Taught Programmes

See below for Taught Programme information.

Information on Postgraduate Certificates is available here.

PAC Course Code: CKL14 full-time; CKL33 part-time

The LLM degree has been offered by UCC Law Faculty since 1992 and remains a very popular vehicle for postgraduate study at the Faculty. The degree offers students a wide choice of options across a range of areas.  Students may either focus their interest in one area, for example business or international law, or choose from a broad variety of legal subjects. A full list of module choices is listed below.

In addition to their chosen modules all LLM students complete a dissertation in an area of interest to them under the supervision of dedicated and experienced lecturers.  Full details of the staff expertise across a wide range of areas are available on the Law Faculty website.  As part of the preparation for their dissertation, students take a course on research methodology.  This opportunity allows students to learn advanced research methods and to make a presentation on their dissertation topic.  

The LLM degree provides students with a high-quality, broadly based postgraduate experience where a commitment to academic excellence is combined with a commitment to developing student appreciation of the practical and policy implications of the law.

Applicants for the LLM  Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Law.  Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM.  The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time.  Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme.  Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM).    

Eligibility for LLM Degree

Candidates must be approved by the Faculty of Law and must normally:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Taught) Degree.

The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

Applications from overseas candidates are welcome and their qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis under (b) above.  Non-EU applicants should contact the International Education Office by email at internationalpostgrad@ucc.ie for application details.

English Language Requirements:

IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL equivalent

Programme Requirements:

The programme can be taken over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Please note that Non-EU students are not eligible to study part-time programmes.

Full-time - 1 Year
Students complete 90 credits which must include LW6538 LLM Dissertation (30 credits), on a subject of their choice as approved by their supervisor and students take 60 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.

Part-time - 2 Years
In Year 1 students choose 40 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.  In Year 2 students take 50 credits to include LW6538 LLM Dissertation (30 credits) plus 20 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.

Timetables are available at http://www.ucc.ie/en/lawsite/currentstudents/timetables/

Core Module:  

Optional Modules:

*There is a quota of 15 students for this module.  Preference will be given to students from the LLM (Child and Family Law) and any remaining places will be allocated on a first come first served basis to students on other LLM programmes.

The range of courses offered are subject to change.
 
Candidates are obliged to reflect a balance between terms 1 and 2 in their choice of modules.

PAC Course Code: CKL38 full-time; CKL39 part-time

The LLM (Business Law) is an exciting new programme which commenced in September 2013.  The course builds on the Faculty’s wide range of expertise and knowledge in a broad range of aspects of business law and in regulation and compliance in the business area. Specialisms in the Faculty include banking, commercial, competition, consumer, company and corporate governance, e-commerce, financial services, international trade, corporate and personal insolvency, maritime and revenue law. The degree combines a focus on realities of business law in practice with a broader discussion of relevant theoretical and policy issues.

The course is taught by a team of academic staff with extensive academic, practical and policy experience in all aspects of business law.  The programme includes a core Business Law in Practice module where students will be equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage with business law in practice. As part of this module, students benefit from guest seminars with experts from legal and business practice, relevant Government departments, regulatory bodies and legal practitioners and international experts in this field. Students also complete a research dissertation in their chosen aspect of business law under expert individualised supervision.

The LLM in Business Law is the perfect specialist qualification for those seeking to establish a career in all aspects of business law including regulation and compliance.  It is also a valuable opportunity for people working in this area who want to improve their knowledge and skills and keep up to date on cutting edge issues in this fast developing area. 

Graduates of this degree will be well placed to seek employment in any area of business law, within Ireland, Europe or internationally.  Employment opportunities include specialist legal practice in the commercial and corporate fields as well as general legal practice, regulatory bodies, business regulation and compliance, the financial services sector, the insolvency sector, taxation, law reform and research.  Because of the transferrable knowledge and skills which this course develops, graduates may also avail of crossover opportunities using their LLM to pursue careers in the business world. 

Applicants for the LLM (Business Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Business Law. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Business Law). The Postgraduate Diploma in Business Law can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM).

Entry Requirements:

Candidates must be approved by the Faculty of Law and must normally:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

Or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Business Law) Degree.*

*Note:  Where appropriate, the Academic Programme Director will identify, in consultation with the candidate, certain optional modules to be taken by a candidate admitted under entry criterion (b) above. The taking of specified modules may be made a condition of acceptance of a candidate’s application. 

The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

Course Requirements

Full-time:
Students take 90 credits as follows.

Core Modules:
Students take core modules to the value of 35 credits as follows:

LW6594 LLM (Business Law) Dissertation (30 credits)
LW6595 Business Law in Practice (5 credits)

Optional Modules:
Students take modules to the value of 55 credits from the list of optional modules set out below. At least 35 credits must be chosen from List A.  Students may choose a total of 20 credits from Lists B and C with a maximum of 10 credits allowed from list C.

List A: LLM Business Law Modules - Students must choose at least 35 credits from the following:  
LW6541 Electronic Commerce Law (10 credits)
LW6578 Consumer Rights: Law and Policy (5 credits)
LW6589 Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Policy (5 credits)
LW6605 Corporate Insolvency and Rescue (10 credits)
LW6588 Enforcement & Sanctions in Antitrust Law (5 credits)
LW6590 International Trade and Transport Law and Policy(5 credits)
LW6579 Law of Secured Lending (5 credits)
LW6574 Intellectual Property and Internet Regulation (10 credits)
LW6529 Information Rights Law (10 credits)
LW6536 Intellectual Property Law (10 credits)
LW6580 Environmental Law in Practice (5 credits)
LW6581 Method in Environmental Law (5 credits)

Students may choose a maximum of 20 credits in total from Lists B and C

List B: Non Law Modules -  Students may choose up to 5 credits from the following:
MG6324 International Marketing (5 credits)

OR

List C:  Undergraduate Modules - Students may choose up to 10 credits from List B above AND up to 10 credits from the following:
LW3316 Financial Services Law and Regulation (5 credits)
LW3317 Banking Law (5 credits)
LW3368 Principles of Revenue Law (5 credits)
LW3369 Income Tax Law (5 credits)
LW2254 Commercial Law (10 credits)
LW3354 Company Law: Theory and Regulation (10 credits)
LW3301 Employment Law: Contracts, Rights and Termination (5 credits)
LW3302 Employment Law: Employee Protection, Equality and Industrial Relations (5 credits)

Students may not choose modules from List C which they have already taken at Undergraduate level.

* Note:  In certain cases, with the permission of the Programme Director, students may elect to take 10 credits from the modules available in the LLM (Taught) (other than those listed above) (see here) in substitution for 10 credits of optional modules from those in Lists B and C above.

Part-time:
Students take 90 credits, completing a total of 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits in Year 2.

Core Module to be taken in Year 1
LW6595 Business Law in Practice (5 credits)

Core Module to be taken in Year 2
LW6594 LLM (Business Law) Dissertation (30 credits)

Optional Modules to be taken in Year 1 or Year 2
Students take modules to the value of 55 credits from the list of optional modules set out below. At least 35 credits must be chosen from List A.  Students may choose a total of 20 credits from Lists B and C with a maximum of 10 credits allowed from list C.

Optional Modules:

List A: LLM Business Law Modules -
Students must choose at least 35 credits from the following: 
LW6541 Electronic Commerce Law (10 credits)
LW6578 Consumer Rights: Law and Policy (5 credits)
LW6589 Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Policy (5 credits)
LW6605 Corporate Insolvency and Rescue (10 credits)
LW6588 Enforcement & Sanctions in Antitrust Law (5 credits)
LW6590 International Trade and Transport Law and Policy(5 credits)
LW6579 Law of Secured Lending (5 credits)
LW6574 Intellectual Property and Internet Regulation (10 credits)
LW6529 Information Rights Law (10 credits)
LW6536 Intellectual Property Law (10 credits)
LW6580 Environmental Law in Practice (5 credits)
LW6581 Method in Environmental Law (5 credits)

Students may choose a maximum of 20 credits in total from Lists B and C

List B: Non Law Modules - Students may choose up to 10 credits from the following:
MG6324 International Marketing (5 credits)

 OR

List C:  Undergraduate Modules - Students may choose up to 10 credits from List B above AND up to 10 credits from the following: 
LW3316 Financial Services Law and Regulation (5 credits)
LW3317 Banking Law (5 credits)
LW3368 Principles of Revenue Law (5 credits)
LW3369 Income Tax Law (5 credits)
LW2254 Commercial Law (10 credits)
LW3354 Company Law: Theory and Regulation (10 credits)
LW3301 Employment Law: Contracts, Rights and Termination (5 credits)
LW3302 Employment Law: Employee Protection, Equality and Industrial Relations (5 credits)

Students may not choose modules from List C which they have already taken at Undergraduate level.

* Note: In certain cases, with the permission of the Programme Director, students may elect to take 10 credits from the modules available in the LLM (Taught) (other than those listed above) in substitution for 10 credits of elective modules from those in Lists B and C above.

Module descriptions are contained in the Book of Modules 2013/14.

PAC Course Code: CKL29 full-time; CKL30 part-time

The LLM in Child and Family Law is the first such course of its kind in Ireland and it builds on the Faculty’s wide range of expertise and knowledge in the area of child and family law. This course combines an important theoretical basis in child law and family law with exposure to the challenges of legal practice through its commitment to clinical education. It is the perfect specialist qualification for those seeking to improve their knowledge of child and family law. 

The LLM Child and Family Law also provides students with the opportunity to get involved in UCC’s innovative Child Law Clinic where students can provide research assistance to lawyers on real cases, helping to make a contribution to the quality of advocacy on children’s issues, and lobbying for the reform of child law and children’s rights. Prospective students can follow the Child Law Clinic on Facebook! Students can also take advantage of two dedicated internships provided exclusively to our LLM students at the Ombudsman for Children’s Office.  Naomi Kennan, a graduate of the LLM (Child and Family Law) 2012/2013 is currently completing an internship in the Ombudsman for Children's Office. Naomi's profile provides details of her experiences in the Ombudsman for Children's Office.

As the only qualification of its kind in Ireland, graduates of the LLM in Child and Family Law are uniquely qualified in the areas of child law and family law. As well as allowing legal professionals to specialise in these up and coming areas of legal practice, graduates of this degree are well equipped to work anywhere in the children’s sector – with government department and agencies (in education, child protection, youth justice etc), with non-governmental organisations or other bodies who work with children. Few statutory or children’s organisations have staff with any legal expertise in the child and family law area and this is a significant gap in the sector.  International job opportunities also exist for graduates to work as advocates, policy officers and researchers in the now wide range of international organisations with an interest in child law and children’s rights. These may include UNICEF, the Council of Europe Children’s Programme and the EU Fundamental Rights Agency. Students might also want to pursue further study in the area.

Applicants for the LLM (Child and Family Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Child and Family Law. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Child and Family Law) degree. The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM).

Eligibility for LLM (Child and Family Law)

Candidates must be approved by the Faculty of Law and must normally:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Child and Family Law) Degree.

The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

Course Requirements

This course can be taken over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Part-time - 2 Years: 

Students complete 90 credits, which include compulsory modules to the value of 60 credits.  Part-time students take 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits including LW6569 (Child and Family Law) Dissertation (30 credits) in Year 2.

In Year 1, spread over the two terms, students should take LW6563 Child Law in Practice (10 credits), LW6568 The Family and the Law plus modules to the value of 20 credits from the list below.

In Year 2, part-time students must complete LW6569 (Child and Family Law) Dissertation and LW6549 Children's Rights (10 credits).

Note: (LW6549 may be chosen as an elective module in Year 1 but if not taken in Year 1 it must be taken in year 2).  plus modules to the value of 20 credits from the modules listed below. These can be spread over two terms.

Timetables are available at http://www.ucc.ie/en/lawsite/currentstudents/timetables/

Full-time - 1 Year:
Students complete 90 credits as follows:

Compulsory Modules (60 credits)

The LLM in Child and Family Law involves three taught compulsory modules in the area of Child Law and Family Law (10 credits each). In addition students complete their dissertation in the child and family law area generally, under the supervision of one of the Law Faculty’s dedicated staff in the field. The dissertation is worth 30 credits and is normally 15,000 words in length.

  • LW6563 Child Law in Practice (10 credits) is an innovative course that covers Irish child law and policy from a clinical perspective. The course examines the challenges of advancing the interests and rights of children through legal practice and law reform.

  • LW6568 The Family and the Law (10 credits) is a wide ranging family law module covering the Irish constitutional and legislative framework. Topics covered will include divorce, civil partnership and the nature of family relationships.

  • LW6549  Children’s Rights (10 credits) will consider children's rights from both an Irish and international perspective, with particular emphasis on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the European Convention on Human Rights.

Students then choose a further 30 credits. 

List A: At least 10 credits must be chosen from the list below:

List B: Up to 20 credits may be chosen from the list below*:

List C: Undergraduate Module

* In certain cases with the permission of the Programme Director, students may elect to take 1 module from the list of modules available for the LLM (Taught) other than the elective modules listed above.

** Where appropriate, the Academic Programme Director will identify, in consultation with the candidate, whether this module should be taken by candidates admitted under entry criterion (b) above.  The taking of this and other specified modules may be made a condition of acceptance of a candidate's application.  Registration for this module requires the permission of the Programme Director.

The range of courses offered are subject to change.

Candidates are obliged to reflect a balance between terms 1 and 2 in their choice of modules.

PAC Course Code: CKL15 full-time; CKL34 part-time

The LLM in Criminal Justice has a core clinical component, which offers students the opportunity to pursue a theoretical inquiry into criminal justice while experiencing the reality of the criminal justice system in practice.  This module, which runs all year long, is based on UCC Law Faculty’s network of relationships with various criminal justice agencies [Gardaí (police), victim organisations, the Probation Service, prisons and the courts (judiciary, prosecutors and defence)] and is run by a dedicated Clinical Co-ordinator.

As well as this innovative and unique clinical component, the LLM Criminal Justice draws on the extensive expertise within the Faculty to offer a wide range of subjects such as Criminology, Juvenile Justice, Penology, Terrorism, Dissonance and Criminal Justice, Cybercrime, Mental Health Law, International Criminal Law, Sanctions and Enforcement in Anti-Trust Law and many more. 

Graduates of this programme are in a unique position to work within criminal law and contribute to future policy making, research and reform. Graduates have qualified as solicitors and barristers as well as working as researchers with the Law Reform Commission, the Judicial Research Office, the Irish Human Rights Commission and the Director of Public Prosecutions. A number of graduates are also currently engaged in further research at PhD level in the areas of criminal justice and human rights, many of whom are Government of Ireland (IRCHSS) scholars.

We welcome applications from professionals working within the criminal justice system, including solicitors, barristers, members of An Garda Siochana, the Prison Service and the Probation Service. We also welcome applications from students in other jurisdictions, including the US.   Non-EU applicants should contact the International Education Office by email at internationalpostgrad@ucc.ie for application details.

Applicants for the LLM (Criminal Justice) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Criminal Justice. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Criminal Justice) degree. The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM).

Entry Requirements

Candidates must be approved by the Faculty of Law. The LLM (Criminal Justice) has a compulsory clinical component at its core, which is undertaken in partnership with the Faculty's placement partners and involves significant interaction with the criminal justice system and its stakeholders. In this regard, the Law Faculty must be satisfied regarding the candidate's commitment to, and suitability for, the programme. Candidates should pay particular attention to satisfying this criterion when completing their application.

Candidates must also:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Criminal Justice) Degree.

The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all otherwise suitable candidates may not be admitted.

Course Outline

The course can be taken over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Please note that non-EU applicants are not eligible to study part-time programmes

For the authoritative statement of the relevant rules please see the UCC Postgraduate Calendar.

Full-time - 1 Year
Students taking this degree must complete 90 credits to include a research dissertation on a subject of their choice in the area of Criminal Justice as approved by the Course Director.  The module LW6519 Criminal Justice (Clinical Programme) (20 credits) is also compulsory.

Part-time - 2 Years
Part-time students complete 90 credits over 24 months.  Students complete 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits in Year 2.  Students must take LW6519 Criminal Justice (Clinical programme) (20 credits) in Year 1 plus 20 credits from the range of taught modules listed below.  Part-time students must take LW6547 LLM (Criminal Justice) Dissertation (30 credits) in Year 2 plus 20 credits from the taught modules listed below.

The following is a link to the timetable for the 2013-2014 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2014-2015 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Compulsory Modules:

Students then take modules to the value of 40 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.  At least 25 credits must be chosen from List A and 15 credits may be chosen from List B: 

Optional Modules:

List A: Students choose at least 25 credits from the following:

List B: Students may choose 15 credits* from the following:

List C: Undergraduate Modules
Where appropriate, the Academic Programme Director will identify, in consultation with the candidate, whether one of these modules should be taken by candidates admitted under entry criterion (b) above. Modules taken from List C would be in substitution for credits from the elective modules in List B. The taking of this and other specified modules may be made a condition of acceptance of a candidate's application. Registration for these modules requires the permission of the Programme Director.

  • LW1153 Criminal Law (10 credits)
  • LW1161 Constitutional Law: Fundamental Rights (5 credits)
  • LW2253 Law of Evidence (10 credits)

Notes:

In certain cases with the permission of the Programme Director, students may elect to take 10 credits from the non-Criminal Justice modules available in the LLM (Taught) (see here) (other than those listed above) in substitution for 10 credits of the elective modules in List B.

It may be that not all modules listed above will be offered each year and/or other options may become available.

In order to ensure a reasonable distribution of workload, when choosing modules, students should take a balance of credits between Semester 1 and Semester 2. Students who wish to deviate from this rule must seek permission from their Programme Director.

Students may not choose the undergraduate module LW2253 if they have already taken this module or equivalent subject matter at undergraduate level or if it involves a timetable clash.

PAC Course Code: CKL16 full-time; CKL35 part-time

The LLM in Intellectual Property and E-Law reflects the close connection in legal research and practice between the fields of Intellectual Property (copyright, patents and trademarks) and E-Law (internet regulation, electronic commerce and cybercrime).

This specialised LLM builds upon the Faculty’s considerable research and teaching expertise in the fields of Intellectual Property and E-Law. Students can choose from a range of intellectual property, commercial, information law and e-law modules and further specialise by writing a dissertation on any one of the modern challenges presented by the practice of intellectual property law in the electronic age. We organise major conferences on Intellectual Property and E Law, e.g. “Regulating Cloud Computing: Clear Skies Ahead?” in 2012.  UCC Law Faculty is the Irish Partner in the global Creative Commons movement and a member of the iLINC European Network of Law Incubators, which aims to facilitate provision of legal information and advice to ICT entrepreneurs and start-ups.

For information on I.P. and e-Law at UCC see www.ucc.ie/law/lawonline/elaw/

Applicants for the LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Intellectual Property and E-Law. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law). The Postgraduate Diploma in Intellectual Property and E-Law can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM).

Eligibility for LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Degree

Candidates must be approved by the Faculty of Law and must normally:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Degree.

The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

Applications from overseas candidates are welcome and their qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis under (c) above. Non-EU applicants should contact the International Education Office by email at internationalpostgrad@ucc.ie for application details.

English Language Requirements:

IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL equivalent

Programme Requirements: 

The programme can be taken over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Please note that non-EU applicants are not eligible to study part-time programmes

For the authoritative statement of the relevant rules please see the UCC Postgraduate Calendar.

Students taking this specialised degree must complete 90 credits, which must include the LLM (Intellectual Property and e-Law) minor dissertation (30 credits), on a subject of their choice in the area of Intellectual Property or e-Law as approved by their supervisor.

Full-time - 1 Year:
Students take 90 credits in total including LW6575 LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Dissertation (30 credits), a minimum of 30 credits from List A which must include at least one of LW6536 or LW6574 and up to 30 credits from List B.

Part-time - 2 Years:
Students take 90 credits in total including LW6575 LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Dissertation (30 credits).  Students take a minimum of 30 credits from List A which must include at least one of LW6536 or LW6574 and up to 30 credits from List B. Students take a total of 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits in Year 2. LW6575 LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Dissertation (30 credits) must be taken in Year 2.

The following is a link to the timetables for the 2013-2014 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2014-2015 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Courses on Offer for the LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law)

LW6575 LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Dissertation (Compulsory) (30 credits) 

Students then choose sixty credits from the taught modules on offer as follows:

List A:  Students must choose a minimum of 30 credits which must include at least one of LW6536 and LW6574:

List B: Student schoose 30 credits from either List A or from the remaining modules on offer, which include the following:

OR

List C: Undergraduate Modules - Students may choose up to 20 credits from List B above AND up to to 10 credits from the following:

Students may not choose a module from List C if they have already taken the module or equivalent subject matter at undergraduate level, or if it inovlves a timetable clash.

The range of courses offered are subject to change.

Candidates are obliged to reflect a balance between terms 1 and 2 in their choice of modules.  

PAC Course Code: CKL27 full-time; CKL28 part-time

The LLM in International Human Rights Law and Public Policy builds on the Law Faculty’s reputation for excellence in International and European human rights law. The programme will be of interest to students and practitioners from a range of different fields including: law; social policy; political science; public administration; development; history; international relations; social sciences.

  • Students benefit from a series of guest seminars and workshops with key actors in the human rights movement
  • Includes a unique International Human Rights clinic core module
  • Engages students in the practice and policy context of Human Rights Law
  • Focus on essential human rights lawyering skills, including: oral and written advocacy (legal and policy); strategic litigation; fact-finding and development

Applicants for the LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in International Law and Human Rights. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) degree. The Postgraduate Diploma in International Law and Human Rights can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM).

Teaching Team

The teaching team includes staff with distinguished records in research, teaching and public policy engagement: Professor Caroline Fennell; Professor Ursula Kilkelly; Professor Siobhán Mullally; Dr Conor O’Mahony; Dr Louise Crowley; Dr Aisling Parkes.  Details of staff profiles are available at: http://www.ucc.ie/en/lawsite/people/

The Law Faculty is delighted to include in its team of Adjunct Professors leading world experts on human rights law and practice: Professor Samantha Power, Special Adviser to President Obama on Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights and Lord Lester of Herne Hill QC, Blackstone Chambers.

Eligibility for LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy)

Candidates must be approved by the Faculty of Law and must normally:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Degree.

The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

Programme Outline

This programme can be taken over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Part-time - 2 Years: 
Students complete 90 credits, completing a total of 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits in Year 2.  Part-time students must complete the LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Dissertation in Year 2.  The core modules LW6586 Human Rights Law in Practice (Clinic), LW6587 International Human Rights Law and LW6572 Contemporary Issues in International Law can be taken in Year 1 or Year 2. Students take modules to the value of 35 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.  At least 25 credits must be chosen from List A and up to 10 credits may be chosen from List B. 

The following is a link to the timetable for the 2013-2014 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2014-2015 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Full-time - 1 Year:
Students complete 90 credits as follows:

Core Modules (55 credits)

  • LW6571 LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Dissertation (30 credits) Students select a research topic in the area of human rights law, and following approval, complete a 15,000 word dissertation under supervision of a Faculty member. Students complete research methodology training and give an oral presentation on their research in progress.

  • LW6586 Human Rights Law in Practice (Clinic) (5 credits) This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage with international human rights enforcement procedures and to evaluate the interaction of domestic and international human rights law, through selected case studies.

  • LW6587 International Human Rights Law (10 credits) This module will provide students with a critical understanding of the institutions and processes of the UN and regional human rights systems.

  • LW6572 Contemporary Issues in International Law (10 credits)  This module gives students a foundation in the core principles and concepts of international law, focussing on contemporary issues and current debates on international law and public policy

Optional Modules (35 credits)

List A: Students must choose at least 25 credits from the following:

 List B: Students may choose 10 credits from the following**:

*Students may not choose the undergraduate module LW2268 if they have already taken this module or equivalent subject matter at undergraduate level, or if it involves a timetable clash.

** In certain cases with the permission of the Programme Director, students may elect to take 10 credits from the list of modules available in the LLM (Taught) (other than those in List B above) see here in substitution for 10 credits of the optional modules listed above.

The range of courses offered are subject to change.

Candidates are obliged to reflect a balance between terms 1 and 2 in their choice of modules.

For enquiries please contact Veronica Calnan v.calnan@ucc.ie or Dr. Siobhan Mullally (Programme Director) s.mullally@ucc.ie

Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights

The Law Faculty hosts the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, established in 2006. The Centre contributes to national and international debates on human rights law and practice through the promotion of cutting edge interdisciplinary research, innovative programmes of legal education and training, and strategic partnerships with Government, statutory bodies, and civil society organisations.The Centre hosts a dynamic programme of seminars, conferences and workshops and an Annual Distinguished Lecture series. 

Recent visitors have included Mr Thomas Hammarberg, Council of Europe Commissioner on Human Rights, Ms Navanethem Pillay, High Commissioner for Human Rights, Mr Micheál Martin, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Prof Conor Gearty, LSE, Bryan Stephenson, (Equal Justice Initiative USA).  Further infomation available at http://www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr/

Please click on the link for Careers in Human Rights Law: Testimonials from UCC Law Students/Graduates

Summer Placements and Internships

The Law Faculty has a vibrant programme of summer placements and internships. Students are supported in applying for internships, internationally and nationally. Currently, the Law Faculty summer placements include:

National Placements
Mental Health Reform; Matheson Ormsby Prentice, Solicitors, Dublin; Attorney General's Office, Dublin; Director of Public Prosecutions, Dublin; Office of the Data Protection Commissioner; The Screen Directors Guild of Ireland; Marriage Equality; The Irish Patents Office; R.A.A.P (Recorded Artists Actors Performers Ltd); Irish Refugee Council; Irish Playwrights' and Screenwriters' Guild; Refugee Legal Service

Europe
PICUM (Platform for International Cooperation on Undocumented Migrants)

USA
Los Angeles Federal District Court Externship; Los Angeles Juvenile Dependency Court; Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), Washington, DC; Public Defender's Office, San Francisco.

PAC Course Code: CKL23

The LLM (Practitioner) is a masters programme developed collaboratively between the Faculty of Law, University College Cork and the Law Society of Ireland.  The programme aims to facilitate practicing legal professionals to gain an internationally recognised masters degree in a flexible manner, individually tailored to their needs and interests.

Entry Requirements

The programme is open to qualified solicitors and barristers.  Candidates must have a minimum of two years full-time post-qualification professional legal experience.  Admission to the programme will be subject to the approval of the Faculty of Law.  The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

Programme Structure

To secure the masters degree qualification, participants must complete 90 credits of law, over a minimum of 12 months full-time or a maximum of 36 months part-time. This requires the completion of modules to the value of 60 credits, including a compulsory clinical practice module. The remaining 30 credits are awarded for the successful submission of a minor dissertation to be completed under the supervision of an academic member of the Faculty of Law. 

At the commencement of the programme, students must elect whether they wish to study part-time or full-time.  In the event that the student is taking the part-time option, the student must at the outset enter into a Learning Agreement which indicates how the student will accumulate the necessary credits over a maximum of thirty six months.  This must be agreed with the Programme Director and signed by both the student and the Programme Director (and approved by Faculty).  This can be a flexible agreement and modified as necessary as the candidate proceeds. 

Students taking Clinical Practice/Reflective Learning must normally be practicing as a solicitor or barrister for the duration of the year in which they take the module.  Part-time students must take the LLM (Practitioner) Dissertation (30 credits) in their final year. 

LW6564 Clinical Practice/Reflective Learning

This mandatory course has been developed specifically for this programme and aims to encourage practitioners to utilise and reflect upon their clinical practice and experience. It will incorporate discussion-based seminars and reflective learning with the completion of a learning journal documenting the practitioner’s experiences in practice.

LW6565 LLM (Practitioner) Dissertation

The dissertation module will require practitioners to research an area of law of particular interest to them. The practitioner will be supported and directed by an academic member of Faculty in completing their written dissertation on their chosen area. In addition, as part of this module, practitioners will be provided with IT/electronic resource training to assist both their learning and practice needs.

Optional Modules on Offer 2012-2013

LW6563  Child Law (Clinical) (10 credits)*
LW6549  Children's Rights (10 credits)
LW6561  Comparative Family Property Law (10 credits)
LW6578  Consumer Rights: Law and Policy (5 credits)
LW6530  Contemporary Issues in Constitutional Law (10 credits)
LW6593  Contemporary Issues in ECHR Law (5 credits)
LW6589  Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Policy (5 credits)
LW6572  Contemporary Issues in International Law (10 credits)
LW6605  Corporate Insolvency and Rescue (10 credits)
LW6544  Criminology (10 credits)
LW6600  Cultural Representations of Crime (5 credits)
LW6560  Cybercrime (10 credits)
LW6576  Disability and the Law (10 credits)
LW6541  Electronic Commerce Law (10 credits)
LW6588  Enforcement & Sanctions in Antitrust Law (5 credits)
LW6580  Environmental Law in Practice  (5 credits)
LW6598  European Health Law and Policy (10 credits)
LW6607  Gender, Sexuality and Human Rights (5 credits)
LW6529  Information Rights Law (10 credits)
LW6536  Intellectual Property Law (10 credits)
LW6574  Intellectual Property and Internet Regulation (10 credits)
LW6550  International Criminal Law (10 credits)
LW6606  International Human Rights Law (10 credits)
LW6590  International Trade and Transport law and Policy (5 credits)
LW6546  Juvenile Justice (10 credits)
LW6579  Law of Secured Lending (5 credits)
LW6107  Legal Aspects of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare (5 credits)
LW6603  Legal Regulation of Cohabitation and Emerging Family Form (5 credits)
LW6558  Mental Health Law: Civil and Criminal Aspects (10 credits)
LW6592  Mental Capacity Law (5 credits)
LW6581  Method in Environmental Law (5 credits)
LW6585  Migration Law and Human Rights (5 credits)
LW6545  Penology (10 credits)
LW6584  Refugee Law (5 credits)
LW6525  Terrorism, Dissonance and Criminal Justice (10 credits)
LW6568  The Family and the Law (10 credits)

*There is a quota of 20 students for this module.  Preference will be given to students from the LLM (Child and Family Law) and any remaining places will be allocated on a first come first served basis to students on other LLM programmes.

It may be that not all modules listed above will be offered in any particular session and/or other options may become available.

Programme Delivery

The flexibility of the programme also extends to the method of delivery of individual modules, which are designed where possible to meet the particular needs of practitioners.  Modules which are currently (in part) offered online are LW6574 Intellectual Property & Internet Regulation, LW6558 Mental Health Law, LW6536 Intellectual Property Law; LW6561 Comparative Perspectives of International Family Property Law and LW6579 Law of Secured Lending. 

Timetable

The academic year consists of two 12 week teaching periods. Each 10 credit taught module incorporates a weekly 2-hour seminar for one teaching period. Each 5 credit taught module incorporates a weekly 2-hour seminar for 6 weeks.  Semester 1 is from September to December and Semester 2 is from January to March. Written examinations are held in December and May, although most modules are examined wholly or in part by continuous assessment.  Students register for the dissertation module in September and the dissertation must be submitted at the latest by the end of September the following year.

The following is a link to the timetable for the 2014-2015 academic year.

Exemptions for Law Society Professional Diplomas

Applicants in possession of professional diplomas may, on application, request exemption from up to 20 credits (10 credits per diploma) of the required 90 credits. The Faculty of Law will approve the distribution of exemptions over the duration of the degree in order to reflect an appropriate workload balance. 

The existing Law Society diploma programmes includes Aviation Law & Finance, Compliance Management, Corporate Law & Governance, Employment Law, Finance Law, In-house Practice, Insolvency and Corporate Restructuring, Investment Funds, Legal Practice Management and Trust & Estate Planning. For information on all Law Society diploma programme courses:
W: www.lawsociety.ie/diplomas
E:  diplomateam@lawsociety.ie
P:  01 672 4802

LLM Modules: Pre-Registration Availability

In advance of full registration for the degree, candidates may opt to take individual LLM modules on an ad hoc basis. These candidates will be identified as intending to proceed to the LLM (Practitioner) and a Learning Agreement will be entered into to provide a bridge to the degree. (This can be a flexible agreement and modified as necessary as the candidate proceeds).

As part of UCC’s commitment to Continuing Professional Development (CPD), qualified candidates can opt to take up to two individual modules on an occasional basis without formally registering for the programme and will be provided with a transcript of marks.

Application Procedure

Application for the degree programme must be made online at www.pac.ie .  The Course Code on PAC is CKL23.  

The Law Faculty uses a system of offer rounds to facilitate decision-making and early notification to applicants. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

The offer round closing dates for a September 2014 start are as follows:

First Round: 15 January 2014

Second Round: 1 March 2014

Third Round: 1 May 2014

Fourth Round: 1 July 2014

New applications will continue to be reviewed at each round if there are still programme places available.

Application for pre-registration modules must be made directly to the Faculty of Law. 

The pre-registration form is available here: OccasionalModulesApplicationForm (132kB)

Enquiries to Anna O'Sullivan (021) 4205170 or email: anna.osullivan@ucc.ie

The following is a link to the book of modules which provides detailed descriptions of the taught modules offered: http://www.ucc.ie/modules/descriptions/page040.html

Cost
The current fee is €1,000 per 10 credit module and €500 per 5 credit module.
The Dissertation module fee is currently €1,800. 

College fees are tax deductible.

PAC Course Code: CKL13 full-time; CKL32 part-time

The LLB Degree is a one year postgraduate law degree offering students the opportunity to expand their portfolio of legal knowledge across a wider area of law in preparation for specific practice or for further study. It offers a wide choice of courses so that students can create a combination that best suits their interests. In particular, it offers students an opportunity to study additional fields of law, such as Medical Law, Environmental Law or Human Rights Law, which may not have been available to them at undergraduate level. The majority of students continue from the LLB degree into the legal profession or to more specialised study on one of our LLM programmes. Many of our LLB students have also entered a wide variety of other careers ranging from banking and insurance, to management and journalism.

Eligibility for LLB Degree:

Candidates must normally hold a Second Class Honours BCL degree from the National University of Ireland or have such other third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience in law as, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, qualifies the candidate for admission to the LLB. For the authoritative statement of the relevant rules please see the UCC Postgraduate Calendar.

Programme Requirements:

Students complete 60 credits over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time.

Full-time - 9 Months:
Students take 60 credits in total including a core module LW6504 Legal Research and Methodology (10 credits), and 50 credits from the list of elective modules.

Part-time - 18 Months:
Students take 60 credits in total including a core module LW6504 Legal Research and Methodology (10 credits), and 50 credits from the list of elective modules. Part-time students take a total of 30 credits in Year 1 (including LW6504 Legal Research and Methodology) and 30 credits in Year 2.  Part-time students who wish to take LW6502 LLB Dissertation must do so in their second year.   

Students are not permitted to select modules they have previously studied at Level 8 degree level.

Compulsory  Module:
LW6504 Legal Research and Methodology (10 credits)

Elective Modules:
LW1106 Law of Torts I (5 credits)
LW1107 Law of Torts II (5 credits)
LW1110 Principles of Public International Law (5 credits)
LW1111 Public International Law: Application and Selected Issues (5 credits)
LW1153 Criminal Law (10 credits)
LW1154 Law of Contract (10 credits)
1LW1161 Constitutional Law: Fundamental Rights (5 credits)
or
1LW1163 Dlí Bunreachtúil: Bunchearta (5 credits)  
2LW1162 Constitutional Law: Institutions of Government (5 credits)
or
2LW1164 Dlí Bunreachtúil: Institiúidí an Rialtais (5 credits)
LW2204 Econonmic Law of the European Union (5 credits)
LW2207 International Human Rights Law (5 credits)
LW2208 Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (5 credits)
LW2209 Constitutional and Institutional Law of the European Union (5 credits)
LW2252 Law of Property (10 credits)
LW2253 Law of Evidence (10 credits)
LW2254 Commercial Law (10 credits)
LW2261 Information Technology Law (10 credits)
LW2263 Law of Public Administration (5 credits)
LW2264
Administrative Law: Grounds of Judicial Review (5 credits)
LW2267 Welfare Law: Social Inclusion and the Law (5 credits)
LW2268 Welfare Law: Poverty and the Law (5 credits)
LW2275 Family Law: Child Law (5 credits)
LW2276 Family Law: Family Relationships (5 credits)
LW3301 Employment Law: Contracts Rights and Termination (5 credits)
LW3302 Employment Law: Employee Protection, Equality and Industrial Relations (5 credits)
LW3303 Law of Equity: Doctrines and Remedies (5 credits)
LW3305 Law of Equity: Trusts (5 credits) 
LW3316 Financial Services: Law and Regulation (5 credits)
LW3317
Banking Law (5 credits)
LW3354 Company Law: Theory and Regulation (10 credits)
LW3357 English Land Law (5 credits)
LW3358 Landlord and Tenant Law (5 credits)
LW3364 Environmental Law (10 credits)
LW3366 Advanced Legal Reasoning (5 credits)
LW3367
Jurisprudence (5 credits)
LW3368
 Principles of Revenue Law (5 credits)
LW3369 Income Tax Law (5 credits)
LW3370 Sports Law (5 credits)
LW3404 Medical Law: Consent, Capacity and Healthcare Decisions (5 credits)
LW3405 Medical Law: Regulation of Healthcare (5 credits)
LW6502 LLB Dissertation (10 credits)

Note:

1LW1161 and LW1163 comprise the same module in English (LW1161) and as Gaeilge (LW1163). Students may take either LW1161 or LW1163 but not both. Students who take LW1163 must also take LW1164.
2LW1162 and LW1164 comprise the same module in English (LW1162) and as Gaeilge (LW1164). Students may take either LW1162 or LW1164 but not both. Students who take LW1164 must also take LW1163.

Information on individual modules and their content is available in the UCC Book of Modules

The range of modules offered is subject to change. 

All taught applications (EU and Non-EU) must be made online through the Postgraduate Applications Centre website at www.pac.ie/ucc

EU or NON-EU?

For admission purpose all applicants are categorised into two categories: EU and Non-EU.

It is important that you establish your status before you make an application to UCC as you will retain your status (EU/Non-EU) during your study and you will be unable to change from one category to the other in the middle of a course. Also there are different application procedures for each category. 

Please view the following document to determine whether you are an EU applicant or a Non-EU applicant:  CriteriaForDeterminingFeeStatus (35kB)

How to Make an Application

For full details on the application procedure and documentation required, please click on the following links: 

If you are experiencing difficulty with this, please contact the Postgraduate Applications Centre at 091 509825.

EU Closing Dates

The Faculty uses a system of offer rounds to facilitate early notification to applicants.  Applicants who do not have their final degree results when applying may receive a conditional offer.

The closing dates for each round are as follows:

15 January 2015

1 March 2015

1 May 2015

1 July 2015                                       

Non EU Closing Date

The closing date for receipt of Non EU applications is 1st June 2015.

Additional Information for Applicants to Taught Programmes 

SUPPLEMENTARY FORM:  Please note that applicants must complete an additional Supplementary Form when completing the online application on PAC.  The Supplementary form is a vital part of the application procedure and will be taken into account in considering your application. 

PAC Course Codes

Applicants may choose up to 3 taught programmes when applying online on PAC.  The following are the Course Codes for the Law Faculty Taught Programmes on PAC:

CKL13 - LLB full-time programme
CKL32 - LLB part-time programme
CKL14 - LLM full-time programme
CKL33 - LLM part-time programme
CKL15 - LLM (Criminal Justice) full-time programme
CKL34 - LLM (Criminal Justice) part-time programme
CKL16 - LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) full-time programme
CKL35 - LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) part-time programme
CKL23 - LLM (Practitioner)
CKL27 - LLM (International Human Rights Law & Public Policy) full-time programme
CKL28 - LLM (International Human Rights Law & Public Policy) part-time programme
CKL29 - LLM (Child & Family Law) full-time programme
CKL30 - LLM (Child & Family Law) part-time programme
CKL38 - LLM (Business Law) full-time programme
CKL39 - LLM (Business Law) part-time programme

Fees

The full-time fee for the 2013-2014 academic year is €6,835.  The part-time fee is €3,417.50 per year. The LLM non-EU fee is €13,900.  For further information please see http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/cost/

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