Taught Programmes

See below for Taught Postgraduate Programme information.

Information on Postgraduate Certificates is available here.

We are now accepting applications for taught postgrad courses with a Sept 2016 start. Application should be made online at www.pac.ie/ucc

Non EU Closing Date: The closing date for receipt of Non EU applications is 1st June 2016

EU Closing Date: Open For Late Applications 2016

For more information on making an application please see: www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/taught/

‌PAC Course Code: CKL48 full-time; CKL49 part-time

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) builds upon UCC Law School’s established reputation for excellence across all aspects of environmental law and policy. It offers students an opportunity to specialise in this field and to explore the emerging legal and regulatory challenges posed by modern environmental problems. It takes advantage of the dynamic group of academic staff based at the Law School who are actively engaged in leading-edge research and policy formulation in a wide range of related areas and who currently hold prominent advisory roles with a number of Irish, EU and international agencies and organisations. The programme is delivered in a flexible teaching and assessment structure to suit both recent law graduates and environmental professionals alike.

This LLM programme offers exposure to a wide variety of legal topics ranging across traditional areas of environmental law, policy and regulation, as well as planning and land-use law, heritage protection, international environmental law, marine environmental law, natural resources law and human rights law. It provides a critical, in-depth theoretical and practical understanding of the key issues arising in environmental and natural resources law, policy and regulation, at local, national and global level.

Teaching Team 

One of the key strengths of the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) lies in the expert academic staff at UCC specialising in teaching and research on many diverse aspects of national, comparative, EU and international environmental and natural resources law. UCC staff contributing to this LLM Programme include: Prof Owen McIntyre, Dr Áine Ryall, Dr Bénédicte Sage-Fuller, Dr Phyllis Comerford, Dr Anne-Marie O’Hagan and Prof Irene Lynch-Fannon. As a national programme, modules will also have contributions from other Irish academics in the field, including Prof Ronan Long, School of Law, NUIG, a world-leading expert in Law of the Sea and Marine Environmental Law. UCC School of Law also benefits from strong links with key environmental agencies and organisations at the national, EU and international levels, upon which we rely for a full programme of guest speakers. Further details on Law School staff can be found on the School of Law website at www.ucc.ie/en/lawsite/about/people/

Careers in Environmental and Natural Resources Law 

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) aims to prepare graduates for a variety of careers in legal practice, regulation and compliance, including the legal professions, governmental and regulatory agencies, international institutions and compliance roles in industry. It also provides a strong basis for careers in the broader environmental regulatory and policy space, encompassing environmental advocacy and campaigning, environmental consultancy, environmental policy advice and research, and academia. It is relevant for those interested in careers in the energy, infrastructure, utilities, natural resources and project finance sectors. The degree provides a valuable opportunity for those already working in these fields to further develop their knowledge and skills and to keep up-to-date with the latest developments and emerging trends in this rapidly developing area.

Course Outline

Students complete 90 credits over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Students take 65 credits of compulsory modules and choose 25 credits from the list of optional modules.  For module descriptions please click on the following link: LLM Environmental & Natural Resources Law Modules 2016-2017 (80kB) 

Compulsory Modules

Students take specialised modules (amounting to 35 credits) as follows:

  • Method in Environmental Law
  • Environmental Law in Practice
  • International Environmental Law
  • Introduction to Planning Law
  • Legal Concepts for Heritage and Environment

Dissertation (30 credits):
Students select a research topic in their chosen aspect of Environmental and Natural Resources Law and complete a 15,000 word dissertation under the supervision of an expert staff member.

Optional Modules

Students choose up to 25 credits from selected complementary modules, such as:

  • Introduction to the Law of the Sea
  • Law of the Sea (Clinical)
  • Port Law
  • Global Maritime Security
  • Contemporary Issues in ECHR Law
  • Contemporary Issues in International Law
  • International Criminal Law
  • International and Human Rights Law
  • European Corporate Restructuring, Insolvency and Rescue
  • Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Policy
  • Enforcement and Sanctions in Antitrust Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • Migration Law and Human Rights
  • Law of Cybercrime
  • Electronic Commerce Law.

Students may also explore technical aspects of the application of environmental and natural resources control measures through selected optional science-based, non-law modules:

  • Introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
  • Introduction to Remote Sensing
  • Characteristics of the Marine Environment.

Flexible Study Arrangements

The delivery methods of this programme are designed for both law graduates and other environmental professionals returning to higher education. The course involves a combination of lectures and directed study. Certain programme modules (Marine Environmental Law, Natural Resources Law and International Environmental Law) are scheduled to run on Fridays and Saturdays, in order to accommodate those with a current professional career. Others will run on various days of the week throughout two semesters, but where possible, will be made available through digital recording.

Fees:

  • EU Fee:  Full-time:  €7,000 Part-time: €3,500 p.a.
  • Non-EU Fee:  Full-time €17,000   See section on International Postgraduate Scholarships.
  • Further details on EU/Non-EU Status see section on Closing Dates and Application Procedure. 

‌‌PAC Course Code: CKL46 full-time; CKL47 part-time‌

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) is a new cutting-edge master’s programme based in UCC School of Law in the areas of marine law, maritime law, maritime security and port law. It provides an environment where students engage with the best legal experts in Ireland in the areas of:

    • marine environmental protection,

    • maritime security and law enforcement at sea

    • marine renewable energies,

    • port and shipping activities,

Based in Cork, one of the largest natural harbours in the world, the LLM has access to leading international marine research outputs and maritime enforcement law and policy through the Irish Maritime and Energy Resource Cluster (IMERC). It combines theoretical and practical learning, notably through a clinical module on Law of the sea, with access to the Naval Service.

The programme provides knowledge and expertise to practice marine and maritime law professionally, in the public and private sectors (maritime law enforcement, shipping, marine research, marine environmental protection, ports).

Programme Team:

Dr Anne Marie O’Hagan is a Senior Research Fellow in the MaREI Centre, UCC and has over 15 years of experience in applied marine and coastal research. Her recent work has focused on the legal aspects of ocean energy, planning and management systems for offshore energy devices and their environmental effects. She is involved in a number of multidisciplinary projects focused on aquaculture, maritime spatial planning, climate change adaptation, environmental assessment, and risk-based consenting. She is a qualified environmental scientist and a lawyer.

Professor Ronán Long holds the Jean Monnet Chair of European Law at the National University of Ireland Galway. He is the author/co-editor of nine books on ocean law and policy and formerly worked for the European Commission and the Naval Service. He has participated in numerous international negotiations at the UN and other bodies. Professor Long teaches Law of the Sea and Marine Resources Law.

Dr Vincent Power is a partner at A&L Goodbody and Adjunct Professor of Law at UCC. His EU Shipping Law book won the Albert Lilar Prize for the best shipping law book in the world in the previous five years. He is visiting professor of EU Law at Dalhousie University, Canada. He brings practical experience and his legal expertise to teaching and learning.

Ms Helen Noble, is the principal of Noble Shipping Law, Ireland’s only legal practice which deals exclusively with Shipping and Transport Law. Helen has been practising for over 21 years in the field of maritime law in the UK and in Ireland. She lectures on maritime subjects at global forums and is the author of numerous articles on admiralty law, marine insurance and the carriage of goods by Sea.

Edmund Sweetman, BL, Abogado is a practising lawyer in Ireland and in Spain. He specialises in admiralty, marine insurance and carriage of goods by Sea. He is the director of the Barcelona office of the Maritime Law firm Meana Green Maura.

Dr Áine Ryall teaches and researches environmental law, European Union law and tort law at the School of Law, UCC.  Her research focuses in particular on environmental assessment, access to justice, environmental law enforcement and implementation of the Aarhus Convention.  A qualified barrister, she is a member of the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee, the Avosetta Group, the Royal Irish Academy Climate Change and Environmental Sciences Committee and is a board member of the Irish Centre for European Law (ICEL).

Professor Owen McIntyre is Director of Research at the School of Law. His principal area of research is Environmental and Natural Resources Law, with a particular focus on International and Comparative Water Law. Prof McIntyre has over 25 years’ experience in the field as adviser to many international bodies (World Bank, UN, EU, EEA, IUCN, UNESCO, EBRD) and is the author / co-editor of numerous articles and of four books in the area of International Water Law.

Dr Bénédicte Sage-Fuller is a full-time member of staff at the UCC School of Law. She teaches the modules on Marine Environmental Law and Port Law. Her experience in EU funded projects in maritime transport since 2000, and in the UNCTAD Port Management Programme since 2009 gives a practical background to her approach to academic teaching and learning.

Course Outline

Students complete 90 credits over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Students take 50 compulsory credits, select at least 20 from a list of elective programme modules, and may take up to 20 from a list of elective non-programme modules. For module descriptions please click on the following link: LLM Marine & Maritime Law Modules 2016-2017 (87kB)

Compulsory Modules (50 credits)

Introduction to Law of the Sea (10 credits)
In this course, students are equipped with the background knowledge of international Law of the sea as a subject in its own right, and necessary to understand other areas of marine environmental protection, marine renewable energy, maritime security, port law.

Admiralty (10 credits)
This module encompasses the core elements of maritime law pertaining to ships and their operation, including collisions, ship arrest, salvage, towage and jurisdiction. It provides a platform to develop a further understanding of the sale and carriage of goods, insurance and ship finance.

Dissertation (30 credits)
Students complete a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice in the area of marine and maritime Law, under the dedicated supervision of a programme team member.

Elective programme modules (at least 20 credits)

Law of the Sea in Practice (Clinical) (5 credits)
This innovative module teaches students about the practice of law of the sea enforcement and includes access to the Naval Service and visits on board a naval ship at Cork.

Port Law (5 credits)
Building on several years of experience of teaching in the port sector, this module identifies the essential features of the law applicable to ports. It recognises ports as being the junction between trade and transport, and essential national assets for States.

Global Maritime Security (5 credits)
Current issues in maritime security include anti-terrorism action, fight against piracy and e-piracy, fisheries protection, narcotics interdiction and migrants and refugees at sea.

Ship Finance (5 credits)
Ship registration and financing, ship mortgages and tonnage tax are core to the shipping industry, and are an essential part of maritime development policy in Ireland.

Sale, Insurance and Carriage of Goods at Sea (5 credits)
This module targets the law of trading goods (types of contracts) and of transporting them (bills of lading) internationally. Critically, it includes the topic of marine insurance law as it relates to these areas. 

International Environmental Law (5 credits)
Set in the international context to environmental protection, this module integrates all types of environmental law issues, i.e. transboundary pollution, climate change, waste, biodiversity and access to environmental justice.

Method in Environmental Law (5 credits)
Environmental Law is a discipline constantly evolving under the constraints of adequate governance, multi-disciplinarily, regulation and multi-jurisdictional issues. 

Environmental Law in Practice (5 credits)
This module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of how environmental law operates in practice, with particular emphasis on access to environmental justice.

Elective non-programme modules (up to 20 credits)

  • Introduction to Planning Law (10 credits)
  • Legal Concepts for Heritage and Environment (10 credits)
  • Refugee Law (5 credits)
  • Migration Law and Human Rights (5 credits)
  • Contemporary Issues in ECHR Law (5 credits)
  • Enforcement and Sanctions in Antitrust Law (5 credits)
  • Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Law (5 credits)
  • Contemporary Issues in International Law (10 credits)
  • International Criminal Law (10 credits)
  • International Human Rights Law (10 credits)
  • Law of Cybercrime (10 credits)
  • Electronic Commerce Law (10 credits)
  • Characteristics of the Marine Environment (5 credits)
  • Introduction to GIS (5 credits)
  • Introduction to Remote Sensing (5 credits)

Marine and Maritime Law in Practice

A central feature of the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) is that it introduces students to the practice of law in the marine and maritime sectors. Three broad avenues are thus presented.

First, throughout the academic year and in support of the maritime law modules (Admiralty Law, Sale, Insurance and Carriage of Goods at Sea, Ship Finance), a series of guest lectures brings students up to date on critical economic, financial and societal issues in the shipping industry. The combination of business law-oriented modules available allows students to specialise in this area.

Modules in the area of public international law of the sea, including marine environmental protection and fisheries law have been specifically designed in the context of IMERC (NS and MaREI).

Third, for students interested in the intersection of law of the sea and human rights, key non-programme modules in Human Rights Law, Refugee Law, Migration Law and ECHR Law compliment modules in international law of the sea and global maritime security. 

Teaching and Learning

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) is structured to facilitate maritime professionals interested in up skilling as well as graduates wanting to pursue a career in the marine or maritime sectors. All compulsory and elective programme modules are taught on Fridays and Saturdays. Non-programme modules are scheduled during the week. Where suitable, lectures are recorded and made available to students.

Fees:

  • EU Fee:  Full-time:  €8,000 Part-time: €4,000 p.a.
  • Non-EU Fee:  Full-time €18,000   See section on International Postgraduate Scholarships.
  • Further details on EU/Non-EU Status see section on Closing Dates and Application Procedure.

Click on the following link to view the brochure: LLM Marine and Maritime Law Brochure (242kB) 

The School of Law is pleased to announce new scholarships funded by the College of Business and Law for postgraduate students commencing in the School of Law in September 2016.  These scholarships are in the form of a fee reduction on the usual Non-EU taught Masters programme fee.

There are two types of scholarship available:

1. Country/Region and UCC Partner Institutions Specific Masters Programme Scholarships where a fee reduction is offered to self-funding students from eligible regions/countries or from UCC partner institutions.  

2. Progression Scholarships are available to international students who have graduated from UCC or have attended UCC in the past as an exchange or study abroad student.  

Application:                                               

It is not necessary to apply as scholarships will be awarded automatically if a student meets the eligibility criteria.

If you wish to enquire further about these scholarships please contact vcalnan@ucc.ie  


 1.  Country/Region and UCC Partner Scholarships will be made of available to students from the eligible regions/countries(a) and partner institutions listed below(b)                                                           

To be eligible for a scholarship a student must:

  • Have firmly accepted their offer from UCC within 3 weeks of the offer being made 
  • Students must be self- funding students                                                             
  • Student must enrolling for a taught programmes with an international fee of €17,000 or greater OR
  • Students must be enrolling for a Research Programmes in the School of Law with an international fee of €11,000 or greater             

 Amount of Scholarship:                                                        

  • 3000 scholarship through fee reduction on the international fee of €17,000 or greater                
  • €2000 scholarship through fee reduction on the international fee of €11,000 or greater in the case of Postgraduate Research Programmes                    

 2. Progression Scholarships                                                                           

International UCC graduates progressing to a post graduate programme (with a fee of €17,000 or higher)  may be eligible for a scholarship in of €2,000.                                                      

Eligibility requirements are:                                                        

  • Students must be self- funding students                                                             
  • Student must enrolling for a taught programmes with an international fee of €17,000 or greater OR
  • Students must be enrolling for a Research Programmes in the School of Law with an international fee of €11,000 or greater
  • The student must be a UCC graduate OR                                          
  • Applicants to the School of Law from China who have already spend time registered with UCC as exchange or study abroad students but who would not necessarily have formally graduated from UCC (This clause excludes those who already have other concessions available to them such as students from specific partner institutions here special discounted fee agreements are already established with UCC)                                                 

(a) Eligible countries/regions are:  Africa, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, South America, Thailand, The Philippines, Turkey and Vietnam.                                        

(b) UCC Partner Institutions     

Albion College API
Appalachian State University Arcadia University: the College of Global Studies
Babson College Barnard College
Bates College Boston College
Bowdoin College Brooklyn Law School NYC
Case Western Reserve University Catholic University of America
Chapman University Chatham University
Colby College College of Saint Benedict/Saint John University
College of Saint Rose College of the Atlantic
College of the Holy Cross Colorado State University
Concordia University Cornell University
Deakin University DePaul University
Drake University East China University of Political Science & Law, Shanghai
Fordham University Georgian Court University
Gustavus Adolophus College IE3 Global – Oregon State University
IFSA Butler University Illinois Institute of Technology
Iowa State University Juniata College
Kansas State University Macalester College
Marist College Marymount University
Mount  Holyoke College North Carolina State University
North Eastern University Oberlin College
Ohio Wesleyan University Oklahoma State University
Otterbein University Presbyterian College
Quinnipiac University Reed College
Regis College Saint Joseph’s University
Saint  Norbert College Slave Regina University
Sarah Lawrence College Smith College
St Louis University St. Louis University School of Law Missouri
Stanford University Suffolk University
SUNY Cortland Swarthmore College
Symbiosis Law School, Pune, India Temple University
Temple University, Beasley School of Law Texas State University
Tulane University University of Maine at Orono
Université de Montréal, Quebec University of Arizona
University of California University of Cincinnati
University of Denver University of Hartford
University of  Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University of Iowa
University of Kansas University of Maine at Farmington
University of Maine at Presque Isle University of Massachusetts at Amherst
University of Massachusetts at Boston University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth
University of Missouri University of Montreal
University of Nebraska at Kearney  University of Nebraska at Omaha
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Northern Iowa
University of Oklahoma University of Oslo, Norway
University of Pennsylvania University of San Diego
University of Scranton USAC
Vassar College Villanova University
Washington & Jefferson College Washington College
Wellesley College Wells College
Wesleyan University West Virginia University
Wheaton College Williamette University

 

Have you always dreamed of becoming a lawyer?  Or have you a passion for human rights or business and think a law degree will help you pursue your dreams of a career in this area?
UCC Law School is now offering two exciting postgraduate degrees under the LLB programme.  Aimed at graduates from all disciplines the LLB is an exciting legal education opportunity which provides both core and advanced skills development.  The two year full-time degree is aimed at non-law graduates and is recognised by the legal professions as a qualifying degree.  The one-year full-time degree is aimed at law graduates and combines access to a range of law modules with a supervised essay option.

Non-Law Graduates

  • Non-Law Graduate LLB (120 credits) - 2 years full-time or 4 years part-time

The two year full-time LLB offers non-law graduates an opportunity to convert to a career in law. The degree places an emphasis on developing not only legal knowledge but also students' legal skills. Each academic year students take a combination of compulsory, optional and skills modules. The degree covers all legal foundational subjects required for the professional exams. The programme is designed to ensure that graduates will have a strong legal training at the end of their two years study (full time) along with suitable critical understanding of core legal issues.

As a non-law graduate you will take core modules which are the foundation topics required for professional qualification in Ireland with the Law Society of Ireland and King's Inns.

These include: Criminal Law, Constitutional Law, Contract Law, EU Law, Property Law, Tort Law

In addition you will also have options which would allow you to study subjects such as: Human Rights Law, Employment Law, Environmental Law, Commercial Law, Corporate and Financial Services Law

See what two current students have to say: Patricia Burke, Ylli Dautaj

All applications must be made online at www.pac.ie/ucc - PAC Course Code: CKL44 full-time; CKL45 part-time

Law Graduates

  • Law Graduate LLB (60 credits) - 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time

The one year full-time LLB is available to students with sufficient law study, including a BCL or equivalent law degree. At this level the programme offers students an opportunity to expand their portfolio of legal knowledge across a wider range of law in preparation for specific practice qualifications or further law or related study.  

The 60 credit LLB degree includes a wide choice of modules which would allow you to choose a combination that best suits your interests, in particular, it offers you an opportunity to study additional fields of law, such as medical law, environmental law, banking law, corporate law or human rights law, which may not have been available to you at undergraduate level. In addition you have the option of completing a supervised LLB dissertation on a research topic of your choice and/or taking 10 credits of LLM modules. 

See what current student Sahara Nankan has to say about the programme.

All applications must be made online at www.pac.ie/ucc  -  PAC Course Code: CKL13 full-time; CKL32 part-time

Career Prospects

The LLB is a challenging and highly rewarding postgraduate degree which allows graduates of law and other disciplines to develop strong legal knowledge and skills. For non-law graduates in particular, the LLB is a conversion programme allowing students to gain the foundational law subjects that will enable them to progress to professional qualifications in Ireland and other common law jurisdictions*.  Graduates of both the law graduate and non-law graduate programme will be well placed to pursue careers in the legal profession, financial services professions, public service or management and business.   

Entry Requirements

The degree is an option to graduates of any discipline who have a level 8 degree with second class honours. 

Graduates who have a Law Degree (Level 8) with at least Second Class Honours (or have equivalent professional qualification/s and experience in law, as determined by the School of Law) should apply for the 60 credit route (CKL13 or CKL32)

International Applicants

Applications from international students are welcome and their qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis. For application details see http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how

English Requirements:  ITELTS 6.5 with no individual section lower than 5.5 (or equivalent).

Programe Details

For full details see http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/law/page01.html

Information on individual modules and their content is available in the UCC Book of Modules

Timetable:
This is a link to the timetables for the 2015-2016 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2016-2017 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Closing Dates for Applications
The School of Law uses a system of rounds to facilitate early notification to applicants.  Applicants who do not have their final degree results when applying may receive a conditional offer.   See our Section Closing Dates and Application Procedure for more information. 

PAC Course Code: CKL38 full-time; CKL39 part-time

The LLM (Business Law) offers you an opportunity to specialise, at masters level, in business law and to explore new legal regulatory challenges posed by the modern business environment.   The course builds on the Law School's wide range of expertise and knowledge in a broad range of aspects of business law and in regulation and compliance. Specialisms in the School of Law include banking, commercial, competition, consumer, company and corporate governance, e-commerce, financial services, international trade, corporate and personal insolvency, maritime and revenue law. The degree combines a focus on realities of business law in practice with a broader discussion of relevant theoretical and policy issues.   Scroll down to see the wide variety of modules on offer in this programme. 

The course is taught by a team of academic staff with extensive academic, practical and policy experience in all aspects of business law. The programme includes a core Business Law in Practice module where students will be equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage with business law in practice. As part of this module, you will benefit from guest seminars with experts from legal and business practice, relevant Government departments, regulatory bodies and legal practitioners and international experts in this field. Students also complete a research dissertation in their chosen aspect of business law under expert individualised supervision.

Career Prospects

The LLM in Business Law is the perfect specialist qualification for those seeking to establish a career in all aspects of business law including regulation and compliance.  It is also a valuable opportunity for people working in this area who want to improve their knowledge and skills and keep up to date on cutting edge issues in this fast developing area. 

Graduates of this degree will be well placed to seek employment in any area of business law, within Ireland, Europe or internationally.  Employment opportunities include specialist legal practice in the commercial and corporate fields as well as general legal practice, regulatory bodies, business regulation and compliance, the financial services sector, the insolvency sector, taxation, law reform and research.  Because of the transferrable knowledge and skills which this course develops, graduates may also avail of crossover opportunities using their LLM to pursue careers in the business world.  

Click here on Taught Graduate Profiles to see what recent graduates are doing now.

Entry Requirements:

Applicants must:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

Or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the School of Law, qualifies applicants to undertake the LLM (Business Law) Degree.*

*Note:  Where appropriate, the Programme Director will identify, in consultation with the applicant, certain optional modules that they must take if they are to be admitted under entry criterion (b) above. Acceptance of this may be a condition of the offer of a place on the programme. 

International Applicants:

Applications from international students are welcome and their qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis under (b) above. For application details and English Language Requirements see http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/ For details of scholarships available to International Students see Scholarships for International Students

Timetable:

This is a link to the timetables for the 2015-2016 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2016-2017 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Part-time Options:

1. LLM (Business Law) Part-time

The part-time option is taught during weekday working hours over 2 years, following the same timetable as the full-time programme. Part-time students take LW6595 Business Law in Practice in Year 1 plus 35 credits as per the lists below.  In year 2, part-time students take 20 credits from the lists below and also complete the LLM (Business Law) dissertation LW6594 (30 credits).  Over years 1 and 2, students will complete a total of 90 credits.  

2. Postgraduate Diploma in Business Law

Applicants for the LLM (Business Law) Degree also have the option of completing a Postgraduate Diploma in Business Law as a first step. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Business Law). The Postgraduate Diploma in Business Law can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.  Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM). 

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme.

Exemptions - Professional Diplomas

Applicants who hold professional diplomas relevant to the LLM may apply for an exemption from up to 20 credits of elective modules.  This request will be considered by the Programme Director and the Chair of the Postgraduate Committee and decisions regarding exemptions will be made on the basis of the relevant of the professional diploma to the programme.

Teaching Methods:

LLM classes are in seminar format.  This participative and interactive format of teaching is suitable for postgraduate level. Students receive advance reading lists and/or materials for each seminar.  Seminars generally take place in 2 hour blocks with one seminar per week.  5 credit modules normally run for 6 weeks and 10 credit modules normally run for 12 weeks.  Seminar times are between 9:00am and 6:00pm, Monday to Friday. 

Assessment:

Students are examined by continuous assessment throughout the year and the dissertation must be submitted in September. Individual module assessments can be viewed at Book of Modules

Course Outline:

Full-time:
Students take 90 credits as follows.

Core Modules:
Students take core modules to the value of 35 credits as follows:

LW6594 LLM (Business Law) Dissertation (30 credits)
LW6595 Business Law in Practice (5 credits)

Optional Modules:
Students take modules 55 credits from the lists, A, B or C as follows:

List A: LLM Business Law Modules - Students take at least 45 credits:  
LW6541 Electronic Commerce Law (10 credits)
LW6578 Consumer Rights: Law and Policy (5 credits)
LW6589 Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Policy (5 credits)
LW6605 European Corporate Restructuring, Insolvency and Rescue (10 credits)
LW6588 Enforcement & Sanctions in Antitrust Law (5 credits)
LW6579 Law of Secured Lending (5 credits)
LW6574 Intellectual Property and Internet Regulation (10 credits)
LW6529 Information Rights Law (10 credits)
LW6536 Intellectual Property Law (10 credits)
LW6580 Environmental Law in Practice (5 credits)
LW6581 Method in Environmental Law (5 credits)
LW6621 Admiralty Law (10 credits)
LW6622 Sale, Insurance and Carriage of Goods at Sea (5 credits)
LW6624 Port Law (5 credits)
Lw6626 Ship Finance (5 credits)
LW6612* IT Law Clinic (97kB) (5 credits)

* LW6612 - students will only be admitted to LW6612 based on application and interview. Further details available from the School of Law.

Students may choose a maximum of 10 credits from EITHER List B or List C.  Students may not combine modules from List B and List C.

List B: Non Law Modules -  Students may choose up to 10 credits:
EC6002 Financial Institutions and Money Markets (5 credits)
EC6004 Regulation and Compliance in Capital Markets (5 credits)
EC6006 Treasury Risk Management (5 credits)
FE6601 Co-operatives and the Third Sector (5 credits)
FE6701 Co-operatives and Social Enterprise (5 credits)
MG6324 International Marketing (5 credits)

OR

List C:  Undergraduate Modules - Students may choose up to 10 credits:
LW2254 Commercial Law (10 credits)
LW3301 Employment Law: Contracts, Rights and Termination (5 credits)
LW3302 Employment Law: Employee Protection, Equality and Industrial Relations (5 credits)
LW3316 Financial Services Law and Regulation (5 credits)
LW3317 Banking Law (5 credits)
LW3345 Company Law: Fundamental Concepts and Doctrines (5 credits)
LW3346 Company Law: Finance, Management and Insolvency (5 credits)
LW3347 Contemporary Issues in Corporate Law (5 credits)
LW3368 Principles of Revenue Law (5 credits)
LW3369 Income Tax Law (5 credits)

For the programme outline and rules see the UCC College Calendar at   http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/law/page08.html

Closing Dates for Applications
The School of Law uses a system of rounds to facilitate early notification to applicants.  Applicants who do not have their final degree results when applying may receive a conditional offer.   See our Section Closing Dates and Application Procedure for more information. 

PAC Course Code: CKL29 full-time; CKL30 part-time

The LLM in Child and Family Law is the first such course of its kind in Ireland  and provides a unique opportunity for students to engage with the School of Law's wide range of expertise and knowledge in the reas of child and family law. The degree combines an important theoretical basis in child law and family law with exposure to the challenges of legal practice through its commitment to clinical education. It is the perfect specialist qualification for those seeking to improve their knowledge and critical understanding of child and family law. Scroll down to see further details of the modules on offer in this distinctive masters degree.  

The LLM Child and Family Law also provides students with the opportunity to get involved in UCC’s innovative Child Law Clinic  and the newly established Family Law Clinic http://familylaw.ucc.ie/ where students can provide research assistance to lawyers on real cases, helping to make a contribution to the quality of advocacy on children’s issues, and lobbying for the reform of child law and children’s rights.

Careers:

Graduates of the LLM (Child and Family Law) are currently employed in the Office of the Ombudsman for Children, the Houses of the Oireachtas, the Children’s Rights Alliance, Youth Advocates Programmes (YAP) Ireland and the International Criminal Court in the Hague. Several graduates are working in the US legal community. Two of our graduates are employed as researchers in the Child Law Clinic and several are pursuing a PhD.

As the only qualification of its kind in Ireland, graduates of the LLM in Child and Family Law are uniquely qualified in the areas of child law and family law. As well as allowing legal professionals to specialise in these up and coming areas of legal practice, graduates of this degree are well equipped to work anywhere in the related sectors – with government department and agencies (in education, child protection, family supports, youth justice etc), with non-governmental organisations (both nationally and internationally) or such as the Ombudsmand for Children and the Children's Rights Alliance and in the courts services. Few statutory or children’s organisations have staff with any legal expertise in the child and family law area and this is a significant gap in the sector. International job opportunities also exist for graduates to work as advocates, policy officers and researchers in the now wide range of international organisations with an interest in child law and children’s rights. These may include UNICEF, the Council of Europe Children’s Programme and the EU Fundamental Rights Agency. Students might also want to pursue further study in the area.

For Profiles of some recent graduates see Taught Graduate Profiles 

Eligibility for LLM (Child and Family Law):

Candidates must be approved by the School of Law and must normally:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the School of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Child and Family Law) Degree. 

International Applicants:

Applications from international students are welcome and their qualifications will be considered on a case by case basis under (b) above. For application details and English Language Requirements see http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how 

Timetable:

The following is a link to the timetables for the 2015-2016 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2016-2017 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Part-time Options:

1. LLM (Child and Family Law) Part-time

The part-time option is taught during weekday working hours over 2 years, following the same timetable as the full-time programme. Part-time studens take 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits in year 2, following the programme requirements as below. The dissertation must be taken in year 2. Over years 1 and 2, students complete a total of 90 credits.    

2. Postgraduate Certificate in Child Law

This certificate is an option for students interested in part-time study. Students can take 30 credits of Child Law modules over one academic year and graduate with a Postgraduate Certificate in Child Law. For further details see Postgraduate Certificate in Child Law

3. Postgraduate Certificate in Advanced Family Law

In this option a student takes 30 credits of Family Law modules over one academic year and graduates with a Postgraduate Certificate in Advanced Family Law. For details see Postgraduate Certificate in Advanced Family Law‌.  

Successful graduates of the certificates can build on their studies and progress to either the Postgraduate Diploma in Child and Family Law or the LLM in Child and Family Law

4. Postgraduate Diploma in Child and Family Law

Applicants for the LLM (Child and Family Law) Degree also have the option of completing a Postgraduate Diploma in Child and Family Law as a first step. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Child and Family) degree. The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM). 

These shorter programmes may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme.

Exemptions - Professional Diplomas

Applicants who hold professional diplomas relevant to the LLM may apply for an exemption from up to 20 credits of elective modules.  This request will be considered by the Programme Director and the Chair of the Postgraduate Committee and decisions regarding exemptions will be made on the basis of the relevant of the professional diploma to the programme.

Teaching Methods:

LLM classes are in seminar format. This participative and interactive format of teaching is suitable for postgraduate level. Students receive advance reading lists and/or materials for each seminar. Seminars generally take place in 2 hour blocks with one seminar per week.  5 credit modules normally run for 6 weeks and 10 credit modules normally run for 12 weeks. Seminar times are between 9:00am and 6:00pm, Monday to Friday. 

Assessment:

Students are examined by continuous assessment throughout the year and the dissertation must be submitted in September. Individual module assessments can be viewed at Book of Modules

Programme Outline:

Students complete 90 credits as follows:

Compulsory Modules (80 credits)

LLM in Child and Family Law students take 80 credits of taught compulsory modules in the area of Child Law and Family Law as follows:

  • LW6569 LLM (Child and Family Law) (30 credits) is where students complete a dissertation in the child and family law area generally, under the supervision of one of the Law School’s dedicated staff in the field. The dissertation is 15,000 words in length.
  • LW6563 Child Law in Practice (10 credits) is an innovative course that covers Irish child law and policy from a clinical perspective. The course examines the challenges of advancing the interests and rights of children through legal practice and law reform.
  • LW6568 The Family and the Law (10 credits) is a wide ranging family law module covering the Irish constitutional and legislative framework. Topics covered will include divorce, civil partnership and the nature of family relationships.
  • LW6549  International Children’s Rights (10 credits) will consider children's rights from both an Irish and international perspective, with particular emphasis on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the European Convention on Human Rights.
  • LW6546 Juvenile Justice(10 credits) draws on a variety of legal sources in order to consider issues of youth justice and detention in Irish law, the law of other jurisdictions and in international law. Issues covered include the nature of youth crime and characteristics of young offenders, the Children Act 2001 as amended.
  • LW6507  Comparative Family Property Law (5 credits) This module facilitates a critical understanding of divergent regulatory approached and underlying policy aims in the governance and regulation of family property arising in the context of relationship breakdown. 

Plus 1 Clinic Module (5 credits) from one of the following 4 clinic modules:  Both the Child Law Clinic and the Family Law Clinic will run as distinct 5 credit modules in each semester. Each Clinic modules will address different issues. (The other 3 clinic modules not chosen here may be taken as electives - see List B below)

  • LW6506 Child Law Clinic (5 credits) (Semester 1)
  • LW6611 Family Law Clinic (5 credits) (Semester 1)
  • LW6615 Child Law Clinic (5 credits) (Semester 2)
  • LW6614 Family Law Clinic (5 credits) (Semester 2)

Students then choose a further 10 credits from the list of elective modules below. 

Elective Modules - List B:  10 credits must be chosen from the list below: (The Clinic module chosen from List A may not be chosen again) 

List C: Undergraduate Modules*

* Where appropriate, the Academic Programme Director will identify, in consultation with the candidate, whether this module should be taken by candidates admitted under entry criterion (b) above. The taking of this and other specified modules may be made a condition of acceptance of a candidate's application. Registration for this module requires the permission of the Programme Director.

For the detailed programme outline and rules see the UCC College Calendar at   http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/law/page08.html

For enquiries please contact Veronica Calnan v.calnan@ucc.ie or Dr Louise Crowley (Programme Director) l.crowley@ucc.ie

Closing Dates for Applications
The School of Law uses a system of offer rounds to facilitate early notification to applicants. Applicants who do not have their final degree results when applying may receive a conditional offer. See our Section Closing Dates and Application Procedure for more information. 

PAC Course Code: CKL16 full-time; CKL35 part-time

The LLM in Intellectual Property and E-Law reflects the close connection in legal research and practice between the fields of Intellectual Property (copyright, patents and trademarks) and E-Law (internet regulation, electronic commerce and cybercrime).

This specialised LLM builds upon the Law School’s considerable research and teaching expertise in the fields of Intellectual Property and E-Law. Students can choose from a range of intellectual property, commercial, information law and e-law modules and further specialise by writing a dissertation on any one of the modern challenges presented by the practice of intellectual property law in the electronic age. We organise major conferences on Intellectual Property and E Law, e.g. “Regulating Cloud Computing: Clear Skies Ahead?” in 2012.  UCC Law School is the Irish Partner in the global Creative Commons movement and a member of the iLINC European Network of Law Incubators, which aims to facilitate provision of legal information and advice to ICT entrepreneurs and start-ups.

For information on I.P. and e-Law at UCC see www.ucc.ie/law/lawonline/elaw/

 

Eligibility for LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Degree

Candidates must be approved by the School of Law and must normally:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the School of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Degree.

The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

International Applicants:

Applications from overseas candidates are welcome and their qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis. For application details and English Language Requirements see http//www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/  

Timetables:

The following is a link to the timetables for the 2015-2016 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2016-2017 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled. 

Part-time Options:  

1. LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Part-time

The part-time option is taught during weekday working hours over 2 years, following the same timetable as the full-time programme. Part-time students take 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits (including the dissertation) in Year 2. 

2. Postgraduate Certificate in Law and Technology Law

This certificate is another option for students interested in part-time study. Student can take 30 credits of Law modules over one academic year and graduate with a Postgraduate Certificate in Law and Technology. For further details see http://www.ucc.ie/en/law-postgrad/taughtprogrammes/postgradcerts/

Successful graduates of the Certficate in Law and Technology can build on their studies and progress to the LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Part-time or to the Postgraduate Diploma in Intellectual Property and E- Law.

3. Postgraduate Diploma in Intellectual Property and E -Law

Applicants for the LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Degree also have the option of completing a Postgraduate Diploma in IP&E as a first step. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (IPE) degree. The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM). 

These shorter programmes may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme.

Exemptions - Professional Diplomas

Applicants who hold professional diplomas relevant to the LLM may apply for an exemption from up to 20 credits of elective modules.  This request will be considered by the Programme Director and the Chair of the Postgraduate Committee and decisions regarding exemptions will be made on the basis of the relevant of the professional diploma to the programme.

Programme Requirements: 

Students take 90 credits as follows: 

Courses on Offer for the LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law)

LW6575 LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) Dissertation (Compulsory) (30 credits) 

Students then choose sixty credits from the taught modules on offer as follows:

List A:  Students must choose a minimum of 25 credits which must include at least one of LW6536 and LW6574:

* LW6612 - students will only be admitted to LW6612 based on application and interview. Further details available from the School of Law.

List B: Students may choose a maximum of 35 credits in total from Lists B and C with a maximum of 10 credits being chosen from List C.

OR

List C: Undergraduate Modules - Students may choose up to 25 credits from List B above AND up to to 10 credits from the following:

Students may not choose a module from List C if they have already taken the module or equivalent subject matter at undergraduate level, or if it involves a timetable clash.

The range of modules offered are subject to change.

Teaching Methods

LLM classes are in seminar format.  This participative and interactive format of teaching is suitable for postgraduate level. Students receive advance reading lists and/or materials for each seminar.  Seminars generally take place in 2 hour blocks with one seminar per week.  5 credit modules normally run for 6 weeks and 10 credit modules normally run for 12 weeks.  Seminar times are between 9:00am and 6:00pm, Monday to Friday. 

Assessment

Students are examined by continuous assessment throughout the year and the dissertation must be submitted in September. Individual module assessments can be viewed at Book of Modules 

PAC Course Code: CKL27 full-time; CKL28 part-time

The LLM in International Human Rights Law and Public Policy builds on the Law School’s reputation for excellence in International and European human rights law. The programme will be of interest to students and practitioners from a range of different fields including: law; social policy; political science; public administration; development; history; international relations; social sciences.  

  • Students benefit from a series of guest seminars and workshops with key actors in the human rights movement
  • The Law School's Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights exposes students a wide range of relevant extra-curricular legal activities
  • The course includes a unique International Human Rights clinic core module
  • Engages students in the practice and policy context of Human Rights Law
  • Focus on essential human rights lawyering skills, including: oral and written advocacy (legal and policy); strategic litigation; fact-finding and development

Careers and Internships:

UCC Graduates have pursued careers in human rights law in legal practice, in Government bodies, in international organisations, including UN agencies, the International Criminal Court, the OSCE and EU institutions, and with leading international NGOs. 

Please click on the link for Careers in Human Rights Law: Testimonials from UCC Law Students/Graduates

The Law School has a vibrant programme of summer placements and internships. Students are supported in applying for internships, internationally and nationally. Currently, the Law School summer placements include:

National Placements
Mental Health Reform; Attorney General's Office, Dublin; Director of Public Prosecutions, Dublin; Office of the Data Protection Commissioner; The Screen Directors Guild of Ireland; Marriage Equality; The Irish Patents Office; R.A.A.P (Recorded Artists Actors Performers Ltd); Irish Refugee Council; Irish Playwrights' and Screenwriters' Guild; Refugee Legal Service

Europe
PICUM (Platform for International Cooperation on Undocumented Migrants)

USA
Los Angeles Federal District Court Externship; Los Angeles Juvenile Dependency Court; Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), Washington, DC; Public Defender's Office, San Francisco.

For further information see Summer Placements and Internships

Teaching Team:

The teaching team includes staff with distinguished records in research, teaching and public policy engagement: Professor Ursula Kilkelly; Professor Siobhán Mullally; Professor Maeve McDonagh,  Dr Conor O’Mahony; Dr Dug Cubie, Dr Aisling Parkes; Dr Vittorio Bufacchi; Dr Fiona Donson; Dr Claire Murray; Dr Catherine O'Sullivan. Detailed staff profiles are available at: http://www.ucc.ie/en/lawsite/about/people/

Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights

The study of criminal justice and human rights and the intersection between the two raises complex and challenging questions. The Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights seeks to contribute to national and international debates on these questions through the promotion of cutting edge interdisciplinary research, innovative programmes of legal education and training and strategic partnerships with Government, statutory bodies, and civil society organisations worldwide. The Centre hosts a dynamic programme of seminars, conferences and workshops and an Annual Distinguished Lecture series. 

Recent visitors to the CCJHR have included Baroness Helen Kennedy QC, Principal, Mansfield College, University of Oxford; Professor Kieran McEvoy, Prof of Law and Transitional Justice, Queens University Belfast; Judge Joan Donoghue, International Court of Justice; Professor Jeremy Waldron, Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory, University of Oxford; Professor Carol Sanger, Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law, Columbia Law School; and Professor Harold Koh, Sterling Professor of International Law, Yale University (former Legal Adviser, US, Department of State, 2009-2013). Further infomation available at http://www.ucc.ie/en/ccjhr/

Eligibility for LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy):

To be admitted to the degree you must:  

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

Or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the School of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Degree.

International Applicants:

We welcome applications from international students, including the US.  International qualifications are considered on a case-by-case basis under criteria (b). For application details and English Language Requirements see http://www.ucc.ie/en/international/noneu-pg/taught/  For information on scholarships available see Scholarships for International Students

Timetable:

The following is a link to the timetable for the 2015-2016 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2016-2017 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Part-time Options:  

1. LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Part-time

The part-time option is taught during weekday working hours over 2 years, following the same timetable as the full-time programme. Part-time students take 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits in Year 2. The disseration must be taken in Year 2.    

2. Postgraduate Certificate in International Law

This certificate is another option for students interested in part-time study. Student can take 30 credits of International Law modules over one academic year and graduate with a Postgraduate Certificate in International Law. For further details see Postgraduate Certificate in International Law 

Successful graduates of the Certficate in International Law can build on their studies and progress to the LLM International Human Rights Law and Public Policy Part-time or to the Postgraduate Diploma in International Human Rights Law and Public Policy

3. Postgraduate Diploma in International Human Rights Law and Public Policy

Applicants for the LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Degree also have the option of completing a Postgraduate Diploma in IHR&PP as a first step. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (IHR&PP) degree. The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM). 

These shorter programmes may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme.

Exemptions - Professional Diplomas

Applicants who hold professional diplomas relevant to the LLM may apply for an exemption from up to 20 credits of elective modules.  This request will be considered by the Programme Director and the Chair of the Postgraduate Committee and decisions regarding exemptions will be made on the basis of the relevant of the professional diploma to the programme.

 

Teaching Methods:

LLM classes are in seminar format. This participative and interactive format of teaching is suitable for postgraduate level. Students receive advance reading lists and/or materials for each seminar. Seminars generally take place in 2 hour blocks with one seminar per week.  5 credit modules normally run for 6 weeks and 10 credit modules normally run for 12 weeks. Seminar times are between 9:00am and 6:00pm, Monday to Friday. 

Assessment:

Students are examined by continuous assessment throughout the year and the dissertation must be submitted in September. Individual module assessments can be viewed at Book of Modules

Programme Outline:

Students complete 90 credits as follows:

Core Modules (55 credits)

  • LW6571 LLM (International Human Rights Law and Public Policy) Dissertation (30 credits) Students select a research topic in the area of human rights law, and following approval, complete a 15,000 word dissertation under supervision of a Faculty member. Students complete research methodology training and give an oral presentation on their research in progress.

  • LW6586 Human Rights Law in Practice (Clinic) (5 credits) This module aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage with international human rights enforcement procedures and to evaluate the interaction of domestic and international human rights law, through selected case studies.

  • LW6606 International Human Rights Law (10 credits) This module will provide students with a critical understanding of the institutions and processes of the UN and regional human rights systems.

  • LW6572 Contemporary Issues in International Law (10 credits) This module gives students a foundation in the core principles and concepts of international law, focussing on contemporary issues and current debates on international law and public policy

Optional Modules (35 credits)

List A: Students must choose at least 25 credits from the following:

 List B: Students may choose 10 credits from the following:

For the detailed programme outline and rules see the UCC College Calendar at   http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/law/page08.html

For enquiries please contact Veronica Calnan v.calnan@ucc.ie or Professor Siobhan Mullally (Programme Director) s.mullally@ucc.ie

Closing Dates for Applications
The School of Law uses a system of offer rounds to facilitate early notification to applicants. Applicants who do not have their final degree results when applying may receive a conditional offer. See our Section Closing Dates and Application Procedure for more information. 

PAC Course Code: CKL14 full-time; CKL33 part-time

The LLM degree has been offered by UCC School of Law since 1992 and remains a very popular vehicle for postgraduate study in the School. The degree offers students a wide choice of options across a range of areas.  Students may either focus their interest in one area, for example business or international law, or choose from a broad variety of legal subjects. A full list of module choices is listed below.

In addition to their chosen modules all LLM students complete a dissertation in an area of interest to them under the supervision of dedicated and experienced lecturers.  Full details of the staff expertise across a wide range of areas are available on the Law School's website.  As part of the preparation for their dissertation, students take a course on research methodology.  This opportunity allows students to learn advanced research methods and to make a presentation on their dissertation topic.  

The LLM degree provides students with a high-quality, broadly based postgraduate experience where a commitment to academic excellence is combined with a commitment to developing student appreciation of the practical and policy implications of the law.

Applicants for the LLM Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Law.  Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM.  The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time.  Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme.  Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM).    

Eligibility for LLM Degree

Candidates must be approved by the School of Law and must normally:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the School of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Taught) Degree.

The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

Applications from overseas candidates are welcome and their qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis under (b) above.  Non-EU applicants should contact the International Education Office by email at internationalpostgrad@ucc.ie for application details.

English Language Requirements:

IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL equivalent

Programme Requirements:

The programme can be taken over 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Please note that Non-EU students are not eligible to study part-time programmes.

Full-time - 1 Year
Students complete 90 credits which must include LW6538 LLM Dissertation (30 credits), on a subject of their choice as approved by their supervisor and students take 60 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.

Part-time - 2 Years
In Year 1 students choose 40 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.  In Year 2 students take 50 credits to include LW6538 LLM Dissertation (30 credits) plus 20 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.

The following is a link to the timetables for the 2015-2016 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2016-2017 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Core Module:  

Optional Modules:

*There is a quota of 15 students for this module. Preference will be given to students from the LLM (Child and Family Law) and any remaining places will be allocated on a first come first served basis to students on other LLM programmes.

The range of modules offered are subject to change.
 
Candidates are obliged to reflect a balance between terms 1 and 2 in their choice of modules.

‌PAC Course Code: CKL23

The LLM (Practitioner) is a masters programme developed collaboratively between the Faculty of Law, University College Cork and the Law Society of Ireland. The programme aims to facilitate practicing legal professionals to gain an internationally recognised masters degree in a flexible manner, individually tailored to their needs and interests.

Entry Requirements

The programme is open to qualified solicitors and barristers.  Candidates must have a minimum of two years full-time post-qualification professional legal experience.  Admission to the programme will be subject to the approval of the School of Law.  The number of places available in any given year is dependent on resources and all qualified candidates may not be admitted.

Programme Structure

To secure the masters degree qualification, participants must complete 90 credits of law, over a minimum of 12 months full-time or a maximum of 36 months part-time.

At the commencement of the programme, students must elect whether they wish to study part-time or full-time.  In the event that the student is taking the part-time option, the student must at the outset enter into a Learning Agreement which indicates how the student will accumulate the necessary credits over a maximum of thirty six months. This must be agreed with the Programme Director and signed by both the student and the Programme Director (and approved by the School of Law). This can be a flexible agreement and modified as necessary as the candidate proceeds. 

Part-time students must take the LLM (Practitioner) Dissertation (30 credits) in their final year. 

Core Modules

LW6565 LLM (Practitioner) Dissertation

The dissertation module will require practitioners to research an area of law of particular interest to them. The practitioner will be supported and directed by an academic member of the School of Law in completing their written dissertation on their chosen area. In addition, as part of this module, practitioners will be provided with IT/electronic resource training to assist both their learning and practice needs.

Elective Modules

LW6563  Child Law in Practice (10 credits)1
LW6549  Children's Rights (10 credits)
LW6561  Comparative Family Property Law (10 credits)
LW6578  Consumer Rights: Law and Policy (5 credits)
LW6530  Contemporary Issues in Constitutional Law (10 credits)
LW6593  Contemporary Issues in ECHR Law (5 credits)
LW6589  Contemporary Issues in EU Competition Policy (5 credits)
LW6572  Contemporary Issues in International Law (10 credits)
LW6605  Corporate Insolvency and Rescue (10 credits)
LW6544  Criminology (10 credits)
LW6600  Cultural Representations of Crime (5 credits) (not running in 2015/16)
LW6560  Cybercrime (10 credits)
LW6576  Disability and the Law (10 credits)
LW6541  Electronic Commerce Law (10 credits)
LW6588  Enforcement & Sanctions in Antitrust Law (5 credits)
LW6580  Environmental Law in Practice  (5 credits)
LW6598  European Health Law and Policy (10 credits) (not running in 2015/16)
LW6607  Gender, Sexuality and Human Rights (5 credits) (not running in 2015/16)
LW6529  Information Rights Law (10 credits)
LW6536  Intellectual Property Law (10 credits)
LW6574  Intellectual Property and Internet Regulation (10 credits)
LW6550  International Criminal Law (10 credits)
LW6606  International Human Rights Law (10 credits)
LW6590  International Trade and Transport law and Policy (5 credits)
LW6546  Juvenile Justice (10 credits)
LW6579  Law of Secured Lending (5 credits)
LW6107  Legal Aspects of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare (5 credits)
LW6603  Legal Regulation of Cohabitation and Emerging Family Form (5 credits)
LW6609  Mental Health Law (5 credits)
LW6592  Mental Capacity Law (5 credits) (not running in 2015/16)
LW6581  Method in Environmental Law (5 credits)
LW6585  Migration Law and Human Rights (5 credits)
LW6545  Penology (10 credits)
LW6584  Refugee Law (5 credits)
LW6525  Terrorism, Dissonance and Criminal Justice (10 credits) (not running in 2015/16)
LW6568  The Family and the Law (10 credits)
LW6612  IT Law Clinic (97kB)
LW6107  Legal Aspects of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare (5 credits)

It may be that not all modules listed above will be offered in any particular session and/or other options may become available.

Notes:
1There is a quota of 20 students for this module.  Preference will be given to students from the LLM (Child and Family Law) and any remaining places will be allocated on a first come first served basis to students on other LLM programmes.

2Students will only be admitted to LW6612 IT Law Clinic (5 credits) based on application and interview.  Further details available from the School of Law.

Part-time students must take the LLM (Practitioner) Dissertation (30 credits) in their final year. 

Timetable

The academic year consists of two 12 week teaching periods. Each 10 credit taught module incorporates a weekly 2-hour seminar for one teaching period. Each 5 credit taught module incorporates a weekly 2-hour seminar for 6 weeks.  Semester 1 is from September to December and Semester 2 is from January to March. Written examinations are held in December and May, although most modules are examined wholly or in part by continuous assessment.  Students register for the dissertation module in September and the dissertation must be submitted in September of the following year (date to be confirmed).

The following is a link to the timetable for the 2015-2016 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2016-2017 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Exemptions for Law Society Professional Diplomas

Applicants in possession of professional diplomas may, on application, request exemption from up to 20 credits (10 credits per diploma) of the required 90 credits. The School of Law will approve the distribution of exemptions over the duration of the degree in order to reflect an appropriate workload balance. 

The existing Law Society diploma programmes includes Aviation Law & Finance, Compliance Management, Corporate Law & Governance, Employment Law, Finance Law, In-house Practice, Insolvency and Corporate Restructuring, Investment Funds, Legal Practice Management and Trust & Estate Planning. For information on all Law Society diploma programme courses:
W: www.lawsociety.ie/diplomas
E:  diplomateam@lawsociety.ie
P:  01 672 4802

LLM Modules: Pre-Registration Availability

In advance of full registration for the degree, candidates may opt to take individual LLM modules on an ad hoc basis. These candidates will be identified as intending to proceed to the LLM (Practitioner) and a Learning Agreement will be entered into to provide a bridge to the degree. (This can be a flexible agreement and modified as necessary as the candidate proceeds).

As part of UCC’s commitment to Continuing Professional Development (CPD), qualified candidates can opt to take up to two individual modules on an occasional basis without formally registering for the programme and will be provided with a transcript of marks.

Application Procedure

Application for the degree programme must be made online at www.pac.ie/ucc .  The Course Code on PAC is CKL23.  

The Law School uses a system of offer rounds to facilitate decision-making and early notification to applicants. Candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible. The rounds closing dates for 2016 are as follows: 1st March 2016, 3rd May 2016 and 1st July 2016.

New applications will continue to be reviewed at each round if there are still programme places available.


Application for pre-registration modules must be made directly to the Faculty of Law. 
The pre-registration form is available here: OccasionalModulesApplicationForm (132kB)

Enquiries to Anna O'Sullivan (021) 4205170 or email: anna.osullivan@ucc.ie

The following is a link to the book of modules which provides detailed descriptions of the taught modules offered: http://www.ucc.ie/modules/descriptions/LW.html

Cost
The current fee is €1,000 per 10 credit module and €500 per 5 credit module.
The Dissertation module fee is currently €1,800. 

College fees are tax deductible.

PAC Course Code: CKL15 full-time; CKL34 part-time:

The LLM in Criminal Justice has a core clinical component, which offers students the opportunity to pursue a theoretical inquiry into criminal justice while experiencing the reality of the criminal justice system in practice.  This module, which runs all year long, is based on UCC Law School’s network of relationships with various criminal justice agencies [Gardaí (police), victim organisations, the Probation Service, prisons and the courts (judiciary, prosecutors and defence)] and is run by a dedicated Clinical Co-ordinator.

As well as this innovative and unique clinical component, the LLM Criminal Justice draws on the extensive expertise within the School of Law to offer a wide range of subjects such as Criminology, Juvenile Justice, Penology, Cybercrime, Mental Health Law, International Criminal Law, Sanctions and Enforcement in Anti-Trust Law and many more. 

We welcome applications from professionals working within the criminal justice system, including solicitors, barristers, members of An Garda Siochana, the Prison Service and the Probation Service.

Career Prospects:

Graduates of this programme are in a unique position to work within criminal law and contribute to future policy making, research and reform. Graduates have qualified as solicitors and barristers as well as working as researchers with the Law Reform Commission, the Judicial Research Office, the Irish Human Rights Commission and the Director of Public Prosecutions. A number of graduates are also currently engaged in further research at PhD level in the areas of criminal justice and human rights, many of whom are Government of Ireland (IRCHSS) scholars.  See profiles of past graduates at LLM (Criminal Justice) Graduate Profiles 

Entry Requirements:

Candidates must be approved by the School of Law. The LLM (Criminal Justice) has a compulsory clinical component at its core, which is undertaken in partnership with the Law School's placement partners and involves significant interaction with the criminal justice system and its stakeholders. In this regard, the Law School must be satisfied regarding the candidate's commitment to, and suitability for, the programme. Candidates should pay particular attention to satisfying this criterion when completing their application.

Candidates must also:

(a) hold a Law Degree with at least Second Class Honours Grade 1

or

(b) have such other relevant third level educational qualifications and/or professional experience as, in the opinion of the School of Law, qualifies the candidate to undertake the LLM (Criminal Justice) Degree.

International Applicants:

Applications from international students are welcome, including the US and their qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis under criteria (b).  For application details and English Language Requirements see http://www.ucc.ie/en/international/noneu-pg/taught/   For details of scholarships available to international students see

Timetable:

The following is a link to the timetable for the 2015-2016 academic year which gives an indication of the likely schedule. Please note that the timetable will be updated for the 2016-2017 academic year and some modules may be rescheduled.

Part-time Options:  

1. LLM (Criminal Justice) Part-time

The LLM Criminal Justice can be taken over 24 months part-time. Part-time students take 40 credits in Year 1 and 50 credits in Year 2.  LW6519 Criminal Justice (Clinical rogramme) (20 credits) must be taken in year 1 and LW6547 LLM (Criminal Justice) Dissertation (30 credits) must be taken in Year 2.   The part-time option is taught during weekday working hours over 2 years, following the same timetable as the full-time programme.    

2. Postgraduate Certificate in Criminal Justice

From 2016 it is possible to take 30 credits of Criminal Justice modules over one academic year and complete a Postgraduate Certificate in Criminal Justice.  For further details see PG Cert CJ     

Successful graduates of the Certficate in Criminal Justice can build on their studies and progress to the LLM Criminal Justice Part-time or to the Postgraduate Diploma in Criminal Justice. 

3. Postgraduate Diploma in Criminal Justice

Applicants for the LLM (Criminal Justice) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Criminal Justice. Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Criminal Justice) degree. The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact v.calnan@ucc.ie or anna.osullivan@ucc.ie for application details.  Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduate with a Masters in Law (LLM). 

These shorter programmes may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme.

Teaching Methods:

LLM classes are in seminar format.  This participative and interactive format of teaching is suitable for postgraduate level. Students receive advance reading lists and/or materials for each seminar.  Seminars generally take place in 2 hour blocks with one seminar per week.  5 credit modules normally run for 6 weeks and 10 credit modules normally run for 12 weeks.  Seminar times are between 9:00am and 6:00pm, Monday to Friday. 

Assessment:

Students are examined by continuous assessment throughout the year and the dissertation must be submitted in September. Individual module assessments can be viewed at Book of Modules

Course Outline:

Compulsory Modules:

Students then take modules to the value of 40 credits from the list of optional modules set out below.  At least 25 credits must be chosen from List A and 15 credits may be chosen from List B: 

Optional Modules:

List A: Students choose at least 25 credits from the following:

List B: Students may choose 15 credits* from the following:

List C: Undergraduate Modules
Where appropriate, the Academic Programme Director will identify, in consultation with the candidate, whether one of these modules should be taken by candidates admitted under entry criterion (b) above. Modules taken from List C would be in substitution for credits from the elective modules in List B. The taking of this and other specified modules may be made a condition of acceptance of a candidate's application. Registration for these modules requires the permission of the Programme Director.

  • LW1153 Criminal Law (10 credits)
  • LW1161 Constitutional Law: Fundamental Rights (5 credits)
  • LW2006 Law of Evidence 1 (5 credits)
  • LW2007 Law of Evidence 2 (5 credits)

Notes:

1 Students will only be admitted to LW6612 based on application and interview.  Further details available from the School of Law.

2 The maximum amount of undergraduate modules allowed is 10 credits, therefore, students taking 10 credits from List C will not be allowed to register for AP3015.

In certain cases with the permission of the Programme Director, students may elect to take 10 credits from the non-Criminal Justice modules available in the LLM (Taught) (see here) (other than those listed above) in substitution for 10 credits of the elective modules in List B.

It may be that not all modules listed above will be offered each year and/or other options may become available. 

All taught applications (EU and Non-EU) must be made online through the Postgraduate Applications Centre website at www.pac.ie/ucc

EU or NON-EU?

For admission purpose all applicants are categorised into two categories: EU and Non-EU.

It is important that you establish your status before you make an application to UCC as you will retain your status (EU/Non-EU) during your study and you will be unable to change from one category to the other in the middle of a course. Also there are different application procedures for each category. 

Please view the following document to determine whether you are an EU applicant or a Non-EU applicant:  CriteriaForDeterminingFeeStatus (35kB)

How to Make an Application

For full details on the application procedure and documentation required, please click on the following links: 

EU Applicants 

Non-EU Applicants

If you are experiencing difficulty with this, please contact the Postgraduate Applications Centre at 091 509825.

Non EU Closing Date

The closing date for receipt of Non EU applications is 1st June 2016.

EU Closing Dates

EU Closing Date: Open For Late Applications 2016

The Law School will continue accepting applications for all taught postgraduate programmes however, please note there is a closing date of 2nd August for the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) and a closing date of August 15th for the LLM (Marine & Maritime Law).

For more information on making an application please see: www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/taught/

Additional Information for Applicants to Taught Programmes 

Supplementary Form: Please note that applicants must complete an additional Supplementary Form when completing the online application on PAC. The Supplementary form is a vital part of the application procedure and will be taken into account in considering your application. 

PAC Course Codes

Applicants may choose up to 3 taught programmes when applying online on PAC. The following are the Course Codes for the Law School's Taught Postgraduate Programmes on PAC:

CKL13 - LLB full-time programme
CKL32 - LLB part-time programme
CKL14 - LLM full-time programme
CKL33 - LLM part-time programme
CKL15 - LLM (Criminal Justice) full-time programme
CKL34 - LLM (Criminal Justice) part-time programme
CKL16 - LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) full-time programme
CKL35 - LLM (Intellectual Property and E-Law) part-time programme
CKL23 - LLM (Practitioner)
CKL27 - LLM (International Human Rights Law & Public Policy) full-time programme
CKL28 - LLM (International Human Rights Law & Public Policy) part-time programme
CKL29 - LLM (Child & Family Law) full-time programme
CKL30 - LLM (Child & Family Law) part-time programme
CKL38 - LLM (Business Law) full-time programme
CKL39 - LLM (Business Law) part-time programme
CKL44 – LLB Non Law Graduate full-time
CKL45 – LLB Non Law Graduate part-time
CKL46 – LLM (Marine & Maritime Law) full-time
CKL47 – LLM (Marine & Maritime Law) part-time
CKL48 – LLM (Environmental & Natural Resources Law) full-time
CKL49 – LLM (Environmental & Natural Resources Law) part-time

FEES

LLMs: The full-time LLM fee for the 2016-2017 academic year is €7,000. The part-time fee is €3,500 per year. The LLM non-EU fee is €17,000. 

Note:  The full-time Fee for the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) is €8,000.  The part-time fee is €4,000 per year.  The Non-EU fee is €18,000.

LLB (Law Graduate 60 credits): The full-time fee for the 2016-2017 academic year is €5,000. The part-time fee is €2,500 per year. The non-EU fee is €12,000.

LLB (Non Law Graduate 120 credits): The full-time fee for the 2016-2017 academic year is €5,000 per year. The part-time fee is €2,500 per year. The non-EU fee is €12,000 per year.

For further information please see http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/cost/

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