/strategic decision-making in a company, industry or country. The emphasis is on applying the skills and knowledge acquired in the MBS Business Economics modules to a business research project.

Module Content: Participants are required to write a research report on a business economics topic, maximum of 12,000 words. Participants select from a range of possible research themes and are then assigned to a research group. Each research group is assigned a research supervision team, co-ordinated by the Programme Director. The research group meet at regular intervals with their supervision team to advance the research process.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· produce a business economics report focused on supporting business/strategic decision-making within a company, industry or country;
· present their report to a business audience.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (1 x 12,000 word Business Economic Report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Continuous Assessement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

[Top of page]

EC6661 Advanced Microeconomics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand how microeconomic theory can be used as a methodology for understanding economic behaviour in the modern business and policy environment and to gain practice in the use of microeconomics in such a context.

Module Content: A selection of key microeconomics theories, models and techniques used in applied research will be examined. Selected methods will be applied to practical issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse the theoretical background to prediciton of consumer, firm and government behaviour and decision-making.
· Demonstrate how choice under uncertainty and information asymmetry leads to issues of moral hazard and adverse selection in markets.
· Provide analysis to explain how and why markets fail to achieve competitive outcomes, assess any distributional and ethical issues that may arise and evaluate policy responses by governments which might help 'correct' these various types of market failure.
· Summarise, interpret and evaluate evidence of systematic departures from perfect rationality.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (2 In Class Examinations 40 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6662 Advanced Macroeconomics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To understand the relationship between business, government and the macroeconomic environment and to examine the potential the impact of government policy on the macroeconomic business environment.

Module Content: A selection of key macroeconomics theories, models and techniques used in applied research will be examined. Selected methods will be applied to practical issues.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the factors that drive economic growth using economic growth models and using key issues such as investment, technology, innovation and knowledge.
· Analyse the roles (using appropriate frameworks) played by governments and central banks, the banking sector, firms and households in causing and propagating recessions and booms.
· Evaluate the role of fiscal and monetary policies.
· Interpret a short run and long run macroeconomic equilibrium.
· Analyse the role of institutions in economic performance.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 1,500 essay 40 marks; 1 In-class examination 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6663 Econometrics: Theory and Applications

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To facilitate preparation for economic research by providing experience of applied econometrics, that is, the application of econometric methods in economic research using data sets.

Module Content: This module presents and facilitates student demonstration of the main econometrics techniques used in applied research. Techniques covered may include: OLS, Maximum Likelihood Estimation, Generalised Least Squares, SURE, Panel Data Analysis, Time Series Analysis.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the different econometric techniques that should be used in different areas of research.
· Specify a statistical hypotheses designed to test a research question.
· Choose the appropriate method based on the research question to be considered and the available data.
· Estimate econometric relationships using relevant software.
· Perform diagnostic analysis of statistical results.
· Report econometric results as presented in the empirical research literature.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: End of Year Written Examination 120 marks; Continuous Assessment 80 marks (1 x 2,000 word project 40 marks; In-class examination 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: End of Year Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s).

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2014. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6664 Current Research Seminars

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 18 x 2hr(s) Workshops (6 x 2 hour Student Presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of selected topics in contemporary economic debate.

Module Content: This module will consist in a detailed critical analysis of selected topics in contemporary economic debate using economic theory and empirical evidence.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the perspective on a contemporary issue taken by major contributors to that debate.
· Apply knowledge of these positions to particular examples and problems.
· Locate these arguments in the wider history of ideas in economics.
· Analyse key questions and arguments.
· Formulate arguments for the various positions and approaches.
· Evaluate the possible implications and consequences of various courses of actions by economic agents like consumers, businesses and policy makers.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (3 X 1,500 word Essay = 120 marks; Presentation = 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6665 Quantitative Techniques for Economic Research

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce the techniques and application of basic quantitative methods for economic research and to appreciate the role of formalism in economics.

Module Content: Differential calculus. Using derivatives in economics. Multi-variable functions in economics. Exponential and Logarithmic functions. Constrained and unconstrained optimisation. Differential Equations. The role of formalism in economics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Analyse and interpret data using appropriate methods.
· Define what is meant by a derivative and explain its application in economics.
· Apply the rules of differentiation to the analysis of economic models, e.g. utility, production, revenue, costs, profits, elasticity, consumption etc.
· Compute solutions to constrained and unconstrained optimisation problems.
· Apply some of the various tools in financial economics for calculating monies received or repaid in the future.
· Evaluate the role of formalism in economics.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 Marks 3 Inclass examinations = 150; 1 x 1,500 word Essay = 50 Marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6666 Research Methods and Professional Development

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 24 x 1hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Eakins, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: The aim of this module is to equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to carry out and critically evaluate research in economics.

Module Content: Lectures, small group tutorials and supervised practical work on research design, methodology, and practice, topics including: varieties of data collection analysis and interpretation; ethical issues; and, report writing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically evaluate the literature in a research area.
· Formulate original research questions.
· Design and carry out a preliminary research study using appropriate methodology.
· Appreciate ethical issues and make ethical judgments.
· Communicate research in written and oral presentations
· Evaluate methodologies used in economic research.
· Reflect on and manage their on-going professional development.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Literature Review = 100 marks; Data Collection and Analysis Report = 100 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC6667 Dissertation in Economics

Credit Weighting: 30

Teaching Period(s):

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s):

Teaching Methods:

Module Co-ordinator: Dr John Considine, Department of Economics (The Dissertation is completed over the summer period and marks are submitted to the Winter Board.).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Application of skills, knowledge and techniques acquired in the M.Econ.Sc. to a minor research project.

Module Content: 10,000 (maximum) word dissertation on a research topic in economics.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Use economic theory in research
· Apply the economic research skill
· Communicate economic research in academic peer-reviewed journal and media outlets
· Identify publication outlets
· Conduct research in economics.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks 1 x 10,000 Word Dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% No end of year written examination.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. No Supplementary Examination.

[Top of page]

EC7000 Developmental Approaches for Practitioner-Researchers

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 8hr(s) Seminars (& Workshops); 3 x 1day(s) Workshops (on Personal-Professional Development); Directed Study (supervised research); Other (Reflective Journal, On-Line discussion forum).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce students to methods and typologies of adult learning and professional development appropriate to practitioner-researchers, including that of thinkers such as Robert Kegan.

Module Content: Exploration of
* Role of increasing complexity of thinking required for adult learning/development as outlined, for example, by Robert Kegan
* Meaning-making as it applies to adult learning/development
* Implications (of above) for specific practitioner-researcher fields of inquiry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the impact of increasing complexity on practitioner learning and development
· Outline how meaning-making applies to practitioner learning and development
· Compare and contrast a technical-rational approach to practice and a meaning-making stance
· Relate and apply the module themes to practitioner experience based on customised assignments.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (one 3,000 word reflective essay, 100 marks; one in-class group presentation, 50 marks; one learning diary 75 marks: on-line forum contributions, 75 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as determined by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC7001 Current Issues in Business Economics

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 18hr(s) Seminars (Workshops); Directed Study (supervised research); Other (Reflective Journal/Learning Diary; On-line discussion forum).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To engage students in contemporary debates in Business Economics leading to collaborative development of research themes and specific topics appropriate and relevant for doctoral research.

Module Content: Themes - all with practitioner orientation - include
* The Economics of Firm Growth and Development,
* Economic Foundations of Entrepreneurship,
* Competitiveness and the Business Environment.
Key theories, conceptual frameworks and published research relating to each theme will be explored.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically assess key writings in terms of
* research theme and question(s)
* research method(s) including analysis and
* evaluation of results.
· Identify research gap(s) of relevance to practitioner audience
· Present (in written and oral formats) outline proposal for addressing research gap(s) identified.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (one 3,000 word research proposal 150 marks; one in-class group presentation, 50 marks; one learning diary 50 marks; on-line forum discussion, 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as determined by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC7002 Research Design and Methods in Business Economics

Credit Weighting: 10

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 12hr(s) Seminars (Workshops); Directed Study (supervised research;); Other (Reflective Journal/Learning Diary; On-Line discussion forum).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To lay foundations of sound empirical research in Business Economics and to explore practitioner-oriented research questions in the context of research designs appropriate to their investigation.

Module Content: Examination of how selected researchers have approached the systematic collection and analysis of data appropriate to their selected question of interest. Focusing on generation of hypotheses, case/sample selection, sourcing information/data, measurement issues, role and appropriateness of quantitative and mixed methods, designing and conducting surveys, working with data sets.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define and explain concepts/tools of research including: The scientific method; Action research; Theory and its role; Survey designs and methods; Case Study research: Approaches to data collection; Hypotheses development:

· Ethical principles and practices; Quantitative/Qualitative/Mixed analytical designs; Survey, Focus Group & Interview methods.
· Effectively critique and evaluate both the theoretical bases and methods employed in selected research articles and/or reports or business/policy analyses.
· Develop an awareness of research in practice and the different issues to consider over the research phases of forming a literature review, identifying valid hypothesis for testing, conducting empirical research, and the challenges to progressing research to completion.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (one 3,000 word reflective essay, 100 marks; one learning diary 50 marks: on-line forum discussion, 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as determined by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC7003 Research Design and Methods for Practitioner Researchers

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 18hr(s) Seminars (Workshops); Directed Study (supervised research); Other (Reflective Journal/Learning Diary, On-line discussion forum).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: Progress the chosen research theme(s); outline and apply appropriate methods to conduct research on the topic(s) identified with the practitioner orientation explicitly identified.

Module Content: Advance the research proposal by selecting a research design and methods appropriate to the research question(s); Make explicit the role and relevance of the practitioner orientation of the research; implement the design and apply the methods to conduct the research, including information/data identification and collection.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply appropriate concepts/tools to design and conduct a research study in Business Economics
· Outline methods for integration and contextualisation of the professional experience of the practitioner into the research study
· Keep ongoing track of the research decisions made and the rationale employed in choices made in conducting the research
· Draw conclusions from the research for plans, strategies and policies relevant for the participant's organization context in the medium-to-long-term.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (one 4,000 word reflective essay, 150 marks; one individual in-class presentation, 50 marks; one learning diary 50 marks: on-line forum discussion, 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as determined by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC7004 Research Analysis and Evaluation

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 12hr(s) Seminars (Workshops); Directed Study (supervised research); Other (Reflective Journal/Learning Diary; On-Line discussion forum).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To introduce doctoral students to core issues in research analysis and evaluation in Business Economics and to provide them with practical advice in these areas relevant to their research objectives.

Module Content: Issues in collection and storing of data/information appropriate to the research dissertation. Analysis of the quantitative or qualitative (or both) and mixed data collected. Evaluation of the data in the light of the research questions including focus on measurement reliability and validity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and collect data relevant to dissertation
· Prepare, input and check data (quantitative or qualitative)
· Integrate data from transcripts/notes, other sources (qualitative)
· Display and describe data using statistics (where appropriate), or matrices, charts, graphs, networks.
· Examine/identify relationships, key themes, patterns, differences, trends in data.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (one 4,000 word assignment 150 marks; one learning diary 100 marks; on-line forum discussion, 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as determined by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]

EC7005 Research Presentation, Analysis and Evaluation for Practitioner Researchers

Credit Weighting: 15

Teaching Period(s): Teaching Periods 1 and 2 and Teaching/Research Period 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15 (None).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Methods: 1 x 12hr(s) Seminars (Workshops); Directed Study (supervised research; Presentations of research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eleanor Doyle, Department of Economics.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Economics.

Module Objective: To provide a practice setting for presenting research to colleagues, engaging in analysis and evaluation of research approach and findings in a collaborative setting, with explicit emphasis on the integration of the practitioner orientation in the research portfolio.

Module Content: Presentations of research in oral, written and electronic formats as the basis for discussion, analysis and evaluation of the research process, outcomes and outputs. Hands-on experience in the application of analytic procedures, including SPSS/STATA, including consideration of the strengths and weaknessess of the procedures. Emphasis is on understanding as well as application and the practitioner perspective is explicitly addressed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Engage in constructive critique of approach, methods and findings in colleagues' research
· Use analytic techniques appropriately to analyse data/information collected to address research question(s) posed
· Draw inferences from the data analysis in terms of the research question(s)
· Outline how the research has contributed to knowledge in Business Economics, emphasising the practitioner orientation
· Outline the implications of the study for the integration of personal, professional and organisational development.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (one individual presentation of research, 75 marks; one 3,000 word assignment, 75 marks; 2 assessments of colleagues' research presentation, 75 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

End of Year Written Examination Profile: No End of Year Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as determined by the Programme Director).

[Top of page]