Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Calendar Entry
  3. Programme Learning Outcomes for DHIT
  4. Timetable
  5. Course Map
  6. Technical and other Requirements - What we expect of you
  7. CS1050 Fundamentals of Internet Computing
  8. CS1068 Introductory Programming in Python
  9. CS1118 Multimedia
  10. CS2511 Usability Engineering
  11. DH1001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities
  12. DH1002 Tools and Methods I
  13. DH1003 Introduction to Student Learning in the Digital Age
  14. CS2051 Introduction to Digital Media
  15. CS2052 Introduction to Internet Information Systems
  16. CS2510 Web Server
  17. CS1106 Introduction to Relational Databases
  18. DH2001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities II
  19. DH2002 Tools and Methods II
  20. DH2005 Research, Analysis and Knowledge Creation in the Digital Age
  21. DH2006 Digital Object Curation
  22. DH3001 Work Placement or Study Abroad
  23. CS3052 Information Systems Security and Electronic Commerce
  24. CS3051 Digital Content Management
  25. CS4624 Digital Video Capture and Packaging
  26. DH4001 Research Seminar
  27. DH4002 Research Methods
  28. DH4003 Research Project
  29. Writing in Digital Humanities
  30. Digital Presence
  31. Backups and Security
  32. Privacy: Private and Public Spaces
  33. Online Learning overview
  34. Glossary

1. Introduction

Welcome to your BA in Digital Humanities and Information Technology - the course team hopes that you will use this opportunity to collaboratively create new knowledge and to develop original thinking that will benefit yourselves, the university community, and your own wider communities.

You are beginning an adventure, breaking a trail which no other group of students in an Irish university have taken. Over the coming months and years you will seek to discover what is it to be human in the digital age, and the answers will help to shape how we see ourselves and others as humanity becomes more connected by technology.

You will develop practical skills to flourish in the digital age and explore the impact of digital technology on culture, power and identity in society.

This degree blends humanities and IT in a way that no other degree in Ireland does. Some of the individual modules are well established, some are new and the overall programme is unique.

We are:

Mike Cosgrave  (m.cosgrave@ucc.ie), @mikecosgrave

Shawn Day (shawn.day@ucc.ie), @iridium

Orla Murphy (o.murphy@ucc.ie), @omurphy16

Gavin Russell (g.russell@ucs.ucc.ie)

Dave Murphy (d.murphy@cs.ucc.ie)

Kate Byrne (k.byrne@ucc.ie)

Office Location: ORB G31 College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences

Phone: 4902773

2. Calendar Entry

The BA in Digital Humanities and Information Technology runs for 36 months full-time from the date of first registration with an optional year abroad or work placement during the third year. Students take taught modules to the value of 60 credits/year.

3. Timetable

Semester 1

Monday

9:00 CS1050 WGB G03
10:00 CS1118 WGB G.14
17:00 DH1003 ORB 212
18:00 DH1003 ORB 212

Tuesday

14:00 CS1068 WGB G.01

Wednesday

9:00 CS1050 WGB G03
10:00 CS1118 WGB G.14

Thursday

14:00 CS1068 BHSC G05

Friday

9:00 CS1050 FS A1
10:00 DH1001 WGB G.13

Semester 2

Monday

9:00 CS1050 WGB G03

Tuesday

14:00 CS2511 WGB G.08

Wednesday

9:00 CS1050 WGB G03
10:00 DH1002 AL G19

Thursday

14:00 CS2511 WGB G.02

Friday

9:00 CS1050 FS A1

4. Course Map

ba-dhit-course-map.png

Year I

Students complete 60 credits as follows:

A. Core Modules:

CS1050 Fundamentals of Internet Computing
CS1068 Introductory Programming in Python
CS1118 Multimedia
CS2511 Usability Engineering
DH1001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities
DH1002 Tools and Methods I
DH1003 Introduction to Student Learning in the Digital Age

B. Plus 15 credits in a minor field of your choice:

  • Archaeology
  • Celtic Civilisation
  • Chinese Studies
  • Economics
  • English
  • French
  • Geography
  • German
  • Greek
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Italian
  • Latin
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Religions and Global Diversity

Year II

Students complete 60 credits as follows:

A. Core Modules:

CS2051 Introduction to Digital Media
CS2052 Introduction to Internet Information Systems
CS2510 Web Server
CS1106 Introduction to Relational Databases
DH2001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities II
DH2002 Tools and Methods II
DH2005 Research, Analysis and Knowledge Creation in the Digital Age
DH2006 Digital Object Curation

B. Plus 10 credits continuing in minor Arts field from Year 1

Year III

Students complete 60 credits as follows:

DH3001 Work Placement or Study Abroad

Year IV

Students complete 60 credits as follows:

A. Core Modules:

CS3052 Information Systems Security and Electronic Commerce
CS3051 Digital Content Management
CS4624 Digital Video Capture and Packaging
DH4001 Research Seminar
DH4002 Research Methods
DH4003 Research Project

B. Plus 10 credits continuing in minor field from Year 1

5. Technical Requirements

The course twitter hashtag is #badhit

This course is all about the digital. You will be doing hands-on projects, assignments and developing a critical appreciation of public participation in the digitally-enabled sphere. To facilitate this please acquire a ‘Domain of your Own’. We are availing ourselves of an academically focussed service provider: Reclaim Hosting.

Reclaim Hosting is a web hosting service for educators and students, providing simple one-click installation of a variety of web apps, including WordPress, Omeka, MediaWiki, and many others —Most importantly Reclaim Hosting is virtually free. The cost is only $US20 for the domain name registration fee. Reclaim Hosting’s other expenses are, for now, covered by a grant from the Shuttleworth Foundation.

Please choose a domain and buy a year of full webhosting services at:

http://reclaimhosting.com

Once you complete the signup process you will be sent registration information allowing you to log into and configure your own web applications. We will providing a workshop on c panel for those who have not had previous experience using it. Please note that if you already are using a shared service or have an existing domain, we ask that you acquire this additional service so that we all work on a common platform.

6. Course Schedules

Semester One

Semester Dates:

Monday 8th September - Friday 28th November 2014

Study Review Week:

Monday 1st December - Friday 5th December 2014

Autumn Examinations:

Monday 8th December - Friday 19th December 2014

Christmas Recess:

Saturday 20th December 2014 - Sunday 11th January 2015

Semester Two

Semester Dates:

Monday 12th January - Friday 3rd April 2015

Easter Recess:

Saturday 4th April - Sunday 19th April 2015

Study Review Week:

Monday 20th April - Friday 25th April 2015

Spring/Summer Examinations:

Monday 27th April - Friday 15th May 2015

Modules

7. CS1050 Fundamentals of Internet Computing

Lecturer:

Mr Gavin Russell, Department of Computer Science.

Objective

To introduce students to Internet computer systems, web design, and
client-side programming.

Content

This module provides an introduction to the key concepts of Internet computing. Starting with the fundamentals of computer systems and the Internet, students progress to learn how to design web sites and how to utilize simple client-side programming. Issues related to user interface design and human-computer interfacing (HCI) are covered. Broader issues related to the use of the Internet for Blogging and Social Networks are discussed. The practical element of the module allows students to develop skills necessary for web site design using simple client side programming.

8. CS1068 Introductory Programming in Python

Lecturer:

Dr Joseph B Manning, Department of Computer Science.

Objective

Introduce the fundamental principles of programming using the Python language.

Content

Variables, expressions and statements; functions, conditionals and recursion; fruitful functions and iteration; strings and lists; tuples and dictionaries; files and exceptions; classes and objects.

9. CS1118 Multimedia

Lecturer

Prof Barry O’Sullivan, Department of Computer Science.

Objective

To provide students with a practical introduction to the hardware and software technologies used for the development and delivery of multimedia products.

Content

Introduction to media types: text, audio, graphic, video, animated images ; audio editing techniques; graphic editing techniques; video editing techniques; use of authoring software package to facilitate media integration and creation of animation effects.

10. CS2511 Usability Engineering

Lecturer

Dr Ian Pitt, Department of Computer Science.

Objective

Students will appreciate the wide range of user-interface devices and style and their effect on the human user. Students will learn how to analyse, design and implement systems with proper regard to the human user.

Content

Human perception and human memory. User-centred design. Screen design. Dynamic interaction and dialogue design. Help systems. Accessibility. Specification and modelling; software architectures; evaluation methodologies.

11. DH1001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities

Lecturer

Dr Orla Murphy, Department of English.

Objective

Introduce basic core concepts in Digital Humanities and lay foundations for collaboration in DH work and further digital scholarship.

Content

This module will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital humanities history and theory. It will lay the foundations for subsequent modules by introducing students to a variety of issues of concern in contemporary digital humanities practice. Students will explore and evaluate the emerging digital communities and collaborations among scholars, review the literature and debates on the changing nature of scholarship, on communities of practice, peer review, collaboration and “critical friends”. The changing nature of academic debate and the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work and topics such as digital rights management, licensing and copyright will be introduced. Students will engage with local, national and international networks, and begin to explore the creation of a digital “presence”.

12. DH1002 Digital Tools and Methods I

Lecturer

Mr Shawn Day, College of CACSSS

Objective

Introduction to key tools and methods in Digital Humanities.

Content

Students will be introduced to some of the key tools and practices which support the creation of digital artefacts and collaborative scholarly work in the Digital Humanities. Students will explore the impact of digital tools in research and on the production of academic work, focusing on Data Capture, Data Structuring and Enhancement, Data Analysis, Data Visualisation, Data Publishing and Dissemination using a variety of standards. A range of other tools will be introduced and explored in lecture and in hands-on seminars.

13. DH1003 Introduction to Student Learning in the Digital Age

Lecturer

Dr Michael Cosgrave, Department of History.

Objective

Introduce new modes of student-centred, active, research based learning.

Content

Introduce students to the idea of student centred, constructivist, research-led learning by surveying reading and examples of practice in the area, based on writers from John Dewey through Schon, Shulman and Bandura to D.R. Garrison, John Seely Brown, Graham Atwell and contemporary work on self-regulated and self-directed learning, exploring student learning goals and needs and engaging in active research and reflection on their own learning process to developing learning journals, reflective learning portfolios and, personal learning plans.

14. CS2051 Introduction to Digital Media

15. CS2052 Introduction to Internet Information Systems

16. CS2510 Web Server

17. CS1106 Introduction to Relational Databases

18. DH2001 Concepts and Collaboration in Digital Humanities II

19. DH2002 Tools and Methods II

20. DH2005 Research, Analysis and Knowledge Creation in the Digital Age

21. DH2006 Digital Object Curation

22. DH3001 Work Placement or Study Abroad

23. CS3052 Information Systems Security and Electronic Commerce

24. CS3051 Digital Content Management

25. CS4624 Digital Video Capture and Packaging

26. DH4001 Research Seminar

27. DH4002 Research Methods

28. DH4003 Research Project

29. Writing in Digital Humanities

Scholarship in the Digital Humanities is not only digital, but open and collaborative, and expressed in a wide variety of media. In this course you will produce content in a range of media – you will engage in critical discussions both in class, online in the ‘confines’ of the Blackboard LMS, and publicly in social media – twitter and blogs.
Types of work which you will produce during the courses, which will build towards final assessments, will include:

  • Twitter and other short form writing to express ideas concisely
  • Discussion posts in forums where you exchange ideas about core readings and issues with other students in a few paragraphs
  • Blog posts where you reflect on and refine ideas to present them for public discussion.
  • Presentations using tools like Powerpoint and Prezi to integrate text and visual presentations of ideas.
  • Conference posters and infographics which also present information and ideas visually.
  • Podcasts, both audio and video
    Across this range of ‘writing’ you will demonstrate developing ability to:
  • Locate relevant sources and critically evaluate the worth of various sources
  • Monitor the flow of digital discourse on topics relevant to the course
  • Make sense of the information, and extract key points through reading summaries, abstracts, mind maps, tweets of key points etc
  • Plan digital ‘writing’ by producing plans and drafts for essays, presentations, podcasts etc
  • Participate in peer review and helpful critique of the plans and drafts of colleagues
  • Produce final pieces of work of an appropriate quality for masters level work and ready for public presentation.
    This will be challenging, but it will be exciting and by the end of the process you will be able to respond flexibly to the opportunities of the digital age.

30. Digital Presence

Developing and maintaining a professional public digital presence is an important part of the Digital Humanities.
During this course you will “walk the walk” of engaging with social media, blogging, collaborative work online, and by the end of the course – and hopefully much sooner – it is expected that you will demonstrate your ability to do this.
This will require you to have accounts on several social network sites, and you need to consider some issues about this:
- You may want to keep your your digital footprints separate and distinct – you may want to maintain division between personal online activity, experimental online work during the course where you try out new tools, and your professional digital footprint.
- You may therefore decide to maintain 2 or 3 different accounts on some services.
- You will need to consider account names, screen names and passwords for all of these. You want these to be easy to remember, and secure. All will need to come back to an email account for signup and password recovery.
All of this can be organised and tracked on one page, if you have a system and are careful.

31. Backups and Security

You are also responsible for keeping copies of your digital work for the course. There are many ways to do this – many students use College email to email copies of work to themselves, there are several online services like Google Drive, Dropbox, Box, Skydrive, Evernote and Zotero which offer a level of free storage. USB keys are now relatively cheap. Most of these options will certainly provide enough space to store as much text as you will deal with during the year, but large media files will need more space.
Work out a backup and “Business Continuity Plan” for your work that works for you
Have backups in several clearly separate and distinct places/services so that if one fails, the other(s) are safe.
The “internet ate my homework” will not be acceptable as an excuse in this course!

32. Online Learning overview

Weekly reading load (200-250 pages).
Weekly writing load 10-12 discussion contributions (blog, blog comments, forums, twitter).
End of term assignment load 10,000-12,000 words, mainly collected from online participation into course portfolio.
Submission: All Final submissions will be done by uploading required materials to assignments in the course sites on Blackboard.

33. Privacy: Private and Public Spaces

A successful online learning community requires trusted spaces for free ranging critical discussions. We also need to produce finished work which reaches a quality suitable for public use. This requires thoughtful engagement with the private, semi-public and public spaces in which we work. The course team also engage in active research on digital pedagogy; as indeed should the students; our learning is the raw material for our research on how we learn.

There are no hard and fast rules as toosl and methods evolve constantly, but we are all now creators of data which includes other people’s personally identifiable information. Therefore, in general:

Emails inside the class should be treated as privileged and not shared without proper considersation.

Discussions within the Blackboard LMS should be regarded as being private,and subject to the Chatham House Rule. This is:

" When a meeting, or part thereof, is held under the Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed“. - See more at: http://www.chathamhouse.org/about/chatham-house-rule#sthash.kGuHJmQH.dpuf

UCC staff email may be subject to FOI where it relates to administration or examinations; Blackboard content may be used for teaching quality reviews by the university; this would be subject to the prevailing FOI and Data Protection legislation.

We use other platforms, outside Blackboard, for explorations and learning in digital cultures. We do not control those and there should be no expectation of privacy in ‘the digital wild’.

We do expect that final work will be of a quality worthy of public presentation.
The learning process will therefore move through different spaces, with different expectations of privacy, and part of your learning in this programme includes developing thoughtful awareness of private and public ‘spaces’ in the digital world.

34. Glossary of Key terms: all via w3c

The semantic web:

In addition to the classic “Web of documents” W3C is helping to build a technology stack to support a “Web of data,” the sort of data you find in databases. The ultimate goal of the Web of data is to enable computers to do more useful work and to develop systems that can support trusted interactions over the network. The term “Semantic Web” refers to W3C’s vision of the Web of linked data. Semantic Web technologies enable people to create data stores on the Web, build vocabularies, and write rules for handling data. Linked data are empowered by technologies such as RDF, SPARQL, OWL, and SKOS.

Linked Data

linked data - XML technologies… all at W3C and also the basics are introduced via w3schools.com

Data

A useful beginning description of DATA is here:
http://www.systems-thinking.org/dikw/dikw.htm

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI)

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) is a consortium which collectively develops and maintains a standard for the representation of texts in digital form.

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