Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

BL1002 Cells, Biomolecules, Genetics and Evolution
BL1004 Physiology and Structure of Plants and Animals
BL1006 Habitats and Ecosystems
BL2001 Plant and Animal Genetics
BL2002 Understanding and Reviewing Scientific Literature
BL3001 ZEPS Literature Review
BL3002 Evolution & Diversity
BL3003 Conservation Biology
BL4001 Research Project
BL4003 Biological Work Placement
BL4004 Frontiers in Biology
BL4005 Research Skills in Biology
BL4006 Food Production
BL6001 Teaching Cellular Biology
BL6002 Teaching Biochemical Components in Biology
BL6003 Teaching Genetics and Biotechnology
BL6004 Teaching Systems Biology
BL6005 Teaching Plant Biology
BL6006 Teaching Ecology and Population Biology
BL6010 Characteristics of the Marine Environment
BL6012 Marine Megafauna
BL6013 Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture
BL6014 Marine Fieldwork and Survey Techniques
BL6015 Practical Marine Workplace Skills
BL6016 Marine Ecology and Conservation
BL6017 Dissertation in Marine Biology
BL6019 Ecological Applications of Geographical Information Systems
BL6020 Genetics and the Marine Environment
BL6023 Cells, Biomolecules, Genetics and Evolution
BL6024 Quantitative Skills for Biologists using R

BL1002 Cells, Biomolecules, Genetics and Evolution

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 510.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barbara Doyle Prestwich, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barbara Doyle Prestwich, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES; Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology; Staff, School of Microbiology.

Module Objective: To describe cell structure and biomolecules; to give a detailed introduction to genetics and the theory of evolution; to explain the role of biotechnology in the improvement of plants for global food security and acquire laboratory skills.

Module Content: Structure of viruses, prokaryote and eukaryote cells. Proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acid. Gene structure and function. Mendelian inheritance and population genetics. Evolution, Darwin's Theory of Natural Selection, major transitions in evolution and the origins of life. Better plants to feed the world using biotechnology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define the differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
?Describe the structure, function and behaviour of genes in a population.
?Explain the major transitions in evolution.
?Demonstrate competence in the use of light microscopes.
?Interpret data from classical genetic studies.
?Integrate concepts of genetic processes in plants and animals.
?Outline the role of biotechnology in global food security.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks (MCQ); Continuous Assessment 40 marks (In-term MCQ 20 marks; 2 x Practicals10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal MCQ Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attend, undertake and submit completed written work for both of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be disbarred from the Formal Written Examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental examination in the module. A student will be notified when he/she has failed to fulfil the above criteria for one practical session.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Autumn 2018. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met.

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BL1004 Physiology and Structure of Plants and Animals

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 400.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Marcel A.K. Jansen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Marcel A.K. Jansen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To provide an outline of the structure and physiology of plants and animals in the light of adaptations to different environments.

Module Content: Plant tissue and organs; role of hormones in development; carbon and nitrogen metabolism; adaptations to abiotic and biotic stresses (practical applications). Comparative animal physiology; excretion, circulation, respiration, digestion, nervous systems, reproduction and immunity. Students will be required to undertake a small number of dissections in this module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the structure of plants and animals
?Describe the physiological processes in different groups of animals and plants
?Demonstrate dissection skills
?Carry out plant physiological experiments
?Interpret data from physiological experiments
?Integrate the concepts of structure and function in living organisms.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (MCQ); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (2 x practicals 15 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attend, undertake and submit completed written work for both of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be disbarred from the Formal Written Examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental examination in the module. A student will be notified when he/she has failed to fulfil the above criteria for one practical session.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Autumn 2018. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met.

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BL1006 Habitats and Ecosystems

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Simon Harrison, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Simon Harrison, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the theoretical principles of ecosystems and to the animal and plant communities of selected terrestrial and aquatic habitats.

Module Content: This module will provide (a) an introduction to the biotic and abiotic processes that control and regulate ecosystems and (b) an introduction to the animals and plants of selected individual terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats, and their functional roles within habitats.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the biotic and abiotic processes that control and regulate selected habitats.
?List the major plant and animal components of selected habitats.
?Identify the faunal and floral groups that are found in key Irish habitats.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (MCQ).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) mcq to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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BL2001 Plant and Animal Genetics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): BL1002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 2 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Astrid Wingler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas Reed, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Prof Astrid Wingler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To describe ecological, evolutionary and molecular genetics of plants and animals, and to present application of genetic techniques in monitoring wild populations, in conservation and for improving domesticated plants and animals.

Module Content: Chromosome structure. Mitosis and Meiosis. Transcription and translation. Methods for DNA analysis: PCR and sequencing. Transcriptional regulation. Genetic vs. epigenetic inheritance. Mendelian and complex traits. Population genetics: mutation, selection, random genetic drift. Evolution and adaptation. Natural genetic variation. Genotyping approaches. Molecular ecology: monitoring of wild populations. Conservation genetics, effects of inbreeding and outbreeding. QTL and association mapping to determine the genetic basis of traits. Genomics ? whole-genome sequencing. Mutagenesis - forward and reverse genetic approaches. Plant and animal domestication and breeding programmes.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the structure, function and distribution of DNA sequences.
?Relate the effects of genetic variation at different levels of organisation.
?Describe the processes driving genetic change in populations and how these processes interact.
?Apply the principles of genetics to the practice of plant and animal breeding.
?Describe the use of molecular tools in genomic and functional genomic analysis and in conservation genetics.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (3 practical reports @ 10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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BL2002 Understanding and Reviewing Scientific Literature

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 3hr(s) Workshops; 3 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 1 x 2month(s) Directed Study (personal research of literature).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Javier Delbarco-Trillo, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of BEES; Dr Javier Delbarco-Trillo, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To develop skills in critically reading and discussing scientific literature, both orally and in written form.

Module Content: The module will involve independent and supervised research from the available literature in the Boole Library, the department and other literature sources. Students will critically read literature in depth. Student will lead discussions in which literature will be critically analysed with their peers, combining both self-directed learning and peer-assisted learning. The project will require the student to synthesise and review the cited literature in essay form. Students will be encouraged to implement feedback into improved versions of the same manuscript.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?- Locate and access scientific information on a given topic
?- Critically lead a discussion on scientific literature
?- Produce a critical review of a scientific topic in an essay.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Lead discussion on scientific literature 20 marks; Literature project 80 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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BL3001 ZEPS Literature Review

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Introductory lecture); 5 Tutorials (Individual tutorials); 4 x 3hr(s) Seminars; 3 x 1month(s) Directed Study (Personal research of Literature).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Valerie Cummins, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Valerie Cummins, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To develop skills in reviewing scientific literature by researching published sources of information on a given topic and to present a written thesis and seminar.

Module Content: The literature project will involve independent and supervised research from the available literature in the Boole Library, the department and other literature sources. Students will develop their own interest in a given subject and demonstrate a depth of knowledge in the chosen topic in the production of a thesis. The project will require the student to synthesise and review the cited literature. Students will be encouraged to present their own ideas and interpretations of the literature reviewed and to draw conclusions. Students will be expected to give a short seminar on the project.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Locate and access scientific information on a given topic
?Discuss a key issue identified in the given topic
?Produce a critical review in conventional scientific format.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 X Literature Project 85 marks; Seminar 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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BL3002 Evolution & Diversity

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): GL2019

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 7 x 3hr(s) Practicals (including seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Maria McNamara, Department of Geology.

Lecturer(s): Prof Marcel A.K. Jansen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Dr Barbara Doyle Prestwich, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Dr Maria McNamara, Department of Geology; Dr Thomas Reed, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To review the history of evolutionary theory, to describe micro- and macro-evolution and the major transitions in plant and animal evolution including the paleobiological context and fossil evidence.

Module Content: Consideration of the development of modern evolutionary concepts; discussion of evolutionary genetics and the forces involved in microevolution (mutation, selection, genetic drift, immigration and emigration); speciation; isolation mechanisms; macroevolution; punctuated equilibrium and phyletic gradualism; evolution of early land plants, co-evolution and response to stress; the origins of land plants; evolutionary changes as plants moved onto land; evolution of insect-plant relationships; evolution of birds; mass extinctions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe micro- and macro-evolution.
?Identify the biological and environmental forces driving evolution.
?Appraise the role of isolating mechanisms between species.
?Critically evaluate the usefulness of the fossil record and of genetic data.
?Integrate concepts of evolutionary processes in animals and plants from specific cases.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (Oral presentation (20 marks); 2 practical tests (5 marks each); MCQ (30 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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BL3003 Conservation Biology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): BL1005 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 1day(s) Fieldwork (visit to a national park which takes place on a weekend).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Padraig Whelan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Padraig Whelan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of biodiversity conservation

Module Content: This module examines the theory and practice of conserving ecosystems, species and genes through in-situ and ex-situ methods of conservation. In situ conservation is examined via case studies of the national and international legal and spatial frameworks applied in both marine and terrestrial ecosystems so as to understand the complexities of managing areas designated for conservation, including threats to biodiversity and achievements of conservation objectives. Management of protective areas for their multiple objectives are addressed in lectures and a weekend field trip to a national park. Ex-situ conservation in zoos, wildlife parks and botanic gardens are evaluated as components of conservation strategies. Legal frameworks for biodiversity conservation are analysed at national and international levels.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the general characteristics of protected areas of world importance
?Describe the challenges to establishing and maintaining such protected areas
?Distinguish different levels of biodiversity
?Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches to conservation
?Recommend strategies that combine conservation and human use in protected areas.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination. One day field trip (on a weekend) to a national park.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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BL4001 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): BL3001

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 1month(s) Directed Study (Independent supervised research); 5 x 3hr(s) Seminars (Individual oral presentations of results).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barbara Doyle Prestwich, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barbara Doyle Prestwich, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the planning, conduct and analysis of zoological, ecological or plant science research.

Module Content: The research project involves an independent piece of scientific research in an area of interest to the student. The project can be either laboratory or field based, and will be conducted over a period of approximately 5 months (although research work can commence over the summer). The planning, design, conduct, analysis and writing up of the project will be carried out under the supervision of a member of staff.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Complete an individual field, laboratory and/or data analysis study
?Produce a written report of such a study in conventional scientific format
?Summarise the usefulness of the findings both in written form and verbally
?Statistically evaluate the findings
?Integrate the results with findings of previous researchers.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (Research project (210 marks); Seminar (45 marks); Supervisors assessment of practical ability (45 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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BL4003 Biological Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1. (Summer after the Third University Examination).

No. of Students: Min 1, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): BL3001

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 x 6weeks(s) Placements (Work Placement); 1 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Valerie Cummins, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Valerie Cummins, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To develop professional and transferable skills and experience by working in an enterprise relevant to the departmental degrees.

Module Content: This module will provide students with exposure to, and experience in, an enterprise relevant to the degree and to a working environment. Students will be required to work in a placement as directed by the enterprise manager and the academic supervisor.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Operate in a structured working environment
?Demonstrate teamwork
?Assess and critique a work organisation
?Communicate the work experience to academic staff and student peers.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Placement Report (50 marks); Seminar (15 marks); Placement Logbook (35 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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BL4004 Frontiers in Biology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Seminars (approx.); 4hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES, with visiting external lecturers.

Module Objective: To expose students to current research in a range of topics in zoology, botany, ecology, evolution, taxonomy. To provide opportunities for students to integrate topics in zoology, botany, ecology, evolution, taxonomy and palaeobiology. To encourage the integration of information across these fields.

Module Content: The seminars will be delivered primarily by visiting lecturers from around Ireland, the UK and broader afield, talking about their own current research. The researchers are normally invited because their interests overlap with those of BEES Staff. Specific topics change from year to year (see BEES website for past seminar titles) but will be relevant to the areas of ecology, evolution, physiology, biotechnology, applied topics and palaeobiology of plants and animals.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Appreciate the dimension, scope and application of contemporary research in Zoology, Ecology, Plant Science and Palaeobiology.
?Appraise and synthesise key aspects of a research topic.
?Access and utilise electronic library resources to research biological topics.
?Write an essay under exam conditions on a chosen research topic showing ability to integrate multiple information sources.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

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BL4005 Research Skills in Biology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 15 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the variety of skills needed to execute and present their own research project in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences.

Module Content: Experimental design; replication, treatments, factors, covariates, confounding effects and bias. Critical thinking; the scientific method; distinguishing fact from interpretation; critical evaluation of scientific papers. Spreadsheets, data management, data manipulation using pivot tables and routines. Presentation of results; effective production of graphs and diagrams with complex variables and differences among groups, and approaches to dealing with multiple variables. Written communication; preparing papers, abstracts, 'power statements' and popular science articles for the public. Oral communication; powerpoint slide design, structuring content and delivery skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Design real experiments to test hypotheses.
?Use software to store, manipulate, explore and present data effectively.
?Use statistical software to fit general linear models to data and conduct other basic statistical tests.
?Critically review and understand the literature.
?Write and report results effectively in a scientific style.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Two in-class tests 50 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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BL4006 Food Production

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Astrid Wingler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Astrid Wingler, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To develop an understanding of food production in the modern world with a particular emphasis on sustainability and impact on the environment.

Module Content: Global food production. Demographic trends in developed and developing worlds. Current threats and opportunities. Environmental impact of food production ? pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Intensive farming: strengths and weaknesses. Alternative crop production systems. Aquaculture and capture fisheries. Milk production in the Irish context. Food quality and safety. Regulation and policy. Circular economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?- Describe global food production and future prospects for farming.
?- Identify the principal features of different production systems and their environmental impacts.
?- Assess and analyse the main challenges affecting sustainable food production.
?- Describe the main drivers of policy at national and international level.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Group project - production of short video (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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BL6001 Teaching Cellular Biology

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 Directed Study (Directed Case Study); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of Biology in Secondary School, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Tommie McCarthy, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, (with assistance from other relevant Departments in Biological Sciences).

Module Objective: Application of modern scientific methodology and experimental design to current frontiers of cell biology including microbiology as per syllabus.

Module Content: Scientific method; hypothesis testing; statistical significance (mean, standard deviation); bias; confounding; interpretation of data; planning experiments; introduction to practical work; Cells - the basic unit of life; eukaryotic vs prokaryotic cells; cell structure and function; passive processes of membrane transport; diffusion, osmosis and active transport; the cell cycle and cell death.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
? Define and apply the principles of scientific method to current frontiers of cell biology
? Describe and illustrate the complexities of cell structure and function
? Differentiate between cell types
? Explain different cell processes such as membrane transport, diffusion, osmosis and active transport
? Illustrate the cell cycle and differentiate the different stages which occur throughout
? Define the characteristics of cancer cells and the role played by proto-oncogene and oncogene in its development.
? Discuss and evaluate teaching approaches that may be used in teaching cellular biology at secondary school level.
? Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio including case study and practical work (1x 5,000-8,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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BL6002 Teaching Biochemical Components in Biology

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1hr(s) Directed Study (directed case study); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of Biology in Secondary School, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Tommie McCarthy, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, (with assistance from other relevant Departments in Biological Sciences).

Module Objective: To introduce the main classes of biomacromolecules and explain how fundamental chemical processes facilitate their organisation in biological systems.

Module Content: Chemicals of life-Macromolecules; carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids; thermodynamics, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms; overview of metabolism.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the composition, structure and function of biological macromolecules
? Explain how fundamental processes facilitate their organization in biological systems
? Describe the special role and processes of enzymes in cell metabolism.
? Discuss and evaluate teaching approaches that may be used in teaching biomacromolecules at secondary school level.
? Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio including case study and practical work (1x5,000 - 8,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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BL6003 Teaching Genetics and Biotechnology

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 Directed Study (directed case study); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of Biology in Secondary School, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Tommie McCarthy, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, (with assistance from other relevant Departments in Biological Sciences).

Module Objective: To describe basic molecular mechanisms underlying heredity, including replication, transcription and recombination and provide an overview of modern genetics and its contemporary relevance and topicality.

Module Content: DNA and its role in heredity; structure and composition of DNA; DNA replication; DNA proof-reading and repair; genotype to phenotype; genome projects; genetic mutations; isolation of DNA; DNA fingerprinting; recombinant DNA technology; biotechnology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the basic molecular mechanisms underlying heredity, including replication, transcription and recombination
?Examine developments in biotechnology and nanotechnology
?Debate contemporary issues related to genetics, biotechnology and nanotechnology.
?Discuss and evaluate teaching approaches that may be used in teaching genetics and biotechnology at secondary school level.
?Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio including case study and practical work (1x 5,000- 8,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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BL6004 Teaching Systems Biology

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 Directed Study (directed case study); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of Biology in Secondary School, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Tommie McCarthy, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, (with assistance from other relevant Departments in Biological Sciences).

Module Objective: To provide a novel approach to teaching the organisation and functions of the main physiological systems of animals and plants.

Module Content: The vascular, digestive, endocrine, nervous, sensory and muscoloskeletal systems; respiration, photosynthesis and immunology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify the organizational structure of animal systems
?Describe the detailed structure and function of each human system
?Explain the specific functioning of the nervous system
?Discuss and evaluate teaching approaches that may be used in teaching systems biology at secondary school level
?Identify the integration of biological systems in relation to the learning process
?Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio including case study and practical work (1 x 5,000 - 8,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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BL6005 Teaching Plant Biology

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 Directed Study (drected case study); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of Biology in Secondary School, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Tommie McCarthy, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, (with assistance from other relevant Departments in Biological Sciences).

Module Objective: To describe new approaches to teaching plant science. The module will involve a study of the basic principles necessary for understanding plant structure and function, including the biochemical and biophysical processes of plant cells.

Module Content: Plant structure, transport, vegetative and sexual reproduction, photosynthesis and plant molecular biology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the structure and functions of plant systems
?Identify the biochemical and physical processes in plant cells
?Evaluate the unique response systems in plants and their contribution to human scientific development
?Describe and conduct plant tissue culturing
?Discuss and evaluate teaching approaches that may be used in teaching plant biology at secondary school level
?Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio including case study and practical work (1 x 5,000 8,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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BL6006 Teaching Ecology and Population Biology

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 16.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 8 x 2hr(s) Practicals; 6 x 2hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 1 Directed Study (directed case study); 6 x 2hr(s) Directed Study (in the context of professional practice in the teaching of Biology in Secondary School, associated reading assignments).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Tommie McCarthy, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, (with assistance from other relevant Departments in Biological Sciences).

Module Objective: To provide an overview of aspects of biology at the population level (macrobiology).

Module Content: Mechanisms of ecosystems, demographics, food production, natural resources, habitats, recycling of nutrients via the carbon and nitrogen cycle, population dynamics, pollution, conservation, waste disposal and management.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Highlight and discuss the inter-relationships that exist between organisms and between organisms and their environment
?Outline and examine the different mechanisms of ecosystems
?Contribute to the debate on contemporary ecological issues
?Discuss and evaluate teaching approaches that may be used in teaching ecology and plant biology at secondary school level
?Perform laboratory practical work in a safe and efficient manner and compile a report of this practical work.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 200 marks; Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Portfolio including case study and practial work (1 x 5,000 - 8,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must pass Continuous Assessment and the Formal Written Examination independently. For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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BL6010 Characteristics of the Marine Environment

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 1 x 3hr(s) Seminars; 2 x 3hr(s) Workshops (Scientific writing, statistics, presentation skills.).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: This module will examine the main characteristics of the marine environment and its key biological processes.

Module Content: This module will examine the physical and chemical properties of the marine environment, the key principles of oceanography, plankton and productivity of the oceans, as well as examine the biotic and abiotic components of the main habitats. The module will also include two workshops on scientific writing and statistics as well seminar presentation techniques.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the physical and chemical properties of the marine environment.
?Discuss the key principles of oceanography.
?Interpret how variations in primary productivity may affect biotic organisms.
?Summarise the biotic and abiotic components of the main habitats.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Seawater Chemistry practical (10 marks); Seminar (10 marks); Essay (10 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by BEES).

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BL6012 Marine Megafauna

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 1day(s) Fieldwork (Cetaceans and Birds); 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals (population viability analysis; distance sampling).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Emer Rogan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To describe the biology of marine megafauna (seabirds, shorebirds, marine mammals, marine reptiles and giant fish) in the context of interaction with human activities and global climate change

Module Content: The module will be concerned with the life histories, biogeography, physiology and foraging of the various megafaunal groups. Surveying, population trends and problems of conservation will be highlighted. Interactions of these charismatic groups with fisheries, aquaculture, climate change and pollution by light, sound including recreational disturbance, and chemicals will be described. About half of the module will be devoted to birds, the rest to the other megafaunal groups.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recall basic features of megafaunal life histories
?Distinguish problems of population estimation amongst the megafaunal groups
?Compare vulnerabilities of megafaunal species to anthropogenic influences
?Integrate directed reading with lecture information and material demonstrated in practical sessions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (2 Practical Reports (PVA report 30 marks; Seabird practical 30 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by BEES).

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BL6013 Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 2.5hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof Sarah Culloty, School of BEES; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To describe the biology, capture and culture of the main fish and shellfish species and the environmental impact of some of these activities.

Module Content: The module will examine in detail the role of fisheries and aquaculture on a global scale, describe the biology of the main temperate species, show the relationship between biology and capture/management and culture of these groups and consider the impacts of fisheries and aquaculture on the environment. The module will also consider the problems of water quality and disease in aquaculture and highlight potential methods of monitoring and control.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Recall basic features of fish and shellfish biology and life histories
?Distinguish different methods of fishing and capture
?Compare different fisheries management approaches
?Discuss the main environmental impacts of fisheries and aquaculture and possible mitigation methods
?Integrate directed reading with lecture information and material demonstrated in practical sessions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (Dissection 5 marks; Celtic Voyager report 40 marks; Dossier 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by BEES).

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BL6014 Marine Fieldwork and Survey Techniques

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 3 x 1day(s) Fieldwork; 1 x 1weeks(s) Fieldwork (Residential Fieldcourse); 10 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Associated with the Fieldcourse and day field trips).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Module Objective: To provide students with fieldwork sampling and survey skills in a range of marine habitats.

Module Content: Students will gain experience of sampling and survey techniques used in intertidal, subtidal and aboard research vessels. Sample processing, identification skills and data analysis will also be included in the various course components.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate competency in different quantitative and qualitative field survey techniques used in intertidal and subtidal marine habitats.
?Employ survey methodologies and sample collection processes aboard research vessels.
?Apply sample processing and identification skills across the various taxonomic groups.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (2 Fieldwork Reports (80 marks each); 1 group assessment (40 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by BEES).

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BL6015 Practical Marine Workplace Skills

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2. (Two week course run in early January at the National Maritime College of Ireland).

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 2 x 1weeks(s) Lectures (and associated Practical components at National Maritime College).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science (With staff from National Maritime College of Ireland in Ringaskiddy).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Module Objective: The aim of this two week module is to provide a number of professionally accredited workplace certifications in Sea Survival, Marine Radio use, Small Boat Handling and Introductory First Aid necessary for work in the Marine Environment

Module Content: This module will utilise the expertise of the National Maritime College Of Ireland to provide a broad range of training courses in Sea Survival, Marine Radio use, small boat handling and occupational first aid and provide related approved accreditations for those successfully passing the courses.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Apply fundamental safety and sea survival techniques whilst working at sea
?Demonstrate practical VHF alerting and marine radio procedures and techniques used in Distress, Urgency, Safety and Routine situations
?Demonstrate practical and theoretical skills on safe practices whilst coxing a small craft
?Apply practical first aid skills in the workplace including CPR.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Professionally Certified courses run by National Maritime College of Ireland in Ringaskiddy.

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessement.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass standard as set by the Instructors on each of the individual courses. Assessed on a Pass /Fail basis.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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BL6016 Marine Ecology and Conservation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 36 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 2 x 3hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Padraig Whelan, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To provide an in-depth knowledge of a range of marine biomes and their conservation

Module Content: Biodiversity of key benthic and pelagic marine biomes on a global scale including temperate, polar and tropical. This will include both hard and soft sediments e.g. coral reefs, mangroves, temperate rocky shores, estuaries, open water and deep sea habitats. Conservation in the broad sense at all levels including goods and ecological services, sustainability, protected areas, natural and anthropogenic threats, invasive species and ecotourism.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Describe the characteristics and biodiversity of the major marine biomes
?Demonstrate a comprehension of the totality of the relationships that govern the natural working of marine biomes
?Demonstrate a comprehension of the actions of human use on natural marine biomes
?Apply the knowledge gained to suggest conservation solutions to case studies of marine biome exploitation
?Appraise the complexity and interconnectedness of marine biomes and their sustainable use and the relevant skills so as to be able to recommend workable solutions for their conservation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 140 marks; Continuous Assessment 60 marks (Case Study Report (40 marks); Seminar (20 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the department).

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BL6017 Dissertation in Marine Biology

Credit Weighting: 30

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4 x 1month(s) Directed Study (Research project under supervision of ZEPS staff member).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Prof John Quinn, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To give students direct experience in the planning, conduct and completion of a research project in marine biology.

Module Content: The research project involves an independent piece of scientific research in an area of marine biology of interest to the student. Typically these projects are linked to the interests of staff and in the past have included projects on the ecology, behaviour, and/or physiology/genetics of marine invertebrates, seabirds, cetaceans and fish. The project can be either laboratory or field based or a mixture of both, and will be conducted over a period of approximately 4 months. The planning and design, conduct and analysis of the project will be carried out under the supervision of a School of BEES member of staff. There may be opportunities for project placements at overseas universities (e.g. through the EU Erasmus scheme) or for students to suggest their own projects, pending agreement by staff.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Assemble and summarise scientific literature in a chosen topic.
?Design a research project.
?Demonstrate practical skills required to carry out marine biology research.
?Evaluate and interpret research results.
?Prepare a research paper in the form of a standard scientific journal.

Assessment: Total Marks 600: Continuous Assessment 600 marks (Research Project Dissertation (420 marks); Seminar (120 marks); assessment of practical ability (60 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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BL6019 Ecological Applications of Geographical Information Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 5 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 3hr(s) Practicals; 10 x 1hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Module Objective: To develop practical skills in the application of the Geographical Information System (GIS) to data integration, analyses and production of the output mapping products to meet ecological scientific needs.

Module Content: GIS applications; mapping principles; geospatial data types; data modelling; metadata; database design; GIS data manipulation including integration, analyses and interpretation; data visualisation; map production; webGIS; case studies of GIS applications in terrestrial and marine environments.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Independently produce desktop GIS projects using Arc GIS 10.x (ESRI) software, integrate and manipulate data, perform basic analyses and modelling and produce good quality maps.
?Obtain essential background knowledge necessary to meet their immediate scientific needs and to be able to continue improving their GIS skills through shown self-educational pathways
?To independently plan a research mapping campaign (data acquisition) in marine or terrestrial environments.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (GIS project (write up 75 marks; presentation 25 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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BL6020 Genetics and the Marine Environment

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Robert McAllen, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the application of genetics to the understanding and sustainable use of the marine environment

Module Content: Students will be provided with an introduction to the methods of collection and analysis of genetic information on marine organisms, including the latest genomic techniques. The biological diversity revealed by these techniques, and technological interventions they enable, will be surveyed. Work will focus on the application of this information to understanding fundamental aspects of the marine environment and its sustainable use with examples from oceanography, fisheries, aquaculture, biotechnology and conservation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate knowledge of the basic methods of analysis of genetic data.
?Describe key aspects of genetic diversity of the marine environment and the major processes influencing it.
?Demonstrate an understanding of genetic technologies and their application.
?Critically evaluate genetic information and its relevance to issues concerning the marine environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Essay (20 marks); Practical report (10 Marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2018.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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BL6023 Cells, Biomolecules, Genetics and Evolution

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barbara Doyle Prestwich, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barbara Doyle Prestwich, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES; Staff, School of Biochemistry and Cell Biology; Staff, School of Microbiology.

Module Objective: To describe cell structure and biomolecules; to give a detailed introduction to genetics and the theory of evolution; and acquire laboratory skills.

Module Content: Structure of viruses, prokaryote and eukaryote cells. Proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acid. Gene structure and function. Mendelian inheritance and population genetics. Evolution, Darwin's Theory of Natural Selection, major transitions in evolution and the origins of life.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Define the differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
?Describe the structure, function and behaviour of genes in a population.
?Explain the major transitions in evolution.
?Demonstrate competence in the use of light microscopes.
?Interpret data from classical genetic studies.
?Integrate concepts of genetic processes in plants and animals.
?Outline the role of biotechnology in global food security.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (In-term MCQ 20 marks; 2 x Practical Reports 10 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must attend, undertake and submit completed written work for both of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be disbarred from the Formal Written Examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental examination in the module. A student will be notified when he/she has failed to fulfil the above criteria for one practical session. Opportunities to repeat missed practicals will be offered on a limited basis during the module semester only.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018. No supplemental examination unless condition(s) are met, Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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BL6024 Quantitative Skills for Biologists using R

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): ST4001 or equivalent

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 4hr(s) Workshops.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Javier Delbarco-Trillo, School of BEES.

Lecturer(s): Dr Javier Delbarco-Trillo, School of BEES; Dr Thomas Reed, Department of Zoology, Ecology and Plant Science; Staff, School of BEES.

Module Objective: To provide quantitative skills required by postgraduate students to successfully conduct and publish their research, with a focus on data analysis and graphing, statistics, and basic modelling, as generally implemented by zoologists and ecologists.

Module Content: Topics include: Introduction to R and R Studio; data exploration and visualisation; interpretation of hypothesis tests; implementation in R of the main types of tests used by biologists, including t-test, ANOVA, correlations, linear regression, and principal component analysis; implementation and interpretation of GLMs and GLMMs; model simplification and selection; reporting results; introduction to mathematical modelling.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Load data into R and be able to run typical statistical tests in R
?Visualise data in R and create professional figures for publication purposes
?Implement and interpret statistical models
?Locate information to implement more complex analyses as required by the specific nature of their research questions
?Write results for publication of research
?Program simple mathematical models using functions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Four in-class practical exercises, 20 marks each; Final Written report of several data analyses, 120 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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