IAP Conference

‌The Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, UCC hosted the annual conferenc of the Irish Association of Pharmacologists, on Friday 16th October 2015.   The programme consisted of a keynote presentation, 5 other presentations of 20 mintues each and 10 minute presentations given by early-career researchers. 

View gallery photos here: Gallery IAP

The full programme can be downloaded at: IAP Conference Programme (543kB)

SD at IAP

Keynote Address: Professor Seamas Donnelly, Professor of Medicine, Trinity College, Dublin.

“Targeting of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer”

The Donnelly Laboratory works encompasses three defined areas :

  • Defining key regulatory pathways which drive chronic inflammation
  • Personalised Medicine and how genetic expression profiles predict prognosis and response to therapy in disease.
  • Enhancing our understanding of how pathogens evade the hosts immune defenses.

This talk will illustrate these research interests via our work over the years in defining the key regulatory roles for the pro-inflammatory cytokine, Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF).  This body of work defines the important role for this protein in a variety of key cellular processes translating to a variety of diseases and presents persuasive data supporting academia and industries current interest in targeting this cytokine as an anti-inflammatory and anti- cancer therapeutic agent.


BIOGRAPHY: Seamas Donnelly is Professor of Medicine at TCD.  He is an international leader in Translational Medicine whose research encompasses defining key regulatory processes driving disease to how pathogens evade the host immune response.  He is a medical graduate of University College Galway and was funded via the Wellcome  Trust to undertake postgraduate studies at the University of Edinburgh and the Picower institute, New York.  Returning to Ireland in 2001, he has generated > €35 million grant funding either as PI or CoPI.  He was recently awarded an honorary Professorship by the University of Edinburgh for international leadership in Translational Medicine.  He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Quarterly Journal of Medicine (QJM).

Biography: 

Seamas Donnelly is Professor of Medicine at TCD.  He is an international leader in Translational Medicine whose research encompasses defining key regulatory processes driving disease to how pathogens evade the host immune response.  He is a medical graduate of University College Galway and was funded via the Wellcome  Trust to undertake postgraduate studies at the University of Edinburgh and the Picower institute, New York.  Returning to Ireland in 2001, he has generated > €35 million grant funding either as PI or CoPI.  He was recently awarded an honorary Professorship by the University of Edinburgh for international leadership in Translational Medicine.  He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Quarterly Journal of Medicine (QJM).

Professor Geraldine Boylan

Irish Centre for Fetal and Neonatal Translational Research - INFANT                  (http://www.infantcentre.ie/people/principal-investigators/professor-geraldine-boylan/)

Biography:

Geraldine Boylan is Professor of Neonatal Physiology at University College Cork. Together with Louise Kenny, Geraldine led the successful Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre bid, which underpins INFANT, and is a founding Director.

Geraldine has a career long track record in clinical neurophysiology and since 1996 has worked exclusively in the field of neonatal neurophysiology. Her PhD thesis from Kings College London focused on EEG and cerebral blood flow velocity during neonatal seizures. She is a Science Foundation Ireland and Wellcome Trust funded Principal Investigator and as an INFANT PI, Geraldine leads the thematic research areas related to the neonatal brain. Geraldine’s group comprise a multidisciplinary research team that have established an international reputation in the area of neurological monitoring in the neonatal intensive care unit, particularly in seizure detection and early diagnosis of brain injury. Researchers in Geraldine’s group are developing automated algorithms for monitoring brain activity and remote monitoring tools for physiological data acquisition in the neonatal intensive care unit.  One such innovation, an automated seizure detection algorithm for newborn babies, is the focus of a large multicentre trial, ANSeR funded by a Strategic Translational Award from the Wellcome Trust and led by INFANT. Geraldine is co-coordinator of the FP7 funded NEMO study, Europe’s first multicentred dose finding and safety study of Bumetanide for the treatment of seizures in newborn babies.

Professor Therese Kinsella

Associate Professor of Biochemistry, School of Biomolecular & Biomed Science, University College Dublin. (http://www.ucd.ie/conway/research/researchers/conwayfellowsa-z/professortheresekinsella/)

Thromboxane Receptors:  A tale of two receptors cut from the same cloth??”

Biography:

B. Therese Kinsella, B.Sc (Hons), PhD, MRIA completed her B.Sc (Hons) and PhD degrees in Biochemistry at University College Cork, before taking up a postdoctoral position at UCC and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Salt Lake City, USA.   From there, she held posts as Senior Molecular Biologist, Guinness Worldwide Research Centre, Dublin (1986-1989) and as Senior Scientist, Weis Center for Cardiovascular Medicine, Geisinger Clinic, PA, USA, affiliated with Hershey Medical School (1989-1992).    
In 1992, she returned to Ireland to take up an academic post at University College Dublin (UCD), where she is Associate Professor of Biochemistry, and runs a highly successful research program at the Conway Institute for Biomolecular & Biomedical Research.  A major focus of her research is in the role of the prostanoids thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin in the vasculature and, more recently, in neoplastic disease.  In this, Therese has gained international recognition for her work in the field, having published extensively in leading peer-reviewed journals and secured funding in excess of €7M.  In recognition of her research achievements, she was awarded the Royal Irish Academy medal for Biochemistry in 2000 and elected Member of the Royal Irish Academy (MRIA) in 2006.  In 2008, she received the Gold Medal from the Biochemical Society (Irish area section). 

 

Professor Brian Lawlor

Conolly Norman Professor of Old Age Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin. (https://www.tcd.ie/Neuroscience/neil/people/personnel/b-lawlor.php

"Through the looking glass: seeing clinical trials in dementia from a different perspective"

Biography: 

Professor Lawlor is Conolly Norman Professor of Old Age Psychiatry at TCD, consultant psychiatrist and Director of the Memory Clinic at St.. James's Hospital, Dublin. His research interests are in the early detection, diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, the neurobiology and treatment of behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia and the study of mental disorders in the community dwelling elderly. The overarching aims of his research programmes are to develop clinical, neuropsychological and biological markers of Alzheimer's disease at the earliest possible stage and to test promising new interventions in clinical populations. His research involves collaborative partnership with disciplines from basic science (developing animal models of Alzheimer's disease) through to health service development, clinical trials and implementation.  His current research activity is focused on CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease as part of BiomarkAPD, coordinating NILVAD (www.nilvad.eu) , a major investigator driven clinical trial of nilvadipine in Alzheimer’s disease and an exercise intervention trial in mild cognitive impairment. In addition, as Clinical Director of the NEIL Research Programme at Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, he is involved in studying hearing impairment and cognitive reserve in older people at the Memory Research Unit and in developing scalable interventions to prevent dementia.

Dr Anne Moore

Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics and School of Pharmacy, University College Cork
http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/C019/annemoore

Dissolvable Microneedle Technologies for Drug and Vaccine Delivery

Biography: 

Dr. Anne Moore graduated with a degree in Biochemistry University College Cork. She completed a PhD in HIV vaccine immunology with Professor Kingston Mills. Dr. Moore subsequently embarked upon post-doctoral work on defects in immune responses in HIV-infected individuals in the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and further work on recombinant vaccines against viruses such as HIV and Ebola virus in Dr. Gary Nabel's lab then at the University of Michigan. As a senior immunologist in Prof. Adrian Hill's group in the University of Oxford, she developed several T cell inducing vaccine candidates against malaria and TB and was involved in clinical trials of these and other vaccine candidates in Oxford and malaria endemic areas in Africa. She took up a position as a Lecturer in Pharmacology, based in the School of Pharmacy, UCC in early 2007.

Professor Timothy O'Brien

Professor of Medicine, NUI Galway, Director of REMEDI, NUI Galway Consultant Physician in Endocrinology, Galway University Hospital. Dean of the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, NUI Galway(http://www.remedi.ie/people/prof-timothy-1obrien)

“Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells in peripheral artery disease”

Biography: 

Prof. Timothy O’Brien trained in internal medicine and endocrinology in Cork, Milwaukee, Rochester and San Francisco.  He was elected to Fellowship of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland in 1995, the Royal College of Physicians of UK in 1997, the American College of Physicians in 1995 and the American College of Endocrinology in 1996. He was awarded MD (1993) and PhD (1997) degrees from the National University of Ireland. 
In 2001 he was appointed as Head of Medicine at NUI Galway and Consultant Endocrinologist at Galway University Hospital.  In 2004 he established the Regenerative Medicine Institute (REMEDI) at NUI Galway with funding in excess of €19 million from Science Foundation Ireland and holds the position of Director. He has been a principal or co-applicant on grants worth in excess of €73 million.  He has published 249 original papers and is an author on 375 abstracts presented at National and International meetings.

Research interests include gene therapy approaches to vascular disease using nitric oxide synthase and the translation of basic research findings in stem cell biology to regenerative approaches to peripheral vascular disease and diabetic complications in partnership with industry and the health service.

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