Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

AR1001 The Archaeology of Ireland in Context
AR1010 Introduction to Archaeology
AR1011 The Archaeology of Prehistoric Ireland
AR1012 The Archaeology of Historic Ireland
AR1013 Archaeology Field Project
AR2014 Artefact Studies
AR2016 The Development of Archaeological Thought
AR2027 The Archaeology of the Viking Age; Scandinavia and the North Atlantic
AR2033 Chalcolithic and Bronze Age Europe
AR2034 The Archaeology of Early Medieval Ireland
AR2037 Introduction to Environmental Archaeology
AR2038 Human Remains for Archaeologists
AR2042 The Archaeology of Later Medieval Ireland, c.AD 1100-1550
AR2044 Heritage Management and Archaeology
AR2045 Introduction to Archaeological Fieldwork
AR2046 Geoarchaeology Field School
AR2047 The Iron Age in Western and Central Europe
AR3010 Research Project
AR3021 Prehistoric Society in Ireland
AR3030 Dissertation
AR3031 Archaeological Ceramics
AR3037 Viking Age Archaeology in Ireland and Britain
AR3039 The Archaeology of the Early Irish Church
AR3040 Health, Diet and Disease in Early Societies
AR3045 The Industrial Archaeology of Ireland, 1750-1930
AR3046 The Archaeology of Agriculture in Medieval Ireland, c. AD 500-1500
AR3047 Professional Practice in Archaeology
AR3048 Case Studies in Environmental Archaeology
AR3049 Palynology and Palaeoecology
AR3050 Archaeo-palynology
AR3051 Wetland archaeology and palaeoenvironments
AR3052 The Iron Age in Ireland - New Horizons
AR6001 Dissertation in Archaeological Excavation
AR6003 Dissertation in Human Osteoarchaeology
AR6004 Archaeological Excavation: Planning and Research Design
AR6005 Archaeological Excavation: Strategy and Practice
AR6006 Post-Excavation Analysis and Interpretation
AR6007 Case Studies in Archaeological Excavation
AR6008 Training Excavation
AR6009 Mortuary Theory
AR6011 Biocultural Approaches to Human Remains
AR6012 Palaeopathology Seminar
AR6013 Archaeological Survey and Remote Sensing
AR6014 Osteoarchaeology Laboratory
AR6022 The Museum in the 21st Century
AR6023 The Museum Environment
AR6025 Museums and The Public
AR6026 Museum Placement 1
AR6027 Dissertation in Museum Studies
AR6028 Museum Curation: Objects, Their Collection, Recording and Presentation
AR6029 Work Placement 2
AR6030 The Exhibition Experience

AR1001 The Archaeology of Ireland in Context

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 300.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Fieldwork (1-day Field Trip); 75 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 25 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Tomas O Carragain, Department of Archaeology; Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the study of archaeology with particular reference to the archaeology of Ireland and to selected topics in world archaeology.

Module Content: This module provides a general introduction to the discipline of Archaeology for students who have no particular background in this subject. Students are introduced to the aims and practices of archaeology as a modern scientific discipline and career option. The module also provides a general introduction to the archaeology of Ireland, spanning some ten millennia from the earliest human settlement of the island to the early modern era.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Acquire a broad understanding of the theoretical concerns and methodologies employed by archaeologists.
· Have a general appreciation of the archaeology of Ireland, from earliest times to the early modern period.
· Acquire practical experience in the identification and interpretation of past material culture (artifacts, monuments and archaeological landscapes).
· Be placed in a strong position to acquire further knowledge of archaeology, as well as practical experience in this field.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Formal Written Examination 180 marks; Continuous Assessment 120 marks (1 x In-class Test 30 marks; 1 x Field Trip 15 marks; Tutorial Work [slide test, notebook and attendance at tutorial] 45 marks; 2 x 1,500 word essays 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ( by taking an additional 1 x 3hr written paper).

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AR1010 Introduction to Archaeology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 30, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures (24 hrs lectures over 8 nights).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Jennings, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Dr Richard Jennings, Department of Archaeology; Staff, Department of Archaeology, PhD researchers.

Module Objective: To provide a broad introduction to the discipline of Archaeology, including its historical development, theoretical concerns and methodologies.

Module Content: This module will introduce students in a general way to Archaeology as an academic and professional discipline. The lectures will explore the historical development of the discipline, and the way its current aims and methodologies have emerged. Students will be taught the basics of archaeological chronology, as well as an understanding of the nature of the archaeological record. These lectures will also introduce the work of the modern archaeologist, and the important contribution the discipline can make in modern society.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Trace the development of Archaeology as an academic discipline
· Identify the important contribution that Archaeology can make in modern society, in respect of cultural heritage, tourism and community development
· Assess the contribution that different theoretical approaches can make to an understanding of the past that relies on material evidence
· Evaluate the use of different methodologies in Archaeology to discover, interpret and date ancient sites and material
· Assess the career potential of Archaeology as a professional discipline.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AR1011 The Archaeology of Prehistoric Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 30, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures (24 hours of lectures over 8 evenings).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Jennings, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Dr Richard Jennings, Department of Archaeology; Staff, Department of Archaeology, PhD researchers.

Module Objective: To provide a general introduction to the prehistoric archaeology of Ireland from 8000 BC to the fifth century AD.

Module Content: A general introduction to the prehistory of Ireland based largely on archaeological information. The lectures deal with the earliest settlement of Ireland, c.8000?3000 BC, from foragers of the Mesolithic period to the arrival of Neolithic farmers and their megalithic tomb traditions. This is followed by a consideration of the many developments that marked the transition to the Bronze Age, including the adoption of metal use and changes in ritual practices. The module examines the Late Bronze Age and Iron Age periods in Ireland, c.1500 BC to AD 400, and the nature of the indigenous society that preceded the first Celtic influences on Ireland. The process of Celticisation is considered in terms of its implications for Irish ethnicity, language and culture. The course ends by considering Ireland's contacts with the Roman world in the early first millennium AD.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Trace the development of human societies in Ireland in the prehistoric period from several different perspectives
· Assess the nature of human settlement in different periods of prehistory in the Munster region
· Recognise prehistoric monuments and artifacts found in Ireland, and specifically in Munster
· Examine the local landscape context of prehistoric settlement in the student's home area
· Assess the touristic potential of prehistoric sites and monuments in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AR1012 The Archaeology of Historic Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures (24 hours lectures over 8 evenings).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Jennings, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Dr Richard Jennings, Department of Archaeology; Staff, Department of Archaeology, PhD researchers.

Module Objective: To provide a general introduction to the historic archaeology of Ireland from the fifth century AD to the early modern era.

Module Content: The lectures deal with the archaeology of the early historic period in Ireland, from the arrival of Christianity in the fifth century AD to early modern times. This includes the archaeology of the early Christian Church, the 'Golden Age' of Irish metalworking and art, secular settlement and economy, Ireland and the Viking world. Later lectures deal with the archaeology of the medieval castle and of the great monastic foundations, rural settlement in Gaelic Ireland, plantation archaeology and the industrial heritage of recent centuries.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Trace the development of human societies in Ireland in the early historic period from several different perspectives
· Assess the nature of human settlement in the historic period in the Munster region
· Recognise historic era monuments and artifacts found in Ireland, and specifically in Munster
· Examine the local landscape context of historic settlement in the student's home area
· Assess the touristic potential of historic sites and monuments in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AR1013 Archaeology Field Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 20, Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 4hr(s) Lectures (4 lecture hours); 1day(s) Fieldwork; 1hr(s) Directed Study (consultation time for individual student projects).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Richard Jennings, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Dr Richard Jennings, Department of Archaeology; Staff, Department of Archaeology, PhD researchers.

Module Objective: To carry out an archaeological field survey in the student's home area.

Module Content: This module will enable students to carry out a research project on the archaeology of their home area. The basic principles of archaeological field survey will be taught, along with the recognition of key monument types in the Irish landscape. Students will be encouraged to explore the touristic and educational value of these ancient sites and landscapes in respect of their own communities. It is hoped to increase the student's awareness of archaeological heritage in the localities where they live.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the main types of archaeological monument in the Irish landscape, and specifically in the Munster region
· Compile a basic photographic and descriptive record of prehistoric and historic era monuments in their home locality
· Assess the application of different methods of field survey to different types of archaeological site/monument
· Examine the significance of these sites from a local and regional historical perspective
· Examine the potential of local archaeological resources in terms of touristic and educational initiatives.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x fieldwork project (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AR2014 Artefact Studies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 22 x 1hr(s) Lectures (excluding museum visit); 2 x 1hr(s) Practicals (including drawing classes).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Ms Rose Cleary, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the study of archaeological artefacts and the skills involved in their analysis.

Module Content: This module aims to give students an appreciation of archaeological artefacts and the skills involved in their curation and analysis. A number of case studies are discussed in lectures while analytical and drawing skills are examined in practical sessions. A museum field-trip is an integral part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the use of raw materials in antiquity, their properties and geological sources.
· Interpret the technological processes connected to the productionof ancient artifacts.
· Assess the principles of conventional artefact recording and the methods employed.
· Be able to evaluate the various scientific approaches to the analysis of archaeological artifacts.
· Assess the range of information that artefacts can provide in regard to past human societies.
· Appreciate the role of museums in the curation of archaeological artefacts and their presentation to the public.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x project).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay(s) in lieu of any failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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AR2016 The Development of Archaeological Thought

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Tomas O Carragain, Department of Archaeology; Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology; Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology; Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology; Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an insight into the key concepts and debates in archaeological theory.

Module Content: This module examines theoretical approaches to understanding the human past. The historical origins of different schools of thought are considered. Using case studies, these approaches are applied to the interpretation of the archaeological record. The module includes formal lectures on the major concepts and ongoing debates in archaeological theory, as well as small group discussion sessions.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appreciate the contribution archaeology has made to an informed understanding of human behaviour in the past.
· Assess the interpretative history of the discipline of Archaeology.
· Identify how the different intellectual constructs are used within or beyond the discipline of archaeology to interpret the past.
· Evaluate major themes in the development of archaeological thought, including internal debates and external influences.
· Explain current issues in archaeological theory and the major terms used in such debates.
· Acquire critical learning and writing skills through selective reading and note-taking, and through essay writing.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (2,000 word Essay 30 marks: Class Presentations 70 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submit Essay in lieu of Failed Essay; Supplemental Autumn exam in lieu of failed Class Presentations.).

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AR2027 The Archaeology of the Viking Age; Scandinavia and the North Atlantic

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the main archaeological aspects of Viking Age Scandinavia, including the Scandinavian colonies in the North Atlantic region.

Module Content: This module begins with an introduction to Scandinavia and concepts such as 'Viking' and 'Viking Age'. The sources used for studying the period are outlined and assessed. The causes of the 'Viking Expansion' are explored and the impact of Scandinavian activity on the North Atlantic region is considered.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and review the multidisciplinary sources relevant to the study of the Viking Age.
· Define and evaluate the key characteristics of the Viking Age in the regions under study.
· Critically evaluate the principal social, economic and ideological developments in the Viking Age.
· Analyse the various dynamics that stimulated change in the Viking Age within the region under study.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 In-Class Multi-Question Test).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay(s) in lieu of any failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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AR2033 Chalcolithic and Bronze Age Europe

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad introduction to the later prehistory of continental Europe and Britain, with reference to Ireland. The student will be introduced to the various issues and debates surrounding the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age periods in Europe.

Module Content: This course will examine developments in human society in western Europe from the Chalcolithic to the Late Bronze Age. The origins and early development of metallurgy will be considered. The thematic approach will explore the social and cultural context of human life in this period, drawing comparisons between developments in Ireland and other regions of Europe.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Interpret the development of Chalcolithic and Bronze Age societies in Europe.
· Identify the range of archaeological evidence from these periods of European prehistory.
· Assess the key sites and monuments of the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age in Europe.
· Assess the key artifact finds from these periods.
· Examine interpretative approaches to the study of the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 1,500 word Departmental Essay 30 marks; Attendance on Fieldtrip 10 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay(s) in lieu of any failed element(s) of Continous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department.).

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AR2034 The Archaeology of Early Medieval Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to the main archaeological aspects and associated problems of the Early Medieval period in Ireland

Module Content: An overview of the archaeology of the period c.400-c.1100 AD. The emphasis is on aspects and problems of secular and ecclesiastical settlement, ecclesiastical arts and culture and the economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the range of available archaeological evidence regarding key aspects of Early Medieval Ireland.
· Examine different interpretative approaches to the study of the early medieval archaeology of Ireland.
· Evaluate and assess significant social and economic developments in Early Medieval Ireland.
· Analyse the key ideological changes in Early Medieval Ireland and their consequences.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x Departmental Test 30 marks; Attendance on fieldtrip 10 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward, Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students must submit essays in lieu of failed elements of continuous assessment as prescribed by the Department.).

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AR2037 Introduction to Environmental Archaeology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Michael Monk, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: This module will introduce the student to the main aims and methods of bioarchaeological studies in the areas of archaeobotany and zooarchaeology.

Module Content: The focus of the module will be on the two main components of bioarchaeology, namely plant remains and animal bone studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Assess the contribution of different methodologies used in geoarchaeology and bioarchaeology research.
· Outline and trace developments in environmental archaeology research over time.
· Evaluate examples of the application of bioarchaeological techniques covered in the course to archaeological sites and landscapes in Ireland.
· Contextualise the contribution of bioarchaeology approaches to archaeology as a whole.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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AR2038 Human Remains for Archaeologists

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): AR1001

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12hr(s) Lectures; 12hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: The principal objective of this practical course is to equip the students with the basic skills necessary to deal with human cranial remains that they might encounter in the course of archaeological fieldwork.

Module Content: The practical element of this course is built around imparting a detailed knowledge of the human skull and, in particular, the ability to identify fragmentary human crania in varying degrees of preservation. Legal and ethical issues concerned with the retrieval of human remains are discussed as are issues related to excavation and curation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the legal status of archaeological human remains in Ireland
· Outline ethical issues attached to the recovery and curation of archaeological human remains
· Identify the bones of the human skull
· Identify fragments of human skull bones
· Side fragments of human skull bones
· Outline the principal methods used to determine sex in archaeological skeletal material
· Outline the principal methods used to estimate age-at-death in archaeological skeletal material.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay, 30 marks; In-class practical tests, 70 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing the In-Class Practical Tests overall, or the essay, must submit essays in lieu of these, as prescribed by the Department.).

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AR2042 The Archaeology of Later Medieval Ireland, c.AD 1100-1550

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of the archaeology of later medieval Ireland, c.AD 1100-1550

Module Content: An overview of the archaeology of the period c. AD 1100-1550. The main emphasis will be on the principal theoretical and methodological approaches applied to the study of settlement forms, economy, society and material culture in Ireland, in the later medieval period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate the principal changes in later medieval Gaelic and Anglo-Norman society
· Identify the new landscape forms developed in Ireland during this period
· Assess the role of the Church as cultural bridge to contemporary Europe and as an agent of change
· Critically evaluate the extent to which Ireland became a colonial society in the later medieval period.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay, 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Pass elements carried forward; essay set in lieu of failed elements of CA.).

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AR2044 Heritage Management and Archaeology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of heritage management and the archaeological resource in Ireland.

Module Content: This module examines several aspects of the heritage/cultural resource management of archaeology in Ireland. These include heritage education, conservation/regeneration, heritage interpretation, cultural tourism, the management of historic buildings and landscapes and role of heritage in the construction of identities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Develop and understand the principles of heritage interpretation and their application to archaeological projects
· Identify ways in which heritage management can facilitate both physical and intellectual access to Ireland's archaeological resource
· Understand the principles underlying the management of archaeological sites and landscapes
· Gain a wider appreciation of the role of archaeology in forging community identities and how they might assist in their generation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Project 50 marks; 1 x class test and presentation 50 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of failed class test and presentation) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (failed elements of CA must be repeated, with written submissions as prescribed by the Dept. Marks in passed elements of CA are carried forward).

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AR2045 Introduction to Archaeological Fieldwork

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): AR1001 or AR1111 or AR2111

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 35 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Mr Nick Hogan, Department of Archaeology; Ms Connie Kelleher, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with the practical knowledge necessary to understand and apply the methods and principles of archaeological fieldwork, including field survey, excavation and underwater archaeology.

Module Content: This course aims to introduce students to the principles and methods of archaeological field survey. The student will be introduced to the different ways archaeologists collect survey information in the field. Topics covered include the organisation of archaeology in Ireland; the legal framework for Irish archaeology and heritage protection; documentary and map studies; and many different approaches to site investigation, from the use of aerial reconnaissance to geophysical survey. Students are required to carry out a field survey project. The course then moves on to examine excavation practice in modern archaeology, ending with an overview of underwater archaeology detailing its history and development. Fieldtrips are an integral part of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and review the sources used in archaeological field survey in Ireland.
· Apply basic archaeological field survey and monument description techniques
· Collate cartographic, documentary and field information with other sources, to produce reports on field monuments.
· Assess the overall approach to archaeological excavation and the methodologies involved.
· Trace the history and development of underwater archaeology in Ireland and abroad.
· Examine current practice and legislation in respect to underwater archaeology in Ireland.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Field-Survey Project 130 marks; 1 x Class exam 45 marks; Fieldtrip participation 25 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Failed elements of CA must be repeated, with written submissions as prescribed by the Dept. Marks in passed elements of CA are carried forward.).

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AR2046 Geoarchaeology Field School

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): AR1001

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 1weeks(s) Fieldwork (residential field school); 14 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology; Staff, Department of Geography.

Module Objective: To provide students with the knowledge necessary to understand and apply the methods and principles of geoarchaeological fieldwork, including field survey and terrain mapping, palaeoenvironmental sampling and landscape analysis.

Module Content: This module aims to introduce students to the principles and methods of geoarchaeological fieldwork and their application to the analysis of historic landscapes. The student will be introduced to the different ways archaeologists collect site and landscape information. Topics include documentary and map studies, remote sensing techniques, site survey methods and palaeoenvironmental sampling. Students will participate in a landscape survey leading to the compilation of a survey project.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Devise appropriate research strategies towards the analysis of different types of historic landscape.
· Apply different geoarchaeological methods in the recording and analysis of historic landscapes.
· Collate cartographic, documentary and field information with other sources, to produce reports on archaeological monuments and landscapes.
· Assess which geoarchaeological methods are suitable for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction in different contexts.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x Field-Survey Project 100 marks; 1 x Fieldwork Assignments Diary 100 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay(s) in lieu of any fialed element(s) of CA, as prescribed by the Department.).

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AR2047 The Iron Age in Western and Central Europe

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Katharina Becker, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Katharina Becker, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the Iron Age of Western and Central Europe, providing an overview over the archaeology of contemporary communities from Ireland to Slovenia and Austria to Denmark as well as the main interpretative issues of the period.

Module Content: The diversity of archaeological expression as well as shared characteristics and role and effect of the interaction with Greeks, Etruscans and Romans will be a focus in discussing Iron Age communities, their emergence and decline over the course of the Hallstatt and La Tene period. Students will be introduced to sites, characteristic artefacts, historic events and places and shifts in interpretation of these in recent research, such as the issue of the Celts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Trace the range and development of archaeological communities during the European Iron Age.
· Identify and review technological and cultural characteristics of the period and their change over time.
· Critically assess interpretations of this material in regard to past and current interpretation.
· Articulate current issues in European Iron Age archaeology.
· Compare and contrast the archaeology of select study regions.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay 30 marks; group work 10 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Essay(s) in lieu of failed element(s) of Continuou Assessment as prescribed by the Department).

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AR3010 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 50.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Independent supervised research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to archaeological research methods and test their ability to complete an archaeological project on a theme related to any module taken or being taken in the Archaeology Department.

Module Content: Students are required to submit a 3,000-4,000 word dissertation, which can be an essay based on archaeological literature, an analysis of a body of material, or a fieldwork project (depending on availability of material and adequate supervision). The standard of organisation and presentation (complete bibliography, proper referencing, adequate and clear illustration) is important.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Formulate an original research topic.
· Identify and access appropriate bibliographic resources and other sources of relevant information.
· Identify and apply appropriate research methods.
· Synthesise information on the chosen archaeological theme, with the appropriate referencing.
· Prepare a bibliography appropriate to the project.
· Communicate research results effectively in a written presentation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 - 4,000 word dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Any failed or non-submitted dissertation must be submitted for the Autumn Supplemental Examination).

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AR3021 Prehistoric Society in Ireland

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To examine current issues and themes in Irish prehistory.

Module Content: This module will explore changing prespectives on prehistoric society in Ireland through lectures and case studies. The themes include the earliest human settlement of this island and the continuing debate regarding an Irish Palaeolithic, the Mesolithic way of life, the introduction of agriculture and the Neolithic world,beakers and the origins of metallurgy, Bronze Age settlement religion society, Iron Age Ireland and the Celtic World, ending with the Romanization of Ireland.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Examine the development of human societies in prehistoric Ireland.
· Assess the key sites and monuments from Irish prehistory.
· Assess the key artifact finds from Irish prehistory.
· Examine different interpretative approaches to the study of Irish prehistory.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (1 x 1500 word essay 30 marks; attendance on fieldtrip 10 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay(s) in lieu of any failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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AR3030 Dissertation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: No Limit.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Independent supervised research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to archaeological research methods and test their ability to complete an archaeological project on a theme related to any module taken or being taken in the Archaeology Department.

Module Content: Students are required to submit at 6,000-8,000 word dissertation, which can be an essay based on archaeological literature, an analysis of a body of material, or a fieldwork project (depending on availability of material and adequate supervision). The standard of organisation and presentation (complete bibliography, proper referencing, adequate and clear illustration) is important.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Formulate an original research topic.
· Identify and access appropriate bibliographic resources and other sources of relevant information.
· Identify and apply appropriate research methods.
· Synthesise information on the chosen archaeological theme, with the appropriate referencing.
· Prepare a bibliography appropriate to the project.
· Communicate research results effectively in a written presentation.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 6,000 - 8,000 word dissertation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Any failed or non-submitted dissertation must be submitted for the Autumn Supplemental Examination).

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AR3031 Archaeological Ceramics

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 2hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rose Cleary, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Ms Rose Cleary, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: The course will provide a foundation in ceramics from the Neolithic to post-medieval periods. On completion, the student will be familiar with and able to identify a range of ceramics including domestic and funerary pottery and other ceramic products.

Module Content: The course will examine raw materials and the technology of pottery production, trade and exchange and the uses of pottery studies for archaeology. Case studies include Irish Neolithic and Bronze Age pottery, post-Roman imported pottery, Viking and Anglo-Norman pottery, post-medieval ceramics including structural and other clay products.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Assess the methods of pottery production in antiquity and the historic period.
· Examine the application of pottery studies in archaeological interpretation.
· Outline the sources used to research and analyse pottery, including ethnography, scientific analyses and observation.
· Identify Irish prehistoric and historic ceramics, including pottery, roof and floor tiles, clay pipes and other ceramic.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Class test x 2 (50 marks);).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

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AR3037 Viking Age Archaeology in Ireland and Britain

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the archaeological evidence for the Vikings in Ireland and Britain.

Module Content: This module begins with a brief introduction to the Viking Age and its background. The activities and impact of the Scandinavians in Ireland and Britain are then considered. Topics that are explored include regionalisms, economies and identity.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define and evaluate the key characteristics of the Viking Age in the regions of Ireland and Britain.
· Assess that archaeological and historical data sources used in this field of research.
· Differentiate and analyse the dynamics that led to Viking Age regionalisms within the regions under study.
· Critically evaluate the consequences of the Scandinavian impact on Ireland and Britain.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 60 marks; Continuous Assessment 40 marks (Class test 30 marks; attendance on fieldtrip 10 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Essays in lieu of failed elements of continuous assessment.).

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AR3039 The Archaeology of the Early Irish Church

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Tomas O Carragain, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Tomas O Carragain, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the archaeology of the early Irish Church, c.400-1100 AD.

Module Content: This module begins with a detailed exploration of the process of conversion in Ireland in light of recent excavations. The principal aspects of ecclesiastical archaeology are then considered including the character and layout of ecclesiastical sites, the organisation of the Church, and ecclesiastical art and architecture. Where possible, similarities and differences between the Irish archaeological evidence and that in other areas of Europe are highlighted.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically assess the archaeological evidence for the conversion of Ireland to Christianity.
· Use archaeological evidence to evaluate the principal models that have been put forward for the organisation of the early Irish Church.
· Examine the range of ideas that may be embodied in the layout of Irish early ecclesiastical sites.
· Describe the influences evident in Irish early ecclesiastical art and architecture, and assess the significance of those influences.
· Assess the validity of the argument that some Irish early ecclesiastical sites became urban during the early medieval period.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3000 word essay (60 marks); 1 x class test (30 marks); Field trip attendance (10 marks).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Essay(s), as prescribed by the Department).

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AR3040 Health, Diet and Disease in Early Societies

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: The objective of the practical element of this course is to equip the students with the basic skills necessary to deal with the human postcranial skeleton that they might encounter in the course of archaeological fieldwork.

Module Content: The practical element of this course is built around imparting a detailed knowledge of the human postcranial skeleton and, in particular, the ability to identify fragmentary human skeletal remains in varying degrees of preservation. Research into past diets are discussed and the course will also consider the origins and evolution of human diseases.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate familiarity with the bones of the human postcranial skeleton.
· Identify fragments of human postcranial bones.
· Side fragments of the human postcranial skeleton.
· Assess information on current issues in paleodietary studies.
· Assess information on current issues in palaeopathology.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x Class Test 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Essay(s) in lieu of any failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Deparment).

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AR3045 The Industrial Archaeology of Ireland, 1750-1930

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of the archaeology of industrial society in Ireland, c.AD 1750-1930.

Module Content: An overview of the archaeology of industry and industrial society in Ireland, in the period c.AD 1750-1930. The main emphasis will be on an introduction to the main theoretical and methodological approaches applied to the study of settlement forms, economy, society and material culture in Ireland in the latter historical period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the nature of incipient industrialisation in Ireland before AD 1750 and identify its landscape impacts.
· Critically evaluate the physical development of the types of industry created in Ireland before AD 1930.
· Gain an active appreciation of the application of recent methodological approaches in landscape archaeology to material culture of Irish industrialisation.
· Contextualise Ireland's role in the industrialisation of Britain and the continent.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay in lieu of failed elements, as prescribed by Dept.).

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AR3046 The Archaeology of Agriculture in Medieval Ireland, c. AD 500-1500

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of the archaeology of agriculture and society in medieval Irland, c.AD 500-1500.

Module Content: This module examines several aspects on the development of agriculture and its impacts on medieval society in Ireland. These include the receiving environment for crop and animal husbandry in early and later medieval Ireland, climate, soils, land-use, field systems, crop-processing technologies and storage, horticulture and the preocessing of animal products. The impacts of agriculture on settlement forms and systems of land ownership and control will also be examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the introduction and development of agriculture systems in medieval Ireland.
· Critically evaluate current theories on how medieval agriculture influenced settlement forms in early medieval and Anglo-Norman Ireland.
· Gain a wider appreciation of the relationship of between agriculture and diet in medieval societies as a whole.
· An appreciation of technological change and continuity in medieval agriculture.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 1,500 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Essays in lieu of failed elements as prescribed by dept).

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AR3047 Professional Practice in Archaeology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of professional archaeology in Ireland, with reference to career possibilities in Ireland and abroad.

Module Content: This module will introduce students to the organisation and practice of professional archaeology in Ireland. The organisation and profile of archaeology is examined, as is the economic and societal environment within which the profession operates. The legislative and administrative aspects of State archaeology are considered in respect of the work of central and local government agencies, and the commercial environment of private sector archaeology is reviewed. The role of the museum sector is examined, as is the cultural heritage management and tourism sectors.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the legal and legislative framework within which the profession of Archaeology in Ireland operates
· Recognise areas in Archaeology where employment opportunities may exist now or in the future
· Develop their employment potential by knowing how to build on academic training with relevant work experience and skill-sets
· Engage with modern profession of Archaeology in Ireland in terms of its organisational and employment framework.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Class Test 50 marks; 1 x Project 50 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (marks in passed elements of CA are carried forward. Failed elements of CA must be repeated by submitting written work in lieu of these, as prescribed by the Department.).

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AR3048 Case Studies in Environmental Archaeology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): AR1001

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology (Ben Geary - New f/t lecturer commencing Oct 2012).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology, Ben Geary.

Module Objective: The student is introduced to critical approaches in environmental archaeology and to practical experience in relevant laboratory techniques.

Module Content: This module provides an introduction to the principles and techniques used to reconstruct past environments and detect environmental change. Topics explored in this module include site-scale issues (context and taphonomic problems), the material basis of the evidence (methods and techniques of analysis) and landscape-scale issues. An appreciation of these issues will be prefaced by a theoretical introduction, while the methodologies will be enhanced by laboratory sessions that form an integral component of the module.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate published research in environmental archaeology and palaeoecology and its relevance to different research contexts.
· Assess the contribution environmental knowledge can make to the interpretation of archaeological sites and landscapes.
· Identify the practical procedures that would need to be implemented to deal with a collection of selected environmental materials.
· Frame and write a lab report on a body of environmental material.
· To assess how past environments and climates can be reconstructed using different approaches and techniques.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (1 x 1.5 hr exam paper 70 marks.); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Essay 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay(s) in lieu of failed CA, as prescribed by Dept.).

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AR3049 Palynology and Palaeoecology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): AR1001

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 14 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology (Ben Geary from Oct 2012).

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology, Ben Geary from Oct 2012.

Module Objective: Students are introduced to the principles and methods of pollen analysis, and its different applicaitons to environmental reconstruction in Archaeology and Quaternary Studies.

Module Content: The module introduces the principles and historical development of palynology, the study of sub-fossil pollen recovered from natural environments and archaeological contexts. It provides pratical field and laboratory experience in the process of recovering, identifying and analysing pollen and spores. Lecture topics include the representativeness of the pollen record; the collation, presentation and interpretation of pollen data; environment modelling, and the integration of pollen with other environmental data sources. The course will examine how pollen data can be applied to solve problems in a range of different disciplines. Applications can range from understanding past climatic changes, changing forest dynamics since the last Ice Age, the origins of agriculture and the impact of other human activities during the Holocene. While the emphasis is on pollen and spores, other types of fossils will also be examined.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Evaluate published research in palynology and palaeoecology and its relevance to different research contexts..
· Assess the contribution that pollen analysis can make to the interpretation of natural environments and historic landscapes.
· Identify the procedures and equipment used in the field sampling and laboratory analysis of pollen cores.
· Assess how past vegetation records and climate history can be reconstructed using different approaches and techniques in palaeoecology.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Project 30 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Essay(s) in lieu of failed elements of continuous assessment as prescribed by department.).

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AR3050 Archaeo-palynology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: This module will introduce students to the practice of palynology, the analysis of sub-fossil pollen. It aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in pollen analysis within the context of archaeological sites and questions (archaeo-palynology) in particular, with a focus ranging from site to landscape. It will also highlight the role of palynology within broader environmental archaeological frameworks in Ireland and further afield.

Module Content: This module will be structured around lectures/seminars and practical classes. The lectures will introduce students to the theory and method of palynology, with subsequent practical classes allowing students to develop 'hands on' laboratory skills, including microscopic indentification of pollen grains, data presentation and analyses. The module will also incorporate comprehensive case studies of the application of palynological data in archaeological research, including landscape scale themes such as the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition, Holocene climatic and cultural change and human activity and site-specific studies of environmental context and economy.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply basic theory, method and practice of palynology, including sample collection, sub-sampling and laboratory techniques including pollen extraction, microscope identification and data presentation.
· Critically interpret palynological data in terms of patterns of vegetatior change, human activity and the associated archaeological record.
· appreciate the contribution that such data can make to understandiing of long term patterns of environmental change.
· Assess the role of pollen analysis within broader archaeological study.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Essay 30 marks (1500 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay(s) in lieu of any failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by the Department).

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AR3051 Wetland archaeology and palaeoenvironments

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Benjamin Gearey, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: This module will introduce students to wetland archaeology, the archaeological study of wetlands including peat bogs, river floodplains and coastal environments. It will present the importance of such contexts for the integrated study of archaeology and environmental archaeology. It will contrast the forms of information provided by wetland environments with terrestrial contexts and demonstrate the importance of information from both contexts for an integrated understanding of past human activity. The module will also highlight the particular methodological approaches to investigating wetland sites.

Module Content: This module will be structured around lectures/seminars and a field trip. It will outline the formation processes of wetland environments and consider the processes underpinning the exceptional preservation of organic material in wetland environments. The module will focus on a series of case studies of iconic wetland sites and finds from Ireland and beyond, including the Ceide Fields of Co. Mayo, human remains from the peatlands of northwest Europe ('bog bodies'), the trackway complexes of the Irish midlands, the prehistoric 'lake settlements' of the Somerset Levels of southwest England and Fenlands of eas England. The module will also include a significant focus on the critical contextual information provided by palaeoenvironmental data, the preservation of which is a key feature of wetland sites and landscapes. The module will also consider the fragility and vulnerability of wetland sites to a range of natural and anthropogenic threats.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Interpret the particular formation processes of wetland environments and their significance for human activity and the archaeological record.
· Appreciate the difference between teh preservation environments of wetland and dryland contexts and the implications for the survival of different forms of archaeological and palaeoenvironmental remains.
· Assess the importance of wetland sites for the integration of archaeolgical and palaeoenvironmental datasets.
· Critically evaluate the contribution that wetland archaeology has made to archaeological understanding and understand the specific methodological approaches to different wetland environments.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Essay 30 marks (1500 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (essay in lieu of failed element of Continuous Assessment , as prescribed by the Department).

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AR3052 The Iron Age in Ireland - New Horizons

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Katharina Becker, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Katharina Becker, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the Irish Iron Age, including its material remains, sites, artefacts and issues with an emphasis on new discoveries, advances in analysis and interpretation.

Module Content: The course will cover Irish later prehistory from the Late Bronze Age (c.1150 BC) to the beginning of the early historic period around AD 400. Sites as well as materials will form the basis for a theoretically informed examination of the Irish Iron Age. The well-known iconic Iron Age sites and artefacts will be set into their contemporary context of mostly newly excavated sites. Recent advances in our understanding of the material culture of the period will be explored in regards to how they add to our understanding of the Irish Iron Age. Through lectures and student tasks the site record and material culture will be examined in detail with an explicit focus on the main research questions and issues of the period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Appreciate the range of sites and materials of the Irish Iron Age
· Assess interpretative approaches to the Irish Iron Age and their change against the background of developments in archaeological theory and discovery
· Critically examine the archaeological record in regard past and current interpretations of the Iron Age in Ireland.
· Evaluate the archaeological record against its British and European counterparts.
· Identify central current and future research issues of the period.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 50 marks; Continuous Assessment 50 marks (Continuous Assessment 50 marks (1 x Project 40 marks; attendance on fieldtrip 10 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Essay(s) to be sumitted in lieu of failed elements of Continuous Assessment, as prescribed by Department.).

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AR6001 Dissertation in Archaeological Excavation

Credit Weighting: 45

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To develop critical writing and interpretative skills specific to the requirements of archaeological excavation.

Module Content: Each student will submit a dissertation by the end of September. The dissertation will apply the knowledge and training gained in course modules towards an investigation and understanding of archaeological excavation. It is also an opportunity to specialize in a particular aspect of excavation or related research. The standard of organization and presentation (comprehensive bibliography, proper referencing, adequate illustration) is important.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and access appropriate bibliographic resources and other sources of relevant information;
· Identify and apply appropriate research methods to the study of an excavation-related topic;
· Collect and analyse information relevant to the dissertation topic;
· Communicate research results effectively in a written and oral presentation.

Assessment: Total Marks 900: Continuous Assessment 900 marks (Dissertation (max 20,000 words)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmit Continuous Assessment (whether passed or failed) (Resubmit revised Dissertation). Resubmit revised dissertation.

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AR6003 Dissertation in Human Osteoarchaeology

Credit Weighting: 45

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Supervised Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To develop the academic skills and critical abilities of a topic of the students own choosing via a piece of extended written work on that subject.

Module Content: Supervised, independent research on topic agreed between student and module co-ordinator.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Quantify, record and analyse osteoarchaeological data;
· utilise appropriate descriptive and analytical procedures;
· demonstrate the ability to formulate and test hypotheses;
· demonstrate the ability to think holistically;
· critically evaluate and draw supportable conclusions from osteoarchaeological data.

Assessment: Total Marks 900: Continuous Assessment 900 marks (1 x 20,000 word Dissertation to be completed by the end of September in the year after Registration).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Submission of Dissertation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Students may resubmit for the Summer Examination Board in the following year.

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AR6004 Archaeological Excavation: Planning and Research Design

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: The aim of this course is to provide students with a broad introduction to archaeological excavation, and specifically to the design and planning of excavation projects, with particular reference to current practice in Ireland.

Module Content: Topics covered in this course include theoretical approaches to excavation; the history of excavation; legal frameworks under which excavation is conducted; ethical concerns and preservation by record; excavation licensing (research designs and method statements); organization and logistics; documentary and cartographic research; site survey; remote sensing; safety and excavation.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the historical basis for current practice in archaeological excavation, as well as the legal framework in which this work is undertaken;
· Apply for excavation licences in Ireland, involving the preparation of site-appropriate research designs and method statements;
· Carry out historical research and cartographic analysis in advance of archaeological excavation;
· Survey archaeological sites in advance of excavation, including both surface mapping and geophysical prospection;
· Identify and organize the resources required to conduct an archaeological excavation, including financial and human resource management expertise.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project 40 marks; class test 60 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing the in-class test in the Summer must take a 1 x 1.5 hour paper in the Autumn.).

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AR6005 Archaeological Excavation: Strategy and Practice

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: This course will provide students with a broad introduction to archaeological site formation and stratification, and to different approaches to excavation and recording.

Module Content: Topics include site- and context-specific approaches to excavation; sample and total excavation strategies; digging methods; site management; formation processes and archaeological stratification; recording systems; context excavation; spatial recording; photography; GIS and computer applications.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Design excavation strategies appropriate to different types of archaeological site and different excavation circumstances;
· Develop the basic skills required to carry out an archaeological excavation, including digging methods and recording systems;
· Work effectively as part of an excavation team, and acquire management skills necessary to direct or supervise these operations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay (40 marks): 1 x Project (60 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AR6006 Post-Excavation Analysis and Interpretation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: The aim of this course is to introduce students to different areas of post-excavation analysis, interpretation and publication practice.

Module Content: Topics covered will include the site report and excavation archives; stratigraphic sequences and the Harris Matrix; absolute chronology; site illustrations; recording and analyzing artifacts; conservation of finds; recovery and analysis of bio-environmental and human remains; publication and dissemination of excavation results.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and assess the range of research carried out at the post-excavation stage, and liase with specialists;
· Write preliminary and final excavation reports, as well as related specialist reports;
· Acquire specialist skills in computing and information technology relevant to archaeological excavation;
· Compile excavation archives;
· Communicate the results of archaeological excavation to a specialist and non-specialist audience using conventional print media and web-based delivery;
· Design conservation plans connected to public presentation and long-term preservation of excavation sites.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay (40 marks); 1 x Project (60 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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AR6007 Case Studies in Archaeological Excavation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 21 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 2 x 2day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: This seminar course will present a range of published case-studies, designed to introduce students to how to approach and complete the excavation of different site types.

Module Content: Seminar presentations on published excavations, presented by department staff, visiting lecturers and M.A students. Broad range of site types covered, with critical examination of excavation publications and consideration of site conservation strategies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· To design excavation strategies appropriate to different types of archaeological site based on published case-study examples;
· Write excavation reports;
· Compile excavation archives;
· Design different approaches to public presentation and long-term preservation of archaeological sites.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Student Seminar Presentation (80 marks); Student Portfolio (120 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated. Autumn Exam to be taken in lieu of failed student presentation. Failed portfolio to be re-submitted.

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AR6008 Training Excavation

Credit Weighting: 15

Semester(s): Semester 3. (May - July).

No. of Students: Min 7, Max 10.

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 4weeks(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: The module will provide students with practical training in archaeological excavation strategy and methods.

Module Content: Students will attend a four-week training excavation as part of this programme. This excavation will be scheduled between March and May. Students will be involved in all stages of the excavation project, from the initial site survey and layout, to the digging, recording and interpretation of archaeological features and finds.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Survey an archaeological site in advance of excavation, including both surface mapping and geophysical prospection;
· Manage the effective running of an archaeological excavation;
· Acquire digging and recording skills required to carry out an archaeological excavation.

Assessment: Total Marks 300: Continuous Assessment 300 marks (2 x projects 150 marks each).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AR6009 Mortuary Theory

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Lectures/Seminars); Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To examine the life cycle and its material culture correlates.

Module Content: Modern archaeology is multi-disciplinary, drawing on information and resources from both the natural and social sciences. This course concentrates on the latter of these two and explores the history of ideas about which aspects of life in the past archaeologists feel they can uncover. Particular attention is paid to the role of ethnography in archaeological explanation. The course is structured around an examination of the human life cycle and proceeds through the examination of mortuary and other behaviours using archaeological and anthropological case studies.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an understanding of the history of archaeological thought;
· critically evaluate differing archaeological approaches to death and disposal;
· understand the development of ideas concerning Rites of Passage;
· critically evaluate differing approaches to childhood in archaeological writing;
· critically evaluate differing approaches to gender in the archaeological literature;
· critically evaluate approaches to Otherness and difference in archaeological research.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (5 x Seminar presentations 50 marks; 1 x Project (2,000 words) 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department.).

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AR6011 Biocultural Approaches to Human Remains

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: This course provides an overview of current theoretical and methodological issues in human osteoarchaeology.

Module Content: The following topics will be considered: biocultural interpretations of human remains in archaeological contexts; depositional and post-depositional attributes that affect interpretations of mortuary sites; bone and tooth structure and the remodelling sequence; patterns of skeletal growth; ecological, behavioural and cultural influences on morphology; age estimation and sex determination; estimation of stature from human remains; genetic relationships and morphology; palaeodemography.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Critically evaluate differing theoretical approaches to the study of archaeological human remains;
· demonstrate an understanding of the ethical issues associated with the excavation and reburial of archaeological human remains;
· critically evaluate different methodological approaches to the study of archaeological human remains.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Seminar Presentations 50 marks; Essay (2,000 words) 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department.).

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AR6012 Palaeopathology Seminar

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: This course provides an overview of current issues in the study of health in past human populations.

Module Content: Topics covered include: disruptions in growth and development; specific and non-specific infectious disease; degenerative joint disease; metabolic disease; congenital abnormality; stress indicators; dental disease; activity-related skeletal changes; skeletal indicators of diet and health; the influence of different subsistence strategies on skeletal/dental variability; the relationship between behaviour and patterns of trauma; cultural modifications to the skeleton and dentition.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Correctly identify and diagnose a range of pathological conditions which can be macroscopically identified on the human skeleton
· Critically evaluate archaeological, documentary and medical records used in the analysis of past human health
· Apply both qualitative and quantitative approaches to palaeopathological analysis
· Interpret palaeopathological data and results in biocultural contexts
· Demonstrate the ability to develop a differential diagnosis
· Recognise and critically appraise relevant theoretical aspects
· Apply palaeoepidemiological approaches and methods to the analysis of disease in past populations.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Seminar presentation 50 marks, Essay (2,000 words) 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department).

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AR6013 Archaeological Survey and Remote Sensing

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 30.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 25 x 1hr(s) Lectures (Lectures/Field Practicals).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Mr Nick Hogan, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To explore contemporary survey methods and technologies employed by field archaeologists in recording archaeological sites and landscapes.

Module Content: This module will examine current approaches adopted by field archaeologists carrying out detailed site and landscape survey in Ireland and beyond. Traditional survey methods will be considered alongside emerging digital technologies. The course will be divided between classroom teaching and field-based practical work. General themes will include traditional and electronic survey methods, archaeological drafting, geophysical prospection, digital cartography, aerial and terrestrial photography, satellite remote sensing, and relevant software systems including GIS (Geographical Information Systems) and CAD (Computer-Aided Drafting/Drawing).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Have acquired knowledge in the principles of, and have gained practical experience with, traditional survey methods, including field-walking and reconnaissance survey, tape survey, levelling and tacheometry
· Understand the principles of, and have gained practical experience with, more recently established and emerging technologies, including Total Station, GPS, terrestrial LiDAR, photogrammetry, and geophysical prospection techniques
· Have experience with all stages of archaeological field survey projects, including desk-based research and the post-survey presentation and dissemination of results
· Appreciate the role of computers in the fieldwork process and have acquired experience with relevant software applications
· Appreciate the need for careful planning and resourcing in order to carry out effective and safe field survey campaigns
· Have gained a level of practical knowledge and confidence enabling them to work effectively on commercial and research archaeological field projects in Ireland and elsewhere.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project 80 marks; Field Practical 20 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Re-submission of failed project. Essay in lieu of failed field practical, as prescribed by Department.).

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AR6014 Osteoarchaeology Laboratory

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 4, Max 7.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 2hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Barra O Donnabhain, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To achieve an understanding of the organisation of the human skeleton and the bioarchaeological methods used in its analysis.

Module Content: Human osteology; estimation of age; determination of sex; estimation of stature; analysis of dentition; palaeopathological description; osteobiography; analysis of cremated remains; osteological databases; osteoarchaeological report writing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identification of fragmentary human bone from archaeological settings;
· gain familiarity with standard methods of estimating age;
· demonstrate proficiency in methods used to determine age-at-death and to estimate living stature;
· demonstrate proficiency in charting of dentition and analysis of same;
· gain experience in analysis of cremated human remains;
· utilise osteological databases;
· demonstrate the ability to think holistically about assemblages of archaeological human remains;
· critically evaluate data and draw supportable conclusions.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (10 x Laboratory Tests, 100 marks; 1 x Project (3,000 words), 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (As prescribed by the Department.).

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AR6022 The Museum in the 21st Century

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1.5 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to current international museological issues and to explore the future direction and potential of museum development.

Module Content: Principal issues addressed include: museum visitor profiles, use of educational theory in museums; the 'total museology' concept; museums as social institutions; the role of museums in the representation of state, community, gender, class and ethnicity, memorial museums and public history, virtual museums, and the role of museums as centres for research on different aspects of cultural heritage.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate an understanding of the potential power of museums
· Evaluate the changing roles of museums in society
· Have an awareness of museums as institutions of contested access
· Demonstrate an understanding of virtual museums
· Evaluate the future of museums.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Project (5,000 words) 70 marks; Class Workshop Presentation 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing the project are required to resubmit, and students failing the Seminar Presentation are required to submit an essay in lieu of the Class Presentation (as prescribed by the Department).).

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AR6023 The Museum Environment

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 8 x 2hr(s) Lectures (Held in National Museum of Ireland, Dublin.); 8 x 1hr(s) Other (Laboratory sessions, held in National Museum of Ireland, Dublin.).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To develop knowledge in key areas of the management of the museum environment: storage, conservation and display.

Module Content: Key issues addressed include storage, conservation and display.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate competence in understanding the physical museum environment in relation to the care and display of objects
· Acquire a range of skills relating to storage, conservation and display of museum collections
· Demonstrate an understanding of good practise in core areas of museum operation
· Appreciate the scientific principles and procedures relating to the conservation of materials in a musuem collection
· Apply best practice to the display of museum materials in a controlled environment.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (100 Continuous Assessment marks (1 x 5,000 word project on an approved topic dealing with an aspect of museum environments relevant to the theme of the module)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmit Continuous Assessment (whether passed or failed) (Failed projects must be resubmitted for examination in the Autumn).

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AR6025 Museums and The Public

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1.5 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Dr Colin Rynne, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the roles of the museums, past and present, in their local, regional and national communities.

Module Content: Key concepts addressed include the emerging role of museums in reflecting cultural diversity, multi-culturalism, social capital, the ethics of public interpretation, and educational services provided to the wider community. The role of specialist museums, such as open air forms, in this regard, will also be examined. Alternative attempts to stimulate and interpret the past in heritage centres and theme parks are also analysed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the emerging role of the museum in the community
· Assess ethical concerns arising from the public presentation and interpretation of museum displays
· Evaluate the role of museums in cultural heritage and social transformation
· Appreciate the important contribution that museums can make to school education
· Evaluate the contribution of folk- and specialist museums in the presentation of cultural herigate
· Evaluate the role of museums in promoting social diversity and inclusion.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (100 marks continuous assessment ( Project (5,000 words) 70 marks; Seminar Presentations 30 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (students failing the Project are required to resubmit, and students failing the Seminar Presentation are required to submit a written paper (as prescribed by Dept)).

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AR6026 Museum Placement 1

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 4weeks(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with work experience and learning opportunities in relevant work environments.

Module Content: A four-week long work placement in which students are provided with learning opportunities and apply the learning outcomes of the taught programme.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a satisfactory standard of competence in working in the instutions of the placement providers and with the work practices utilised in them
· Demonstrate the ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with placement providers
· Demonstrate evidence of learning activities and experiences in a Placement Report Portfolio
· Demonstrate the application of principles of Museum Studies modules in the placement settings and in the Placement Report Portfolio.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (200 Continuous Assessment marks: 1 x 5,000 word Placements Report Portfolio to be completed, together with placement provider report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% 40% in Continuous Assessment and a pass judgement in the placement. Students who fail to satisfy this requirement will fail the module overall. Candidates must normally meet a requirement of 100% attendance for the placement. If students do not complete the required number of placement hours due to illness etc, any time off must be made up by extending the placement (subject to availability).

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AR6027 Dissertation in Museum Studies

Credit Weighting: 35

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Supervised research); Seminars (Research Skills Training); Other (Student Presentations).

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To develop academic skills and critical abilities, on a topic specific to museum studies, via a piece of extended written work on that subject.

Module Content: Supervised, independent research on a topic agreed between student and supervisor. This may be an analytical or practice-based study, involving, for example, an exhibition, an archival database project, a study in policy development, a visitor experience study, digital media application, etc. The work will apply the knowledge gained on course modules, and elsewhere, towards the research topic.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify and access appropriate bibliographic and other relevant resources
· identify and apply appropriate research methods to the study of a museum-related topic
· Critically engage with theoretical and methodlological issues relevant to the topic
· Demonstrate the ability to formulate and test hypotheses, and think holistically
· Draw supportable conclusions from the research and communicate these results effectively.

Assessment: Total Marks 700: Continuous Assessment 700 marks (1 x 20,000 word dissertation to be completed by the end of September in the year following registration.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AR6028 Museum Curation: Objects, Their Collection, Recording and Presentation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures; 1.5 x 1day(s) Fieldwork.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Prof William O'Brien, Department of Archaeology; Mr Griffin Murray, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To train students in modern standards of museum curation and introduce them to issues relating to collections management and exhibitions.

Module Content: Topics covered will include: the history of collections; collection, disposal and exhibition policies; legislation; ethical considerations; documentations; loans; storage and access; security and emergency planning; exhibitions; online presentations; research and publication.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· fully document and catalogue museum objects
· write museum policies relating to collections management and exhibitions
· assess different areas of Irish legislation concerning museum collections
· appreciate the practical and ethical issues concerning museum collections and exhibitions
· critically evaluate museum exhibitions from a customer and educational perspective
· evaluate the storage, access and security requirements for museum collections and exhibitions
· prepare an emergency plan for the protection of a museum collection and exhibition
· apply best practice in national and international museum standards programmes to the care of museum collections.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Essay or Museum Cataloguing Project (5,000 words) 70 marks; Class presentations 30 marks.).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Students failing the essay/project are required to resubmit, and students failing the Class Presentations are required to submit a written paper (as prescribed by Dept).).

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AR6029 Work Placement 2

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 1 x 4weeks(s) Placements.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Mr John Sheehan, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with work experience and learning opportunities in relevant work environments.

Module Content: A four-week long work placement in which students are provided with learning opportunities and apply the learning outcomes of the taught programme.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a satisfactory standard of competence in working in the instutions of the placement providers and with the work practices utilised in them
· Demonstrate the ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships with placement providers
· Demonstrate evidence of learning activities and experiences in a Placement Report Portfolio
· Demonstrate the application of principles of Museum Studies modules in the placement settings and in the Placement Report Portfolio.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (200 Continuous Assessment marks: 1 x 5,000 word Placements Report Portfolio to be completed, together with placement provider report).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% 40% in Continuous Assessment and a pass judgement in the placement. Students who fail to satisfy this requirement will fail the module overall. Candidates must normally meet a requirement of 100% attendance for the placement. If students do not complete the required number of placement hours due to illness etc, any time off must be made up by extending the placement (subject to availability).

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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AR6030 The Exhibition Experience

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 14.

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 54hr(s) Practicals (Practical and workshop hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Rose Cleary, Department of Archaeology.

Lecturer(s): Staff, Department of Archaeology.

Module Objective: To provide students with experience and learning opportunities in exhibition planning and production.

Module Content: Key issues in exhibition planning are addressed, building on the content of the taught programme, in which the students develop and produce a group exhibition on a recommended theme.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a satisfactory standard of competence in the skills required to develop and produce a thematic exhibition
· Demonstrate the ability to contribute to, and work effectively within, the exhibition project team
· Demonstrate a satisfactory standard of preparing an exhibition catalogue
· Organise a public launch and promotion of a temporary museum exhibition
· Assess visitor reaction to such an exhibition from a touristic and educational perspective.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Group Exhibition Project Portfolio (4,000 words), 100 marks; Group Exhibition Catalogue (100 marks)).).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Resubmit Continuous Assessment (whether passed or failed) (Failed project or catalogue must be resubmitted for examination in the Autumn).

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